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Sample records for brain swelling due

  1. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Soo Kyung; Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  2. Cardiac arrest due to intracranial hypotension following pseudohypoxic brain swelling induced by negative suction drainage in a cranioplasty patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Ryun; Kim, Seon Ju

    2016-01-01

    Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is known to be an uncommon event that may occur during and following an uneventful brain surgery, when negative suction drainage is used. The cerebrospinal fluid loss related to suction drainage can evoke intracranial hypotension that progress to PHBS. The main presentations of PHBS are sudden unexpected circulatory collapses, such as severe bradycardia, hypotension, cardiac arrest, consciousness deterioration and diffuse brain swelling as seen with brain computerized tomography (CT). We present a stuporous 22-year-old patient who underwent cranioplasty under general anesthesia. The entire course of the general anesthesia and operation progressed favorably. However, the time of scalp suture completion, sudden bradycardia and hypotension occurred, followed by cardiac arrest immediately after initiation of subgaleal and epidural suction drainage. After successful resuscitation, the comatose patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit and PHBS was confirmed using brain CT. PMID:27274378

  3. Brain Swelling and Death in Children with Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, Karl B.; Kampondeni, Samuel D.; Valim, Clarissa; Potchen, Michael J.; Milner, Danny A.; Muwalo, Francis W.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Bradley, William G.; Fox, Lindsay L.; Glover, Simon J.; Hammond, Colleen A.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Chilingulo, Cowles A.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Case fatality rates among African children with cerebral malaria remain in the range of 15 to 25%. The key pathogenetic processes and causes of death are unknown, but a combination of clinical observations and pathological findings suggests that increased brain volume leading to raised intracranial pressure may play a role. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available in Malawi in 2009, and we used it to investigate the role of brain swelling in the pathogenesis of fatal cerebral malaria in African children. METHODS We enrolled children who met a stringent definition of cerebral malaria (one that included the presence of retinopathy), characterized them in detail clinically, and obtained MRI scans on admission and daily thereafter while coma persisted. RESULTS Of 348 children admitted with cerebral malaria (as defined by the World Health Organization), 168 met the inclusion criteria, underwent all investigations, and were included in the analysis. A total of 25 children (15%) died, 21 of whom (84%) had evidence of severe brain swelling on MRI at admission. In contrast, evidence of severe brain swelling was seen on MRI in 39 of 143 survivors (27%). Serial MRI scans showed evidence of decreasing brain volume in the survivors who had had brain swelling initially. CONCLUSIONS Increased brain volume was seen in children who died from cerebral malaria but was uncommon in those who did not die from the disease, a finding that suggests that raised intracranial pressure may contribute to a fatal outcome. The natural history indicates that increased intracranial pressure is transient in survivors. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Wellcome Trust U.K.) PMID:25785970

  4. Swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome Poor nutrition Pregnancy Thyroid disease Too little albumin in the blood (hypoalbuminemia) Too much salt or ... the swelling. Tests that may be done include: Albumin blood test Blood electrolyte levels Echocardiography ECG Kidney ...

  5. Sarcoidosis detected due to tattoo swellings in an Indian female.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    A female patient presented with asymptomatic swellings in old blue-black tattoo marks of her forearms. On careful skin examination, few raised erythematous, circular plaques were also found on the non-tattooed skin on her back, about which she was unaware. The diagnosis of cutaneous and systemic sarcoidosis was confirmed after classical histopathological findings from skin lesions from her non tattooed back and from papulonodular tattooed lesions, ruling out other causes of granulomas and supported by a negative Mantoux test, raised serum angiotensin converting enzyme level, high resolution computed tomography thorax, etc. She responded well to oral steroid therapy. The importance of a careful skin examination, easy access provided by skin lesions in suspected cases of cutaneous/systemic sarcoidosis, the value of sudden tattoo changes in the diagnosis here and the possible contribution of tattoos toward the causation of cutaneous and/or systemic sarcoidosis are highlighted. PMID:26275266

  6. Mathematical model of the effect of ischemia-reperfusion on brain capillary collapse and tissue swelling.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Mokhtarudin, M J; Payne, S J

    2015-05-01

    Restoration of an adequate cerebral blood supply after an ischemic attack is a primary clinical goal. However, the blood-brain barrier may break down after a prolonged ischemia causing the fluid in the blood plasma to filtrate and accumulate into the cerebral tissue interstitial space. Accumulation of this filtration fluid causes the cerebral tissue to swell, a condition known as vasogenic oedema. Tissue swelling causes the cerebral microvessels to be compressed, which may further obstruct the blood flow into the tissue, thus leading to the no-reflow phenomenon or a secondary ischemic stroke. The actual mechanism of this however is still not fully understood. A new model is developed here to study the effect of reperfusion on the formation of vasogenic oedema and cerebral microvessel collapse. The formation of vasogenic oedema is modelled using the capillary filtration equation while vessel collapse is modelled using the tube law of microvessel. Tissue swelling is quantified in terms of displacement, which is modelled using poroelastic theory. The results show that there is an increase in tissue displacement and interstitial pressure after reperfusion. In addition, the results also show that vessel collapse can occur at high value of reperfusion pressure, low blood osmotic pressure, high cerebral capillary permeability and low cerebral capillary stiffness. This model provides insight on the formation of ischemia-reperfusion injury by tissue swelling and vessel collapse. PMID:25749185

  7. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Shaik, Mohammed A; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-02-13

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000 x 10(-3) osmoles l(-1) (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  8. Dimensional errors in LIGA-produced metal structures due to thermal expansion and swelling of PMMA.

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Bruce L.; Dryden, Andrew S.; Crowell, Jeffrey A.W.; Griffiths, Stewart K.

    2004-04-01

    Numerical methods are used to examine dimensional errors in metal structures microfabricated by the LIGA process. These errors result from elastic displacements of the PMMA mold during electrodeposition and arise from thermal expansion of the PMMA when electroforming is performed at elevated temperatures and from PMMA swelling due to absorption of water from aqueous electrolytes. Both numerical solutions and simple analytical approximations describing PMMA displacements for idealized linear and axisymmetric geometries are presented and discussed. We find that such displacements result in tapered metal structures having sidewall slopes up to 14 {micro}m per millimeter of height for linear structures bounded by large areas of PMMA. Tapers for curved structures are of similar magnitude, but these structures are additionally skewed from the vertical. Potential remedies for reducing dimensional errors are also discussed. Here we find that auxiliary moat-like features patterned into the PMMA surrounding mold cavities can reduce taper by an order of magnitude or more. Such moats dramatically reduce tapers for all structures, but increase skew for curved structures when the radius of curvature is comparable to the structure height.

  9. Penis swelling due to foreign body reaction after injection of silicone.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Tobias; Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2010-09-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with phimosis and painful swelling of the penis four weeks after augmentation with silicone in Thailand. Histology revealed a foreign body reaction to silicone. Infectious causes were ruled out. Granulomatous foreign body reactions to silicone are common, but there are few case reports on reactions following silicone injection for penis enlargement. Foreign body reactions should be included in the differential diagnosis of penis swelling. PMID:20337774

  10. Reversible brain swelling in crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) in response to high external ammonia and anoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Michael P; Stecyk, Jonathan A W; Couturier, Christine S; Sidhu, Sanya; Sandvik, Guro K; Nilsson, Göran E

    2015-06-01

    Increased internal ammonia (hyperammonemia) and ischemic/anoxic insults are known to result in a cascade of deleterious events that can culminate in potentially fatal brain swelling in mammals. It is less clear, however, if the brains of fishes respond to ammonia in a similar manner. The present study demonstrated that the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) was not only able to endure high environmental ammonia exposure (HEA; 2 to 22 mmol L(-1)) but that they experienced 30% increases in brain water content at the highest ammonia concentrations. This swelling was accompanied by 4-fold increases in plasma total ammonia (TAmm) concentration, but both plasma TAmm and brain water content were restored to pre-exposure levels following depuration in ammonia-free water. The closely related, ammonia-tolerant goldfish (Carassius auratus) responded similarly to HEA (up to 3.6 mmol L(-1)), which was accompanied by 4-fold increases in brain glutamine. Subsequent administration of the glutamine synthetase inhibitor, methionine sulfoximine (MSO), reduced brain glutamine accumulation by 80% during HEA. However, MSO failed to prevent ammonia-induced increases in brain water content suggesting that glutamine may not be directly involved in initiating ammonia-induced brain swelling in fishes. Although the mechanisms of brain swelling are likely different, exposure to anoxia for 96 h caused similar, but lesser (10%) increases in brain water content in crucian carp. We conclude that brain swelling in some fishes may be a common response to increased internal ammonia or lower oxygen but further research is needed to deduce the underlying mechanisms behind such responses. PMID:25582543

  11. Simulated diabetic ketoacidosis therapy in vitro elicits brain cell swelling via sodium-hydrogen exchange and anion transport.

    PubMed

    Rose, Keeley L; Watson, Andrew J; Drysdale, Thomas A; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Chan, Melissa; Rupar, C Anthony; Fraser, Douglas D

    2015-08-15

    A common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a state of severe insulin deficiency. A potentially harmful consequence of DKA therapy in children is cerebral edema (DKA-CE); however, the mechanisms of therapy-induced DKA-CE are unknown. Our aims were to identify the DKA treatment factors and membrane mechanisms that might contribute specifically to brain cell swelling. To this end, DKA was induced in juvenile mice with the administration of the pancreatic toxins streptozocin and alloxan. Brain slices were prepared and exposed to DKA-like conditions in vitro. Cell volume changes were imaged in response to simulated DKA therapy. Our experiments showed that cell swelling was elicited with isolated DKA treatment components, including alkalinization, insulin/alkalinization, and rapid reductions in osmolality. Methyl-isobutyl-amiloride, a nonselective inhibitor of sodium-hydrogen exchangers (NHEs), reduced cell swelling in brain slices elicited with simulated DKA therapy (in vitro) and decreased brain water content in juvenile DKA mice administered insulin and rehydration therapy (in vivo). Specific pharmacological inhibition of the NHE1 isoform with cariporide also inhibited cell swelling, but only in the presence of the anion transport (AT) inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid. DKA did not alter brain NHE1 isoform expression, suggesting that the cell swelling attributed to the NHE1 was activity dependent. In conclusion, our data raise the possibility that brain cell swelling can be elicited by DKA treatment factors and that it is mediated by NHEs and/or coactivation of NHE1 and AT. PMID:26081282

  12. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  13. Testicular Swelling Due to Lymphatic Filariasis after Brief Travel to Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Luis A.; Shapley, Nathan P.; Eberhard, Mark; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Fox, LeAnne M.; Magill, Alan; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    After 6 months of a trip to Haiti, a 25-year-old healthy man presented with a 6-week history of a very slow progressive intermittent bilateral testicular pain and swelling. The biopsies in both testicles revealed the presence of a dead filarial parasite. Polymerase chain reaction products of the DNA from the biopsy were shown to have a 100% identity to Wuchereria bancrofti. Despite being uncommon in travelers, this presentation of W. bancrofti highlights the possibility of acquiring W. bancrofti during short-term trips to highly endemic regions of the world (i.e., Haiti). PMID:24865674

  14. Gliotoxin-induced swelling of astrocytes hinders diffusion in brain extracellular space via formation of dead-space microdomains

    PubMed Central

    SHERPA, ANG DOMA; VAN DE NES, PAULA; XIAO, FANRONG; WEEDON, JEREMY; HRABETOVA, SABINA

    2014-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of numerous life-threatening and debilitating brain diseases is cellular swelling that negatively impacts extracellular space (ECS) structure. The ECS structure is determined by two macroscopic parameters, namely tortuosity (λ) and volume fraction (α). Tortuosity represents hindrance imposed on the diffusing molecules by the tissue in comparison with an obstacle-free medium. Volume fraction is the proportion of tissue volume occupied by the ECS. From a clinical perspective, it is essential to recognize which factors determine the ECS parameters and how these factors change in brain diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that dead-space (DS) microdomains increased λ during ischemia and hypotonic stress, as these pocket-like structures transiently trapped diffusing molecules. We hypothesize that astrocytes play a key role in the formation of DS microdomains because their thin processes have concave shapes that may elongate as astrocytes swell in these pathologies. Here we selectively swelled astrocytes in the somatosensory neocortex of rat brain slices with a gliotoxin DL-α-Aminoadipic Acid (DL-AA), and we quantified the ECS parameters using Integrative Optical Imaging (IOI) and Real-Time Iontophoretic (RTI) diffusion methods. We found that α decreased and λ increased during DL-AA application. During recovery, α was restored whereas λ remained elevated. Increase in λ during astrocytic swelling and recovery is consistent with the formation of DS microdomains. Our data attribute to the astrocytes an important role in determining the ECS parameters, and indicate that extracellular diffusion can be improved not only by reducing the swelling but also by disrupting the DS microdomains. PMID:24687699

  15. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Benjamin S.; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000×10−3 osmoles l−1 (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  16. Rigid swelling of sublingual caruncle area due to the salivary gland duct obstruction by a sialolith.

    PubMed

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Martins, Gustavo; Alves, Andreia Oliveira; Costa, José Ronaldo Vieira da; Azulay, David Rubem; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is the presence of calculus within the ductal system of a salivary gland. Among the diagnostic methods are inspection, palpation, checking the amount of saliva secreted and the identification of a sialolith. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old female patient with edema of the submandibular area and a bulging sublingual caruncle due to a calculus that obstructed the salivary gland ostium. PMID:25387506

  17. Rigid swelling of sublingual caruncle area due to the salivary gland duct obstruction by a sialolith*

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; Martins, Gustavo; Alves, Andreia Oliveira; da Costa, José Ronaldo Vieira; Azulay, David Rubem; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is the presence of calculus within the ductal system of a salivary gland. Among the diagnostic methods are inspection, palpation, checking the amount of saliva secreted and the identification of a sialolith. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old female patient with edema of the submandibular area and a bulging sublingual caruncle due to a calculus that obstructed the salivary gland ostium. PMID:25387506

  18. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  19. [Unusual location of a brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes].

    PubMed

    Coste, J-F; Duval, V; Nguyen, Y; Guillard, T; Brasme, L; David, C; Strady, C; Lecuit, M; de Champs, C

    2012-10-01

    Here we report a case of sustentorial brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes. Blood culture and procalcitonine blood measurement were negative. L. monocytogenes was isolated from CSF after inoculation in Castañeda medium. PMID:21835558

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Brain Injury due to Head Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Chang Min; Kim, Sung Ho; Goldsmith, Werner

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) due to head impact by external impactor was analyzed using Finite Element Method (FEM). Two-dimensiona modeling was performed according to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of Mongolian subject. Pressure variation in a cranium due to external impact was analyzed in order to simulate Nahum et al.'s cadaver test.6 And, analyzed results were compared with Nahum et al.'s experimental data.6 As results, stress and strain behaviors of the brain during impact were accorded with experimental data qualitatively even though there were some differences in quantitative values. In addition, they were accorded with other references about brain injury as well.

  1. Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract protects neurons from apoptosis and mitigates brain swelling in experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral malaria is a rapidly developing encephalopathy caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Drugs currently in use are associated with poor outcome in an increasing number of cases and new drugs are urgently needed. The potential of the medicinal plant Azadirachta indica (Neem) for the treatment of experimental cerebral malaria was evaluated in mice. Methods Experimental cerebral malaria was induced in mice by infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Infected mice were administered with Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract at doses of 300, 500, or 1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) in experimental groups, or with the anti-malarial drugs chloroquine (12 mg/kg, i.p.) or artemether (1.6 mg/kg, i.p.), in the positive control groups. Treatment was initiated at the onset of signs of brain involvement and pursued for five days on a daily basis. Mice brains were dissected out and processed for the study of the effects of the extract on pyramidal cells’ fate and on markers of neuroinflammation and apoptosis, in the medial temporal lobe. Results Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract mitigated neuroinflammation, decreased the severity of brain oedema, and protected pyramidal neurons from apoptosis, particularly at the highest dose used, comparable to chloroquine and artemether. Conclusions The present findings suggest that Azadirachta indica ethanolic extract has protective effects on neuronal populations in the inflamed central nervous system, and justify at least in part its use in African and Asian folk medicine and practices. PMID:23984986

  2. Selective vasopressin-1a receptor antagonist prevents brain edema, reduces astrocytic cell swelling and GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 expression after focal traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Marmarou, Christina R; Liang, Xiuyin; Abidi, Naqeeb H; Parveen, Shanaz; Taya, Keisuke; Henderson, Scott C; Young, Harold F; Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Baumgarten, Clive M

    2014-09-18

    A secondary and often lethal consequence of traumatic brain injury is cellular edema that we posit is due to astrocytic swelling caused by transmembrane water fluxes augmented by vasopressin-regulated aquaporin-4 (AQP4). We therefore tested whether vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) inhibition would suppress astrocyte AQP4, reduce astrocytic edema, and thereby diminish TBI-induced edematous changes. V1aR inhibition by SR49059 significantly reduced brain edema after cortical contusion injury (CCI) in rat 5h post-injury. Injured-hemisphere brain water content (n=6 animals/group) and astrocytic area (n=3/group) were significantly higher in CCI-vehicle (80.5±0.3%; 18.0±1.4 µm(2)) versus sham groups (78.3±0.1%; 9.5±0.9 µm(2)), and SR49059 blunted CCI-induced increases in brain edema (79.0±0.2%; 9.4±0.8µm(2)). CCI significantly up-regulated GFAP, V1aR and AQP4 protein levels and SR49059 suppressed injury induced up regulation (n=6/group). In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, GFAP was 1.58±0.04, 0.47±0.02, and 0.81±0.03, respectively; V1aR was 1.00±0.06, 0.45±0.05, and 0.46±0.09; and AQP4 was 2.03±0.34, 0.49±0.04, and 0.92±0.22. Confocal immunohistochemistry gave analogous results. In CCI-vehicle, sham and CCI-SR49059 groups, fluorescence intensity of GFAP was 349±38, 56±5, and 244±30, respectively, V1aR was 601±71, 117.8±14, and 390±76, and AQP4 was 818±117, 158±5, and 458±55 (n=3/group). The results support that edema was predominantly cellular following CCI and documented that V1aR inhibition with SR49059 suppressed injury-induced up regulation of GFAP, V1A and AQP4, blunting edematous changes. Our findings suggest V1aR inhibitors may be potential therapeutic tools to prevent cellular swelling and provide treatment for post-traumatic brain edema. PMID:24933327

  3. Postoperative Submandibular Gland Swelling following Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Haruka; Tono, Tetsuya; Ibusuki, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Reporting of a rare case of postoperative submandibular gland swelling following craniotomy. Case Report. A 33-year-old male underwent resection for a brain tumor under general anesthesia. The tumor was resected via a retrosigmoid suboccipital approach and the patient was placed in a lateral position with his face down and turned to the right. Slight swelling of the right submandibular gland was observed just after the surgery. Seven hours after surgery, edematous change around the submandibular gland worsened and he required emergent reintubation due to airway compromise. The cause of submandibular gland swelling seemed to be an obstruction of the salivary duct due to surgical positioning. Conclusion. Once submandibular swelling and edematous change around the submandibular gland occur, they can worsen and compromise the air way within several hours after operation. Adequate precaution must be taken for any predisposing skull-base surgery that requires strong cervical rotation and flexion. PMID:26697254

  4. Changes in brain gray matter due to repetitive painful stimulation.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, S; Herken, W; Bingel, U; Schoell, E; May, A

    2008-08-15

    Using functional imaging, we recently investigated how repeated painful stimulation over several days is processed, perceived and modulated in the healthy human brain. Considering that activation-dependent brain plasticity in humans on a structural level has already been demonstrated in adults, we were interested in whether repeated painful stimulation may lead to structural changes of the brain. 14 healthy subjects were stimulated daily with a 20 min pain paradigm for 8 consecutive days, using structural MRI performed on days 1, 8, 22 and again after 1 year. Using voxel based morphometry, we are able to show that repeated painful stimulation resulted in a substantial increase of gray matter in pain transmitting areas, including mid-cingulate and somatosensory cortex. These changes are stimulation dependent, i.e. they recede after the regular nociceptive input is stopped. This data raises some interesting questions regarding structural plasticity of the brain concerning the experience of both acute and chronic pain. PMID:18582579

  5. Was Julius Caesar's epilepsy due to a brain tumor?

    PubMed

    Gomez, J G; Kotler, J A; Long, J B

    1995-03-01

    Two thousand thirty-eight years later, in the setting of a similar care presentation, a physician would take a detailed history and perform a clinical and neurological examination. A preliminary diagnosis would be entertained and followed by electroencephalography and magnetic resonance of the brain with and without paramagnetic contrast for diagnostic confirmation. The proper medical or surgical treatment would then be instituted. A reconstruction of the clinical history of Julius Caesar (100-44 B.C.) has been attempted from available information from literature. Although a definite conclusion obviously cannot be made, a differential diagnosis provided with a tentative hypothesis is presented. The patient had late onset of seizures in the last two years of his life, headaches, personality changes. Upon reexamination of existing Julius Caesar iconography, busts, statues and minted coins no skull deformities have been noted. Identification of a skull deformity as described by Suetonius would have confirmed the suspicion of meningioma involving the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres. Meningioma or slow-growing supratentorial glioma may well have been responsible for this man's illness. Who knows how the course of history might have been changed... Probably not at all. PMID:7738524

  6. Cinnamon polyphenols attenuate cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction following oxygen-glucose deprivation in glial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Astrocyte swelling is an integral component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemic injury. While mechanisms underlying astrocyte swelling are likely multifactorial, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are hypothesized to contribute to such swelling. We investigated the protective effects of...

  7. Inhibition of Brain Swelling after Ischemia-Reperfusion by β-Adrenergic Antagonists: Correlation with Increased K+ and Decreased Ca2+ Concentrations in Extracellular Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junnan; Du, Ting; Yan, Enzhi; Walz, Wolfgang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Infarct size and brain edema following ischemia/reperfusion are reduced by inhibitors of the Na+, K+, 2Cl−, and water cotransporter NKCC1 and by β1-adrenoceptor antagonists. NKCC1 is a secondary active transporter, mainly localized in astrocytes, driven by transmembrane Na+/K+ gradients generated by the Na+,K+-ATPase. The astrocytic Na+,K+-ATPase is stimulated by small increases in extracellular K+ concentration and by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Larger K+ increases, as occurring during ischemia, also stimulate NKCC1, creating cell swelling. This study showed no edema after 3 hr medial cerebral artery occlusion but pronounced edema after 8 hr reperfusion. The edema was abolished by inhibitors of specifically β1-adrenergic pathways, indicating failure of K+-mediated, but not β1-adrenoceptor-mediated, stimulation of Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 transport during reoxygenation. Ninety percent reduction of extracellular Ca2+ concentration occurs in ischemia. Ca2+ omission abolished K+ uptake in normoxic cultures of astrocytes after addition of 5 mM KCl. A large decrease in ouabain potency on K+ uptake in cultured astrocytes was also demonstrated in Ca2+-depleted media, and endogenous ouabains are needed for astrocytic K+ uptake. Thus, among the ionic changes induced by ischemia, the decrease in extracellular Ca2+ causes failure of the high-K+-stimulated Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 ion/water uptake, making β1-adrenergic activation the only stimulus and its inhibition effective against edema. PMID:25478577

  8. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  9. A thoracic mechanism of mild traumatic brain injury due to blast pressure waves.

    PubMed

    Courtney, A C; Courtney, M W

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. An experiment is proposed which isolates the thoracic mechanism from cranial mechanisms of mTBI due to blast wave exposure. Results have implications for evaluating risk of mTBI due to blast exposure and for developing effective protection. PMID:18829180

  10. Swelling during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... few months. This can cause slight swelling (called edema), particularly in the legs, feet and ankles, but ... few months. This can cause slight swelling (called edema), particularly in the legs, feet and ankles, but ...

  11. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  12. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Li, G; Chen, S; Bihl, J; Buck, J; Zhu, Y; Xia, H; Lazartigues, E; Chen, Y; Olson, J E

    2014-07-25

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in the cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD result from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of Nox isoforms. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  13. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Brain abscesses commonly occur when bacteria or fungi infect part of the brain. As a result, swelling and irritation (inflammation) develop. Infected brain cells, white blood cells, live and dead bacteria, ...

  14. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  15. The phenomenology of personality change due to traumatic brain injury in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Max, J E; Robertson, B A; Lansing, A E

    2001-01-01

    The authors aimed to contribute a clinically rich description of personality change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children. The sample consisted of consecutively injured children. Ninety-four subjects ages 5 to 14 years were assessed at the time of hospitalization after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). A standardized psychiatric interview, the Neuropsychiatric Rating Schedule, was used to elicit symptoms of PC. PC occurred in 59% of severe (22/37) and 5% of mild/moderate (3/57) TBI subjects. Among the 37 severe TBI subjects, the labile subtype of PC was the most common (49%), followed by the aggressive and disinhibited subtypes (38% each), apathy (14%), and paranoia (5%). Also frequent in severe TBI was perseveration (35%). A detailed case example, numerous clinical vignettes of PC symptoms, and a tabulation of their frequencies provide clinicians a broader frame of reference for eliciting symptoms of PC. PMID:11449023

  16. Swelling of Olympic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, M.; Fischer, J.; Werner, M.; Sommer, J.-U.

    2014-06-01

    The swelling equilibrium of Olympic gels, which are composed of entangled cyclic polymers, is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast to chemically cross-linked polymer networks, we observe that Olympic gels made of chains with a larger degree of polymerization, N, exhibit a smaller equilibrium swelling degree, Q∝N-0.28ϕ0-0.72, at the same polymer volume fraction ϕ0 at network preparation. This observation is explained by a desinterspersion (reorganization with release of nontrapped entanglements) process of overlapping nonconcatenated rings upon swelling.

  17. Personality Change Due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents: Neurocognitive Correlates.

    PubMed

    Max, Jeffrey E; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Hanten, Gerri; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell J; Saunders, Ann E; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B; Thompson, Wesley K; Yang, Tony T; Levin, Harvey S

    2015-01-01

    Personality change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children is an important psychiatric complication of injury and is a form of severe affective dysregulation. This study aimed to examine neurocognitive correlates of PC. The sample included 177 children 5-14 years old with traumatic brain injury who were enrolled from consecutive admissions to five trauma centers. Patients were followed up prospectively at baseline and at 6 months, and they were assessed with semistructured psychiatric interviews. Injury severity, socioeconomic status, and neurocognitive function (measures of attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, verbal working memory, executive function, naming/reading, expressive language, motor speed, and motor inhibition) were assessed with standardized instruments. Unremitted PC was present in 26 (18%) of 141 participants assessed at 6 months postinjury. Attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, and executive function were significantly associated with PC even after socioeconomic status, injury severity, and preinjury attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were controlled. These findings are a first step in characterizing concomitant cognitive impairments associated with PC. The results have implications beyond brain injury to potentially elucidate the neurocognitive symptom complex associated with mood instability regardless of etiology. PMID:26185905

  18. Personality Change due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents: Neurocognitive Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Hanten, Gerri; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell J.; Saunders, Ann E.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Yang, Tony T.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2015-01-01

    Personality Change due to traumatic brain injury (PC) in children is an important psychiatric complication of injury and is a form of severe affective dysregulation. The aim of the study was to examine neurocognitive correlates of PC. The sample included children (n=177) aged 5-14 years with traumatic brain injury from consecutive admissions to 5 trauma centers were followed prospectively at baseline and 6 months with semi-structured psychiatric interviews. Injury severity, socioeconomic status, and neurocognitive function (measures of attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, verbal working memory, executive function, naming/reading, expressive language, motor speed, and motor inhibition) were assessed with standardized instruments. Unremitted PC was present in 26/141 (18%) participants assessed at 6 months post-injury. Attention, processing speed, verbal memory, IQ, and executive function, were significantly associated (p < .05) with PC even after socioeconomic status, injury severity, and pre-injury attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were controlled. These findings are a first step in characterizing concomitant cognitive impairments associated with PC. The results have implications beyond brain injury to potentially elucidate the neurocognitive symptom complex associated with mood instability regardless of etiology. PMID:26185905

  19. Brain abscess due to Cladophialophora bantiana: a review of 124 cases.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Kaur, Harsimran; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Appannanavar, Suma B; Patel, Atul; Mukherjee, Kanchan K; Ghosh, Anup; Ray, Ujjwayini

    2016-02-01

    Brain abscess caused by Cladophialophora bantiana is a rare disease associated with high mortality due to delay in diagnosis and absence of standardized therapy. We reviewed 124 culture proven C. bantiana brain abscess cases; 103 cases published in English literature during 1952 through 2014 and 21 unpublished cases from our reference center. The majority (57.3%) of the patients was from Asian countries especially from India (62/124, 50%). The diagnosis of the cases was delayed with mean duration 115 days after developing symptoms. The disease was nearly equally distributed in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts but associated with significantly higher mortality (77.1%) in later group. Complete excision of brain lesion in immunocompetent host led to significantly better survival (43.7%). Though all commercially available antifungal drugs have been used in these patients, amphotericin B deoxycholate or lipid preparations were most commonly (62.83%) prescribed agent. None of the drugs used was found to be independently associated with improved outcome. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of 13 isolates of our center, demonstrated good activity to voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole, but these triazoles were prescribed in only 29.2% patients. Increased awareness with early suspicion of the disease, and aggressive medical and surgical approach in treating these patients may improve the outcome. PMID:26483430

  20. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  1. [A case of a penetrating brain injury due to an explosion of a construction machine].

    PubMed

    Ibayashi, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Gakushi; Uno, Takeshi; Shimada, Shiko; Kawashima, Mariko; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yushi

    2012-05-01

    Penetrating brain injury caused by a high speed projectile is rather rare in Japan, known for its strict gun-control laws. We report a case of a 55-year-old male, who was transferred to our hospital with a foreign body in the brain due to penetrating head injury, which was caused by an explosion of a construction machine. Neurological examination demonstrated severe motor aphagia with no apparent motor paresis. The patient had a scalp laceration on his left forehead with exposed cerebral tissue and CSF leakage. Head CT scan and plain skull X-ray revealed a 20 mm×25 mm bolt which had penetrated due to the explosion of the machine. The anterior wall of the left frontal sinus was fractured resulting in dural laceration, and scattered bone fragments were seen along the trajectory of the bolt. Digital subtraction angiography showed no significant vascular injuries including superior sagittal sinus. We performed open surgery, and successfully removed the bolt along with the damaged frontal lobe. The patient had no infection or seizure after the surgery, and was transferred for further rehabilitation therapy. We performed a cosmetic cranioplasty six months later. Surgical debridement of the damaged cerebral tissue along the trajectory led to successful removal of the bolt with no further neurological deficit. PMID:22538284

  2. Brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction due to adrenal insufficiency in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction (LCD) due to adrenal insufficiency (AI) in preterm infants. Methods: Among the 257 preterm infants born at <33 weeks of gestation between December 2009 and February 2014 at our institution, 35 preterm infants were diagnosed with AI. Brain ultrasonographic findings were retrospectively analyzed before and after LCD in 14 preterm infants, after exclusion of the other 21 infants with AI due to the following causes: death (n=2), early AI (n=5), sepsis (n=1), and patent ductus arteriosus (n=13). Results: Fourteen of 257 infants (5.4%) were diagnosed with LCD due to AI. The age at LCD was a median of 18.5 days (range, 9 to 32 days). The last ultrasonographic findings before LCD occurred showed grade 1 periventricular echogenicity (PVE) in all 14 patients and germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) with focal cystic change in one patient. Ultrasonographic findings after LCD demonstrated no significant change in grade 1 PVE and no new lesions in eight (57%), grade 1 PVE with newly appearing GMH in three (21%), and increased PVE in three (21%) infants. Five infants (36%) showed new development (n=4) or increased size (n=1) of GMH. Two of three infants (14%) with increased PVE developed cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. Conclusion: LCD due to AI may be associated with the late development of GMH, increased PVE after LCD, and cystic PVL with rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. PMID:27156563

  3. Predictors of Personality Change Due to Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents in the First Six Months after Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Max, Jeffrey E.; Levin, Harvey S.; Landis, Julie; Schachar, Russell; Saunders, Ann; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Chapman, Sandra B.; Dennis, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the phenomenology and predictive factors of personality change due to traumatic brain injury. Method: Children (N = 177), aged 5 to 14 years with traumatic brain injury from consecutive admissions to five trauma centers, were followed prospectively at baseline and 6 months with semistructured psychiatric interviews. Injury…

  4. Alterations in rat brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism due to acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, R; Huang, H M; Sun, G Y

    1988-04-01

    The effects of acute ethanol administration on the polyphosphoinositide metabolism of rat brain cerebral cortex were examined. Intracerebral injections of [gamma-32P]ATP proved to be an effective in vivo method to prelabel brain phospholipids, especially the polyphosphoinositides. High acute doses of ethanol (8 or 6 g/kg b.wt.) administered by gavage significantly inhibited the breakdown of polyphosphoinositides as judged by an elevation in the concentration as well as the labeling of these compounds. Concomitantly, there was a significant reduction in the level of diacylglycerols. Low acute doses of ethanol (2 g/kg b.wt.) did not seem to have any effects on the basal levels or labeling of these compounds. The changes in polyphosphoinositide labeling due to ethanol intoxication were reverted to near control values when animals regained their righting reflex (approximately 4 hr). These studies demonstrate that, under normal conditions, polyphosphoinositides and diacylglycerols are maintained in a dynamic equilibrium and that acute doses of ethanol can suppress the signal transduction process and disturb this equilibrium. PMID:2834532

  5. Post-mortem Findings in Huntington’s Deep Brain Stimulation: A Moving Target Due to Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Hilliard, Justin D.; Carbunaru, Samuel; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Bloom, Joshua; Keeling, Peyton; Awe, Lisa; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and primary dystonia. However, mixed results have been reported in Huntington’s disease (HD). Case Report A single case of HD DBS was identified from the University of Florida DBS Brain Tissue Network. The clinical presentation, evolution, surgical planning, DBS parameters, clinical outcomes, and brain pathological changes are summarized. Discussion This case of HD DBS revealed that chorea may improve and be sustained. Minimal histopathological changes were noted around the DBS leads. Severe atrophy due to HD likely changed the DBS lead position relative to the internal capsule. PMID:27127722

  6. Multiple Brain Abscesses due to Streptococcus anginosus: Prediction of Mortality by an Imaging Severity Index Score

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient with altered mental status, brain abscesses, ventriculitis, and empyemas died of septic shock and brain abscesses secondary to Streptococcus anginosus despite aggressive treatment. An imaging severity index score with a better prognostic value than the Glasgow coma scale predicted mortality in this patient. PMID:27034878

  7. Irradiation creep relaxation of void swelling-driven stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Swelling-driven-creep test specimens are used to measure the compressive stresses that develop due to constraint of irradiation void swelling. These specimens use a previously non-irradiated 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel holder to axially restrain two Type 304 stainless steel tubular specimens that were previously irradiated in the US Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) at 490 °C. One specimen was previously irradiated to fluence levels in the void nucleation regime (9 dpa) and the other in the quasi-steady void growth regime (28 dpa). A lift-off compliance measurement technique was used post-irradiation to determine compressive stresses developed during reirradiation of the two specimen assemblies in Row 7 of EBR-II at temperatures of 547 °C and 504 °C, respectively, to additional damage levels each of about 5 dpa. Results obtained on the higher fluence swelling-driven-creep specimen show that compressive stress due to constraint of swelling retards void swelling to a degree that is consistent with active load uniaxial compression specimens that were irradiated as part of a previously reported multiaxial in-reactor creep experiment. Swelling results obtained on the lower fluence swelling-driven creep specimen show a much larger effect of compressive stress in reducing swelling, demonstrating that the larger effect of stress on swelling is on void nucleation as compared to void growth. Test results are analyzed using a recently proposed multiaxial creep-swelling model.

  8. Postoperative pectoral swelling after shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    ERCIN, ERSIN; BILGILI, MUSTAFA GOKHAN; ONES, HALIL NADIR; KURAL, CEMAL

    2015-01-01

    Fluid extravasation is possibly the most common complication of shoulder arthroscopy. Shoulder arthroscopy can lead to major increases in the compartment pressure of adjacent muscles and this phenomenon is significant when an infusion pump is used. This article describes a case of pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy. A 24-year-old male underwent an arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent shoulder dislocation. The surgery was performed in the beach chair position and lasted two hours. At the end of the procedure, the patient was found to have left pectoral swelling. A chest radiography showed no abnormality. Pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy has not previously been documented. PMID:26889473

  9. Computational Morphometry for Detecting Changes in Brain Structure Due to Development, Aging, Learning, Disease and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mietchen, Daniel; Gaser, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The brain, like any living tissue, is constantly changing in response to genetic and environmental cues and their interaction, leading to changes in brain function and structure, many of which are now in reach of neuroimaging techniques. Computational morphometry on the basis of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images has become the method of choice for studying macroscopic changes of brain structure across time scales. Thanks to computational advances and sophisticated study designs, both the minimal extent of change necessary for detection and, consequently, the minimal periods over which such changes can be detected have been reduced considerably during the last few years. On the other hand, the growing availability of MR images of more and more diverse brain populations also allows more detailed inferences about brain changes that occur over larger time scales, way beyond the duration of an average research project. On this basis, a whole range of issues concerning the structures and functions of the brain are now becoming addressable, thereby providing ample challenges and opportunities for further contributions from neuroinformatics to our understanding of the brain and how it changes over a lifetime and in the course of evolution. PMID:19707517

  10. The costs of traumatic brain injury due to motorcycle accidents in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Hanh TM; Pham, Tran L; Vo, Thuy TN; Nguyen, Phuong K; Doran, Christopher M; Hill, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Background Road traffic accidents are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries in Vietnam. The purpose of this study is to estimate the costs, in the first year post-injury, of non-fatal traumatic brain injury (TBI) in motorcycle users not wearing helmets in Hanoi, Vietnam. The costs are calculated from the perspective of the injured patients and their families, and include quantification of direct, indirect and intangible costs, using years lost due to disability as a proxy. Methods The study was a retrospective cross-sectional study. Data on treatment and rehabilitation costs, employment and support were obtained from patients and their families using a structured questionnaire and The European Quality of Life instrument (EQ6D). Results Thirty-five patients and their families were interviewed. On average, patients with severe, moderate and minor TBI incurred direct costs at USD 2,365, USD 1,390 and USD 849, with time lost for normal activities averaging 54 weeks, 26 weeks and 17 weeks and years lived with disability (YLD) of 0.46, 0.25 and 0.15 year, respectively. Conclusion All three component costs of TBI were high; the direct cost accounted for the largest proportion, with costs rising with the severity of TBI. The results suggest that the burden of TBI can be catastrophic for families because of high direct costs, significant time off work for patients and caregivers, and impact on health-related quality of life. Further research is warranted to explore the actual social and economic benefits of mandatory helmet use. PMID:18718026

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Bull Assault in a Girl: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    ALVIS-MIRANDA, Hernando Raphael; CASTELLAR-LEONES, Sandra Milena; VELÁSQUEZ-LOPERENA, Dufays Danith; VILLA-DELGADO, Rosmery; ALCALA-CERRA, Gabriel; MOSCOTE-SALAZAR, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury is a common condition in the emergency services, affecting the pediatric and adult population significantly. Patterns of head injury as well as management principles in children are important differences compared to adults. Traumatic brain injury by bull rush is usually seen in adults but has not been described in children-report a pediatric cranial trauma present bull rush, which to our knowledge is the first report in the literature of this nature. PMID:24790672

  12. Swelling of particle-encapsulating random manifolds.

    PubMed

    Haleva, Emir; Diamant, Haim

    2008-08-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a closed random manifold of fixed area and fluctuating volume, encapsulating a fixed number of noninteracting particles. Scaling analysis yields a unified description of such swollen manifolds, according to which the mean volume gradually increases with particle number, following a single scaling law. This is markedly different from the swelling under fixed pressure difference, where certain models exhibit criticality. We thereby indicate when the swelling due to encapsulated particles is thermodynamically inequivalent to that caused by fixed pressure. The general predictions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of two particle-encapsulating model systems: a two-dimensional self-avoiding ring and a three-dimensional self-avoiding fluid vesicle. In the former the particle-induced swelling is thermodynamically equivalent to the pressure-induced one, whereas in the latter it is not. PMID:18850811

  13. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  14. Directional control of diffusion and swelling in megamolecular polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Joshi, G; Okeyoshi, K; Okajima, M K; Kaneko, T

    2016-07-01

    Directional control of diffusion and swelling in megamolecular polysaccharide hydrogels is demonstrated by focusing on the anisotropic structures for water absorption. Due to the presence of a layered structure in the hydrogel, the directional control for diffusion parallel to the planar direction and swelling in the lateral direction are possible. PMID:27223843

  15. A biophysical model of shape changes due to atrophy in the brain with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Bishesh; Lorenzi, Marco; Ayache, Nicholas; Pennec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a model of brain deformation triggered by atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). We introduce a macroscopic biophysical model assuming that the density of the brain remains constant, hence its volume shrinks when neurons die in AD. The deformation in the brain parenchyma minimizes the elastic strain energy with the prescribed local volume loss. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is modelled differently to allow for fluid readjustments occuring at a much faster time-scale. PDEs describing the model is discretized in staggered grid and solved using Finite Difference Method. We illustrate the power of the model by showing different deformation patterns obtained for the same global atrophy but prescribed in gray matter (GM) or white matter (WM) on a generic atlas MRI, and with a realistic AD simulation on a subject MRI. This well-grounded forward model opens a way to study different hypotheses about the distribution of brain atrophy, and to study its impact on the observed changes in MR images. PMID:25485361

  16. [Interhemispheral interaction of brain biopotentials in neurosensory deafness due to occupational factors].

    PubMed

    Drozdova, T V; Morenko, V M

    2008-01-01

    The authors studied value and trends of changes in interhemispheral coefficients of biorhythms coherence in brain cortex under exposure to occupational factors complex in engine crew workers. The authors followed character and dynamics of those changes in railway workers with long length of service, with or without occupational neurosensory deafness. PMID:18522205

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 knockout ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Chang; Zhang, Zongze; Zou, Yufeng; Peng, Mian; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a crucial receptor in the innate immune system, and increasing evidence supports its role in inflammation, stress, and tissue injury, including injury to the lung and brain. We aimed to investigate the effects of TLR4 on neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction in mechanically ventilated mice. Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and TLR4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were divided into three groups: (1) control group (C): spontaneous breathing; (2) anesthesia group (A): spontaneous breathing under anesthesia; and (3) mechanical ventilation group (MV): 6h of MV under anesthesia. The behavioral responses of mice were tested with fear conditioning tests. The histological changes in the lung and brain were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The level of TLR4 mRNA in tissue was measured using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the TLR4 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were measured by double immunofluorescence. MV mice exhibited impaired cognition, and this impairment was less severe in TLR4 KO mice than in WT mice. In WT mice, MV increased TLR4 mRNA expression in the lung and brain. MV induced mild lung injury, which was prevented in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, increased microglia and astrocyte activation. Microgliosis was alleviated in TLR4 KO mice. MV mice exhibited increased TLR4 immunoreactivity, which was expressed in microglia and astrocytes. These results demonstrate that TLR4 is involved in neuroinflammation due to the lung-brain interaction and that TLR4 KO ameliorates neuroinflammation due to lung-brain interaction after prolonged MV. In addition, Administration of a TLR4 antagonist (100μg/mice) to WT mice also significantly attenuated neuroinflammation of lung-brain interaction due to prolonged MV. TLR4 antagonism

  18. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array. PMID:26945363

  19. Role of MicroRNAs in innate neuroprotection mechanisms due to preconditioning of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Insults to the brain that are sub-threshold for damage activate endogenous protective pathways, which can temporarily protect the brain against a subsequent harmful episode. This mechanism has been named as tolerance and its protective effects have been shown in experimental models of ischemia and epilepsy. The preconditioning-stimulus can be a short period of ischemia or mild seizures induced by low doses of convulsant drugs. Gene-array profiling has shown that both ischemic and epileptic tolerance feature large-scale gene down-regulation but the mechanism are unknown. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs of ~20–22 nucleotides length which regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level via mRNA degradation or inhibition of protein translation. MicroRNAs have been shown to be regulated after non-harmful and harmful stimuli in the brain and to contribute to neuroprotective mechanisms. This review focuses on the role of microRNAs in the development of tolerance following ischemic or epileptic preconditioning. PMID:25954143

  20. Dynamic imaging with lanthanide chelates in normal brain: contrast due to magnetic susceptibility effects.

    PubMed

    Villringer, A; Rosen, B R; Belliveau, J W; Ackerman, J L; Lauffer, R B; Buxton, R B; Chao, Y S; Wedeen, V J; Brady, T J

    1988-02-01

    Using a one-dimensional rapid imaging technique, we have found that injection of lanthanide chelates such as Gd(DTPA)2- leads to a significant decrease (50%) in rat brain signal intensity at 1.45 T using T2-weighted pulse sequences; however, no effect of comparable size is observed with T1-weighted pulse sequences. The transient effect and its kinetics were followed with a temporal resolution of between 1 and 8 s. Experiments with different lanthanide chelates show that the observed decrease in signal intensity correlates with the magnetic moment of each agent but not with their longitudinal relaxivity. Three-dimensional chemical-shift resolved experiments demonstrate significant line broadening in brain during infusion with Dy(DTPA)2-. Our results show that the cause of this effect is the difference in susceptibility between the capillaries, containing the contrast agent, and the surrounding tissue. As a result of these susceptibility differences, field gradients are produced in the tissue and diffusion of water through these gradients leads to a loss of spin phase coherence and thus a decrease in signal intensity. We propose this as a new type of contrast agent mechanism in NMR. The effect and its kinetics are likely to be related to important physiological parameters such as cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow, and do not depend on a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier as do conventional contrast agent techniques. PMID:3367774

  1. Mice with neuropathic pain exhibit morphine tolerance due to a decrease in the morphine concentration in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Kaneta, Mitsumasa; Nagae, Marina; Yuzuhara, Ami; Li, Xin; Suzuki, Haruka; Hanagata, Mika; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Suto, Wataru; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Kon, Risako; Miyashita, Kazuhiko; Masukawa, Daiki; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-20

    The chronic administration of morphine to patients with neuropathic pain results in the development of a gradual tolerance to morphine. Although the detailed mechanism of this effect has not yet been elucidated, one of the known causes is a decrease in μ-opioid receptor function with regard to the active metabolite of morphine, M-6-G(morphine-6-glucuronide), in the ventrotegmental area of the midbrain. In this study, the relationship between the concentration of morphine in the brain and its analgesic effect was examined after the administration of morphine in the presence of neuropathic pain. Morphine was orally administered to mice with neuropathic pain, and the relationship between morphine's analgesic effect and its concentration in the brain was analysed. In addition, the expression levels of the conjugation enzyme, UGT2B (uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase), which has morphine as its substrate, and P-gp, which is a transporter involved in morphine excretion, were examined. In mice with neuropathic pain, the concentration of morphine in the brain was significantly decreased, and a correlation was found between this decrease and the decrease in the analgesic effect. It was considered possible that this decrease in the brain morphine concentration may be due to an increase in the expression level of P-gp in the small intestine and to an increase in the expression level and binding activity of UGT2B in the liver. The results of this study suggest the possibility that a sufficient analgesic effect may not be obtained when morphine is administered in the presence of neuropathic pain due to a decrease in the total amount of morphine and M-6-G that reach the brain. PMID:27102159

  2. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Phialemonium in a Renal Transplant Recipient: First Case Report in the Literature.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mehtap; Özçelik, Ümit; Çevik, Halime; Çınar, Özlem; Evren, Ebru; Demirağ, Alp

    2015-11-01

    Fungal brain abscesses are a rare but serious complication in transplant recipients. Phialemonium organisms are rare causes of invasive mold infections. Here, we present the first case of a renal transplant recipient with multiple brain abscesses caused by Phialemonium infection A. A 51-year-old female kidney transplant recipient was admitted with pneumonia of an unknown cause and treated with empiric intravenous antibiotics. Her treatment was uneventful, and she was discharged 1010 days later. After 5 days, she was readmitted with fever, cerebral palsy, and speech disorder. The patient had undergone living-donor renal transplant 7 months earlier. A cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed for a possible cerebrovascular pathology. The magnetic resonance imaging scan showed multiple brain abscesses located at the left parietal, frontal and occipital lobes; right parietal and occipital lobes; right basal ganglia; and left cerebellum. The patient received meropenem, linezolid, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and AmBisome for probable pathogenic infection, and immunosuppressive agents dosage was reduced increasingly immunosuppressed. We identified Phialemonium in cerebrospinal fluid culture. The patient received voriconazole 200 mg twice daily. Lesions could not be drained due to lack of capsula formation. The patient died on the 30th day of antifungal therapy. Phialemonium organisms, although a rare cause of fungal infections, are associated with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing multiple brain abscesses due to Phialemonium in a transplant recipient. Clinicians recipient should be alert about these rare opportunistic fungi in the differential diagnosis of brain abscess, and bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage are recommended for transplant patients when they are admitted with pneumonia exclude fungal infections. PMID:26640919

  3. Quantitative MRI analysis of brain volume changes due to controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Niall C; Cronin, Michelle M; Gobbo, Oliviero L; O'Mara, Shane M; O'Connor, William T; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    More than 85% of reported brain traumas are classified clinically as "mild" using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS); qualitative MRI findings are scarce and provide little correspondence to clinical symptoms. Our goal, therefore, was to establish in vivo sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) following lower and higher levels of impact to the frontal lobe using quantitative MRI analysis and a mechanical model of penetrating impact injury. To investigate time-based morphological and physiological changes of living tissue requires a surrogate for the human central nervous system. The present model for TBI was a systematically varied and controlled cortical impact on deeply-anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, that was designed to mimic different injury severities. Whole-brain MRI scans were performed on each rat prior to either a lower- or a higher-level of impact, and then at hourly intervals for 5 h post-impact. Both brain volume and specific anatomical structures were segmented from MR images for inter-subject comparisons post-registration. Animals subjected to lower and higher impact levels exhibited elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the low compensatory reserve (i.e., nearly exhausted), and terminal disturbance (i.e., exhausted) ranges, respectively. There was a statistically significant drop in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 35% in the lower impacts, and 65% in the higher impacts, at 5 h compared to sham controls. There was a corresponding increase in corpus callosum volume starting at 1 h, of 60-110% and 30-40% following the lower- and higher-impact levels, respectively. A statistically significant change in the abnormal tissue from 2 h to 5 h was observed for both impact levels, with greater significance for higher impacts. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference between the lower impacts and the sham controls occurred at 3 h. These results are statistically substantiated by a fluctuation in the physical size of the corpus callosum, a decrease in

  4. The Swelling of Olympic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Fischer, Jakob; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-03-01

    The swelling equilibrium of Olympic gels is studied by Monte Carlo Simulations. We observe that gels consisting of flexible cyclic molecules of a higher degree of polymerization N show a smaller equilibrium swelling degree Q ~N - 0 . 28φ0- 0 . 72 for the same monomer volume fraction φ0 at network preparation. This observation is explained by a disinterpenetration process of overlapping non-concatenated polymers upon swelling. In the limit of a sufficiently large number of concatenations per cyclic molecule we expect that the equilibrium degree of swelling becomes proportional to φ0- 1 / 2 independent of N. Our results challenge current textbook models for the equilibrium degree of swelling of entangled polymer networks. Now at: Bio Systems Analysis Group, Jena Centre for Bioinformatics (JCB) and Department for Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, 07743 Jena, Germany.

  5. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress after birth led us to localize reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production in the developing rat brain. Brains were assessed a day prenatally and on postnatal days 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 30, and 60. Oxidation of dihydroethidium detected superoxide; 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate revealed hydrogen peroxide; immunohistochemical proof of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine detected peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation, respectively. Blue autofluorescence detected protein oxidation. The foetuses showed moderate RONS production, which changed cyclically during further development. The periods and sites of peak production of individual RONS differed, suggesting independent generation. On day 1, neuronal/glial RONS production decreased indicating that increased oxygen concentration after birth did not cause oxidative stress. Dramatic changes in the amount and the sites of RONS production occurred on day 4. Nitrotyrosine detection reached its maximum. Day 14 represented other vast alterations in RONS generation. Superoxide production in arachnoidal membrane reached its peak. From this day on, the internal elastic laminae of blood vessels revealed the blue autofluorescence. The adult animals produced moderate levels of superoxide; all other markers reached their minimum. There was a strong correlation between detection of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine probably caused by lipid peroxidation initiated with RONS. PMID:27190574

  6. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Rapid-Onset Natural Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Regens, James L.; Mould, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) attributable to rapid-onset natural disasters is a major challenge confronting disaster preparedness planners and emergency medical personnel responding to those incidents. The kinetic energy released by rapid-onset natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes or typhoons, and tornadoes can cause mild, moderate, or severe TBIs. As a result, neurotrauma is a major risk factor for mortality and morbidity outcomes within the spatial domain impacted by a rapid-onset natural disaster. This review article elucidates major challenges associated with immediate emergency medical response, long-term care, and prevention of post-event increases in pediatric TBIs because of child abuse when rapid-onset natural disasters occur. PMID:24783188

  8. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  9. Prevention and treatment of traumatic brain injury due to rapid-onset natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Regens, James L; Mould, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) attributable to rapid-onset natural disasters is a major challenge confronting disaster preparedness planners and emergency medical personnel responding to those incidents. The kinetic energy released by rapid-onset natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes or typhoons, and tornadoes can cause mild, moderate, or severe TBIs. As a result, neurotrauma is a major risk factor for mortality and morbidity outcomes within the spatial domain impacted by a rapid-onset natural disaster. This review article elucidates major challenges associated with immediate emergency medical response, long-term care, and prevention of post-event increases in pediatric TBIs because of child abuse when rapid-onset natural disasters occur. PMID:24783188

  10. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-08-31

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  11. On the pressure response in the brain due to short duration blunt impacts.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher W; Young, Philippe G

    2014-01-01

    When the head is subject to non-penetrating (blunt) impact, contusion-type injuries are commonly identified beneath the impact site (the coup) and, in some instances, at the opposite pole (the contre-coup). This pattern of injury has long eluded satisfactory explanation and blunt head injury mechanisms in general remain poorly understood. There are only a small number of studies in the open literature investigating the head's response to short duration impacts, which can occur in collisions with light projectiles. As such, the head impact literature to date has focussed almost exclusively on impact scenarios which lead to a quasi-static pressure response in the brain. In order to investigate the response of the head to a wide range of impact durations, parametric numerical studies were performed on a highly bio-fidelic finite element model of the human head created from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data with non-linear tissue material properties. We demonstrate that short duration head impacts can lead to potentially deleterious transients of positive and negative intra-cranial pressure over an order of magnitude larger than those observed in the quasi-static regime despite reduced impact force and energy. The onset of this phenomenon is shown to be effectively predicted by the ratio of impact duration to the period of oscillation of the first ovalling mode of the system. These findings point to dramatically different pressure distributions in the brain and hence different patterns of injury depending on projectile mass, and provide a potential explanation for dual coup/contre-coup injuries observed clinically. PMID:25478695

  12. On the Pressure Response in the Brain due to Short Duration Blunt Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Christopher W.; Young, Philippe G.

    2014-01-01

    When the head is subject to non-penetrating (blunt) impact, contusion-type injuries are commonly identified beneath the impact site (the coup) and, in some instances, at the opposite pole (the contre-coup). This pattern of injury has long eluded satisfactory explanation and blunt head injury mechanisms in general remain poorly understood. There are only a small number of studies in the open literature investigating the head's response to short duration impacts, which can occur in collisions with light projectiles. As such, the head impact literature to date has focussed almost exclusively on impact scenarios which lead to a quasi-static pressure response in the brain. In order to investigate the response of the head to a wide range of impact durations, parametric numerical studies were performed on a highly bio-fidelic finite element model of the human head created from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data with non-linear tissue material properties. We demonstrate that short duration head impacts can lead to potentially deleterious transients of positive and negative intra-cranial pressure over an order of magnitude larger than those observed in the quasi-static regime despite reduced impact force and energy. The onset of this phenomenon is shown to be effectively predicted by the ratio of impact duration to the period of oscillation of the first ovalling mode of the system. These findings point to dramatically different pressure distributions in the brain and hence different patterns of injury depending on projectile mass, and provide a potential explanation for dual coup/contre-coup injuries observed clinically. PMID:25478695

  13. Calculation of change in brain temperatures due to exposure to a mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Van Leersum, B. J. A. M.; Zwamborn, A. P. M.; Hornsleth, S. N.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.

    1999-10-01

    In this study we evaluated for a realistic head model the 3D temperature rise induced by a mobile phone. This was done numerically with the consecutive use of an FDTD model to predict the absorbed electromagnetic power distribution, and a thermal model describing bioheat transfer both by conduction and by blood flow. We calculated a maximum rise in brain temperature of 0.11 °C for an antenna with an average emitted power of 0.25 W, the maximum value in common mobile phones, and indefinite exposure. Maximum temperature rise is at the skin. The power distributions were characterized by a maximum averaged SAR over an arbitrarily shaped 10 g volume of approximately 1.6 W kg-1. Although these power distributions are not in compliance with all proposed safety standards, temperature rises are far too small to have lasting effects. We verified our simulations by measuring the skin temperature rise experimentally. Our simulation method can be instrumental in further development of safety standards.

  14. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-03-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  15. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  16. Uncovering latent deficits due to mild traumatic brain injury by using normobaric hypoxia stress.

    PubMed

    Temme, Leonard; Bleiberg, Joseph; Reeves, Dennis; Still, David L; Levinson, Dan; Browning, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Memory deficits and other cognitive symptoms frequently associated with mTBI are commonly thought to resolve within 7-10 days. This generalization is based principally on observations made in individuals who are in the unstressed environmental conditions typical of a clinic and so does not consider the impact of physiologic, environmental, or psychological stress. Normobaric hypoxic stress can be generated with normal mean sea level (MSL) air, which is about 21% oxygen (O2) and 78% nitrogen (N), by reducing the percentage of O2 and increasing the percentage of N so that the resultant mixed-gas has a partial pressure of O2 approximating that of specified altitudes. This technique was used to generate normobaric hypoxic equivalents of 8,000, 12,000, and 14,000 feet above MSL in a group of 36 volunteers with a mTBI history and an equal number of controls matched on the basis of age, gender, tobacco smoking consumption, weight, height, and body mass index. Short-term visual memory was tested using the Matching to Sample (M2S) subtest of the BrainCheckers analog of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics. Although there were no significant differences in M2S performance between the two groups of subjects at MSL, with increased altitude, the mTBI group performance was significantly worse than that of the control group. When the subjects were returned to MSL, the difference disappeared. This finding suggests that the "hypoxic challenge" paradigm developed here has potential clinical utility for assessing the effects of mTBI in individuals who appear asymptomatic under normal conditions. PMID:23641232

  17. The cellular mechanisms of neuronal swelling underlying cytotoxic edema.

    PubMed

    Rungta, Ravi L; Choi, Hyun B; Tyson, John R; Malik, Aqsa; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Lin, Paulo J C; Cain, Stuart M; Cullis, Pieter R; Snutch, Terrance P; MacVicar, Brian A

    2015-04-23

    Cytotoxic brain edema triggered by neuronal swelling is the chief cause of mortality following brain trauma and cerebral infarct. Using fluorescence lifetime imaging to analyze contributions of intracellular ionic changes in brain slices, we find that intense Na(+) entry triggers a secondary increase in intracellular Cl(-) that is required for neuronal swelling and death. Pharmacological and siRNA-mediated knockdown screening identified the ion exchanger SLC26A11 unexpectedly acting as a voltage-gated Cl(-) channel that is activated upon neuronal depolarization to membrane potentials lower than -20 mV. Blockade of SLC26A11 activity attenuates both neuronal swelling and cell death. Therefore cytotoxic neuronal edema occurs when sufficient Na(+) influx and depolarization is followed by Cl(-) entry via SLC26A11. The resultant NaCl accumulation causes subsequent neuronal swelling leading to neuronal death. These findings shed light on unique elements of volume control in excitable cells and lay the ground for the development of specific treatments for brain edema. PMID:25910210

  18. Biophysics: Unfolding the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The folded surface of the human brain, although striking, continues to evade understanding. Experiments with swelling gels now fuel the notion that brain folding is modulated by physical forces, and not by genetic, biological or chemical events alone.

  19. Dissecting anode swelling in commercial lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ningxin; Tang, Huaqiong

    2012-11-01

    An innovative method is applied to investigate anode swelling during electrochemical processes in commercial lithium-ion batteries. Cathode surface is partially covered with a piece of paste to block the transportation of lithium ion from active material during charging/discharging, and the corresponding part on the anode film shows no formation of Li-graphite compounds during different electrochemical processes, which is confirmed by XRD analysis. The increases of anode thickness within and outside lithiated zone are measured, and defined as electrochemical swelling and physical swelling respectively. The microscopic lattice expansion of graphite due to lithiation process correlates to mesoscopic electrochemical swelling synchronically, while physical swelling tends to decrease steadily with time. The relationship among the microscopic stress due to lithium-ion intercalation, the mesoscopic stress resulting in anode swelling, and the macroscopic rippling of pouch cell after a large number of cycle test, is analyzed and correlated in terms of stress evolution across different scales, and suggestions for solving anode swelling are provided.

  20. Memory deficits due to brain injury: unique PET findings and dream alterations.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masaki; Nariai, Tadashi; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Nishikawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The authors herein report the case of a young male with memory deficits due to a traumatic head injury, who presented with sleep-related symptoms such as hypersomnia and dream alterations. Although MRI and polysomnography showed no abnormalities, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and (11)C flumazenil (FMZ)-PET revealed findings consistent with cerebral damage to the affected temporal region. The memory deficit of the patient gradually improved in parallel with the relief of the sleep-related symptoms. FDG-PET showed considerable improvement in glucose metabolism when he had recovered, however, evidence of neural loss remained in the FMZ-PET findings. PMID:22674950

  1. Memory deficits due to brain injury: unique PET findings and dream alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Masaki; Nariai, Tadashi; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Nishikawa, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The authors herein report the case of a young male with memory deficits due to a traumatic head injury, who presented with sleep-related symptoms such as hypersomnia and dream alterations. Although MRI and polysomnography showed no abnormalities, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and 11C flumazenil (FMZ)-PET revealed findings consistent with cerebral damage to the affected temporal region. The memory deficit of the patient gradually improved in parallel with the relief of the sleep-related symptoms. FDG-PET showed considerable improvement in glucose metabolism when he had recovered, however, evidence of neural loss remained in the FMZ-PET findings. PMID:22674950

  2. Green tea polyphenols attenuate glial swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction following oxygen-glucose deprivation in cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Astrocyte swelling is a major component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemia. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been hypothesized to contribute to such swelling in cultures. We investigated the protective effects of polyphenol-rich green tea extract (GTE) on key features of ischemi...

  3. Dynamics of swelling and drying in a spherical gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Thibault; MacMinn, Christopher W.; Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Peixinho, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Swelling is a fundamental process in biology, engineering, and the earth sciences. Macroscopically, swelling is a volumetric-growth process in which a porous material expands due to the spontaneous imbibition of additional pore fluid. However, swelling is distinct from other growth processes because it is inherently poromechanical: Local expansion of the pore structure requires that additional fluid be drawn from elsewhere in the material, or into the material from across the boundaries. Here, we study the swelling and subsequent drying of a sphere of hydrogel. Despite the apparent simplicity of this problem, no model has yet shown satisfying quantitative agreement with experiments in terms of the dynamics of swelling and drying. We develop a dynamic model based on large-deformation poromechanics and we compare the predictions of the model with a series of experiments performed with polyacrylamide spheres. We use the model and the experiments to study the dynamics of swelling and drying, and to highlight the fundamental differences between these two processes. Although we assume spherical symmetry, the model also provides insight into the transient patterns that form and then vanish during swelling, as well as the tendency of large spheres to fracture during drying.

  4. Cinnamon Polyphenols Attenuate Neuronal Death and Glial Swelling in Ischemic Injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain edema is a major complication associated with ischemic stroke and is characterized by a volumetric enlargement of the brain. Astrocyte swelling is a major component of brain edema. We investigated the protective effects of polyphenols isolated from green tea and cinnamon in C6 glial cultures s...

  5. The Economic Burden of Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Fatal Traffic Accidents in Shahid Rajaei Trauma Hospital, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kavosi, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Hatam, Nahid; Enaami, Meysam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) as a result of traffic accidents are one of the major causes of deaths, which lead to the loss of individuals’ productive and working years of life. Objectives: This study aimed to calculate the economic burden of traumatic brain injuries in fatal crashes at Shahid Rajaei Trauma Hospital, Shiraz, Iran for a period of five years. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study the population included people who had died as a result of TBIs during 2009 to 2013 in Shiraz Shahid Rajaei Trauma Hospital. Cost and demographic data were obtained from the participants’ medical records using data gathering forms, and some other information was also collected via telephone calls to the victims’ families. Economic burden of TBIs due to traffic accidents, which led to death, was estimated using the human capital as direct costs of treatment, and the number of potential years of life lost and lost productivity as indirect costs. Results: Deaths resulting from TBIs due to traffic accidents in Shiraz imposed 6.2 billion Rials (511000 USD) of hospital costs, 6390 potential years of life lost, and 506 billion Rials (20 million USD) of productivity lost. In the present study, the mean age of the individuals who died was 38.4 ± 19.41 and the productivity lost per capita was 1.8 billion Rials (73000 USD). Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that the economic burden of TBIs was high in fatal accidents in Fars Province so that it was equivalent to 0.00011% of Iran’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2013. Therefore, more attention has to be paid to the rules to prevent the fatal accidents. PMID:25834791

  6. Synthesis and swelling behavior of xanthan-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Vania Blasques; Bentini, Ricardo; Catalani, Luiz Henrique; Petri, Denise Freitas Siqueira

    2013-02-15

    In this work xanthan chains were crosslinked by esterification reaction at 165 °C either in the absence or in the presence of citric acid. Higher crosslinking density was obtained using citric acid, as evidenced by its lower swelling degree. Tensiometry, a very precise and sensitive technique, was applied to study swelling rates and diffusion mechanisms of water, which was initially quasi-Fickian, controlled by wicking properties, changing to Fickian or Anomalous, depending on hydrogel composition. Hydrogels swelling degree increased at high pH values, due to electrostatic repulsion and ester linkages rupture. Equilibrium swelling degree was affected by salts, depending on gel composition and kind of salt. Effects could be explained by interaction between ions and polymeric chains, EPA/EPD ability of water or osmotic gradient. PMID:23399133

  7. Specific absorption rate variation in a brain phantom due to exposure by a 3G mobile phone: problems in dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2013-12-01

    A specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements system has been developed for compliance testing of personal mobile phone in a brain phantom material contained in a Perspex box. The volume of the box has been chosen corresponding to the volume of a small rat and illuminated by a 3G mobile phone frequency (1718.5 MHz), and the emitted radiation directed toward brain phantom .The induced fields in the phantom material are measured. Set up to lift the plane carrying the mobile phone is run by a pulley whose motion is controlled by a stepper motor. The platform is made to move at a pre-determined rate of 2 degrees per min limited up to 20 degrees. The measured data for induced fields in various locations are used to compute corresponding SAR values and inter comparison obtained. These data are also compared with those when the mobile phone is placed horizontally with respect to the position of the animal. The SAR data is also experimentally obtained by measuring a rise in temperature due to this mobile exposures and data compared with those obtained in the previous set. To seek a comparison with the safety criteria same set of measurements are performed in 10 g phantom material contained in a cubical box. These results are higher than those obtained with the knowledge of induced field measurements. It is concluded that SAR values are sensitive to the angular position of the moving platform and are well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. The data are suggestive of having a fresh look to understand the mode of electromagnetic field -bio interaction. PMID:24579373

  8. Changes in Brain Metallome/Metabolome Pattern due to a Single i.v. Injection of Manganese in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Neth, Katharina; Lucio, Marianna; Walker, Alesia; Zorn, Julia; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Michalke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of Manganese (Mn) is known to potentially induce an accumulation in the brain, leading to a Parkinson related disease, called manganism. Versatile mechanisms of Mn-induced brain injury are discussed, with inactivation of mitochondrial defense against oxidative stress being a major one. So far, studies indicate that the main Mn-species entering the brain are low molecular mass (LMM) compounds such as Mn-citrate. Applying a single low dose MnCl2 injection in rats, we observed alterations in Mn-species pattern within the brain by analysis of aqueous brain extracts by size-exclusion chromatography—inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS). Additionally, electrospray ionization—ion cyclotron resonance-Fourier transform-mass spectrometry (ESI-ICR/FT-MS) measurement of methanolic brain extracts revealed a comprehensive analysis of changes in brain metabolisms after the single MnCl2 injection. Major alterations were observed for amino acid, fatty acid, glutathione, glucose and purine/pyrimidine metabolism. The power of this metabolomic approach is the broad and detailed overview of affected brain metabolisms. We also correlated results from the metallomic investigations (Mn concentrations and Mn-species in brain) with the findings from metabolomics. This strategy might help to unravel the role of different Mn-species during Mn-induced alterations in brain metabolism. PMID:26383269

  9. Psychological and adjustment problems due to acquired brain lesions in pediatric patients: a comparison of vascular, infectious, and other origins.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Valentina; Galbiati, Susanna; Villa, Federica; Colombo, Katia; Recla, Monica; Adduci, Annarita; Avantaggiato, Paolo; Bardoni, Alessandra; Strazzer, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe psychological, behavioral, and adjustment problems in children and adolescents with acquired brain lesions of different origins. Three groups of patients with acquired brain lesions (15 patients with infectious origin, 37 with vascular origin, and 15 with other origin), ranging in age from 4 to 18 years, received a psychological evaluation, including the Child Behavior Checklist for ages 4 to 18 and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. About half of the total sample (47.8%) showed psychological problems. Difficulties varied according to the cause of the brain lesions. The most problematic patients were children with brain lesions of infectious origin, whereas children with brain lesions of vascular origin scored lower on most of the Child Behavior Checklist scales. The authors conclude that psychological and behavioral difficulties are very common among school-aged children with acquired brain lesions, and their relevance and impact must necessarily be considered. PMID:24453143

  10. Somato-axodendritic release of oxytocin into the brain due to calcium amplification is essential for social memory.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain from the cell soma, axons, and dendrites of neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus. Locally released OT can activate OT receptors, form inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and elevate intracellular free calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations [(Ca(2+)) i ] in self and neighboring neurons in the hypothalamus, resulting in further OT release: i.e., autocrine or paracrine systems of OT-induced OT release. CD38-dependent cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is also involved in this autoregulation by elevating [Ca(2+)] i via Ca(2+) mobilization through ryanodine receptors on intracellular Ca(2+) pools that are sensitive to both Ca(2+) and cADPR. In addition, it has recently been reported that heat stimulation and hyperthermia enhance [Ca(2+)] i increases by Ca(2+) influx, probably through TRPM2 cation channels, suggesting that cADPR and TRPM2 molecules act as Ca(2+) signal amplifiers. Thus, OT release is not simply due to depolarization-secretion coupling. Both of these molecules play critical roles not only during labor and milk ejection in reproductive females, but also during social behavior in daily life in both genders. This was clearly demonstrated in CD38 knockout mice in that social behavior was impaired by reduction of [Ca(2+)] i elevation and subsequent OT secretion. Evidence for the associations of CD38 with social behavior and psychiatric disorder is discussed, especially in subjects with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26586001

  11. Growth hormone deficiency due to traumatic brain injury in a patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Engiz, Ozlem; Ozön, Alev; Riepe, Felix; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2010-01-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and is frequently associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The production of other pituitary hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], growth hormone [GH], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], and prolactin [PRL]) is usually normal. Mutations of the DAX-1 gene have been reported in patients with AHC and HH. We present a 13-year-old male patient with AHC caused by a nonsense mutation in the DAX-1 gene who developed GH deficiency following head trauma. He showed signs of adrenal insufficiency at the age of 23 months, and glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment was started. His parents reported head trauma due to a traffic accident at the age of 21 months. Adrenal computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the left and agenesis of the right adrenal gland. Decreased growth rate was noted at the age of 12.5 years while receiving hydrocortisone 15 mg/m2/day. His height was 139.9 cm (-1.46 SD), body weight was 54.9 kg, pubic hair was Tanner stage 1, and testis size was 3 ml. His bone age was 7 years. His gonadotropin (follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], luteinizing hormone [LH]) and testosterone levels were prepubertal. The evaluation of GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion at the age of 13 years revealed GH deficiency. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a hypoplastic hypophysis (< 2.5 mm) and a normal infundibulum. GH treatment (0.73 IU/kg/week) was started. This paper reports a patient with genetically confirmed AHC demonstrating GH deficiency possibly due to a previous head trauma. Complete pituitary evaluation should be performed in any child who has survived severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:20718192

  12. Swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... Collier DS, Bryan S, eds. Signs and Symptoms in Family Medicine: A Literature-Based Approach . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ... Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, ...

  13. Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Arsenlis, Athanasios; Satcher, Jr., Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei O.

    2011-12-27

    A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

  14. Vulval Swelling: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sapre, Shilpa; Natu, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Vulval swellings have always caused dilemmas in diagnosis and more so when they are huge in size. Sebaceous cysts are known to occur as a result of blocked pilo-sebaceous gland and duct or as a result of any injury to the skin. Face, neck, chest, back, scalp, and ears are known sites, however, they also occur over private parts. They are mostly asymptomatic but cause intense pain and discomfort if infected. Symptomatic cysts warrant removal. PMID:26538748

  15. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were swollen and ... at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself at the ...

  16. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  17. Diffuse light reflectance signals as potential indicators of loss of viability in brain tissue due to hypoxia: charge-coupled-device-based imaging and fiber-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue is highly vulnerable to ischemia/hypoxia, and real-time monitoring of its viability is important. By fiber-based measurements for rat brain, we previously observed a unique triphasic reflectance change (TRC) after a certain period of time after hypoxia. After TRC, rats could not be rescued, suggesting that TRC can be used as an indicator of loss of brain tissue viability. In this study, we investigated this diffuse-reflectance change due to hypoxia in three parts. First, we developed and validated a theoretical method to quantify changes in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients involved in TRC. Second, we performed charge-coupled-device-based reflectance imaging of the rat brain during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation to examine spatiotemporal characteristics of the reflectance and its correlation with reversibility of brain tissue damage. Third, we made simultaneous imaging and fiber-based measurement of the reflectance for the rat to compare signals obtained by these two modalities. We observed a nontriphasic reflectance change by the imaging, and it was associated with brain tissue viability. We found that TRC measured by the fibers preceded the reflectance-signal change captured by the imaging. This time difference is attributable to the different observation depths in the brain with these two methods.

  18. Diffuse light reflectance signals as potential indicators of loss of viability in brain tissue due to hypoxia: charge-coupled-device-based imaging and fiber-based measurement.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Nishidate, Izumi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue is highly vulnerable to ischemia/hypoxia, and real-time monitoring of its viability is important. By fiber-based measurements for rat brain, we previously observed a unique triphasic reflectance change (TRC) after a certain period of time after hypoxia. After TRC, rats could not be rescued, suggesting that TRC can be used as an indicator of loss of brain tissue viability. In this study, we investigated this diffuse-reflectance change due to hypoxia in three parts. First, we developed and validated a theoretical method to quantify changes in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients involved in TRC. Second, we performed charge-coupled-device-based reflectance imaging of the rat brain during hypoxia followed by reoxygenation to examine spatiotemporal characteristics of the reflectance and its correlation with reversibility of brain tissue damage. Third, we made simultaneous imaging and fiber-based measurement of the reflectance for the rat to compare signals obtained by these two modalities. We observed a nontriphasic reflectance change by the imaging, and it was associated with brain tissue viability. We found that TRC measured by the fibers preceded the reflectance-signal change captured by the imaging. This time difference is attributable to the different observation depths in the brain with these two methods. PMID:23291715

  19. Alkaline Ceramidase 3 Deficiency Results in Purkinje Cell Degeneration and Cerebellar Ataxia Due to Dyshomeostasis of Sphingolipids in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Chet; Wang, Louis; Yi, Jae Kyo; Lin, Chih-Li; Sun, Wei; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Rhee, Soyoung; Li, Mingsong; Zhou, Jie; Ge, Shaoyu; Zhang, Guofeng; Snider, Ashley J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.; Mao, Cungui

    2015-01-01

    Dyshomeostasis of both ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the brain has been implicated in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders in humans. However, mechanisms that maintain the homeostasis of these bioactive sphingolipids in the brain remain unclear. Mouse alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3), which preferentially catalyzes the hydrolysis of C18:1-ceramide, a major unsaturated long-chain ceramide species in the brain, is upregulated with age in the mouse brain. Acer3 knockout causes an age-dependent accumulation of various ceramides and C18:1-monohexosylceramide and abolishes the age-related increase in the levels of sphingosine and S1P in the brain; thereby resulting in Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum and deficits in motor coordination and balance. Our results indicate that Acer3 plays critically protective roles in controlling the homeostasis of various sphingolipids, including ceramides, sphingosine, S1P, and certain complex sphingolipids in the brain and protects Purkinje cells from premature degeneration. PMID:26474409

  20. Alkaline Ceramidase 3 Deficiency Results in Purkinje Cell Degeneration and Cerebellar Ataxia Due to Dyshomeostasis of Sphingolipids in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Xu, Ruijuan; Schrandt, Jennifer; Shah, Prithvi; Gong, Yong Z; Preston, Chet; Wang, Louis; Yi, Jae Kyo; Lin, Chih-Li; Sun, Wei; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Rhee, Soyoung; Li, Mingsong; Zhou, Jie; Ge, Shaoyu; Zhang, Guofeng; Snider, Ashley J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M; Mao, Cungui

    2015-10-01

    Dyshomeostasis of both ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the brain has been implicated in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders in humans. However, mechanisms that maintain the homeostasis of these bioactive sphingolipids in the brain remain unclear. Mouse alkaline ceramidase 3 (Acer3), which preferentially catalyzes the hydrolysis of C18:1-ceramide, a major unsaturated long-chain ceramide species in the brain, is upregulated with age in the mouse brain. Acer3 knockout causes an age-dependent accumulation of various ceramides and C18:1-monohexosylceramide and abolishes the age-related increase in the levels of sphingosine and S1P in the brain; thereby resulting in Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum and deficits in motor coordination and balance. Our results indicate that Acer3 plays critically protective roles in controlling the homeostasis of various sphingolipids, including ceramides, sphingosine, S1P, and certain complex sphingolipids in the brain and protects Purkinje cells from premature degeneration. PMID:26474409

  1. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  2. Validity of semi-quantitative scale for brain MRI in unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions: Relationship with hand sensorimotor function and structural connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Pannek, Kerstin; Ware, Robert S.; Rossi, Giuseppe; Klingels, Katrijn; Feys, Hilde; Coulthard, Alan; Cioni, Giovanni; Rose, Stephen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To provide first evidence of construct validity of a semi-quantitative scale for brain structural MRI (sqMRI scale) in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) secondary to periventricular white matter (PWM) lesions, by examining the relationship with hand sensorimotor function and whole brain structural connectivity. Methods Cross-sectional study of 50 children with UCP due to PWM lesions using 3 T (MRI), diffusion MRI and assessment of hand sensorimotor function. We explored the relationship of lobar, hemispheric and global scores on the sqMRI scale, with fractional anisotropy (FA), as a measure of brain white matter microstructure, and with hand sensorimotor measures (Assisting Hand Assessment, AHA; Jebsen–Taylor Test for Hand Function, JTTHF; Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, MUUL; stereognosis; 2-point discrimination). Results Lobar and hemispheric scores on the sqMRI scale contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia correlated with sensorimotor paretic hand function measures and FA of a number of brain structural connections, including connections of brain areas involved in motor control (postcentral, precentral and paracentral gyri in the parietal lobe). More severe lesions correlated with lower sensorimotor performance, with the posterior limb of internal capsule score being the strongest contributor to impaired hand function. Conclusion The sqMRI scale demonstrates first evidence of construct validity against impaired motor and sensory function measures and brain structural connectivity in a cohort of children with UCP due to PWM lesions. More severe lesions correlated with poorer paretic hand sensorimotor function and impaired structural connectivity in the hemisphere contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia. The quantitative structural MRI scoring may be a useful clinical tool for studying brain structure–function relationships but requires further validation in other populations of CP. PMID:26106533

  3. Tropical inter-annual SST oscillations and Southern Ocean swells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yalin; Rogers, Erick; Jensen, Tommy

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of teleconnections between Southern Ocean swells and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on inter-annual time scales in the Eastern Pacific Niño3 region and southeastern Indian Ocean is investigated using numerical wave models. Two alternative parameterizations for swell dissipation are used. It is found that swell dissipation in the models is not directly correlated with large inter-annual variations such as the El Nino - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). However, using one of the two swell dissipation parameterizations, a correlation is found between observed SST anomalies and the modification of turbulent kinetic energy flux (TKEF) by Southern Ocean swells due to the damping of short wind waves: modeled reduction of TKEF is in opposite phase with the SST anomalies in the Niño-3 region, indicating a potential positive feedback. The modeled bi-monthly averaged TKEF reduction in the southeastern Indian Ocean is also well correlated with the IOD mode.

  4. Swell Sleeves for Testing Explosive Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Todd J.; Dean, Richard J.; Hohmann, Carl W.; Hacker, Scott C.; Harrington, Douglas W.; Bacak, James W.

    2003-01-01

    A method of testing explosive and pyrotechnic devices involves exploding the devices inside swell sleeves. Swell sleeves have been used previously for measuring forces. In the present method, they are used to obtain quantitative indications of the energy released in explosions of the devices under test. A swell sleeve is basically a thick-walled, hollow metal cylinder threaded at one end to accept a threaded surface on a device to be tested (see Figure 1). Once the device has been tightly threaded in place in the swell sleeve, the device-and-swell-sleeve assembly is placed in a test fixture, then the device is detonated. After the explosion, the assembly is removed from the test fixture and placed in a coordinate-measuring machine for measurement of the diameter of the swell sleeve as a function of axial position. For each axial position, the original diameter of the sleeve is subtracted from the diameter of the sleeve as swollen by the explosion to obtain the diametral swelling as a function of axial position (see Figure 2). The amount of swelling is taken as a measure of the energy released in the explosion. The amount of swelling can be compared to a standard amount of swelling to determine whether the pyrotechnic device functioned as specified.

  5. Synchrotron X-ray microtomographic study of tablet swelling.

    PubMed

    Laity, P R; Cameron, R E

    2010-06-01

    Tablet swelling behaviour was investigated by following the movements of embedded glass microsphere tracers, using X-ray microtomography (XmicroT) with intense illumination from a synchrotron. Specimens were prepared using combinations of hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose (HPMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) or pre-gelatinised starch (PGS), three materials commonly used as excipients for compacted tablets. The results revealed significant differences in swelling behaviour due to excipient type and compaction conditions. In particular, a sudden change was observed from gel-forming behaviour of formulations containing PGS or high HPMC content, to more rapid expansion and disintegration for formulations above 70% MCC. Although some radial expansion was observable with the higher PGS formulations and during later stages of swelling, axial expansion (i.e. the reverse of the compaction process) appeared to dominate in most cases. This was most pronounced for the 10/90 HPMC/MCC specimens, which rapidly increased in thickness, while the diameter remained almost unchanged. The expansion appeared to be initiated by hydration and may be due to the relaxation of residual compaction stress. This occurred within 'expansion zones', which initially appeared as thin bands close to the compacted (upper and lower) faces, but gradually advanced towards the centre and spread around the sides of the tablets. These zones exhibited lower X-ray absorbance, probably because they contained significant amounts of bubbles, which were formed by air released from the swelling excipients. Although, in most cases, these bubbles were too small to be resolved (<60 microm), larger bubbles (diameter up to 1mm) were clearly evident in the rapidly swelling 10/90 HPMC/MCC specimens. It is suggested that the presence of these bubbles may affect subsequent water ingress, by increasing the tortuosity and occluding part of the gel, which may affect the apparent diffusion kinetics (i.e. Fickian or Case II

  6. Reliability of Arch dams subject to concrete swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.M.; Silva, H.S.; Pinho, S. de

    1995-12-31

    In this report, results of several studies are presented. The main aim of those studies was to assess the reliability of the three arch dams, in which swelling occurred due to alkali- aggregate reactions in various stages of development and having different effects on their reliability: the Cahora-Bassa dam, in Mozambique, where swelling accumulated up to the moment are very moderate and their development is apparently homogeneous; Santa-Luzia dam, in Portugal, where accumulated swelling have already considerable magnitude, nevertheless, important fissuration has not been observed up to the moment due to the homogeneous development of the swelling process; Alto-Ceira dam, also in Portugal, where accumulated swelling have also considerable magnitude but with a heterogeneous development, causing in conjunction with thermal variations important fissuration. Mention is made of mineralogical, chemical and petrographic analyses carried out for identification of the nature of reactions developed in each case and the back-analysis and other technics used in the assessment of the magnitude and distribution of swelling. Results are presented of measurement tests of the ultrasonic pulse velocity, used both in the assessment of alterations in the physical properties of concretes and in the determination of the depth of fissuration. Results are also presented of tests for characterisation of the rheology of integral concrete. Lastly, considerations are made about the reliability of the works on the basis of studies and the results of analyses of the state of stress, performed by means of the finite element method, by assuming for either visco-elastic or visco-elastic-plastic behaviour.

  7. Influence of the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base on brain kinematics due to sagittal plane head rotation.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, J; Viano, D C; Lövsund, P

    2002-08-01

    Two-dimensional physical models of the human head were used to investigate how the lateral ventricles and irregular skull base influence kinematics in the medial brain during sagittal angular head dynamics. Silicone gel simulated the brain and was separatedfrom the surrounding skull vessel by paraffin that provided a slip interface between the gel and vessel. A humanlike skull base model (HSB) included a surrogate skull base mimicking the irregular geometry of the human. An HSBV model added an elliptical inclusion filled with liquid paraffin simulating the lateral ventricles to the HSB model. A simplified skull base model (SSBV) included ventricle substitute but approximated the anterior and middle cranial fossae by a flat and slightly angled surface. The models were exposed to 7600 rad/s2 peak angular acceleration with 6 ms pulse duration and 5 deg forced rotation. After 90 deg free rotation, the models were decelerated during 30 ms. Rigid body displacement, shear strain and principal strains were determined from high-speed video recorded trajectories of grid markers in the surrogate brains. Peak values of inferior brain surface displacement and strains were up to 10.9X (times) and 3.3X higher in SSBV than in HSBV. Peak strain was up to 2.7X higher in HSB than in HSBV. The results indicate that the irregular skull base protects nerves and vessels passing through the cranial floor by reducing brain displacement and that the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid relieves strain in regions inferior and superior to the ventricles. The ventricles and irregular skull base are necessary in modeling head impact and understanding brain injury mechanisms. PMID:12188208

  8. Multiple abscesses of the left brain hemisphere due to Listeria monocytogenes in an immunocompromised patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matera, Giovanni; Puccio, Rossana; Giancotti, Aida; Quirino, Angela; Guadagnino, Vincenzo; Pardatscher, Kurt; Caroleo, Santo; De Rose, Marisa; Amorosi, Andrea; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses in a cirrhotic and diabetic 57-year-old woman showing fever, aphasia, right hemiparesis and seizures. Neuroradiological investigation revealed unilateral cerebritis evolving in multiple abscesses. From blood and surgical drainage samples Listeria monocytogenes grew in pure culture. Despite decompressive craniotomy, the patient died two months after hospital admission. PMID:23299068

  9. Malignant cerebral swelling following cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Honeybul, S; Damodaran, O; Lind, C R P; Lee, G

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years there have been a number of case reports and small cohort studies that have described so called "malignant" cerebral swelling following an uneventful cranioplasty procedure. The pathophysiology remains to be established however it has been suggested that it may be related to a combination of failure of autoregulation and the use of closed vacuum suction drainage. The current study presents three further patients who had had a decompressive hemicraniectomy for ischaemic stroke. If decompressive craniectomy is utilised in the management of neurological emergencies, close attention and wider reporting of this type of complication is required not only to focus attention on possible management strategies, but also to determine which patients are at most risk of this devastating complication. PMID:27189792

  10. Prediction of swelling rocks strain in tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsapour, D.; Fahimifar, A.

    2016-05-01

    Swelling deformations leading to convergence of tunnels may result in significant difficulties during the construction, in particular for long term use of tunnels. By extracting an experimental based explicit analytical solution for formulating swelling strains as a function of time and stress, swelling strains are predicted from the beginning of excavation and during the service life of tunnel. Results obtained from the analytical model show a proper agreement with experimental results. This closed-form solution has been implemented within a numerical program using the finite element method for predicting time-dependent swelling strain around tunnels. Evaluating effects of swelling parameters on time-dependent strains and tunnel shape on swelling behavior around the tunnel according to this analytical solution is considered. The ground-support interaction and consequent swelling effect on the induced forces in tunnel lining is considered too. Effect of delay in lining installation on swelling pressure which acting on the lining and its structural integrity, is also evaluated. A MATLAB code of " SRAP" is prepared and applied to calculate all swelling analysis around tunnels based on analytical solution.

  11. Treatment of persistent post-concussion syndrome due to mild traumatic brain injury: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hadanny, Amir; Efrati, Shai

    2016-08-01

    Persistent post-concussion syndrome caused by mild traumatic brain injury has become a major cause of morbidity and poor quality of life. Unlike the acute care of concussion, there is no consensus for treatment of chronic symptoms. Moreover, most of the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments have failed to demonstrate significant efficacy on both the clinical symptoms as well as the pathophysiologic cascade responsible for the permanent brain injury. This article reviews the pathophysiology of PCS, the diagnostic tools and criteria, the current available treatments including pharmacotherapy and different cognitive rehabilitation programs, and promising new treatment directions. A most promising new direction is the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which targets the basic pathological processes responsible for post-concussion symptoms; it is discussed here in depth. PMID:27337294

  12. BRAIN ABSCESS DUE TO Staphylococcus aureus OF CRYPTOGENIC SOURCE IN AN HIV-1 INFECTED PATIENT IN USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Anna Paula Romero; PAPPALARDO, Mara Cristina; DANTAS, Daniel; LINS, Diogo; VIDAL, José Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is broad. The most frequent etiologies include primary diseases (caused by HIV itself) or secondary diseases (opportunistic infections or neoplasms). Despite these conditions, HIV-infected patients are susceptible to other infections observed in patients without HIV infection. Here we report a rare case of a brain abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an HIV-infected patient. After drainage of the abscess and treatment with oxacilin, the patient had a favorable outcome. This case reinforces the importance of a timely neurosurgical procedure that supported adequate management of an unusual cause of expansive brain lesions in HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:27074328

  13. Comparing the Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type B Injection at Different Dosages for Patient with Drooling due to Brain Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Dong; Park, Sang Jun; Choi, Yong Min

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate Botulinum toxin type B (BNT-B) injection's effect and duration depending on dose for patients with brain lesion. Method Twenty one patients with brain lesion and severe drooling were included and divided into three groups. All patients received conventional dysphagia therapy. Group A patients (n=7) received an injection of 1,500 units and group B patients (n=7) received an injection of 2,500 units of BNT-B in submandibular gland under ultrasound guidance. Group C patients (n=7) received conventional dysphagia therapy. Saliva secretion was assessed quantitatively at baseline and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The severity and frequency of drooling was assessed using the Drooling Quotient (DQ) by patients and/or caregivers. Results Group A and B reported a distinct improvement of the symptoms within 2 weeks after BNT-B injection. Compared to the baseline, the mean amount of saliva decreased significantly throughout the study. However, there was no meaningful difference between the two groups. The greatest reductions were achieved at 2 weeks and lasted up to 8 weeks after BNT-B injection. Group C did not show any differences. Conclusion Local injection of 1,500 units of BNT-B into salivary glands under ultrasonic guidance proved to be a safe and effective dose for drooling in patient with brain lesion, as did 2,500 units. PMID:23342318

  14. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  15. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  16. Bilateral parotid swelling: a radiological review

    PubMed Central

    Gadodia, A; Bhalla, A S; Sharma, R; Thakar, A; Parshad, R

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral parotid swelling is not an uncommon occurrence and may pose a challenge for clinicians and radiologists. Numerous causes of bilateral parotid swellings have been identified. The purpose of this pictorial review is to display this wide array with a focus on multimodality approach. PMID:21960397

  17. Insulin signaling disruption in male mice due to perinatal bisphenol A exposure: Role of insulin signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fangfang; Gao, Yue; Wang, Tingwei; Chen, Donglong; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Cheng, Jie; Gao, Rong; Wang, Jun; Xiao, Hang

    2016-03-14

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptor, is widely used for producing polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Available data have shown that perinatal exposure to BPA contributes to peripheral insulin resistance, while in the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perinatal BPA exposure on insulin signaling and glucose transport in the cortex of offspring mice. The pregnant mice were administrated either vehicle or BPA (100 μg/kg/day) at three perinatal stages. Stage I: from day 6 of gestation until parturition (P6-PND0 fetus exposure); Stage II: from lactation until delactation (PND0-PND21 newborn exposure) and Stage III: from day 6 of pregnancy until delactation (P6-PND21 fetus and newborn exposure). At 8 months of age for the offspring mice, the insulin signaling pathways and glucose transporters (GLUTs) were detected. Our data indicated that the insulin signaling including insulin, phosphorylated insulin receptor (IR), phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β) and phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (p-ERK) were significantly decreased in the brain. In parallel, GLUTs (GLUT1/3/4) were obviously decreased as well in BPA-treated group in mice brain. Noteworthily, the phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were markedly up-regulated in all BPA-treated groups. These results, taken together, suggest the adverse effects of BPA on insulin signaling and GLUTs, which might subsequently contribute to the increment of p-tau and APP in the brain of adult offspring. Therefore, perinatal BPA exposure might be a risk factor for the long-term neurodegenerative changes in offspring male mice. PMID:26779933

  18. Brain Stem Infarction Due to Basilar Artery Dissection in a Patient with Moyamoya Disease Four Years after Successful Bilateral Revascularization Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takatsugu; Fujimura, Miki; Mugikura, Shunji; Endo, Hidenori; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-06-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease with an unknown etiology and is characterized by intrinsic fragility in the intracranial vascular walls such as the affected internal elastic lamina and thinning medial layer. The association of MMD with intracranial arterial dissection is extremely rare, whereas that with basilar artery dissection (BAD) has not been reported previously. A 46-year-old woman developed brain stem infarction due to BAD 4 years after successful bilateral superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for ischemic-onset MMD. She presented with sudden occipitalgia and subsequently developed transient dysarthria and mild hemiparesis. Although a transient ischemic attack was initially suspected, her condition deteriorated in a manner that was consistent with left hemiplegia with severe dysarthria. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed brain stem infarction, and MR angiography delineated a double-lumen sign in the basilar artery, indicating BAD. She was treated conservatively and brain stem infarction did not expand. One year after the onset of brain stem infarction, her activity of daily living is still dependent (modified Rankin Scale of 4), and there were no morphological changes associated with BAD or recurrent cerebrovascular events during the follow-up period. The association of MMD with BAD is extremely rare. While considering the common underlying pathology such as an affected internal elastic lamina and fragile medial layer, the occurrence of BAD in a patient with MMD in a stable hemodynamic state is apparently unique. PMID:27068774

  19. Modulation of ocean skin temperature by swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, A. T.; Hesany, V.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared measurements of sea surface temperature from R/P Flip in the deep ocean show that there is significant modulation of ocean skin temperature by swell waves and that the wind plays a dominant role in the process. The squared coherence and the magnitude of the transfer function between the skin temperature and surface displacement respond to the wind speed, while its phase is determined by the direction of the wind relative to the swell. When the swell and wind are in the same direction, the transfer function phase indicates that the maximum skin temperature occurs on the forward face, which, in this case, is also the downwind side. Remarkably, the phase changes by roughly 180° when the wind direction reverses from going with the swell to going against it, so that the maximum switches to the rear face, which is again downwind. The peak-to-peak modulation T0 is found to be correlated with the bulk-skin temperature difference ΔT. Furthermore, T0 is of the same order as ΔT, suggesting that small-scale wave breaking due to longwave/shortwave interaction may dominate the phenomenon.

  20. Alveolar echinococcosis of liver presenting with neurological symptoms due to brain metastases with simultaneous lung metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aydinli, Bülent; Aydin, Unal; Yazici, Pinar; Oztürk, Gürkan; Onbaş, Omer; Polat, K Yalçin

    2008-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis (EM). AE is an endemic disease in Turkey and it is particularly common in people living in the eastern Anatolia Region. In addition to various clinical presentations, symptoms which lead to diagnosis, however, are usually associated with the metastatic lesions. We herein reported a 62-year-old man who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with simultaneous lung and brain metastasis. We think there was only one therapeutic option, namely medical treatment with albendazol, which is the usual treatment for patients living in eastern Anatolia and who are admitted late resulting in a subsequent inoperable situation. Thus, radiological screening studies for the public in this region may increase the possibility of surgical treatment for alveolar hydatid disease. PMID:19156614

  1. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  2. A rare cause of lateral facial swelling.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sujata; Gulati, Ujjwal; Vandana; Singh, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    A case of chronic, recurrent and asymptomatic facial swelling in a young male is presented. Swelling extended from lower midface to upper lateral neck and right commissure to anterior massetric border. History, clinical signs and symptoms and examination pointed towards the benign nature of the swelling. Fine-needle aspiration cytology tapered the diagnostic possibilities to a salivary cyst or pseudocyst. Ultrasonography identified the lesion to contain echogenic fluid with irregular borders. "Tail sign" was absent on contrast magnetic resonance imaging, excluding the involvement of the sublingual gland. Surgical excision of the lesion was done along with submandibular gland as both were in continuity via a bottle-neck tract. Final histopathological diagnosis was that of the submandibular gland extravasation phenomenon. As per the best of our knowledge, it is the first case report of a submandibular gland extravasation causing swelling in a retrograde direction onto the face. PMID:25593883

  3. Brain-computer interface with somatosensory feedback improves functional recovery from severe hemiplegia due to chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takashi; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kawashima, Kimiko; Ota, Naoki; Ito, Mari; Ota, Tetsuo; Mukaino, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has a great potential for motor rehabilitation in stroke patients with severe hemiplegia. However, key elements in BCI architecture for functional recovery has yet to be clear. We in this study focused on the type of feedback to the patients, which is given contingently to their motor-related EEG in a BCI context. The efficacy of visual and somatosensory feedbacks was compared by a two-group study with the chronic stroke patients who are suffering with severe motor hemiplegia. Twelve patients were asked an attempt of finger opening in the affected side repeatedly, and the event-related desynchronization (ERD) in EEG of alpha and beta rhythms was monitored over bilateral parietal regions. Six patients were received a simple visual feedback in which the hand open/grasp picture on screen was animated at eye level, following significant ERD. Six patients were received a somatosensory feedback in which the motor-driven orthosis was triggered to extend the paralyzed fingers from 90 to 50°. All the participants received 1-h BCI treatment with 12–20 training days. After the training period, while no changes in clinical scores and electromyographic (EMG) activity were observed in visual feedback group after training, voluntary EMG activity was newly observed in the affected finger extensors in four cases and the clinical score of upper limb function in the affected side was also improved in three participants in somatosensory feedback group. Although the present study was conducted with a limited number of patients, these results imply that BCI training with somatosensory feedback could be more effective for rehabilitation than with visual feedback. This pilot trial positively encouraged further clinical BCI research using a controlled design. PMID:25071543

  4. Physiological roles of dietary glutamate signaling via gut-brain axis due to efficient digestion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Torii, Kunio; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Nakamura, Eiji

    2013-04-01

    Dietary glutamate (Glu) stimulates to evoke the umami taste, one of the five basic tastes, enhancing food palatability. But it is also the main gut energy source for the absorption and metabolism for each nutrient, thus, only a trace amount of Glu reaches the general circulation. Recently, we demonstrated a unique gut sensing system for free Glu (glutamate signaling). Glu is the only nutrient among amino acids, sugars and electrolytes that activates rat gastric vagal afferents from the luminal side specifically via metabotropic Glu receptors type 1 on mucosal cells releasing mucin and nitrite mono-oxide (NO), then NO stimulates serotonin (5HT) release at the enterochromaffin cell. Finally released 5HT stimulates 5HT3 receptor at the nerve end of the vagal afferent fiber. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI, 4.7 T) analysis revealed that luminal sensing with 1 % (w/v) monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) in rat stomach activates both the medial preoptic area (body temperature controller) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (basic metabolic regulator), resulting in diet-induced thermogenesis during mealing without changes of appetite for food. Interestingly, rats were forced to eat a high fat and high sugar diet with free access to 1 % (w/w) MSG and water in a choice paradigm and showed the strong preference for the MSG solution and subsequently, they displayed lower fat deposition, weight gain and blood leptin. On the other hand, these brain functional changes by the f-MRI signal after 60 mM MSG intubation into the stomach was abolished in the case of total vagotomized rats, suggesting that luminal glutamate signaling contributes to control digestion and thermogenesis without obesity. PMID:23463402

  5. Sternoclavicular joint swellings: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Searle, A E; Gluckman, P; Sanders, R; Breach, N M

    1991-01-01

    Five patients with sternoclavicular swellings are described. The group presents a variety of diagnoses which highlight the need for thorough investigation and appropriate management of swellings around the sternoclavicular joint. Although frequently assumed to be benign, this series demonstrates the potential occurrence of malignant disease, and the dangers of pursuing a simple conservative course. Conversely, a substantiated benign diagnosis may avoid the use of unnecessary surgical treatment. PMID:1933108

  6. Atlas based brain volumetry: How to distinguish regional volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology.

    PubMed

    Opfer, Roland; Suppa, Per; Kepp, Timo; Spies, Lothar; Schippling, Sven; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Fully-automated regional brain volumetry based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in quantitative neuroimaging. In clinical trials as well as in clinical routine multiple MRIs of individual patients at different time points need to be assessed longitudinally. Measures of inter- and intrascanner variability are crucial to understand the intrinsic variability of the method and to distinguish volume changes due to biological or physiological effects from inherent noise of the methodology. To measure regional brain volumes an atlas based volumetry (ABV) approach was deployed using a highly elastic registration framework and an anatomical atlas in a well-defined template space. We assessed inter- and intrascanner variability of the method in 51 cognitively normal subjects and 27 Alzheimer dementia (AD) patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative by studying volumetric results of repeated scans for 17 compartments and brain regions. Median percentage volume differences of scan-rescans from the same scanner ranged from 0.24% (whole brain parenchyma in healthy subjects) to 1.73% (occipital lobe white matter in AD), with generally higher differences in AD patients as compared to normal subjects (e.g., 1.01% vs. 0.78% for the hippocampus). Minimum percentage volume differences detectable with an error probability of 5% were in the one-digit percentage range for almost all structures investigated, with most of them being below 5%. Intrascanner variability was independent of magnetic field strength. The median interscanner variability was up to ten times higher than the intrascanner variability. PMID:26723849

  7. Morphing of geometric composites via residual swelling.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Shillig, Steven A; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques. PMID:26076671

  8. Swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels after swelling in osmotic pressure solution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Liu, Yuntong; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Xiaoduo

    2016-08-01

    The potential of polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVA/PVP) hydrogels as articular cartilage replacements was in vitro evaluated by using a macromolecule-based solution to mimic the osmotic environment of cartilage tissue. The effects of osmotic pressure solution on the morphology, crystallinity, swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels were investigated by swelling them in non-osmotic and osmotic pressure solutions. The results demonstrated that swelling ratio and equilibrium water content were greatly reduced by swelling in osmotic solution, and the swelling process was found to present pseudo-Fickian diffusion character. The crystallization degree of hydrogels after swelling in osmotic solution increased more significantly when it compared with that in non-osmotic solution. After swelling in osmotic solution for 28days, the compressive tangent modulus and storage modulus of hydrogels were significantly increased, and the low friction coefficient was reduced. However, after swelling in the non-osmotic solution, the compressive tangent modulus and friction coefficient of hydrogels were comparable with those of as-prepared hydrogels. The better material properties of hydrogels in vivo than in vitro evaluation demonstrated their potential application in cartilage replacement. PMID:27157740

  9. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation.

  10. Evaluating the geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the near-field host clay rock using a THC model and the diffuse double layer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Liu, H.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in a clay formation is the potential self-sealing capability due to clay swelling. The swelling properties of the near-field host clay rock can be altered due to geochemical factors, including changes in groundwater geochemistry, proportions of exchangeable cations, and swelling clay mineral abundances. The clay host rock can also undergo geochemical changes due to the interaction with the engineered barrier system (EBS) materials. In this paper, coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) models are linked with a swelling model based on diffuse double layer (DDL) theory and changes in the swelling properties of clay host rocks in the near field area are evaluated. Findings based on THC simulations using the reaction-transport code TOUGHREACT include: 1) Significant changes in the swelling pressure could be expected depending on various hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions. The change of hydration rate of the EBS (via the adjustment of tortuosity) could have significant effect on the swelling pressure. 2) Geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage only occurs in the near-field area, within a few meters from the EBS interface. 3) Swelling/shrinkage induced porosity change is generally much smaller than that caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution. 4) The geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage of host clay rock is the combined effect of variation in the pore water geochemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three latter factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically-induced swelling pressure.

  11. Swelling of p H -sensitive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; deClaville Christiansen, J.

    2015-02-01

    A model is derived for the elastic response of polyelectrolyte gels subjected to unconstrained and constrained swelling. A gel is treated as a three-phase medium consisting of a solid phase (polymer network), solvent (water), and solutes (mobile ions). Transport of solvent and solutes is modeled as their diffusion through the network accelerated by an electric field formed by ions and accompanied by chemical reactions (dissociation of functional groups attached to the chains). Constitutive equations (including the van't Hoff law for ionic pressure and the Henderson-Hasselbach equation for ionization of chains) are derived by means of the free energy imbalance inequality. Good agreement is demonstrated between equilibrium swelling diagrams on several pH-sensitive gels and results of simulation. It is revealed that swelling of polyelectrolyte gels is driven by electrostatic repulsion of bound charges, whereas the effect of ionic pressure is of secondary importance.

  12. Mechanisms affecting swelling in alloys with precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Haynes, M.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    In alloys under irradiation many mechanisms exist that couple phase instability to cavity swelling. These are compounded with the more familiar mechanisms associated with point defect behavior and the evolution of microstructure. The mechanisms may be classified according to three modes of operation. Some affect cavity swelling directly by cavity-precipitate particle association, others operate indirectly by precipitate-induced changes in sinks other than cavities and finally there are mechanisms that are mediated by precipitate-induced changes in the host matrix. The physics of one mechanism of each type is developed in detail and the results compared where possible to experimental measurements. In particular, we develop the theory necessary to treat the effects on swelling of precipitation-induced changes in overall sink density; precipitation-induced changes in point defect trapping by solute depletion and creation of precipitate particle-matrix interfacial trap sites.

  13. [Soft tissue swelling of the sternoclavicular joint].

    PubMed

    Kloth, J K; Weber, M-A

    2012-05-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a swelling of the right sternoclavicular joint the size of a hens egg which had persisted for 2 years. After a corticosteroid injection 8 months previously the swelling was asymptomatic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed synovialitis of the sternoclavicular joint with edema of the adjacent bone. The constellation is indicative of Tietze syndrome, an inflammation of costochondral junctions of the ribs or chondrosternal joints. The treatment is usually directed at pain relief and benign conditions are often self-limiting. PMID:22584483

  14. NMR imaging and cryoporometry of swelling clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Szutkowski, Kosma; Petrov, Oleg V.; Furó, István.

    2010-05-01

    Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising "self-sealing" buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. In environmental sciences, evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted clay are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. Major goal of present study was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored [1]. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were obtained. Expansion rates for bulk swelling and swelling in narrow slits were compared. For sodium-exchanged montmorillonite in contact with de-ionised water, we observed a remarkable acceleration of expansion as compared to that obtained in the bulk. To characterize the porosity of the clay a cryoporometric study [2] has been performed. Our results have important implications to waste repository designs and for the assessment of its long-term performance. Further research exploring clay-water interaction over a wide variety of clay composition and water ionic

  15. Swelling enhanced remanent magnetization of hydrogels cross-linked with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, Susanne; Biewenga, Pieter D; Verkleij, Suzanna P; van Zon, J Hans B A; Boere, Kristel W M; Pal, Antara; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels that are pH-sensitive and partially cross-linked by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles exhibit remarkable remanent magnetization behavior. The magnetic fields measured outside our thin disks of ferrogel are weak, but in the steady state, the field dependence on the magnetic content of the gels and the measurement geometry is as expected from theory. In contrast, the time-dependent behavior is surprisingly complicated. During swelling, the remanent field first rapidly increases and then slowly decreases. We ascribe the swelling-induced field enhancement to a change in the average orientation of magnetic dipolar structures, while the subsequent field drop is due to the decreasing concentration of nanoparticles. During shrinking, the field exhibits a much weaker time dependence that does not mirror the values found during swelling. These observations provide original new evidence for the markedly different spatial profiles of the pH during swelling and shrinking of hydrogels. PMID:25485553

  16. Review on the screening of semen by hypo-osmotic swelling test.

    PubMed

    Zubair, M; Ahmad, M; Jamil, H

    2015-09-01

    The hypo-osmotic swelling test (HOST) is widely used as a valuable test for determining sperm quality by evaluating the membrane integrity of spermatozoa of various domestic animals including cattle, horses and swine. The HOST has also been used as an indicator of the fertilising capacity of spermatozoa. This test is based on the swelling ability when functional spermatozoa submitted to hypo-osmotic solutions. This test is commonly used as an important parameter for the evaluation of semen due to its strong correlation with semen evaluation parameters. The objective of this review was to analyse its significance in semen evaluation, swelling of spermatozoa under various osmolarities and variations in swelling percentage under different seasons. PMID:25220607

  17. Subconjuctival Loa loa with Calabar swelling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Yoon; Lee, Yoon-Jung; Shin, Sun-Young; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2008-08-01

    Loa loa is unique among the human filariae in that adult worms are occasionally visible during subconjunctival migration. A 29-yr-old African female student, living in Korea for the past 5 yr without ever visiting her home country, presented with acute eyelid swelling and a sensation of motion on the left eyeball. Her symptoms started one day earlier and became worse over time. Examination revealed a threadlike worm beneath the left upper bulbar conjunctiva with mild eyelid swelling as well as painless swelling of the right forearm. Upon exposure to slit-lamp illumination, a sudden movement of the worm toward the fornix was noted. After surgical extraction, parasitologic analysis confirmed the worm to be a female adult Loa loa with the vulva at the extreme anterior end. On blood smear, the microfilariae had characteristic features of Loa loa, including sheath and body nuclei up to the tip of the tail. The patient also showed eosinophilia (37%) measuring 4,100/microL. She took ivermectin (200 microg/kg) as a single dose and suffered from a mild fever and chills for one day. This patient, to the best of our knowledge, is the first case of subconjunctival loiasis with Calabar swelling in Korea. PMID:18756067

  18. Oyster shell calcium induced parotid swelling

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; Srinivasamurthy, Sureshkumar; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2014-01-01

    A 59 year old female consumer was started on therapy with oyster shell calcium in combination with vitamin D3 and she presented with swelling below the ear, after two doses. She stopped the drug by herself and the swelling disappeared in one day. She started the drug one day after recovery and again she developed the swelling. She was advised to stop the drug with a suggestion to take lemon to enhance parotid secretion and the swelling subsided. Calcium plays major role in salivary secretion and studies have shown reduced parotid secretion in rats, deficient of vitamin D. But in humans involvement of calcium and vitamin D3 in parotid secretion is unknown. However, the patient had no history of reaction though she had previously taken vitamin D3 with calcium carbonate which was not from oyster shell. Hence, we ruled out vitamin D3 in this reaction and suspecting oyster shell calcium as a culprit. This adverse drug reaction (ADR) was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) causality assessment, Naranjo's and Hartwig severity scales. As per WHO causality assessment scale, the ADR was classified as “certain”. This reaction was analyzed as per Naranjo's algorithm and was classified as probable. According to Hartwig's severity scale the reaction was rated as mild. Our case is an example of a mild but rare adverse effect of oyster shell calcium carbonate which is widely used. PMID:25422569

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Infants with Communication Defects due to Severe Perinatal Brain Insult: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deifalla, Shaymaa M.; El-Houssinie, Moustafa; Mokbel, Somaia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The neuroregenerative drug Cerebrolysin has demonstrated efficacy in improving cognition in adults with stroke and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of communication defects in infants with severe perinatal brain insult. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in which 158 infants (age 6-21 months) with communication defects due to severe perinatal brain insult were enrolled; 120 infants completed the study. The Cerebrolysin group (n=60) received twice-weekly Cerebrolysin injections of 0.1 mL/kg body weight for 5 weeks (total of ten injections). The placebo group (n=60) received the same amount and number of normal saline injections. Results The baseline Communication and Symbolic-Behavior-Scale-Developmental Profile scores were comparable between the two groups. After 3 months, the placebo group exhibited improvements in the social (p<0.01) and speech composite (p=0.02) scores, with 10% and 1.5% increases from baseline, respectively. The scores of the Cerebrolysin group changed from concern to no concern, with increases of 65.44%, 45.54%, 358.06%, and 96.00% from baseline in the social (p<0.001), speech (p<0.001), symbolic (p<0.001), and total (p<0.001) scores. Conclusions Cerebrolysin dramatically improved infants' communication especially symbolic behavior which positively affected social interaction. These findings suggest that cerebrolysin may be an effective and feasible way equivalent to stem cell therapy. PMID:26365023

  20. Anions Govern Cell Volume: A Case Study of Relative Astrocytic and Neuronal Swelling in Spreading Depolarization.

    PubMed

    Hübel, Niklas; Ullah, Ghanim

    2016-01-01

    Cell volume changes are ubiquitous in normal and pathological activity of the brain. Nevertheless, we know little about the dynamics of cell and tissue swelling, and the differential changes in the volumes of neurons and glia during pathological states such as spreading depolarizations (SD) under ischemic and non-ischemic conditions, and epileptic seizures. By combining the Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations, and simultaneous neuronal and astroglial volume changes into a comprehensive model, we elucidate why glial cells swell more than neurons in SD and the special case of anoxic depolarization (AD), and explore the relative contributions of the two cell types to tissue swelling. Our results demonstrate that anion channels, particularly Cl-, are intrinsically connected to cell swelling and blocking these currents prevents changes in cell volume. The model is based on a simple and physiologically realistic description. We introduce model extensions that are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles, or by a phenomenological combination of these principles and known physiological facts. This work provides insights into numerous studies related to neuronal and glial volume changes in SD that otherwise seem contradictory, and is broadly applicable to swelling in other cell types and conditions. PMID:26974767

  1. Anions Govern Cell Volume: A Case Study of Relative Astrocytic and Neuronal Swelling in Spreading Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell volume changes are ubiquitous in normal and pathological activity of the brain. Nevertheless, we know little about the dynamics of cell and tissue swelling, and the differential changes in the volumes of neurons and glia during pathological states such as spreading depolarizations (SD) under ischemic and non–ischemic conditions, and epileptic seizures. By combining the Hodgkin–Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations, and simultaneous neuronal and astroglial volume changes into a comprehensive model, we elucidate why glial cells swell more than neurons in SD and the special case of anoxic depolarization (AD), and explore the relative contributions of the two cell types to tissue swelling. Our results demonstrate that anion channels, particularly Cl−, are intrinsically connected to cell swelling and blocking these currents prevents changes in cell volume. The model is based on a simple and physiologically realistic description. We introduce model extensions that are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles, or by a phenomenological combination of these principles and known physiological facts. This work provides insights into numerous studies related to neuronal and glial volume changes in SD that otherwise seem contradictory, and is broadly applicable to swelling in other cell types and conditions. PMID:26974767

  2. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  3. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J.; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  4. Swelling and dissolution of cellulose in amine oxide/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chanzy, H.; Noe, P.; Paillet, M.; Smith, P.

    1983-01-01

    The swelling behavior and the dissolution process of various cellulosic fibers, both native and regenerated, in N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (MMNO), dimethylethanolamine N-oxide (DMEAO), and mixtures thereof were studied in the presence of various amounts of water. The principal tools in this investigation were optical microscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The two amine oxides could either dissolve or only swell cellulose, depending on the water concentration, which was found to be of critical importance. Three domains of water concentration were found important. When only a few percent water was present, cellulose fibers, such as ramie, cotton, rayon, etc., dissolved readily without noticeable swelling in the amine oxide/water system brought above its melting point. At a relatively high water concentration (e.g., 18% w/w for MMNO), the cellulose fibers exhibited an extensive swelling (up to sevenfold increase in the fiber diameter) but no dissolution. In that case, the removal of the swelling agent showed that the initial native cellulose fibers were converted into an unoriented cellulose II structure. With still greater water content (e.g., 20% and more for MMNO or 15% for DMEAO), only partial swelling was observed, and the native cellulose fibers recovered their initial oriented cellulose I structure after removal of the swelling medium. X-ray investigations provided no evidence forthe formation of cellulose/solvent complexes in the swollen fibers. A relatively large decrease of the cellulose I (110) reflection was found in the WAXS patterns of the gels. This is interpreted as due to a preferential cleavage of the cellulose crystals along the corresponding plane when the cellulose fibers are exposed to the swelling forces of the amine oxide/water systems. 29 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  5. Morphological effect on swelling behaviour of hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Yacob, Norzita; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2014-02-12

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer networks that are capable of imbibing large amounts of water. In this work, hydrogels prepared from natural and synthetic polymers were irradiated by using electron beam irradiation. The morphology of hydrogel inter-polymeric network (IPN) was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal correlations between pore sizes of IPN with degree of cross-linking. This relation also has an effect on swelling properties of the hydrogel. The results indicated that hydrogel with smaller pore size, as a result of much dense IPN, would decrease water uptake capacity. Combination of natural and synthetic polymers to form hydrogel affects the pore size and swelling property of the hydrogel as compared to each component of polymer.

  6. Morphological effect on swelling behaviour of hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacob, Norzita; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer networks that are capable of imbibing large amounts of water. In this work, hydrogels prepared from natural and synthetic polymers were irradiated by using electron beam irradiation. The morphology of hydrogel inter-polymeric network (IPN) was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal correlations between pore sizes of IPN with degree of cross-linking. This relation also has an effect on swelling properties of the hydrogel. The results indicated that hydrogel with smaller pore size, as a result of much dense IPN, would decrease water uptake capacity. Combination of natural and synthetic polymers to form hydrogel affects the pore size and swelling property of the hydrogel as compared to each component of polymer.

  7. Clinical and diagnostic approach to patients with hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS).

    PubMed

    Karamouzis, Ioannis; Pagano, Loredana; Prodam, Flavia; Mele, Chiara; Zavattaro, Marco; Busti, Arianna; Marzullo, Paolo; Aimaretti, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction attributable to traumatic brain injury (TBI), aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS) has been lately highlighted. The diagnosis of TBI-induced-hypopituitarism, defined as a deficient secretion of one or more pituitary hormones, is made similarly to the diagnosis of classical hypopituitarism because of hypothalamic/pituitary diseases. Hypopituitarism is believed to contribute to TBI-associated morbidity and to functional and cognitive final outcome, and quality-of-life impairment. Each pituitary hormone must be tested separately, since there is a variable pattern of hormone deficiency among patients with TBI-induced-hypopituitarism. Similarly, the SAH and IS may lead to pituitary dysfunction although the literature in this field is limited. The drive to diagnose hypopituitarism is the suspect that the secretion of one/more pituitary hormone may be subnormal. This suspicion can be based upon the knowledge that the patient has an appropriate clinical context in which hypopituitarism can be present, or a symptom known as caused by hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be diagnosed as a combination of low peripheral and inappropriately normal/low pituitary hormones although their basal evaluation may be not distinctive due to pulsatile, circadian, or situational secretion of some hormones. Evaluation of the somatotroph and corticotroph axes require dynamic stimulation test (ITT for both axes, GHRH + arginine test for somatotroph axis) in order to clearly separate normal from deficient responses. PMID:26573924

  8. Bilateral Parotid Swelling in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Yakov; Mandel, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is recognized by the presence of polycystic ovaries, irregular menstruation, and increased androgen levels. Many patients have insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance and an associated development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A patient with PCOS is presented whose cosmetic concerns centered on the prolonged existence of substantial bilateral parotid swelling. The pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy of sialosis are discussed. PMID:26657398

  9. Controlling morphology in swelling-induced wrinkled surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breid, Derek Ronald

    ranging from 50--1000 μm were fabricated using the same material system. Upon wrinkling, the hemispheres formed complex hierarchical assemblies reminiscent of naturally occurring structures. The curvature of a surface exhibited a correlation with its critical buckling stress, independent of other factors. This enables the surface curvature to be used as an independent control over the dimple-to-ridge transition which occurs as a function of overstress. As in the flat buckling surfaces, this transition was shown to occur at an overstress value of ˜2. Surface curvature was also shown to improve the observed hexagonal ordering of the dimple arrays, resulting in the formation of regular "golf ball" structures. Geometric effects in finite flat plates were also examined. Using circular masks during the oxidation process, plates with radii ranging from 0.4--8.6 mm were created. Upon wrinkling, a dimple-to-ridge transition was observed with increasing plate size, with the morphological switch occurring at a radius of ˜2 mm. This observed transition was not found to be due to the inherent mechanics of plates of different sizes, but instead to a reduction in the oxide conversion due to shadowing or stagnation caused by the masking process, which lowered the applied overstress. The shape of the finite plate was found to have little impact on the resulting wrinkle morphologies. Kinetic aspects of wrinkling were qualitatively characterized by observing the wrinkling process over the course of swelling. Wrinkling was observed to frontally propagate across the surface, and the ordering of the patterns which developed showed a qualitative correlation with the degree of uniformity in the advancing wrinkle front. Swelling with different solvents was found to lead to the formation of different patterns, based on the swelling kinetics of the UVO-treated PDMS upon exposure to each solvent.

  10. [Extensive swelling reaction after a pentavalent vaccination].

    PubMed

    Gébus, M; Barbier, C; Bost-Bru, C; Michard-Lenoir, A P; Plantaz, D

    2015-09-01

    Injection site reactions (ISRs) are quite common side effects defined by a local adverse drug reaction directly caused by a vaccine. Twenty-four hours after an intramuscular injection (in the deltoid muscle) of the diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated poliomyelitis, Haemophilus influenza type b (DTPCa-Hib) combined vaccine, a 3-year-old boy developed fever. A few hours later, local redness and swelling appeared at the injection site, with rapid extension to the entire limb, it was pain-free, and no other clinical anomalies were present. The patient received intravenous antibiotics for suspected cellulitis. The progression was favorable in 12h (apyrexia and decreased limb swelling), allowing the intravenous antibiotic treatment to be discontinued. Since the child was in excellent general health and recovery was fast, an ISR was diagnosed. Extensive limb swelling is frequent, mostly after the fourth dose of DTPCa-Hib. Deltoid muscle injection of DTP vaccine increases the risk of ISR compared to injection in the thigh, before the age of 3 years. The introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine decreased the risk of general side effects but may increase the risk of ISR. These reactions disappear with symptomatic treatment and do not contraindicate the product. PMID:26239287

  11. Swelling of phospholipids by monovalent salt

    PubMed Central

    Petrache, Horia I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Harries, Daniel; Kučerka, Norbert; Nagle, John F.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Critical to biological processes such as membrane fusion and secretion, ion-lipid interactions at the membrane-water interface still raise many unanswered questions. Using reconstituted phosphatidylcholine membranes, we confirm here that multilamellar vesicles swell in salt solutions, a direct indication that salt modifies the interactions between neighboring membranes. By varying sample histories, and by comparing with data from ion carrier-containing bilayers, we eliminate the possibility that swelling is an equilibration artifact. Although both attractive and repulsive forces could be modified by salt, we show experimentally that swelling is driven primarily by weakening of the van der Waals attraction. To isolate the effect of salt on van der Waals interactions, we focus on high salt concentrations at which any possible electrostatic interactions are screened. By analysis of X-ray diffraction data, we show that salt does not alter membrane structure or bending rigidity, eliminating the possibility that repulsive fluctuation forces change with salt. By measuring changes in interbilayer separation with applied osmotic stress, we have determined, using the standard paradigm for bilayer interactions, that 1 M concentrations of KBr or KCl decrease the van der Waals strength by 50%. By weakening van der Waals attractions, salt increases energy barriers to membrane contact, possibly affecting cellular communication and biological signaling. PMID:16267342

  12. Evolution of midplate hotspot swells: Numerical solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Mian; Chase, Clement G.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of midplate hotspot swells on an oceanic plate moving over a hot, upwelling mantle plume is numerically simulated. The plume supplies a Gaussian-shaped thermal perturbation and thermally-induced dynamic support. The lithosphere is treated as a thermal boundary layer with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The two fundamental mechanisms of transferring heat, conduction and convection, during the interaction of the lithosphere with the mantle plume are considered. The transient heat transfer equations, with boundary conditions varying in both time and space, are solved in cylindrical coordinates using the finite difference ADI (alternating direction implicit) method on a 100 x 100 grid. The topography, geoid anomaly, and heat flow anomaly of the Hawaiian swell and the Bermuda rise are used to constrain the models. Results confirm the conclusion of previous works that the Hawaiian swell can not be explained by conductive heating alone, even if extremely high thermal perturbation is allowed. On the other hand, the model of convective thinning predicts successfully the topography, geoid anomaly, and the heat flow anomaly around the Hawaiian islands, as well as the changes in the topography and anomalous heat flow along the Hawaiian volcanic chain.

  13. Feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance triathlete: a case study.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies investigating ultraendurance athletes showed an association between excessive fluid intake and swelling of the lower limbs such as the feet. To date, this association has been investigated in single-stage ultraendurance races, but not in multistage ultraendurance races. In this case study, we investigated a potential association between fluid intake and feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance race such as a Deca Iron ultratriathlon with ten Ironman triathlons within 10 consecutive days. A 49-year-old well-experienced ultratriathlete competed in autumn 2013 in the Deca Iron ultratriathlon held in Lonata del Garda, Italy, and finished the race as winner within 129:33 hours:minutes. Changes in body mass (including body fat and lean body mass), foot volume, total body water, and laboratory measurements were assessed. Food and fluid intake during rest and competing were recorded, and energy and fluid turnovers were estimated. During the ten stages, the volume of the feet increased, percentage body fat decreased, creatinine and urea levels increased, hematocrit and hemoglobin values decreased, and plasma [Na(+)] remained unchanged. The increase in foot volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. The poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. This case report shows that the volume of the foot increased during the ten stages, and the increase in volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. Furthermore, the poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. The continuous feet swelling during the race was most probably due to a combination of a high fluid intake and a progressive decline in renal function (ie, continuous increase in creatinine and urea), leading to body fluid retention (ie, increase in total body water). PMID:26508884

  14. Feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance triathlete: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies investigating ultraendurance athletes showed an association between excessive fluid intake and swelling of the lower limbs such as the feet. To date, this association has been investigated in single-stage ultraendurance races, but not in multistage ultraendurance races. In this case study, we investigated a potential association between fluid intake and feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance race such as a Deca Iron ultratriathlon with ten Ironman triathlons within 10 consecutive days. A 49-year-old well-experienced ultratriathlete competed in autumn 2013 in the Deca Iron ultratriathlon held in Lonata del Garda, Italy, and finished the race as winner within 129:33 hours:minutes. Changes in body mass (including body fat and lean body mass), foot volume, total body water, and laboratory measurements were assessed. Food and fluid intake during rest and competing were recorded, and energy and fluid turnovers were estimated. During the ten stages, the volume of the feet increased, percentage body fat decreased, creatinine and urea levels increased, hematocrit and hemoglobin values decreased, and plasma [Na+] remained unchanged. The increase in foot volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. The poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. This case report shows that the volume of the foot increased during the ten stages, and the increase in volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. Furthermore, the poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. The continuous feet swelling during the race was most probably due to a combination of a high fluid intake and a progressive decline in renal function (ie, continuous increase in creatinine and urea), leading to body fluid retention (ie, increase in total body water). PMID:26508884

  15. Mitochondrial free radical overproduction due to respiratory chain impairment in the brain of a mouse model of Rett syndrome: protective effect of CNF1.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Rasmo, Domenico; Musto, Mattia; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Fiorentini, Carla; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2015-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene associated with severe intellectual disability, movement disorders, and autistic-like behaviors. Its pathogenesis remains mostly not understood and no effective therapy is available. High circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients and the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in MeCP2-deficient mouse models suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in RTT pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism and the origin of the oxidative stress have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a redox imbalance arises from aberrant mitochondrial functionality in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, a condition that more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. The marked increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in the brain of RTT mice seems mainly produced by the dysfunctional complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, both membrane potential generation and mitochondrial ATP synthesis are decreased in RTT mouse brains when succinate, the complex II respiratory substrate, is used as an energy source. Respiratory chain impairment is brain area specific, owing to a decrease in either cAMP-dependent phosphorylation or protein levels of specific complex subunits. Further, we investigated whether the treatment of RTT mice with the bacterial protein CNF1, previously reported to ameliorate the neurobehavioral phenotype and brain bioenergetic markers in an RTT mouse model, exerts specific effects on brain mitochondrial function and consequently on hydrogen peroxide production. In RTT brains treated with CNF1, we observed the reactivation of respiratory chain complexes, the rescue of mitochondrial functionality, and the prevention of brain hydrogen peroxide overproduction. These results provide definitive evidence of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction in RTT mouse brain and

  16. Baboon sexual swellings: information content of size and color.

    PubMed

    Higham, James P; MacLarnon, Ann M; Ross, Caroline; Heistermann, Michael; Semple, Stuart

    2008-03-01

    Primate sexual swellings are hormone-dependent sexual signals that play a key role in determining patterns of behavior. They are among the most conspicuous signals exhibited by any mammal, and their large size and bright coloration have fascinated evolutionary biologists for well over a century. A number of different adaptive hypotheses have been proposed for the evolution of sexual swellings, and there have been several recent attempts to test some of these using precise swelling measurements made in the field. Most of these studies have focused only on the size element of the swelling, and those that have measured other aspects of swellings, such as color, have done so only crudely. A focus solely on swelling size is inconsistent with most theoretical models of mate choice, which emphasize the importance of multiple cues within sexual signals. Here, we present data on baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis) sexual swellings, including measures of both swelling size and color, measured objectively using digital photography at Gashaka-Gumti National Park, Nigeria. We combined these measurements with detailed data on fecal progestogen and estrogen levels, and estimates of the timing of ovulation and the fertile period around ovulation based on those levels. We show that swelling color and size vary independently, and that, consistent with results in other species, swelling size contains information about the timing of ovulation and the fertile period. However, we show that swelling color does not contain such information. In addition, swelling size contains information about female parity, and we found some evidence to suggest that color may also contain such information. These results indicate that baboon sexual swellings may contain information about multiple aspects of female fertility. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the nature of swellings as behavioral signals, and the role of swellings in mate choice. PMID:18206889

  17. Segmentation of knee injury swelling on infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, John; Langet, Hélène; Herry, Christophe; Frize, Monique

    2011-03-01

    Interpretation of medical infrared images is complex due to thermal noise, absence of texture, and small temperature differences in pathological zones. Acute inflammatory response is a characteristic symptom of some knee injuries like anterior cruciate ligament sprains, muscle or tendons strains, and meniscus tear. Whereas artificial coloring of the original grey level images may allow to visually assess the extent inflammation in the area, their automated segmentation remains a challenging problem. This paper presents a hybrid segmentation algorithm to evaluate the extent of inflammation after knee injury, in terms of temperature variations and surface shape. It is based on the intersection of rapid color segmentation and homogeneous region segmentation, to which a Laplacian of a Gaussian filter is applied. While rapid color segmentation enables to properly detect the observed core of swollen area, homogeneous region segmentation identifies possible inflammation zones, combining homogeneous grey level and hue area segmentation. The hybrid segmentation algorithm compares the potential inflammation regions partially detected by each method to identify overlapping areas. Noise filtering and edge segmentation are then applied to common zones in order to segment the swelling surfaces of the injury. Experimental results on images of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament sprain show the improved performance of the hybrid algorithm with respect to its separated components. The main contribution of this work is a meaningful automatic segmentation of abnormal skin temperature variations on infrared thermography images of knee injury swelling.

  18. Cellulose nanocrystal interactions probed by thin film swelling to predict dispersibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Michael S.; Villalobos, Marco; Cranston, Emily D.

    2016-06-01

    The production of well-dispersed reinforced polymer nanocomposites has been limited due to poor understanding of the interactions between components. Measuring the cohesive particle-particle interactions and the adhesive particle-polymer interactions is challenging due to nanoscale dimensions and poor colloidal stability of nanoparticles in many solvents. We demonstrate a new cohesive interaction measurement method using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a model system; CNCs have recently gained attention in the composites community due to their mechanical strength and renewable nature. Multi-wavelength surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) was used to monitor the swelling of CNC thin films to elucidate the primary forces between CNCs. This was achieved by measuring swelling in situ in water, acetone, methanol, acetonitrile, isopropanol, and ethanol and relating the degree of swelling to solvent properties. Films swelled the most in water where we estimate 1.2-1.6 nm spacings between CNCs (or 4-6 molecular layers of water). Furthermore, a correlation was found between film swelling and the solvent's Hildebrand solubility parameter (R2 = 0.9068). The hydrogen bonding component of the solubility parameters was more closely linked to swelling than the polar or dispersive components. The films remained intact in all solvents, and using DLVO theory we have identified van der Waals forces as the main cohesive interaction between CNCs. The trends observed suggest that solvents (and polymers) alone are not sufficient to overcome CNC-CNC cohesion and that external energy is required to break CNC agglomerates. This work not only demonstrates that SPR can be used as a tool to measure cohesive particle-particle interactions but additionally advances our fundamental understanding of CNC interactions which is necessary for the design of cellulose nanocomposites.The production of well-dispersed reinforced polymer nanocomposites has been limited due to poor understanding of

  19. Cellulose nanocrystal interactions probed by thin film swelling to predict dispersibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Michael S.; Villalobos, Marco; Cranston, Emily D.

    2016-06-01

    The production of well-dispersed reinforced polymer nanocomposites has been limited due to poor understanding of the interactions between components. Measuring the cohesive particle-particle interactions and the adhesive particle-polymer interactions is challenging due to nanoscale dimensions and poor colloidal stability of nanoparticles in many solvents. We demonstrate a new cohesive interaction measurement method using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a model system; CNCs have recently gained attention in the composites community due to their mechanical strength and renewable nature. Multi-wavelength surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) was used to monitor the swelling of CNC thin films to elucidate the primary forces between CNCs. This was achieved by measuring swelling in situ in water, acetone, methanol, acetonitrile, isopropanol, and ethanol and relating the degree of swelling to solvent properties. Films swelled the most in water where we estimate 1.2-1.6 nm spacings between CNCs (or 4-6 molecular layers of water). Furthermore, a correlation was found between film swelling and the solvent's Hildebrand solubility parameter (R2 = 0.9068). The hydrogen bonding component of the solubility parameters was more closely linked to swelling than the polar or dispersive components. The films remained intact in all solvents, and using DLVO theory we have identified van der Waals forces as the main cohesive interaction between CNCs. The trends observed suggest that solvents (and polymers) alone are not sufficient to overcome CNC-CNC cohesion and that external energy is required to break CNC agglomerates. This work not only demonstrates that SPR can be used as a tool to measure cohesive particle-particle interactions but additionally advances our fundamental understanding of CNC interactions which is necessary for the design of cellulose nanocomposites.The production of well-dispersed reinforced polymer nanocomposites has been limited due to poor understanding of

  20. ATP Dependence of the ICl, swell Channel Varies with Rate of Cell Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Tamara; Basavappa, Srisaila; Christensen, Michael; Strange, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Swelling-induced activation of the outwardly rectifying anion current, ICl, swell, is modulated by intracellular ATP. The mechanisms by which ATP controls channel activation, however, are unknown. Whole cell patch clamp was employed to begin addressing this issue. Endogenous ATP production was inhibited by dialyzing N1E115 neuroblastoma cells for 4–5 min with solutions containing (μM): 40 oligomycin, 5 iodoacetate, and 20 rotenone. The effect of ATP on current activation was observed in the absence of intracellular Mg2+, in cells exposed to extracellular metabolic inhibitors for 25–35 min followed by intracellular dialysis with oligomycin, iodoacetate, and rotenone, after substitution of ATP with the nonhydrolyzable analogue AMP-PNP, and in the presence of AMP-PNP and alkaline phosphatase to dephosphorylate intracellular proteins. These results demonstrate that the ATP dependence of the channel requires ATP binding rather than hydrolysis and/or phosphorylation reactions. When cells were swollen at 15–55%/min in the absence of intracellular ATP, current activation was slow (0.3–0.8 pA/pF per min). ATP concentration increased the rate of current activation up to maximal values of 4–6 pA/pF per min, but had no effect on the sensitivity of the channel to cell swelling. Rate of current activation was a saturable, hyperbolic function of ATP concentration. The EC50 for ATP varied inversely with the rate of cell swelling. Activation of current was rapid (4–6 pA/pF per min) in the absence of ATP when cells were swollen at rates ≥65%/min. Intracellular ATP concentration had no effect on current activation induced by high rates of swelling. Current activation was transient when endogenous ATP was dialyzed out of the cytoplasm of cells swollen at 15%/min. Rundown of the current was reversed by increasing the rate of swelling to 65%/min. These results indicate that the channel and/or associated regulatory proteins are capable of sensing the rate of cell volume

  1. Cellulose nanocrystal interactions probed by thin film swelling to predict dispersibility.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michael S; Villalobos, Marco; Cranston, Emily D

    2016-06-16

    The production of well-dispersed reinforced polymer nanocomposites has been limited due to poor understanding of the interactions between components. Measuring the cohesive particle-particle interactions and the adhesive particle-polymer interactions is challenging due to nanoscale dimensions and poor colloidal stability of nanoparticles in many solvents. We demonstrate a new cohesive interaction measurement method using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a model system; CNCs have recently gained attention in the composites community due to their mechanical strength and renewable nature. Multi-wavelength surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) was used to monitor the swelling of CNC thin films to elucidate the primary forces between CNCs. This was achieved by measuring swelling in situ in water, acetone, methanol, acetonitrile, isopropanol, and ethanol and relating the degree of swelling to solvent properties. Films swelled the most in water where we estimate 1.2-1.6 nm spacings between CNCs (or 4-6 molecular layers of water). Furthermore, a correlation was found between film swelling and the solvent's Hildebrand solubility parameter (R(2) = 0.9068). The hydrogen bonding component of the solubility parameters was more closely linked to swelling than the polar or dispersive components. The films remained intact in all solvents, and using DLVO theory we have identified van der Waals forces as the main cohesive interaction between CNCs. The trends observed suggest that solvents (and polymers) alone are not sufficient to overcome CNC-CNC cohesion and that external energy is required to break CNC agglomerates. This work not only demonstrates that SPR can be used as a tool to measure cohesive particle-particle interactions but additionally advances our fundamental understanding of CNC interactions which is necessary for the design of cellulose nanocomposites. PMID:27256628

  2. Swelling of thermo-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Drozdov, A D

    2014-10-01

    A model is developed for the elastic response and solvent diffusion through a thermo-responsive gel under an arbitrary deformation with finite strains. The constitutive equations involve the stress-strain relation, the nonlinear diffusion equation for solvent molecules, the heat conduction equation, and the Allen-Cahn equation for an order parameter (proportional to the concentration of hydrophilic segments in polymer chains). Material constants are found by fitting swelling diagrams for PNIPA gels under uniaxial tension. Numerical analysis demonstrates good agreement between predictions of the model and observations in tests with stress- and strain-controlled programs. PMID:25326783

  3. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Gretchen; Ajioka, James W; Kelly, Krystyna A; Mui, Ernest; Roberts, Fiona; Kasza, Kristen; Mayr, Thomas; Kirisits, Michael J; Wollmann, Robert; Ferguson, David JP; Roberts, Craig W; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Trendler, Toria; Kennan, Richard P; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Reardon, Catherine; Hickey, William F; Chen, Lieping; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap), effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase), synapse remodeling (Complement 1q), and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection) and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease). Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of Sylvius and hippocampus

  4. NMR imaging of chitosan and carboxymethyl starch tablets: swelling and hydration of the polyelectrolyte complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y J; Assaad, E; Ispas-Szabo, P; Mateescu, M A; Zhu, X X

    2011-10-31

    The hydration and swelling properties of the tablets made of chitosan, carboxymethyl starch, and a polyelectrolyte complex of these two polysaccharides have been studied by NMR imaging. We studied the effect of pH and ionic strength on the swelling of the tablets and on the diffusion of fluid into the tablets in water and simulated physiological fluids. The pH value of the fluids exerts a more significant effect than their ionic strengths on the swelling of the tablets. The tablets are compared also with those made of cross-linked high amylose starch. The formation of complex helps to keep the integrity of the tablets in various media and render a slow and restricted swelling similar to that of the tablets of the cross-linked high amylase starch, which is significantly lower than the swelling of chitosan and of carboxymethyl starch. The capacities to modulate the release rate of drugs in different media are discussed by comparing the matrices and evaluating the preparation process of the complex. A sustained release of less soluble drugs such as aspirin in gastrointestinal fluids can be provided by the complex, due to the ionic interaction and hydrogen bonding between the drug and the biopolymer complex. PMID:21864660

  5. Polymers for use in controlled release systems: the effect of surfactants on their swelling properties.

    PubMed

    Vlachou, M; Hani, N; Efentakis, M; Tarantili, P A; Andreopoulos, A G

    2000-07-01

    The effect of an ampholytic surfactant on the swelling properties of polymeric materials was studied, using various swelling liquids. Tablets were prepared consisting of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, poly(oxyethylene) and sodium alginate. Tego betain was the non-ionic surfactant used as an additive in a series of samples made of the above polymers. Those tablets were immersed in distilled water, phosphate buffer and 0.1 N HCl, and their weight uptake was recorded as a function of time, in order to assess the swelling process. Measurements of the contact angle of the above systems were also carried out for estimating their wetting properties. The results of this study showed a selectivity among polymers, surfactant and surrounding liquid. Clearly, an enhancement of the swelling capacity of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose tablets due to the surfactant was recorded. An unclear effect was observed in the case of poly(oxyethylene), whereas for sodium alginate, the dominant factor is its water solubility that controls swelling behaviour. PMID:10972160

  6. Hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of latewood cell wall micropillars reveal ultrastructural anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Stiefel, Michael; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Mokso, Rajmund; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We document the hygroscopic swelling and shrinkage of the central and the thickest secondary cell wall layer of wood (named S2) in response to changes in environmental humidity using synchrotron radiation-based phase contrast X-ray tomographic nanoscopy. The S2 layer is a natural fibre-reinforced nano-composite polymer and is strongly reactive to water. Using focused ion beam, micropillars with a cross section of few micrometres are fabricated from the S2 layer of the latewood cell walls of Norway spruce softwood. The thin neighbouring cell wall layers are removed to prevent hindering or restraining of moisture-induced deformation during swelling or shrinkage. The proposed experiment intended to get further insights into the microscopic origin of the anisotropic hygro-expansion of wood. It is found that the swelling/shrinkage strains are highly anisotropic in the transverse plane of the cell wall, larger in the normal than in the direction parallel to the cell wall's thickness. This ultrastructural anisotropy may be due to the concentric lamellation of the cellulose microfibrils as the role of the cellulose microfibril angle in the transverse swelling anisotropy is negligible. The volumetric swelling of the cell wall material is found to be substantially larger than the one of wood tissues within the growth ring and wood samples made of several growth rings. The hierarchical configuration in wood optimally increases its dimensional stability in response to a humid environment with higher scales of complexity. PMID:24671938

  7. Bilateral lower extremity swelling: black pearl.

    PubMed

    Smithson, Clinton C; Ham, Jared C; Juergens, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic pneumothorax secondary to thoracentesis is relatively uncommon but does present to the emergency department (ED). Iatrogenic pneumothoraces developing tension physiology are rare. We report a case of an elderly female patient presenting to the ED with an isolated chief complaint of bilateral leg swelling, beginning the day after a thoracentesis, which was performed 3 days prior for pleural effusions secondary to lung cancer. Given that the patient was hemodynamically stable, not hypoxic, and had a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and recent history of pleural effusions with diminished lung sounds throughout, this was a radiologic diagnosis. Immediately upon diagnosis, a 10F intrapleural catheter was inserted at the second intercostal space in the midclavicular line with successful resolution of the tension phenomenon. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and the catheter was removed on hospital day 2 without recurrence of the pneumothorax. She experienced resolution of her lower extremity swelling and was discharged from the hospital 2 days later. Isolated inferior vena cava syndrome secondary to a subacute tension pneumothorax was likely the cause of the patient's symptoms. This presentation is very rare and is undocumented in the literature. A high degree of suspicion for acute chest pathology should exist in every patient presenting to the ED with history of recent pleural violation. PMID:26003746

  8. Swelling and diffusion of PNIPA-based gels for localized chemotherapy and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Oni, Y; Soboyejo, W O

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the swelling and diffusion of poly(N-iso-propyl-acrylamide) PNIPA-based gels with the potential for applications in bio-micro-electro-mechanical systems (BioMEMS) for localized cancer treatment that involves both chemotherapy and hyperthermia. The swelling due to the uptake of water, rhodamine dye and the cancer drug, paclitaxel, are studied using weight gain experiments that are conducted over a range of temperatures in which hyperthermia can occur during drug delivery. The release of rhodamine dye and paclitaxel is also elucidated by considering their diffusion through the gels. The underlying mechanisms of diffusion and swelling are discussed over a temperature range in which synergistic cancer treatment can be effected by the combined use of hyperthermia and chemotherapy. PMID:23177767

  9. Experimental study of swelling of irradiated solid methane during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E.; Fedorov, A.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, D.

    2008-12-01

    Solid methane is still widely in use at pulsed neutron sources due to its excellent neutronic performance (IPNS, KENS, Second Target Station at ISIS), notwithstanding poor radiation properties. One of the specific problems is radiolytic hydrogen gas pressure on the walls of a methane chamber during annealing of methane. In this paper results of an experimental study of this phenomenon under fast neutron irradiation with the help of a specially made low temperature irradiation rig at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. The peak pressure on the wall of the experimental capsule during heating of a sample irradiated at 23-35 K appears to have a maximum of 2.7 MPa at an absorbed dose 20 MGy and then falls down with higher doses. The pressure always reached its peak value at the temperature range 72-79 K. Generally, three phases of methane swelling during heating can be distinguished, each characterized by a proper rate and intensity.

  10. Improvement of the Dimensional Stability of Powder Injection Molded Compacts by Adding Swelling Inhibitor into the Debinding Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang-Liang; Hwang, Kuen-Shyang; Su, Shao-Chin

    2008-02-01

    Defects are frequently found in powder injection molded (PIM) compacts during solvent debinding due to the swelling of the binders. This problem can be alleviated by adjusting the composition of the debinding solvent. In this study, 10 vol pct swelling inhibitors were added into heptane, and the in-situ amounts of swelling and sagging of the specimen in the solvent were recorded using a noncontacting laser dilatometer. The results show that the addition of ethanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol reduced the amounts of swelling by 31, 21, 17, and 11 pct, respectively. This was because the small molecule alcohols, which do not dissolve paraffin wax (PW) or stearic acid (SA) in the binder system, could diffuse easily into the specimen and increased the portion of the swelling inhibitor inside. The amount of the extracted PW and SA also decreased, but only by 8.3, 6.1, 4.3, and 2.4 pct, respectively. The solubility parameters of 1-bromopropane (n-PB) and ethyl acetate (EA) are between those of heptane and alcohols, and they also yielded a slight reduction in the amounts of swelling by 6 and 11 pct, respectively. These results suggest that to reduce defects caused by binder swelling during solvent debinding, alcohols with high solubility parameters can be added into heptane without sacrificing significantly on the debinding rate.

  11. Release of Water Soluble Drugs from Dynamically Swelling POLY(2-HYDROXYETHYL Methacrylate - CO - Methacrylic Acid) Hydrogels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jim Hwai-Cher

    In this study, ionizable copolymers of HEMA and methacrylic acid (MA) are investigated for their potential use in developing pH dependent oral delivery systems. Because of the MA units, these gels swell extensively at high pH. Since solute diffusion in the hydrophilic polymers depends highly on the water content of the matrix, it is anticipated that the release rate will be modulated by this pH induced swelling. From a practical point of view, the advantage of the present system is that one can minimize drug loss in the stomach and achieve a programmed release in intestine. This approach is expected to improve delivery of acid labile drugs or drugs that cause severe gastrointestinal side effects. This work mainly focuses on the basic understanding of the mechanism involved in drug release from the poly(HEMA -co- MA) gels, especially under dynamic swelling conditions. Equilibrium swelling is first characterized since water content is the major determinant of transport properties in these gels. Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is chosen as the model drug for the release study and its diffusion characteristics in the gel matrix determined. The data obtained show that the PPA diffusivity follows the free volume theory of Yasuda, which explains the accelerating effect of swelling on drug release. A mathematical model based on a diffusion mechanism has been developed to describe PPA release from the swelling gels. Based on this model, several significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the release rate can be modulated by the aspect ratio of the cylindrical geometry, and this has a practical implication in dosage form design. Second, the release rate can be lowered quite considerably if the dimensional increase due to swelling is significant. Consequently, it is the balance between the drug diffusivity increase and the gel dimensional growth that determines the release rate from the swelling matrix. Third, quasi-steady release kinetics, which are characteristic of swelling

  12. The relationship between water content and swelling parameters of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samet Öngen, Ali; Abiddin Ergüler, Zeynal

    2016-04-01

    The level of swelling dependent damages of low-rising engineering structures constructed on and/or in unsaturated zone of soil deposits is generally controlled by mineralogical compositions and water content of soils. It is well known that seasonal or even daily variations in water content causes volumetric changes within unsaturated zone of a soil composed mainly of swelling type clay minerals. In this regard, in addition to mineralogical composition of soils, water content should be considered as another major factor for understanding swelling behavior of soils. It can be concluded from literature review that swelling parameters of soils were determined by performing experimental studies on dry samples or samples having natural water content without incorporating seasonal continuous variations in water content. Thus, the effect of variation in water content on swelling mechanism of soils is not yet sufficiently studied in previous studies. For achieving accurate understanding of swelling behavior at field conditions, a new approach is required to identify swelling parameter at different initial water content. For this purpose, a comprehensive study was performed to investigate the effect of water content on swelling behavior of soils and to find a new parameter for assessing swelling parameters of samples prepared at different initial water content conditions. Based on main objectives of this study, soil samples having wide range in terms of grain size distributions, mineralogical compositions and Atterberg limits were collected from different locations in Turkey. To minimize the effect of dry unit weight on swelling behavior of soils, samples were prepared at the same dry unit weight (14.6 kN/m3) and different initial water contents. It was determined that there is a linear relationship between initial water content and swelling parameters, and swelling parameters decrease with increasing initial water content conditions. By utilizing this relationship, a new

  13. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p < 0.05). The co-injection of minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p < 0.01). Albumin, a marker of BBB disruption, was measured by Western blot analysis. Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p < 0.01). Iron-handling protein levels in the brain, including ceruloplasmin and transferrin, were reduced in the minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism. PMID:26463975

  14. Time-dependent response of hydrogels under constrained swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; Sommer-Larsen, P.; Christiansen, J. deClaville; Sanporean, C.-G.

    2014-06-01

    Constitutive equations are developed for the viscoplastic behavior of covalently cross-linked hydrogels subjected to swelling. The ability of the model to describe the time-dependent response is confirmed by comparison of results of simulation with observations on partially swollen poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) gel specimens in uniaxial tensile tests with a constant strain rate and tensile relaxation tests. The stress-strain relations are applied to study the kinetics of unconstrained and constrained swelling. The following conclusions are drawn from numerical analysis: (i) maximum water uptake under constrained swelling a viscoplastic hydrogel is lower than that for unconstrained swelling of its elastic counterpart and exceeds maximum water uptake under constrained swelling of the elastic gel, (ii) when the rate of water diffusion exceeds the rate of plastic flow in a polymer network, swelling curves (mass uptake versus time) for viscoplastic gels under constraints demonstrate characteristic features of non-Fickian diffusion.

  15. Laser-induced swelling of transparent glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logunov, S.; Dickinson, J.; Grzybowski, R.; Harvey, D.; Streltsov, A.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the process of forming bumps on the surface of transparent glasses such as display glasses with moderate thermal expansion ˜3.2 × 10 -6 K -1 and high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) glasses, e.g. soda-lime glasses with CTE ˜9 × 10 -6 K -1 using high-power ultra-violet (UV) lasers at a wavelength where glass is transparent. We characterize the effect with optical dynamic measurements. The process relies on increased glass absorption from color-center generation and leads to glass swelling with bumps formation. The bump height may constitute more than 10% of the thickness of the glass sample. The required exposure time is relatively short ˜1 s, and depends on the glass properties, laser power, its repetition rate, and focusing conditions. A brief review of the potential applications for these bumps is provided.

  16. Hygromorphic behaviour of cellular material: hysteretic swelling and shrinkage of wood probed by phase contrast X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derome, Dominique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Patera, Alessandra; Guyer, Robert; Carmeliet, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Wood is a hygromorphic material, meaning it responds to changes in environmental humidity by changing its geometry. Its cellular biological structure swells during wetting and shrinks during drying. The origin of the moisture-induced deformation lies at the sub-cellular scale. The cell wall can be considered a composite material with stiff cellulose fibrils acting as reinforcement embedded in a hemicellulose/lignin matrix. The bulk of the cellulose fibrils, forming 50% of the cell wall, are oriented longitudinally, forming long-pitched helices. Both components of cell wall matrix are displaying swelling. Moisture sorption and, to a lesser degree, swelling/shrinkage are known to be hysteretic. We quantify the affine strains during the swelling and shrinkage using high resolution images obtained by phase contrast synchrotron X-ray tomography of wood samples of different porosities. The reversibility of the swelling/shrinkage is found for samples with controlled moisture sorption history. The deformation is more hysteretic for high than for low density samples. Swelling/shrinkage due to ad/desorption of water vapour displays also a non-affine component. The reversibility of the swelling/shrinkage indicates that the material has a structural capacity to show a persistent cellular geometry for a given moisture state and a structural composition that allows for moisture-induced transitional states. A collection of qualitative observations of small subsets of cells during swelling/shrinkage is further studied by simulating the observed behaviour. An anisotropic swelling coefficient of the cell wall is found to emerge and its origin is linked to the anisotropy of the cellulose fibrils arrangement in cell wall layers.

  17. Irradiation creep due to SIPA under cascade damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.H.; Garner, F.A.; Holt, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    This paper derives the relationships between void swelling and irradiation creep due to Stress-Induced Preferred Absorption (SIPA) and SIPA-Induced Growth (SIG) under cascade damage conditions in an irradiated pressurized tube. It is found that at low swelling rates irradiation creep is a major contribution to the total diametral strain rate of the tube, whereas at high swelling rates the creep becomes a minor contribution. The anisotropy of the corresponding dislocation structure is also predicted to decline as the swelling rate increases. The theoretical predictions are found to agree very well with experimental results.

  18. Tracking the attenuation and nonbreaking dissipation of swells using altimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haoyu; Stopa, Justin E.; Wang, He; Husson, Romain; Mouche, Alexis; Chapron, Bertrand; Chen, Ge

    2016-02-01

    A method for systematically tracking swells across oceanic basins is developed by taking advantage of high-quality data from space-borne altimeters and wave model output. The evolution of swells is observed over large distances based on 202 swell events with periods ranging from 12 to 18 s. An empirical attenuation rate of swell energy of about 4 × 10-7 m-1 is estimated using these observations, and the nonbreaking energy dissipation rates of swells far away from their generating areas are also estimated using a point source model. The resulting acceptance range of nonbreaking dissipation rates is -2.5 to 5.0 × 10-7 m-1, which corresponds to a dissipation e-folding scales of at least 2000 km for steep swells, to almost infinite for small-amplitude swells. These resulting rates are consistent with previous studies using in-situ and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations. The frequency dispersion and angular spreading effects during swell propagation are discussed by comparing the results with other studies, demonstrating that they are the two dominant processes for swell height attenuation, especially in the near field. The resulting dissipation rates from these observations can be used as a reference for ocean engineering and wave modeling, and for related studies such as air-sea and wind-wave-turbulence interactions.

  19. Processes and controls in swelling anhydritic clay rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Referring to the swelling of anhydritic clay rocks in tunneling, Leopold Müller-Salzburg noted in the third volume on tunneling of his fundamental text book on rock engineering that "a truly coherent explanation of these phenomena is still owing" (Müller-Salzburg 1978, p. 306). This valuation is still true after more than three decades of research in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of such rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical controls of the swelling. In this contribution, a review of processes in swelling anhydritic clay rocks and of associated controls is presented. Also numerical models that aim at simulating the swelling processes and controls are included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-oriented work in this review, the presentation intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling anhydritic clay rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical engineering projects. Keywords: swelling; anhydritic clay rocks; review

  20. Swelling and thermodynamic studies of temperature responsive 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/itaconic acid copolymeric hydrogels prepared via gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, Simonida L. J.; Mićić, Maja M.; Filipović, Jovanka M.; Suljovrujić, Edin H.

    2007-08-01

    The copolymeric hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and itaconic acid (IA) were synthesized by gamma radiation induced radical polymerization. Swelling and thermodynamic properties of PHEMA and copolymeric P(HEMA/IA) hydrogels with different IA contents (2, 3.5 and 5 mol%) were studied in a wide pH and temperature range. Initial studies of so-prepared hydrogels show interesting pH and temperature sensitivity in swelling and drug release behavior. Special attention was devoted to temperature investigations around physiological temperature (37 °C), where small changes in temperature significantly influence swelling and drug release of these hydrogels. Due to maximum swelling of hydrogels around 40 °C, the P(HEMA/IA) hydrogel containing 5 mol% of IA without and with drug-antibiotic (gentamicin) were investigated at pH 7.40 and in the temperature range 25-42 °C, in order to evaluate their potential for medical applications.

  1. Methodology for determining void swelling at very high damage under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Taller, S.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Was, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    At very high damage levels in ion irradiated samples, the decrease in effective density of the irradiated material due to void swelling can lead to errors in quantifying swelling. HT9 was pre-implanted with 10 appm He and subjected to a raster-scanned beam with a damage rate of ∼1 × 10-3 dpa/s at 460oC. Voids were characterized from 0 to 1300 nm. Fixed damage rate and fixed depth methods were developed to account for damage-dependent porosity increase and resulting dependence on depth. The fixed depth method was more appropriate as it limits undue effects from the injected interstitial while maintaining a usable void distribution. By keeping the depth fixed and accounting for the change in damage rate due to reduced density, the steady state swelling rate was 10% higher than calculation of swelling from raw data. This method is easily translatable to other materials, ion types and energies and limits the impact of the injected interstitial.

  2. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell swelling and mitochondrial dysfunction are attenuated by cinnamtannin D1, green tea extract, and resveratrol in vitro.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S; Qin, Bolin; Anderson, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    Polyphenols possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cytotoxic brain edema in cerebral ischemia. In addition, OS and pro-inflammatory cytokines also damage the endothelial cells and the neurovascular unit. Endothelial cell swelling may contribute to a leaky blood-brain barrier which may result in vasogenic edema in the continued presence of the existing cytotoxic edema. We investigated the protective effects of polyphenols on cytotoxic cell swelling in bEND3 endothelial cultures subjected to 5 hours oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). A polyphenol trimer from cinnamon (cinnamtannin D1), a polyphenol-rich extract from green tea, and resveratrol prevented the OGD-induced rise in mitochondrial free radicals, cell swelling, and the dissipation of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential. Monocyte chemoattractant protein (also called CCL2), a chemokine, but not tumor necrosis factor-α or interleukin-6, augmented the cell swelling. This effect of monochemoattractant protein 1-1 was attenuated by the polyphenols. Cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, did not attenuate cell swelling but BAPTA-AM, an intracellular calcium chelator did, indicating a role of [Ca(2+)]i but not the mPT in cell swelling. These results indicate that the polyphenols reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and subsequent cell swelling in endothelial cells following ischemic injury and thus may reduce brain edema and associated neural damage in ischemia. One possible mechanism by which the polyphenols may attenuate endothelial cell swelling is through the reduction in [Ca(2+)]i. PMID:24773045

  3. Synoptic View of a Swell Field in the Pacific: from Spaceborne SAR Measurements to Seismic Noise on the Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, R.; Collard, F.; Ardhuin, F.; Stutzmann, E.; Balanche, A.

    2010-12-01

    . Hereby, our approach confirms that the observed micro-seismic activity in the Pacific has a strong contribution from swell, probably due to the reflection to the coast. This result emphasizes the possibility to use the energy of the swell signal measured by the seismic noise to validate the energy dynamic of the synthetic swell field, taking advantage of numerous seismic stations. Additionally, the estimation of transfer functions from the seismic noise to the swell energy would be a unique opportunity to revisit world-wide swell energy of the last 60 years given the historical seismic data available.

  4. Opening of the blood-brain barrier tight junction due to shock wave induced bubble collapse: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Goliaei, Ardeshir; Adhikari, Upendra; Berkowitz, Max L

    2015-08-19

    Passage of a shock wave across living organisms may produce bubbles in the blood vessels and capillaries. It was suggested that collapse of these bubbles imposed by an impinging shock wave can be responsible for the damage or even destruction of the blood-brain barrier. To check this possibility, we performed molecular dynamics computer simulations on systems that contained a model of tight junction from the blood-brain barrier. In our model, we represent the tight junction by two pairs of interacting proteins, claudin-15. Some of the simulations were done in the absence of a nanobubble, some in its presence. Our simulations show that when no bubble is present in the system, no damage to tight junction is observed when the shock wave propagates across it. In the presence of a nanobubble, even when the impulse of the shock wave is relatively low, the implosion of the bubble causes serious damage to our model tight junction. PMID:26075566

  5. New constraints on the Hawaiian swell origin using wavelet analysis of the geoid to topography ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadio, C.; Ballmer, M.; Panet, I.; Ribe, N.; Diament, M.

    2012-04-01

    Analyzing the formation of hotspot swells, including the shallowness around the Hawaiian Islands, is critical for understanding the origin of intraplate volcanism and the underlying geodynamical processes. Two main hypotheses for the origin of this swell are generally considered: thermal lithospheric thinning, and dynamical support by a convective ascending plume. A major goal of these models is to quantitatively explain the two important characteristics of the Hawaiian swell: its topography and the corresponding geoid anomaly. In simple models of isostatic compensation, the geoid-to-topography ratio (GTR) is linearly related to the depth of the compensating mass; therefore it is often considered as a fundamental parameter to assess swell support mechanisms. According to previous work, the observed GTR has been reported to range from 4 to 5 m/km. The corresponding apparent compensation depth is about 45 km, which is shallower than predicted by the dynamic support model. However, analysis of the data processing methods shows that the applied bandpass filters to retain only characteristic wavelengths of the swell topography and geoid, cannot completely remove the signal due to loading of the volcanic edifices and related lithospheric flexure. In order to resolve these issues, we apply a continuous wavelet transform, which allows us to retrieve lateral variations of the GTR at each spatial scale. A series of synthetic tests based on different geodynamic models clearly indicates that by efficiently filtering the unwanted contributions, our approach is able to estimate the proper GTR of the Hawaiian swell. A high GTR of 8 m/km is recovered on the current hotspot location. Therefore, for the first time, the recovered GTR agrees with realistic geodynamic models of the Hawaiian plume. Accordingly, the thermal rejuvenation model can be ruled out by our analysis. Instead, the swell as a whole is shown to be mainly supported dynamically by the uprising Hawaiian plume

  6. Observations of swell influence on ocean surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Paul A.

    2008-12-01

    Field measurements of the ocean surface wave spectrum focusing on the slope-contributing components are used to construct a spectral model of the ocean surface roughness. The spectral parameterization is established with the observed empirical power law relation between the dimensionless wave spectral density and wind speed. The power law parameters (proportionality coefficient and exponent) are shown to be modified by swell. Discussions are presented on the swell effects of spectral properties, including their wind speed dependence and swell modification of roughness components characterizing Bragg resonance and surface tilting in radar application. Several notable results include the following: (1) With increasing swell intensity, the spectral density increases in the long-wave portion and decreases in the short-wave portion of the intermediate-scale waves. (2) There is a nodal point with respect to swell impact in the wave number dependence of the coefficient and exponent of the spectral parameterization function in the vicinity of wave number near 3 rad/m, suggesting that waves about a couple of meters long are insensitive to swell influence. (3) Spectral density in the decimeter length scale becomes less sensitive to wind speed variation as swell intensity increases. (4) Increasing swell influence shifts wave breaking toward shorter and broader scales.

  7. Electrostatic swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Parsons, Edward S; McCarthy, Nicola L C; Ces, Oscar; Law, Robert V; Seddon, John M; Brooks, Nicholas J

    2015-04-28

    Lipid bicontinuous cubic phases have attracted enormous interest as bio-compatible scaffolds for use in a wide range of applications including membrane protein crystallisation, drug delivery and biosensing. One of the major bottlenecks that has hindered exploitation of these structures is an inability to create targeted highly swollen bicontinuous cubic structures with large and tunable pore sizes. In contrast, cubic structures found in vivo have periodicities approaching the micron scale. We have been able to engineer and control highly swollen bicontinuous cubic phases of spacegroup Im3m containing only lipids by (a) increasing the bilayer stiffness by adding cholesterol and (b) inducing electrostatic repulsion across the water channels by addition of anionic lipids to monoolein. By controlling the composition of the ternary mixtures we have been able to achieve lattice parameters up to 470 Å, which is 5 times that observed in pure monoolein and nearly twice the size of any lipidic cubic phase reported previously. These lattice parameters significantly exceed the predicted maximum swelling for bicontinuous cubic lipid structures, which suggest that thermal fluctuations should destroy such phases for lattice parameters larger than 300 Å. PMID:25790335

  8. Low flow venous malformation lesion presented with medial canthal swelling simulating swelling of the lacrimal sac origin: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ALSwaina, Nayef F.; ALSuhaibani, Adel H.

    2015-01-01

    Low flow venous malformation lesions (e.g. cavernous venous malformations) are commonly seen in the orbit and peri-orbital area. Common conditions may present with unexpected presentation. Here we report a 50 years old male patient with low flow venous malformation lesion presented with medial canthal swelling similar to the swelling typically seen in lacrimal sac related pathologies. PMID:26309438

  9. Propionate induces cell swelling and K+ accumulation in shark rectal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, G.M.; Ziyadeh, F.N.; Mills, J.W.; Booz, G.W.; Kleinzeller, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Small organic anions have been reported to induce cell solute accumulation and swelling. To investigate the mechanism of swelling, we utilized preparations of rectal gland cells from Squalus acanthias incubated in medium containing propionate. Propionate causes cells to swell by diffusing across membranes in its nonionic form, acidifying cell contents, and activating the Na+-H+ antiporter. The Na+-H+ exchange process tends to correct intracellular pH (pHi), and thus it maintains a favorable gradient for propionic acid diffusion and allows propionate to accumulate. Activation of the Na+-H+ antiport also facilitates Na+ entry into the cell and Nai accumulation. At the same time Na+-K+-ATPase activity, unaffected by propionate, replaces Nai with Ki, whereas the K+ leak rate, decreased by propionate, allows Ki to accumulate. As judged by {sup 86}Rb+ efflux, the reduction in K+ leak was not due to propionate-induced cell acidification or reduction in Cli concentration. Despite inducing cell swelling, propionate did not disrupt cell structural elements and F actin distribution along cell membranes.

  10. Low void swelling in dispersion strengthened copper alloys under single-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, M.; Watanabe, H.; Akiba, M.; Yoshida, N.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened copper (ODS-Cu) alloys GlidCop CuAl15 and CuAl25 were irradiated with Cu 2+ ions at 573-773 K up to doses of 30 dpa. Void swelling was observed in all specimens irradiated at temperatures ranging from 573 to 673 K. In CuAl15 brazed with graphite at 1083 K, mean grain size was about 800 nm. Voids were observed in grains larger than 1 μm but not in smaller than 500 nm in diameter. The CuAl25 joined with SUS316 by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1323 K had a mean grain size of 60 μm because of a large grain growth during the HIP process and showed large void swelling. Small grain size is effective in suppressing void swelling due to strong sink effects of grain boundaries for the point defects. The present results indicate that joining at high temperatures may reduce the void swelling resistance of GlidCop copper alloys.

  11. Optical measurement and modelling of parison sag and swell in blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béreaux, Yves; Charmeau, Jean-Yves; Balcaen, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Blow moulding is a process whereby a cylindrical parison is extruded first, then pinched between the two halves of a mould and, finally, blown into the product. Parison size and shape result from complex interactions between mandrel and die geometries, processing parameters and viscoelastic properties of the polymeric material. Moreover, parison size changes with time due to sag. An innovative, contactless and online measurement technique of the parison is shown to be an effective tool to measure precisely parison diameter and thickness and to capture dimensional changes with time. This technique employs laser lighting of the parison and hinges on the refractive properties of molten polymer. Images taken with a digital camera are processed to give a precise measurement of diameter and thickness, at different time step during extrusion. Thus, parison swell and sag have been recorded for a commercial HDPE. Influence of processing parameters such as the rotational screw speed or die gap width can be brought forward. Thickness swell is found to possess a different behaviour from diameter swell. Swell is a purely viscoelastic phenomenon, therefore requiring a numerical modelling with an integral viscoelastic constitutive equation. On the other hand, sag has been measured and could be modelled from a Newtonian perspective using one dimensional convected coordinates. A sagging susceptibility coefficient of the polymer is deduced.

  12. Drainage and Landscape Evolution in the Bighorn Basin Accompanying Advection of the Yellowstone Hotspot Swell Through North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, E. F.; Meigs, A.

    2012-12-01

    basin is an ideal location to quantify long wavelength dynamic topography due to its low relief. Long river profiles streams that are transverse to the topographic swell in the basin suggest a transient advective signal preserved as profile knickpoints. Abandoned strath terraces, stream piracy, drainage reorganization, and lateral channel migration within the Bighorn Basin are all consistent indicators of the advection of a topographic swell. However, the lack of a high-resolution absolute age chronology precludes us from attributing the primary landscape and drainage forcing to climate change or dynamic topography. Our future work will focus on the timing of geomorphic and river profile evolution to disentangle competing effects of topographic advection, climate, and other factors.

  13. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemia-like injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Panickar, K S; Polansky, M M; Graves, D J; Urban, J F; Anderson, R A

    2012-01-27

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury, including cell swelling, increased free radical production, increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial dysfunction, and the reduction in glutamate uptake. Astrocyte (glial) swelling is a major component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemia and, along with vasogenic edema, may contribute to increased intracranial pressure, brain herniation, and additional ischemic injuries. C6 glial cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 5 h, and cell swelling was determined at 90 min after the end of OGD. OGD-induced increases in glial swelling were significantly blocked by trimer 1, but not by the major nonpolyphenol fractions of CE including cinnamaldehyde and coumarin. Increased free radical production, a contributing factor in cell swelling following ischemic injury, was also significantly reduced by trimer 1. Mitochondrial dysfunction, another key feature of ischemic injury, is hypothesized to contribute to glial swelling. Depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) was assessed using a fluorescent dye (tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester [TMRE]), and was significantly attenuated by trimer 1 as was OGD-induced increased [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together with our previous observation that blockers of [Ca(2+)](i) reduce cell swelling, our results indicate that trimer 1 may attenuate cell swelling by regulating [Ca(2+)](i). Trimer 1 also significantly attenuated the OGD-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. In addition, cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability pore (mPT), but not FK506 (that does not block the mPT), reduced the OGD-induced decline in glutamate uptake indicating a role of the mPT in such effects. Thus, the effects of trimer 1 in attenuating the

  14. Rheological behavior of rat mesangial cells during swelling in vitro.

    PubMed

    Craelius, W; Huang, C J; Guber, H; Palant, C E

    1997-01-01

    The response of cells to mechanical forces depends on the rheological properties of their membranes and cytoplasm. To characterize those properties, mechanical and electrical responses to swelling were measured in rat mesangial cells (MC) using electrophysiologic and video microscopic techniques. Ion transport rates during hyposmotic exposures were measured with whole-cell recording electrodes. Results showed that cell swelling varied nonlinearly with positive internal pressure, consistent with a viscoelastic cytoplasm. The extrapolated area expansivity modulus for small deformations was estimated to be 450 dyne/cm. Cell swelling, caused either by positive pipet pressure or hyposmotic exposure (40-60 mOsm Kg-1), rapidly induced an outwardly rectifying membrane conductance with an outward magnitude 4-5 times the baseline conductance of 0.9 +/- 0.5 nS (p < .01). Swelling-induced (SI) current was weakly selective for K+ over Na+, partially reversed upon return to isotonicity, and was antagonized by 0.5 mM GdCl3 (p < 0.02; n = 6). Isolated cells treated with GdCl3 rapidly lysed after hypotonic exposure, in contrast to untreated cells that exhibited regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Our results indicate that volume regulation by MC depends upon a large swelling-induced K+ efflux, and suggest that swelling in MC is a viscoelastic process, with a viscosity dependent on the degree of swelling. PMID:9640355

  15. A case of delayed brain abscess due to a retained intracranial wooden foreign body: a case report and review of the last 20 years.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Y; Hayashi, N; Hamada, H; Hirashima, Y; Endo, S

    2004-08-01

    A 13-year-old female is presented. When she was six years old, she had fallen, holding wooden chopsticks and got stuck with a chopstick in the right upper eyelid. She was brought to a physician immediately, but a residual foreign body was missed and no particular symptom had developed during 7 years. She visited our department with fever and headache, and a brain abscess and an intracranial foreign body were found on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) 7 years after the penetrating injury. She underwent removal of the object and abscess by craniotomy and recovered without neurological abnormalities. Since intracranial retained wooden foreign bodies frequently cause delayed complications of severe central nervous system infection, surgical removal is necessary even in the absence of symptoms. PMID:15254807

  16. [Swelling of the submandibular and parotid glands : A description of possible differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Hofauer, B; Chaker, A; Strenger, T; Bas, M; Mansour, N; Knopf, A

    2016-05-01

    Swelling of single or multiple major salivary glands can be caused by various local or systemic diseases. In differential diagnosis, congenital cystic or vascular malformations should be considered, as well as infectious or tumorous alterations. Salivary duct obstructions due to sialolithiasis or stenosis can cause salivary gland enlargement. Multiple systemic diseases can have manifestations in the parotid or submandibular glands. As therapy varies from cause to cause, knowledge of the different potential diagnoses is crucial. PMID:27160691

  17. Swelling and Contraction of Phaseolus Hypocotyl Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, M. J.; Truelove, B.

    1968-01-01

    Isolated Phaseolus mitochondria will swell spontaneously in buffered KCl and contract with an oxidizable substrate or ATP + Mg2+. The conditions under which the mitochondria are swollen affect subsequent contraction, substrate oxidation and ion accumulation, but not their oxidative phosphorylation ability. Bovine serum albumin reduces the rate of swelling and promotes substrate oxidation, contraction and ion accumulation. Swelling of these mitochondria is associated with the release of malic dehydrogenase and a loss of membrane integrity. The beneficial effects of bovine serum albumin in preserving the energy linked functions of Phaseolus mitochondria is discussed. PMID:16656729

  18. Influence of network topology on the swelling of polyelectrolyte nanogels.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Levin, Y

    2016-03-21

    It is well-known that the swelling behavior of ionic nanogels depends on their cross-link density; however, it is unclear how different topologies should affect the response of the polyelectrolyte network. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the equilibrium properties of ionic nanogels as a function of salt concentration Cs and the fraction f of ionizable groups in a polyelectrolyte network formed by cross-links of functionality z. Our results indicate that the network with cross-links of low connectivity result in nanogel particles with higher swelling ratios. We also confirm a de-swelling effect of salt on nanogel particles. PMID:27004897

  19. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability. PMID:27401424

  20. Geologic report on the San Rafael Swell Drilling Project, San Rafael Swell, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, C.T.; Rundle, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    Twenty-two holes totaling 34,874 feet (10,629.6 meters) were rotary and core drilled on the northern and western flanks of the San Rafael Swell to test fluvial-lacustrine sequences of the Morrison Formation and the lower part of the Chinle Formation. The objective of the project was to obtain subsurface data so that improved uranium resource estimates could be determined for the area. Although the Brushy Basin and the Salt Wash Members of the Morrison Formation are not considered favorable in this area for the occurrence of significant uranium deposits, uranium minerals were encountered in several of the holes. Some spotty or very low-grade mineralization was also encountered in the White Star Trunk area. The lower part of the Chinle Formation is considered to be favorable for potentially significant uranium deposits along the west flank of the San Rafael Swell. One hole (SR-202) east of Ferron, Utah, intersected uranium, silver, molybdenum, and copper mineralization. More exploratory drilling in the vicinity of this hole is recommended. As a result of the study of many geochemical analyses and a careful determination of the lithology shown by drilling, a sabkha environment is suggested for the concentration of uranium, zinc, iron, lead, copper, silver, and perhaps other elements in parts of the Moody Canyon Member of the Moenkopi Formation.

  1. Modeling injected interstitial effects on void swelling in self-ion irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. P.; Gaston, D. R.; Jin, M.; Shao, L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ion irradiations at high dose rates are often used to simulate slow and expensive neutron irradiation experiments. However, many differences in the resultant modes of damage arise due to unique aspects of heavy ion irradiation. One such difference was recently shown in pure iron to manifest itself as a double peak in void swelling, with both peaks located away from the region of highest displacement damage. In other cases involving a variety of ferritic alloys there is often only a single peak in swelling vs. depth that is located very near the ion-incident surface. We show that these behaviors arise due to a combination of two separate effects: 1) suppression of void swelling due to injected interstitials, and 2) preferential sinking of interstitials to the ion-incident surface, which are very sensitive to the irradiation temperature and displacement rate. Care should therefore be used in collection and interpretation of data from the depth range outside the Bragg peak of ion irradiation experiments, as it is shown to be more complex than previously envisioned.

  2. Development of an Operational Typhoon Swell Forecasting and Coastal Flooding Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y. M.; Wu, L. C.; Doong, D. J.; Kao, C. C.; Wang, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    Coastal floods and typhoon swells are a consistent threat to oceanfront countries, causing major human suffering and substantial economic losses, such as wrecks, ship capsized, and marine construction failure, etc. Climate change is exacerbating the problem. An early warning system is essential to mitigate the loss of life and property from coastal flooding and typhoon swells. The purpose of this study is to develop a typhoon swell forecasting and coastal flooding early warning system by integrating existing sea-state monitoring technology, numerical ocean forecasting models, historical database and experiences, as well as computer science. The proposed system has capability offering data for the past, information for the present, and for the future. The system was developed for Taiwanese coast due to its frequent threat by typhoons. An operational system without any manual work is the basic requirement of the system. Integration of various data source is the system kernel. Numerical ocean models play the important role within the system because they provide data for assessment of possible typhoon swell and flooding. The system includes regional wave model (SWAN) which nested with the large domain wave model (NWW III), is operationally set up for coastal waves forecasting, especially typhoon swell forecasting before typhoon coming, and the storm surge predicted by a POM model. Data assimilation technology is incorporated for enhanced accuracy. A warning signal is presented when the storm water level that accumulated from astronomical tide, storm surge, and wave-induced run-up exceeds the alarm sea level. This warning system has been in practical use for coastal flooding damage mitigation in Taiwan for years. Example of the system operation during Typhoon Haitung struck Taiwan in 2005 is illustrated in this study.

  3. Geometric Dependence of Electric Field Swelling in Simulation of HF Ionospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, B. Z.; Shao, X.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B. E.; Papadopoulos, D.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between a high frequency (HF) ordinary mode electromagnetic wave and the ionosphere induces electrostatic turbulence near the critical layer which results in the acceleration of electrons and ionization of the neutral gas by energetic electrons. Due to the artificial plasma created by this process, the reflection point of the electromagnetic wave is shifted downwards, leading to descending artificial ionospheric layers (DAILs). This work studies the dependence of DAIL formation on the injection angle of the HF wave and on the related ionospheric conditions. The model is based on a combination of ray-tracing techniques and numerical solutions of the Försterling equations. A model based on the Försterling equations has been developed to calculate the enhancement (swelling) of the electric field near the reflection point. As the swelling exceeds a certain threshold, it excites Langmuir turbulence, which in turn accelerates electrons to high energies, resulting in DAIL formation. Previous full-wave simulations of ionospheric turbulence have been able to capture some of the 2D nature of ionospheric heating but at great computational cost. This works presents an approach to performing rapid calculations of the electric field swelling of the ordinary mode, in order to facilitate a more computationally efficient 2D study of DAIL formation. Results show maximum swelling of the electric field near the magnetic zenith, with an amplitude on the order of several tens of volts per meter for a pump voltage of 1-2 V/m, which is in agreement with previous computational models as well as experiment. Preliminary work to incorporate a model for Langmuir turbulence induced by electric field swelling into the overall algorithm is also presented.

  4. MOELCULAR SIZE EXCLUSION BY SOIL ORGANIC MATERIALS ESTIMATED FROM THEIR SWELLING IN ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A published method previously developed to measure the swelling characteristics of pow dered coal samples has been adapted for swelling measurements on various peat, pollen, chain, and cellulose samples The swelling of these macromolecular materials is the volumetric manifestatio...

  5. Efavirenz and Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Relationship with CYP2B6 c.516G→T Genotype and Perturbed Blood-Brain Barrier Due to Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Fisher, Martin; Nelson, Mark; Winston, Alan; Else, Laura; Carr, Daniel F.; Taylor, Steven; Ustianowski, Andrew; Back, David; Pirmohamed, Munir; Solomon, Tom; Farrar, Jeremy; Törok, M. Estée; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFZ) has been associated with neuropsychiatric side effects. Recently, the 8-hydroxy-EFZ (8OH-EFZ) metabolite has been shown to be a potent neurotoxin in vitro, inducing neuronal damage at concentrations of 3.3 ng/ml. EFZ induced similar neuronal damage at concentrations of 31.6 ng/ml. We investigated the effect of genotype and blood-brain barrier integrity on EFZ metabolite concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We measured CSF drug concentrations in subjects from two separate study populations: 47 subjects with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) coinfection in Vietnam receiving 800 mg EFZ with standard antituberculous treatment and 25 subjects from the PARTITION study in the United Kingdom without central nervous system infection receiving 600 mg EFZ. EFZ and metabolite concentrations in CSF and plasma were measured and compared with estimates of effectiveness and neurotoxicity from available published in vitro and in vivo data. The effect of the CYP2B6 c.516G→T genotype (GG genotype, fast EFV metabolizer status; GT genotype, intermediate EFV metabolizer status; TT genotype, slow EFV metabolizer status) was examined. The mean CSF concentrations of EFZ and 8OH-EFZ in the TBM group were 60.3 and 39.3 ng/ml, respectively, and those in the no-TBM group were 15.0 and 5.9 ng/ml, respectively. Plasma EFZ and 8OH-EFZ concentrations were similar between the two groups. CSF EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 76% of samples (GG genotype, 61%; GT genotype, 90%; TT genotype, 100%) in the TBM group and 13% of samples (GG genotype, 0%; GT genotype, 18%; TT genotype, 50%) in the no-TBM group. CSF 8OH-EFZ concentrations were above the in vitro toxic concentration in 98% of the TBM group and 87% of the no-TBM group; levels were independent of genotype but correlated with the CSF/plasma albumin ratio. Potentially neurotoxic concentrations of 8OH-EFZ are frequently observed in CSF independently of the CYP2B6 genotype, particularly in those

  6. Assessment of Brain Damage and Plasticity in the Visual System Due to Early Occipital Lesion: Comparison of FDG-PET with Diffusion MRI Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jeong-won; Tiwari, Vijay N.; Shin, Joseph; Chugani, Harry T.; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relation between glucose metabolic changes of the primary visual cortex, structural abnormalities of the corresponding visual tracts, and visual symptoms in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS). Materials and Methods In 10 children with unilateral SWS (ages 1.5–5.5 years), a region-of-interest analysis was applied in the bilateral medial occipital cortex on positron emission tomography (PET) and used to track diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) streamlines corresponding to the central visual pathway. Normalized streamline volumes of individual SWS patients were compared with values from age-matched control groups as well as correlated with normalized glucose uptakes and visual field deficit. Results Lower glucose uptake and lower corresponding streamline volumes were detected in the affected occipital lobe in 9/10 patients, as compared to the contralateral side. Seven of these 9 patients had visual field deficit and normal or decreased streamline volumes on the unaffected side. The two other children had no visual symptoms and showed high contralateral visual streamline volumes. There was a positive correlation between the normalized ratios on DWI and PET, indicating that lower glucose metabolism was associated with lower streamline volume in the affected hemisphere (R = 0.70, P = 0.024). Conclusion We demonstrated that 18F-flurodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET combined with DWI tractography can detect both brain damage on the side of the lesion and contralateral plasticity in children with early occipital lesions. PMID:24391057

  7. Swelling of ultrathin crosslinked polyamide water purification membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin; Stafford, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polyamide (PA) ultrathin films represent the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these materials, such as permselectivity, is intimately linked with extent of swelling of the PA network. Thus, quantifying their swelling behavior would be a useful and simple route to understanding the specific network structural parameters that control membrane performance. In this work, we measure the swelling behavior of PA ultrathin films using X-ray reflectivity as a function of water hydration. By applying the Flory-Rehner theory used to describe the swelling behavior of polymer networks, we quantify the PA network properties including Flory interaction parameter and the monomer units between crosslinks. Finally, we demonstrate application of this measurement approach for characterizing the network properties of different types of PA ultrathin films relevant to water purification and discuss the relationship between network and transport properties. Materials Science and Engineering Division

  8. Fission induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Park, J. M.; Robinson, A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Fission-induced swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel meat was measured using microscopy images obtained from post-irradiation examination. The data of reduced-size plate-type test samples and rod-type test samples were employed for this work. A model to predict the meat swelling of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was developed. This model is composed of several submodels including a model for interaction layer (IL) growth between U-Mo and Al matrix, a model for IL thickness to IL volume conversion, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of U-Mo alloy particles, a correlation for the fission-induced swelling of IL, and models of U-Mo and Al consumption by IL growth. The model was validated using full-size plate data that were not included in the model development.

  9. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams.

    PubMed

    Lucantonio, A; Nardinocchi, P; Pezzulla, M

    2014-11-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  10. Swelling-induced and controlled curving in layered gel beams

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, A.; Nardinocchi, P.; Pezzulla, M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe swelling-driven curving in originally straight and non-homogeneous beams. We present and verify a structural model of swollen beams, based on a new point of view adopted to describe swelling-induced deformation processes in bilayered gel beams, that is based on the split of the swelling-induced deformation of the beam at equilibrium into two components, both depending on the elastic properties of the gel. The method allows us to: (i) determine beam stretching and curving, once assigned the characteristics of the solvent bath and of the non-homogeneous beam, and (ii) estimate the characteristics of non-homogeneous flat gel beams in such a way as to obtain, under free-swelling conditions, three-dimensional shapes. The study was pursued by means of analytical, semi-analytical and numerical tools; excellent agreement of the outcomes of the different techniques was found, thus confirming the strength of the method. PMID:25383031

  11. Mechanically robust, negative-swelling, mussel-inspired tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Devin G; Bushnell, Grace G; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2013-05-01

    Most synthetic polymer hydrogel tissue adhesives and sealants swell considerably in physiologic conditions, which can result in mechanical weakening and adverse medical complications. This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of mechanically tough zero- or negative-swelling mussel-inspired surgical adhesives based on catechol-modified amphiphilic poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers. The formation, swelling, bulk mechanical, and tissue adhesive properties of the resulting thermosensitive gels were characterized. Catechol oxidation at or below room temperature rapidly resulted in a chemically cross-linked network, with subsequent warming to physiological temperature inducing a thermal hydrophobic transition in the PPO domains and providing a mechanism for volumetric reduction and mechanical toughening. The described approach can be easily adapted for other thermally sensitive block copolymers and cross-linking strategies, representing a general approach that can be employed to control swelling and enhance mechanical properties of polymer hydrogels used in a medical context. PMID:23184616

  12. Generation of Continental Rifts, Basins and Swells by Lithosphere Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milelli, L.; Fourel, L.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    blocks of finite size that became unstable due to cooling from above and describe the peculiar horizontal planform that developed. Dynamical behaviour depends on three dimensionless numbers, a Rayleigh number for the unstable block, a buoyancy number that scales the intrinsic density contrast to the thermal one and the aspect ratio of the block. Within the block, instability develops in two different ways in an outer annulus and in an inner region. In the outer annulus, upwellings and downwellings take the form of radial rolls spaced regularly. In the interior region, the planform adopts the more familiar form of polygonal cells. Translated to geological conditions, such instabilities should manifest themselves as linear rifts striking at a right angle to the continent-ocean boundary and an array of domal uplifts, volcanic swells and basins in the continental interior. The laboratory data lead to simple scaling laws for the dimensions and spacings of the convective structures. For the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, these dimensions and distances take values in the 500-1000 km range, close to geological examples. The large intrinsic buoyancy of Archean lithospheric roots prevents this type of instability, which explains why the widespread volcanic activity that currently affects Western Africa is confined to post-Archean domains.

  13. Lepromatous leprosy presenting as a swelling in the neck.

    PubMed

    Dogra, D; Verma, K K; Sood, A; Handa, R

    1999-01-01

    A 25-year-old electrician presented with gradually, asymptomatic swelling on left of the neck since 2 years. The swelling which was initially diagnosed as cervical lymphadenitis by the internist represented the enlarged left great auricular nerve. Cutaneous examination revealed an ill-defined, hypoaesthetic macule with minimal atrophy on the pinna of the left ear. The histopathology of the nerve showed a lepromatous neuritis with bacteriological index (BI) of 5+. PMID:20921641

  14. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  15. Competition between adsorption-induced swelling and elastic compression of coal at CO2 pressures up to 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-11-01

    Enhanced Coalbed Methane production (ECBM) by CO2 injection frequently proves ineffective due to rapidly decreasing injectivity. Adsorption-induced swelling of the coal matrix has been identified as the principal factor controlling this reduction. To improve understanding of coal swelling in response to exposure to CO2 at high pressures, numerous laboratory studies have been performed in the past decades. These studies consistently reveal an increase in swelling with CO2 pressure. However, it remains unclear what the relative contributions are of adsorption-induced swelling versus elastic compression of the coal framework, and hence what is the true relationship between adsorption-induced swelling and CO2 uptake. Here, we report the results of dilatometry experiments conducted on unconfined, cylindrical coal matrix samples (˜4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter) of high volatile bituminous coal, where we aim to measure the effective volumetric effect of CO2 and to separate this into a component caused by adsorption-induced swelling and a component caused by elastic compression. The experiments were performed using a high pressure eddy current dilatometer that was used to measure one-dimensional sample expansion or contraction (resolution <50 nm). The tests were conducted at a constant temperature of 40 °C, and CO2 pressures up to 100 MPa. Our results show that the matrix samples reveal anisotropic expansion over the full range of CO2 pressures used. Expansion perpendicular to the bedding was about 1.4 times the average expansion measured in the bedding plane. Net volumetric strains, which were computed from the net linear strain in all directions measured, reveal that the response of coal is characterised by an expansion-dominated stage below 10-20 MPa of CO2 pressure and a contraction-dominated stage at higher CO2 pressures. Our data demonstrate direct competition between adsorption-induced swelling and elastic compression in the coal matrix. We propose a model for

  16. Aetiopathology of maxillary swelling--a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Deb; Crank, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    A wide variety of lesions and not necessarily a malignant tumour can cause maxillary swelling. Non-specificity of clinical and radiological features of these maxillary lesions makes their diagnosis difficult. Review of literature adds a little regarding the aetiopathological distribution of the various lesions causing maxillary swelling. We present our finding regarding the relative distribution of various conditions causing maxillary swelling. The awareness of the spectrum of pathology related to maxillary swelling is essential for correct diagnosis and treatment. Forty-eight patients who presented with a swelling of the maxilla to our hospital between May 1998 and April 2001 were prospectively studied regarding the clinical presentations, radiological features and histological findings. Maxillary swelling was found to be caused by malignant tumours in 54.2%, benign neoplasms in 22.9% and non-neoplastic lesions in 22.9%. Overall squamous cell carcinoma (22.9%) was the commonest lesion, tumour of vascular origin was the commonest benign neoplasm and odontogenic cyst was the commonest among the non-neoplastic lesions. PMID:17611767

  17. Swelling of four glove materials challenged by six metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhai; Que Hee, Shane S

    2008-01-01

    The performance of protective gloves against metalworking fluids (MWFs) has rarely been studied because of the difficult chemical analysis associated with complex MWFs. In the present study, glove swelling was used as a screening parameter of glove compatibility after challenge of the outer surfaces of chloroprene, latex, nitrile, and vinyl disposable gloves by six MWF concentrates for 2 hours in an ASTM F-739-type permeation cell without collection medium. Swelling relative to original thickness was up to 39% for latex, 7.6% for chloroprene, and 3.5% for nitrile. Shrinking up to 9.3% occurred for vinyl. Chloroprene and latex did not swell significantly for the semisynthetic and synthetic MWFs. Vinyl, previously not tested, was a good candidate for MWFs other than the soluble oil type. Although nitrile was recommended by the National Institute for the Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for all types of MWFs, its swelling after 2-hour challenge was significant with Student t-tests for the soluble oil, synthetic, and semisynthetic MWFs. Glove swelling can be used as a screening chemical degradation method for mixtures such as MWFs with difficult chemical analysis. Further studies need to be conducted on the relationship between permeation and glove swelling. PMID:17680173

  18. Rate dependence of swelling in lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, KY; Siegel, JB; Secondo, L; Kim, SU; Samad, NA; Qin, JW; Anderson, D; Garikipati, K; Knobloch, A; Epureanu, BI; Monroe, CW; Stefanopoulou, A

    2014-12-01

    Swelling of a commercial 5 Ah lithium-ion cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. In combination with sensitive displacement measurements, knowledge of the electrode configuration within this prismatic cell's interior allows macroscopic deformations of the casing to be correlated to electrochemical and mechanical transformations in individual anode/separator/cathode layers. Thermal expansion and interior charge state are both found to cause significant swelling. At low rates, where thermal expansion is negligible, the electrode sandwich dilates by as much as 1.5% as the charge state swings from 0% to 100% because of lithium-ion intercalation. At high rates a comparably large residual swelling was observed at the end of discharge. Thermal expansion caused by joule heating at high discharge rate results in battery swelling. The changes in displacement with respect to capacity at low rate correlate well with the potential changes known to accompany phase transitions in the electrode materials. Although the potential response changes minimally with the C-rate, the extent of swelling varies significantly, suggesting that measurements of swelling may provide a sensitive gauge for characterizing dynamic operating states. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of Molecular Structure of Porous Epoxy Thermosets via Swelling and Glass Transition Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Majid; Ghorpade, Kaustubh; Raman, Vijay; Palmese, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Many of the excellent properties of highly crosslinked polymers are due to their molecular structures. In this study, network structures of three epoxy systems, Epon828-PACM, Epon836-PACM, and Epon1001F-PACM were investigated via equilibrium swelling theory. Each systems separately cured in presence of an inert solvent, THF, ranging from 0 to 92% by volume fraction of solvent. Experimental results showed that the conventional swelling theory is valid for specimens polymerized in moderate dilute environments, i.e. up to around 60% solvent by vol. whereas in extremely dilute environments, i.e. above 60%, the computed Mc values are exponentially increasing. This drastic increase in Mc was investigated by Tg measurement of the polymer phase (on supercritically dried specimens). The measured Mc could not predict the corresponding Tg values according to Fox equation. Due to the highly porous nature of the resulting thermosets after supercritical drying, a modifying factor, based on the probability of finding elastic chains in a porous network, was incorporated in the conventional swelling model (Bray-Merrill equation). It was shown that the adjusted Mc values of each thermoset and the corresponding Tgs are acceptably match via the well-known Fox equation. The modified Mc values indicate that, polymer networks produced in presence of miscible inert phases have relatively uniform molecular weight between crosslinks, irrespective of the amount of that inert phase.

  20. What can asymmetry tell us? Investigation of asymmetric versus symmetric pinch and swell structures in nature and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Robyn; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Pinch and swell structures occur from microscopic to landscape scales where a more competent layer in a weaker matrix is deformed by pure shear, often in rifting environments. The Anita Shear Zone (ASZ) in Fiordland, New Zealand has an example of landscape scale (1 km width) asymmetric pinch and swell structures developed in ultramafic rocks. Field work suggests that the asymmetry is a result of variations in the surrounding 'matrix' flow properties as the ultramafic band is surrounded to the east by an orthogneiss (Milford Orthogneiss) and to the west by a paragneiss (Thurso Paragneiss). In addition, there is a narrow and a much wider shear zone between the ultramafics and the orthogneiss and paragneiss, respectively. Detailed EBSD analysis of samples from a traverse across the pinch and swell structure indicate the ultramafics in the shear zone on the orthogneiss side have larger grain size than the ultramafics in the shear zone on the paragneiss side. Ultramafic samples from the highly strained paragneiss and orthogneiss shear zones show dislocation creep behaviour, and, on the paragneiss side, also significant deformation by grain boundary sliding. To test if asymmetry of pinch and swell structures can be used to derive the rheological properties of not only the pinch and swell lithologies, but also of the matrix, numerical simulations were performed. Numerical modelling of pure shear (extension) was undertaken with (I) initially three layers and then (II) five layers by adding soft high strain zones on both sides of the rheological hard layer. The matrix was given first symmetric, then asymmetric viscosity. Matrix viscosity was found to impact the formation of pinch and swell structures with the weaker layer causing increased tortuosity of the competent layer edge due to increased local differential stress. Results highlight that local, rheologically soft layers and the relative viscosity of matrix both impact significantly the shape and symmetry of developing

  1. Magnetic relaxation -- coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the CW (continuous wave) and pulsed EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) have been examined of the swelled Argonne Premium whole coals and the swelled residues of these coals. The CW EPR spectra will not be of high quality due to the unexpectedly microwave-lossy character of the pyridine used for swelling. Being relatively unaffected by this characteristic, the pulsed EPR measurements of the spin relaxation times of the broad (non-inertinite) and narrow (inertinite) macerals have been completed. Although detailed analyses of these results have not yet been done, marked differences have been found between the relaxation times of the swelled and unswelled coals and residues. The most startling are the less than 200 nsec times T{sub 1} of the spin-lattice relaxation of the inertinite radicals in the swelled samples. The T{sub 1} of this maceral in the unswelled coal were approaching 1 millisecond. The T{sub 1} contrast was much less pronounced between the swelled and non-swelled non-inertinite macerals. The prospects of significant progress in coal pore size measurements with xenon and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) have dimmed since the beginning of this project. This assessment is based on the dearth of these types of studies, a paper at a contractors` meeting on this subject that did not materialize, and discussions with colleagues with experience with the technique in coals. Instead, the authors have been developing a pulsed EPR technique for the spin probing of molecular motion to be applied to pores in carbonaceous materials. This report contains a copy of a nearly final draft of a paper being prepared on the development of this technique, entitled {open_quotes}Physical Characterization of the State of Motion of the Phenalenyl Spin Probe in Cation-Exchanged Faujasite Zeolite Supercages with Pulsed EPR.{close_quotes}

  2. The Goodman swell: a lithospheric flexure caused by crustal loading along the Midcontinent rift system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Sims, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr biotite ages of Archean and Early to Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks in northern Wisconsin and adjacent Upper Peninsula of Michigan describe a regionally systematic pattern related to differential uplift. An "age low' occurs in northern Wisconsin where values range from 1070-1172 Ma for rocks with crystallization ages of 1760 to 1865 Ma. These values overlap with the main episode of mafic igneous activity (1090 to 1120 Ma) along the Midcontinent rift system (MRS). We interpret these low biotite ages as registering closure due to cooling below the 300??C isotherm as a consequence of uplift and rapid erosion of an area that we are informally naming the Goodman swell. We interpret the swell to be a forebulge imposed on an elastic crust by loading of mafic igneous rocks along and within the axis of the MRS. -from Authors

  3. Hydrogel-swelling driven delivery device for corrosion resistance of metal in water.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu; Yang, Li-Ming; Chen, Jie; Wang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion on steel and copper pipes in industry can trigger pollution and weakness due to undesired chemical and biochemical reactions. Too much or too little inhibitor can decrease its efficiency, even causing waste and pollution. In this contribution, an innovative delivery device driven by hydrogel swelling, mainly consisting of a semi-permeable membrane, a hydrogel-swelling force drive and a release orifice, was developed to control the release of inhibitor in a water system at a constant rate, leading the amount of inhibitor to maintain a proper concentration. The effects of hydrogel mass and orifice dimension on release property were studied for controlling release rate. Moreover, a weight loss experiment on carbon steels was carried out to show the incredible anti-corrosion function of the system. PMID:26676016

  4. Swelling or erosion on the surface of patterned GaN damaged by heavy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan; Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang; Xu, Fujun; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-06-08

    Wurtzite undoped GaN epilayers (0 0 0 1) was implanted with 500 keV Au+ ions at room temperature under different doses, respectively. Ion implantation was performed through photoresist masks on GaN to produce alternating strips. The experimental results showed that the step height of swelling and decomposition in implanted GaN depended on ion dose and annealing temperature, i.e., damage level and its evolution. This damage evolution is contributed to implantation-induced defect production, and defect migration/accumulation occurred at different levels of displacement per atom. The results suggest that the swelling is due to the formation of porous structures in the amorphous region of implanted GaN. The decomposition of implanted area can be attributed to the disorder saturation and the diffusion of surface amorphous layer.

  5. Effect of helium on the swelling of GlidCop Al25 IG alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabritsiev, S. A.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Zinkle, S. J.; Ostrovsky, S. E.

    2002-12-01

    This report presents data on the effect of neutron irradiation up to 0.5 dpa in the mixed spectrum SM-2 reactor at Tirr≈160 and ≈295 °C and on the TEM microstructure of GlidCop Al25 IG oxide dispersion strengthened copper after different heat treatments (CR+annealed, HIP). It is shown for the first time that a high helium generation rate in the alloy, due to boron introduced into the alloy in the capacity of deoxidizer, results in high-rate swelling of GlidCop Al25 IG of about 1%/dpa at 300 °C. It is shown that the average size of Al 2O 3 particles reduces under irradiation. The conclusion is made that the application of elements with high cross-sections of helium generation as deoxidizers can result in a substantial decrease of the resistance to swelling of copper alloys for fusion applications.

  6. The hypo-osmotic swelling test for evaluation of sperm membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Sivakumar; Jeyendran, Rajasingam S

    2013-01-01

    A functional membrane is requisite for the fertilizing ability of spermatozoa, as it plays an integral role in sperm capacitation, acrosome reaction, and binding of the spermatozoon to the egg surface. The hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test evaluates the functional integrity of the sperm's plasma membrane and also serves as a useful indicator of fertility potential of sperm. The HOS test predicts membrane integrity by determining the ability of the sperm membrane to maintain equilibrium between the sperm cell and its environment. Influx of the fluid due to hypo-osmotic stress causes the sperm tail to coil and balloon or "swell." A higher percentage of swollen sperm indicates the presence of sperm having a functional and intact plasma membrane. Here, we present the detailed protocol for performing the HOS test and explain the results for interpretation. PMID:22992900

  7. A study of the kinetics of swelling in cylindrical polystyrene gels: Mechanical behavior and final properties after swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakiki, Abdelkrim; Herz, Jean E.

    1994-11-01

    Mechanical properties of cylindrical polystyrene gels were investigated both by the kinetics of swelling and uniaxial elastic modulus. These gels were prepared by specific chemical reactions using well-defined difunctional and precursor polymers. From the data of the kinetics of swelling we determined the cooperative diffusion coefficient of the gel and the related mesh size. Experimental results were found to be consistent with the theory of Tanaka et al. Elastic moduli were interpreted on the basis of the phantom and affine models.

  8. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated. PMID:22886112

  9. Crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Hoggar swell (Central Sahara, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Lesquer, A.; Bezzeghoud, M.

    2000-02-01

    The Hoggar region is known as one of the most important swells in the African continent. Its altitude culminates at 2908 m in the Tahat hill (Atakor). The Hoggar and other massifs of central Africa (Aı̈r, Eghei, Tibesti, Darfur, Cameroon mount, …) form a system of domal uplifts with similar scale, morphology and volcanic activity. The knowledge of the structure beneath the Hoggar swell will help us to understand the origin of continental swells. In order to get an image of the lithosphere in this region, we have performed a teleseismic field experiment. The 33 short-period seismic stations have been maintained for 2 1/2 month along a 700-km long NNW-SSW profile. This experiment crossed the Central Hoggar and extended northward into the In-Salah Sahara basin which is characterized by high heat flow values of deep origin. The high quality of the data recorded during this experiment allows us to perform a velocity inversion. The Hoggar appears to be characterized by lower mantle velocities. The anomalous zone extends from the upper lithosphere to the mantle. The weak velocity contrast is interpreted in agreement with gravity, geothermal and petrological data as due to extensive mantle modifications inherited from Cenozoic volcanic activity. It confirms that the Hoggar swell is not due to a large-scale uplift of hot asthenospheric materials but corresponds to a now cooled-off modified mantle. On the contrary, local low-velocity zones associated with the Atakor and Tahalra volcanic districts show that hot materials still exist at depths in relation with recent basaltic volcanism.

  10. Coupled thermo-hydro-chemical models of swelling bentonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, Javier; Mon, Alba; Zheng, Liange; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Pisani, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories is based on the multibarrier concept of retention of the waste by a combination of engineered and geological barriers. The engineered barrier system (EBS) includes the solid conditioned waste-form, the waste container, the buffer made of materials such as clay, grout or crushed rock that separate the waste package from the host rock and the tunnel linings and supports. The geological barrier supports the engineered system and provides stability over the long term during which time radioactive decay reduces the levels of radioactivity. The strong interplays among thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration, thermal and solute transport stages of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository call for coupled THMC models for the metallic overpack, the unsaturated compacted bentonite and the concrete liner. Conceptual and numerical coupled THMC models of the EBS have been developed, which have been implemented in INVERSE-FADES-CORE. Chemical reactions are coupled to the hydrodynamic processes through chemical osmosis (C-H coupling) while bentonite swelling affects solute transport via changes in bentonite porosity changes (M-H coupling). Here we present THMC models of heating and hydration laboratory experiments performed by CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) on compacted FEBEX bentonite and numerical models for the long-term evolution of the EBS for 1 Ma. The changes in porosity caused by swelling are more important than those produced by the chemical reactions during the early evolution of the EBS (t < 100 years). For longer times, however, the changes in porosity induced by the dissolution/precipitation reactions are more relevant due to: 1) The effect of iron mineral phases (corrosion products) released by the corrosion of the carbon steel canister; and 2) The hyper alkaline plume produced by the concrete liner. Numerical results show that

  11. Brain investigation and brain conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Redolfi, Alberto; Bosco, Paolo; Manset, David; Frisoni, Giovanni B.

    Summary The brain of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. PMID:24139654

  12. Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructural development for type 316 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of swelling and cavity microstructures for one heat of 20% cold-worked (CW) type 316 stainless steel (316) irradiated at 500 to 650/sup 0/C in EBR-II (up to 75 dpa) and HFIR (up to 61 dpa) suggests that void growth and swelling are suppressed by the higher helium generation found in HFIR. Instead of voids, many small bubbles develop in the CW 316 in HFIR and resist conversion to voids. However, similar comparison of solution-annealed (SA) 316 irradiated in EBR-II and HFIR at 500 to 550/sup 0/C leads to an opposite conclusion; void swelling is enhanced by helium in HFIR. Many more bubbles nucleate in SA 316 at low fluence in HFIR compared to EBR-II, but bimodel distributions and rapid coarsening eventually lead to high swelling due to high concentrations of matrix ands precipitate-associated voids in HFIR. A key to the swelling resistance of the CW 316 in HFIR appears to be the development of a sufficiently cavity-dominated sink system in the early stages of evolution.

  13. Study of sorption and swelling on block coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shijie; Chen, Guoqing; Yang, Jianli; Shen, Wenzhong; Li, Yunmei; Niu, Hongxian; Busch, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Reducing CO2 emission into atmosphere is very important for the mitigation of global climate change. Many processes have been proposed for this purpose, including CO2 sequestration in un-minable coalbeds and enhance coalbed methane production (CO2-ECBM). Several theoretical studies and worldwide demonstration sites have illustrated the potential of the process.Most of these projects experienced permeability reduction of the coalbed with time, leading to operational difficulties because of the loss of injectability. The permeability reduction is generally considered to be caused by the coal swelling that is induced by gas sorption, because it can narrow or close the cleat of the coalbed. As a result, the migration of injected CO2 in coal pore or cleat becomes more difficult. Therefore, sorption and swelling characterizations are important issues for forecasting the performance of aimed coalbed. In this work, CO2/CH4sorption and swelling isotherms of two Chinese block coals (QS and YQ) were measured simultaneously under different temperature and pressure conditions. It was found that the swelling ratio of coal block by CO2 sorption increased with the increase of the gas sorption amount until it approached to a value of ~3 mmol-gas/g-coal and decreased slightly afterwards for both coals; while the swelling ratio of coal block by CH4 sorption increased with the increase of the gas sorption amount in the entire test region for both coals. By correlating the gas sorption amount and the corresponding swelling ratio, it was found that the swelling ratio of coal block is independent of temperature and coal type when the gas sorption amount is less than ~2mmol/g-coal. The differential profile of the swelling ratio with respect to sorption amount is appeared with a maximum value at ~1 mmol/g-coal for CH4 and at ~1.8 mmol/g-coal for CO2. Based on the theories related to gas sorption and solid surface energy, a mathematical model which correlates sorption and swelling behavior

  14. Dissolution/swelling behavior of cycloolefin polymers in aqueous base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Allen, Robert D.; Opitz, Juliann; Wallow, Thomas I.; Truong, Hoa D.; Hofer, Donald C.; Varanasi, Pushkara R.; Jordhamo, George M.; Jayaraman, Saikumar; Vicari, Richard

    2000-06-01

    Polycycloolefins prepared by addition polymerization of norbornene derivatives are quite different from hydroxystyrene-based polymers in terms of their interaction with aqueous base. Their dissolution kinetics monitored on a quartz crystal microbalance is not a smooth function of the ratio of the polar to nonpolar functionalities in polymer but abruptly changes from very fast dissolution to massive swelling within a narrow range of composition. The maximum swelling is a function of thickness and the entire film thickness can swell in a few seconds at > 3,000 angstroms/sec or at immeasurably fast rates. The initial concentration of a pendant carboxylic acid in polymer has to be selected to minimize swelling and the concentration of an acid-labile group to induce fast dissolution in the exposed area. Furthermore, swelling which occurs in the partially- exposed regions must be minimized by incorporating a third monomer unit or by adding a dissolution modifying agent (DMA) such as t-butyl cholate. However, the function of DMA which is also acid-labile is quite complex; depending on the matrix polymer composition and its dissolution/swelling behavior, DMA could function as a swelling suppressor or promoter and a carboxylic acid generated by acidolysis of DMA as a dissolution or swelling promoter. Photochemically generated sulfonic acid could also affect the dissolution/swelling behavior. Base hydrolysis of anhydride during development is controlled by the polarity (carboxylic acid concentration) in polymer film, which has been demonstrated in an unequivocal fashion by IR spectroscopy under the condition strongly mimicking the development process and thus could boost development contrast but could hurt performance as well. Thus, incorporation of carboxylic acid in the form of methacrylic acid, for example, in radical copolymerization of norbornene with maleic anhydride must be handled carefully as it would increase the susceptibility of the anhydride hydrolysis and could

  15. South Pacific hotspot swells dynamically supported by mantle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Claudia; Yoshida, Masaki; Isse, Takehi; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Fukao, Yoshio; Barruol, Guilhem

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of mantle plumes and the origin of their associated swells remain some of the most controversial topics in geodynamics. According to the plume theory, originally proposed by Morgan, the hotspot volcanoes are created by jets of hot material (plumes) rising from the deep mantle. With later studies, troubling inconsistencies began to emerge and other phenomena are invoked to explain intraplate volcanism, thus tending to nail the plume coffin. However, the problems encountered may simply be "the maturing of a valid theory to deal with the complexity of the real planet". This alternative is tested here by studying the dynamics of the South Pacific plumes through a new numerical model of mantle flow based on a highly-resolved seismic tomography model. We show here, for the first time, that a direct link exists between the surface observations and the mantle flow. We find indeed outstanding correlations between the observed and the modelled swells and between the modelled flow pattern and the active volcanism. This shows that at a first order, the morphology of the volcanic chains and their associated swells is controlled by the mantle flows. The excellent correlation we find between the buoyancy fluxes obtained from our numerical model and the ones deduced from the swells morphology has even broader implications. It implies indeed that we can accurately evaluate the heat transported by mantle plumes from a careful estimation of the swell morphology. We show that the heat transported by the South Pacific plumes accounts for 13% of the total plume heat flux.

  16. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuroinflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective (3)H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces (3)[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  17. Rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunt show differential increase of translocator protein (18 kDa) binding in different brain areas, which is not affected by chronic MAP-kinase p38 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Agusti, Ana; Dziedzic, Jennifer L.; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a main role in neurological deficits in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) due to portacaval shunt (PCS). Treating PCS rats with SB239063, an inhibitor of MAP-kinase-p38, reduces microglial activation and brain inflammatory markers and restores cognitive and motor function. The translocator protein-(18-kDa) (TSPO) is considered a biomarker of neuro-inflammation. TSPO is increased in brain of PCS rats and of cirrhotic patients that died in hepatic coma. Rats with MHE show strong microglial activation in cerebellum and milder in other areas when assessed by MHC-II immunohistochemistry. This work aims were assessing: 1) whether binding of TSPO ligands is selectively increased in cerebellum in PCS rats; 2) whether treatment with SB239063 reduces binding of TSPO ligands in PCS rats; 3) which cell type (microglia, astrocytes) increases TSPO expression. Quantitative autoradiography was used to assess TSPO-selective 3H-(R)-PK11195 binding to different brain areas. TSPO expression increased differentially in PCS rats, reaching mild expression in striatum or thalamus and very high levels in cerebellum. TSPO was expressed in astrocytes and microglia. Treatment with SB239063 did not reduces 3[H]-PK11195 binding in PCS rats. SB239063 reduces microglial activation and levels of inflammatory markers, but not binding of TSPO ligands. This indicates that SB239063-induced neuroinflammation reduction in PCS rats is not mediated by effects on TSPO. Also, enhanced TSPO expression is not always associated with cognitive or motor deficits. If enhanced TSPO expression plays a role in mechanisms leading to neurological alterations in MHE, SB239063 would interfere these mechanisms at a later step. PMID:24307181

  18. Strain localization in ductile rocks: A comparison of natural and simulated pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    We study pinch-and-swell structures in order to uncover the onset of strain localization and the change of deformation mechanisms in layered ductile rocks. To this end, boudinaged monomineralic veins embedded in an ultramylonitic matrix are analyzed quantitatively. The swells are built up by relatively undeformed original calcite grains, showing twinning and minor subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Combined with progressive formation of high-angle misorientations between grains, indicative of SGR, severe grain size reduction defines the transition to the pinches. Accordingly, dynamically recrystallized grains have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Toward the necks, further grain size reduction, increasingly random misorientations, nucleation of new grains, and a loss of the CPO occur. We postulate that this microstructure marks the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep induced by strain localization. We confirm that the development of boudins is insensitive to original grain sizes and single-crystal orientations. In order to test these microstructural interpretations, a self-consistent numerical grain size evolution is implemented, based on thermo-mechanical principles, end-member flow laws and microphysical processes. Applying constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions to a 3-layer finite element pure shear box, pinch-and-swell structures emerge out of the homogeneous layer through grain size softening at a critical state. Viscosity weakening due to elevated strain rates and dissipated heat from grain size reduction promotes strain rate weakening until a critical grain size is reached. At this point, a switch from dislocation to diffusion creep occurs. This state locks in at local steady states and is microstructurally expressed in pinches and swells, respectively. Thus, boudinage is identified as an energy attractor, identifying the high-energy steady state of an extending layered structure. We conclude from the

  19. Geoid height versus topography for oceanic plateaus and swells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Mackenzie, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    Gridded geoid height data (Marsh et al.l, 1986) and gridded bathymetry data (Van Wykhouse, 1973) are used to estimate the average compensation depths of 53 oceanic swells and plateaus. The relationship between geoid height and topography is examined using Airy and thermal compensation models. It is shown that geoid height is linearly related to topography between wavelengths of 400 and 4000 m as predicted by isostatic compensation models. The geoid/topography ratio is dependent on the average depth of compensation. The intermediate geoid/topography ratios of most thermal swells are interpreted as a linear combination of the decaying thermal swell signature and that of the persisting Airy-compensated volcanic edifice.

  20. Swelling behavior of bisensitive interpenetrating polymer networks for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Krause, A T; Zschoche, S; Rohn, M; Hempel, C; Richter, A; Appelhans, D; Voit, B

    2016-07-01

    Bisensitive interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogels of temperature sensitive net-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and pH sensitive net-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) for microfluidic applications were prepared via a sequential synthesis using free radical polymerization. The IPN indicated a suitable reversible alteration of swelling in response to the change in pH and temperature. The adequate change of the hydrogel volume is a basic requirement for microfluidic applications. Using the introduced correction factor f, it is possible to determine the cooperative diffusion coefficient (Dcoop) of cylindrical samples at any aspect ratio. The determined cooperative diffusion coefficient allowed the evaluation of varying swelling processes of different network structures. The presence of the second sub-network of the IPN improved the swelling behaviour of the first sub-network compared to the individual networks. PMID:27174740

  1. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  2. Non-breaking swell dissipation from synthethic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin; Husson, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Swells have the unique ability to propagate away from their generation region with very little attenuation. Only one study exists in the ocean wave literature that measures the decay rate by following a swell with in-situ measurements along its great circle route. More recently used space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to measure the attenuation. They estimated the dissipation rate from SAR with a limited number of cases: 11 storms with 22 total events. The present work extrapolates their technique to more events since ENVISAT has collected SAR data from 2002-2012. The dissipation rate is then determined in a two step process. First swell sources are identified from density maps of back-propagated waves at their group velocity along great circles. Next a "point-source" model is assumed and the waves from all directions and frequencies are propagated forward to find matching SAR observations. Relatively small directional bins are used to group observations creating transects from a given swell event. This ensemble of tracks is the basic dataset used to calculate a more statistically robust measure of the dissipation rate. Individual tracks and the swell behavior are explored through this dataset. Our results are in agreement with previous findings and it is verified that swells are very persistent with e-folding scales larger than 20,000 km and they behave nonlinearly as a function of wave frequency. The results are discussed in terms of their implications in spectral wave models as well as identify limitations of the remotely sensed wave spectra. The wind's role on the dissipation rate cannot be determined from this analysis stressing the need for concurrent wind and wave observations.

  3. Model films from native cellulose nanofibrils. Preparation, swelling, and surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahola, S; Salmi, J; Johansson, L-S; Laine, J; Osterberg, M

    2008-04-01

    Native cellulose model films containing both amorphous and crystalline cellulose I regions were prepared by spin-coating aqueous cellulose nanofibril dispersions onto silica substrates. Nanofibrils from wood pulp with low and high charge density were used to prepare the model films. Because the low charged nanofibrils did not fully cover the silica substrates, an anchoring substance was selected to improve the coverage. The model surfaces were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of nanofibril charge density, electrolyte concentration, and pH on swelling and surface interactions of the model film was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and AFM force measurements. The results showed that the best coverage for the low charged fibrils was achieved by using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTS) as an anchoring substance and hence it was chosen as the anchor. The AFM and XPS measurements showed that the fibrils are covering the substrates. Charge density of the fibrils affected the morphology of the model surfaces. The low charged fibrils formed a network structure while the highly charged fibrils formed denser film structure. The average thickness of the films corresponded to a monolayer of fibrils, and the average rms roughness of the films was 4 and 2 nm for the low and high charged nanofibril films, respectively. The model surfaces were stable in QCM-D swelling experiments, and the behavior of the nanofibril surfaces at different electrolyte concentrations and pHs correlated with other studies and the theories of Donnan. The AFM force measurements with the model surfaces showed well reproducible results, and the swelling results correlated with the swelling observed by QCM-D. Both steric and electrostatic forces were observed and the influence of steric forces increased as the films were swelling due to changes in pH and electrolyte concentration. These films differ from

  4. Managing Local Swelling Following Intratumoral Electro-Chemo-Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cutrera, Jeffry; King, Glenn; Jones, Pamela; Gumpel, Elias; Xia, Xueqing

    2014-01-01

    Summary Delivering genes and other materials directly into the tumor tissue causes specifically localized and powerfully enhanced efficacy of treatments; however, these specific effects can cause rapid, drastic changes in the appearance, texture, and consistency of the tumor. These changes complicate clinical response measurements which can confound the results and render recurring treatments difficult to perform and clinical response measurements nearly impossible to accurately obtain. One of these complicating issues is local swelling. Here, we will demonstrate how swelling caused by intratumoral gene treatments can confound the clinical results and impede further treatments, and we will demonstrate an easy technique to help to overcome this potential hurdle. PMID:24510827

  5. Rare cause of bilateral groin swelling: Round ligament varicosities

    PubMed Central

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Taskin, Mine Islimye; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen; Adali, Ertan; Basbug, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Round ligament varicosity (RLV) is rare and almost all cases are pregnant women. RLV appears as a unilateral or bilateral groin swelling. Pain and tenderness may present. Clinical evaluation is inadequate for exact diagnosis because inguinal hernia has similar findings. Ultrasonography (US) is essential when a groin swelling is detected in a pregnant woman. We present gray scale US and colour Doppler US findings of a 32-week pregnant woman with bilateral RLVs at the inguinal canal, parauterine area and in the myometrium. PMID:26430450

  6. The physicochemical properties of polyurethane membranes determined by swelling measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Carja, Gabriela; Apostolescu, Gabriela; Apostolescu, Nicolae

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we have dispersed SAPO-5 zeolite particles in polyurethane matrix for preparation of porous mixed matrix membranes. The goal of work is the determination of the cohesive energy density for unfilled- and zeolite - filled polyurethane membranes. Experimental determination of cohesive energy density values for the prepared membranes is obtained by measuring the swelling coefficients in water and several alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol). The solubility parameters of the membranes are also calculated. For the unfilled membranes the corresponded values of cohesive energy density and solubility parameter increase in comparison to those of the filled membranes. All the tested membranes show a tendency to swell with ethanol.

  7. Rare cause of bilateral groin swelling: Round ligament varicosities.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Erdogan; Taskin, Mine Islimye; Yanik, Bahar; Demirpolat, Gulen; Adali, Ertan; Basbug, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Round ligament varicosity (RLV) is rare and almost all cases are pregnant women. RLV appears as a unilateral or bilateral groin swelling. Pain and tenderness may present. Clinical evaluation is inadequate for exact diagnosis because inguinal hernia has similar findings. Ultrasonography (US) is essential when a groin swelling is detected in a pregnant woman. We present gray scale US and colour Doppler US findings of a 32-week pregnant woman with bilateral RLVs at the inguinal canal, parauterine area and in the myometrium. PMID:26430450

  8. A Rare Case of Mycetoma Due to Curvularia

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Rupali S; Hanumantha, Sreedevi; Mantur, Basappa G; Parande, Mahantesh V

    2015-01-01

    Mycetoma due to Curvularia is a rare clinical entity. Here, we report a case of 27-year-old female presented with multiple swellings and discharging wounds around left shoulder joint since 12 years. Local examination showed diffuse nodular swellings over left anterior chest wall, posterior chest wall, and axilla. Multiple nodules and discharging sinuses were seen. Fungal culture of the biopsy of the lesion revealed Curvularia species. Patient showed significant clinical improvement with itraconazole therapy. PMID:25949061

  9. Nondestructive Creation of Ordered Nanopores by Selective Swelling of Block Copolymers: Toward Homoporous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong

    2016-07-19

    the increasingly opened nanoporous intermediates, to interconnected networks of micellar nanofibers, and finally to isolated micellar spheres with increasing degrees of swelling. When the BCP films are aligned perpendicularly or in-plane, selective swelling results in uniform "standing" (perpendicular orientation) and "sleeping" (in-plane orientation) pores, respectively. Pore sizes can be tuned by changing molecular weights of the BCPs and swelling conditions without the loss of pore uniformity. Due to the nondestructive nature of this swelling process, nothing in the BCPs is lost during the pore-forming procedure, and consequently the formed pores can be progressively closed also by selective swelling. Such reversible pore opening/closing can be repeated many times, enabling the application of these materials in drug delivery and intelligent antireflective coatings. The monodispersed pore sizes, straight pore profile, and hydrophilic pore walls particularly favor the application of the porous BCPs in separations as homoporous membranes (HOMEs) exhibiting high selectivity, permeability, and inherent stimulus responsiveness. PMID:27349573

  10. Swelling and Eicosanoid Metabolites Differentially Gate TRPV4 Channels in Retinal Neurons and Glia

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Jo, Andrew O.; Frye, Amber M.; Vazquez-Chona, Felix; MacAulay, Nanna; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2014-01-01

    Activity-dependent shifts in ionic concentrations and water that accompany neuronal and glial activity can generate osmotic forces with biological consequences for brain physiology. Active regulation of osmotic gradients and cellular volume requires volume-sensitive ion channels. In the vertebrate retina, critical support to volume regulation is provided by Müller astroglia, but the identity of their osmosensor is unknown. Here, we identify TRPV4 channels as transducers of mouse Müller cell volume increases into physiological responses. Hypotonic stimuli induced sustained [Ca2+]i elevations that were inhibited by TRPV4 antagonists and absent in TRPV4−/− Müller cells. Glial TRPV4 signals were phospholipase A2- and cytochrome P450-dependent, characterized by slow-onset and Ca2+ waves, and, in excess, were sufficient to induce reactive gliosis. In contrast, neurons responded to TRPV4 agonists and swelling with fast, inactivating Ca2+ signals that were independent of phospholipase A2. Our results support a model whereby swelling and proinflammatory signals associated with arachidonic acid metabolites differentially gate TRPV4 in retinal neurons and glia, with potentially significant consequences for normal and pathological retinal function. PMID:25411497

  11. Swelling and drug release from oral thin films (OTFs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrover, A.; Casadei, M. A.; Paolicelli, P.; Petralito, S.; Varani, G.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the characteristic time-scales for swelling and drug release from polymeric thin films for buccal delivery. In this work, novel OTFs were prepared combining Gellan gum, a natural polysaccharide well known in the pharmaceutical field, along with Glycerol, used as plasticizer. A new millifluidic flow-through device is adopted for in-vitro release tests.

  12. [A former bodybuilder with a swelling on the forearm].

    PubMed

    Strijbos, Ruben M; Zwaard, Ton M

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man came to the general practitioner with a solitary compressible swelling on his left forearm, which enlarged during exercise. The patient reported a history of bodybuilding and he worked as a plasterer. Physical examination revealed primary varicose of the upper extremity, a rare localisation of a common vascular disease. PMID:25804109

  13. A 47-year-old man with tongue swelling.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Roa, Maristely; Nazario, Sylvette; Ramos, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Intermittent tongue angioedema can be the initial presentation of several disorders including angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor induced angioedema and hereditary angioedema. Persistent angioedema on the other hand, can be associated with amyloidosis, tumors, thyroid disorders and acromegaly. We present a case of intermittent episodes of tongue swelling progressing to macroglossia. PMID:27401321

  14. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-28

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active polymer swelling. In the three different situations, the Flory exponent is now ν = 3/4, 1/4, 1 and again unchanged under self-propulsion. However, the chain extension behaves non-monotonic in the self-propulsion strength. PMID:25833607

  15. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active polymer swelling. In the three different situations, the Flory exponent is now ν = 3/4, 1/4, 1 and again unchanged under self-propulsion. However, the chain extension behaves non-monotonic in the self-propulsion strength.

  16. Demonstration of Solvent Differences by Visible Polymer Swelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Joseph H.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of the "polarity" of low-polarity solvents on the amount of swelling produced in a solid polymer (demonstrated in an organic chemistry lecture) is also suitable as a laboratory experiment. Students can be assigned to a small group of solvents from the list provided. Procedures and materials needed are included. (Author/JN)

  17. [A toddler with a swelling of his penis].

    PubMed

    Staps, P; Smeets, C C J M

    2016-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy presented with a subcutaneous, yellowish swelling of 0.8 by 1.5 cm on his penis. We made the diagnosis of a smegma retention cyst. This cyst is the result of a physiologic phenomenon that originates from the separation of the foreskin. PMID:27405570

  18. [A smoker with hoarseness and a swelling of his neck].

    PubMed

    van der Poel, N A; Vleming, M; Bok, J W

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to the Department of Otolaryngology because of a swelling of his neck and hoarseness. CT imaging of his neck revealed a cystic mass in the larynx as well as in the neck, with an air-fluid level. The diagnosis 'laryngopyocele' was made. PMID:27096477

  19. [A premature neonate with a right pre-auricular swelling].

    PubMed

    Schene, Kiry M; Schiering, Irene A M; Mallant, Maarten P J H

    2015-01-01

    We present a 14-day-old premature born girl with a temperature of 37.8°C and a swelling and redness of the right parotid gland. Laboratory tests revealed a CRP of 79 mg/l and ultrasound examination confirmed a parotitis. Treatment with augmentin i.v. resolved the condition. PMID:26043253

  20. Impedimetric transduction of swelling in pH-responsive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mac Kenna, Nicky; Calvert, Paul; Morrin, Aoife

    2015-05-01

    A pH-responsive hydrogel composed of an aliphatic diamine cross-linked with polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) using a single, rapid polymerisation step has been used to detect glucose by entrapping glucose oxidase (GOx) within its cationic network. The swelling response of hydrogel disks on exposure to glucose were optimised through variation of factors including the cross-linking density of the network, GOx loading and the addition of catalase. Hydrogel-modified carbon cloth electrodes were also prepared and characterised using voltammetric and impedimetric techniques. Non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and gravimetry were both employed to track the swelling response of the gels quantitatively. The clear potential of utilising impedance to transduce hydrogel swelling was demonstrated where a linear decrease in gel resistance (Rgel) corresponding to the swelling response was observed in the range 1 to 100 μM. A dramatic increase in the limit of detection of six orders of magnitude over the gravimetric measurement was achieved (from 0.33 mM to 0.08 μM). This increased sensitivity, coupled with the textile-based electrode substrate approach opens the potential applicability of this system for monitoring glucose concentration via the skin by sweat or interstitial fluid (ISF). PMID:25768307

  1. Swelling of polyelectrolyte and polyzwitterion brushes by humid vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan; Galvin, Casey; Dimitriou, Michael; Satija, Sushil

    2015-03-01

    Swelling behavior of polyelectrolyte and polyzwitterion brushes derived from poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) in water vapor is investigated using a combination of neutron and X-ray reflectivity and spectroscopic ellipsometry over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) levels. The extent of swelling depends strongly on the nature of the side-chain chemistry. For parent PDMAEMA, there is an apparent enrichment of vapor at the polymer/air interface. Despite extensive swelling at high humidity level, no evidence of charge repulsion is found in weak or strong polyelectrolyte brushes. Polyzwitterionic brushes swell to a greater extent than the quaternized brushes studied. However, for RH levels beyond 70%, the polyzwitterionic brushes start to exclude water molecules, leading to a decline in water volume fraction from the maximum of 0.30 down to 0.10. Using a gradient in polymer chain grafting density, we provide evidence that this behavior stems from the formation of inter- and intramolecular zwitterionic complexes.

  2. Corn Mitochondrial Swelling and Contraction—an Alternate Interpretation 1

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Carl; Koeppe, D. E.; Miller, Raymond J.

    1974-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from 3-day-old etiolated corn shoots (Zea mays L.) can be categorized into three separate groups, each group characteristic of the cell type from which the mitochondria were isolated. Phloem sieve tubes and some adjacent parenchyma cells contain mitochondria that have few cristae and little amorphous matrix. Mitochondria from meristematic and undifferentiated cells have more cristae and matrix. Vaculate and differentiated cells have mitochondria with well-developed cristae and abundant matrix. Each mitochondrial type exhibits typical in vitro spontaneous swelling and substrate-induced contraction responses. characterized by change or lack of change in cristae size and in density of amorphous material. For the second and third types of mitochondria, swelling and contraction are characterized by a change in degree of cristae size and in matrix density. The first type undergoes few changes upon swelling or contraction. Radical changes of the inner membrane, withdrawal and infolding, are associated with cell differentiation and not with swelling and contraction of isolated corn shoot mitochondria. Images PMID:16658816

  3. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W. ); Gutterman, C. ); Chander, S. )

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  4. Lupus erythematosus--a case of facial swelling.

    PubMed

    Loescher, A; Edmondson, H D

    1988-04-01

    A case is reported of acute facial swelling following tooth extraction that failed to respond in a normal manner. The patient developed systemic signs and symptoms ultimately revealing the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus. The possibility of soft tissue lesions arising in some forms of lupus is emphasised by this report. PMID:3163493

  5. Anomalous swelling behavior of FM 5055 carbon phenolic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    The swelling response of a typical carbon phenolic composite was measured in the three primary material directions. The data obtained sugrest that at low and high relative humidities the incremental increase in moisture absorption can be attributed primarily to the resin. At intermediate relative humidities, the water is moving largely into the carbonized fibers.

  6. Shrink-swell behavior of soil across a vertisol catena

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shrinking and swelling of soils and the associated formation and closing of cracks can vary spatially within the smallest hydrologic unit subdivision utilized in surface hydrology models. Usually in the application of surface hydrology models, cracking is not considered to vary within a hydrologic u...

  7. Absorption and swelling characteristics of silver (I) antimicrobial wound dressings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important characteristic of moist wound dressings is their ability to swell and absorb exudates from the wound, while maintaining a moist atmosphere at the wound site. At the Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC), we have previously developed antimicrobial silver-sodium-carboxymethylated (CM)-...

  8. Irradiated PVAl membrane swelled with chitosan solution as dermal equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodas, A. C. D.; Ohnuki, T.; Mathor, M. B.; Lugao, A. B.

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic membranes as dermal equivalent can be applied at in vitro studies for developing new transdermal drugs or cosmetics. These membranes could be composed to mimic the dermis and seed cultivated keratinocytes as epidermal layer on it. The endothelial cells ingrowth to promote neovascularization and fibroblasts ingrowth to promote the substitution of this scaffold by natural components of the dermis. As, they can mimic the scaffold function of dermis; the membranes with biological interaction could be used for in vivo studies as dermal equivalent. For this application, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAl) membranes crosslinked by gamma radiation were swelled with chitosan solution. PVAl do not interact with the organism when implanted and is intended to mimic the mechanical characteristics of the dermal scaffold. The chitosan as a biocompatible biosynthetic polysaccharide were incorporated into PVAl membranes to improve the organism response. Degradation of chitosan by the organism occurs preferably by hydrolysis or enzymatic action, for example, by lysozyme. For this purpose the swelling kinetic of PVAl membranes with chitosan solution were performed and it was verified their degradation in vitro. The results showed that the swelling equilibrium of the PVAl membranes with chitosan membranes was reached in 120 h with average swelling of 1730%. After swelling, PVAl and chitosan/PVAl membranes were dried and immersed in phosphate buffer solution pH 5.7 and pH 7.4, with and without lysozyme, as those pH values are the specific physiologic pH for external skin and the general physiological pH for the organism, respectively. It was verified that the pure PVAl membrane did not showed change in their mass during 14 days. PVAl membranes swelled with chitosan solution showed mass decrease from 1 to 14 days inside these solutions. The highest mass decrease was verified at pH 5.7 in phosphate buffer solution without lysozyme. The smallest mass decrease was verified at pH 7.4 in

  9. Highly swelling hydrogels from ordered galactose-based polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Martin, B D; Linhardt, R J; Dordick, J S

    1998-01-01

    High swelling galactose-based hydrogels have been prepared using a chemoenzymatic procedure. Regioselective acylation of beta-O-methyl-galactopyranoside in nearly anhydrous pyridine with lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia yields the 6-acryloyl derivative (Compound I). Further lipase-catalysed acylation of the monoacrylate derivative in nearly anhydrous acetone yielded 2,6-diacryloyl-beta-O-methyl galactopyranoside (Compound II) that can act as a cross-linker with a structure similar to that of the sugar-based monomer. The high selectivity of enzyme catalysis yielded apparently highly regular hydrogel networks with swelling ratios at equilibrium ranging from 170 to 1100. elastic moduli ranging from 0.005 to 0.088 MPa and calculated mesh sizes ranging from 1160 to 6600 A. These values are far higher than conventional uncharged or lightly charged hydrogels at similar elastic moduli. Gel swelling was fast, with 75% of the equilibrium swelling value reached in a fractional time of 0.17. Non-selective chemical acryloylation of beta-O-methyl galactopyranoside followed by polymerization yielded a far lower-swelling hydrogel than that obtained using selective enzyme catalysis. These results indicate that the highly regular polymer structure achieved by regioselective enzyme-catalysed acylation yields relatively strong and highly swellable materials. Sugar-based hydrogels, such as those described herein, may find particular use as biomaterials because of their high water content, homogeneity, stability and expected non-toxicity. A wide range of pore sizes can be attained, suggesting that they may also be especially useful as matrices for enzyme immobilization and controlled delivery of biological macromolecules. PMID:9678852

  10. South Pacific hotspot swells dynamically supported by mantle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Adam, C.; Isse, T.; Suetsugu, D.; Fukao, Y.; Barruol, G.

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of mantle plumes and the origin of their associated swells remain some of the most controversial topics in geodynamics. According to the plume theory, originally proposed by Morgan, the hotspot volcanoes are created by jets of hot material (plumes) rising from the deep mantle. With later studies, troubling inconsistencies began to emerge and other phenomena are invoked to explain intraplate volcanism, thus tending to nail the plume coffin. However, the problems encountered may simply be “the maturing of a valid theory to deal with the complexity of the real planet”. This alternative is tested here by studying the dynamics of the South Pacific plumes through a new numerical model of mantle flow based on a highly-resolved seismic tomography model. We show here, for the first time, that a direct link exists between the surface observations and the mantle flow. We find indeed outstanding correlations between the observed and the modelled swells and between the modelled flow pattern and the active volcanism. This shows that at a first order, the morphology of the volcanic chains and their associated swells is controlled by the mantle flows. The excellent correlation we find between the buoyancy fluxes obtained from our numerical model and the ones deduced from the swells morphology has even broader implications. It implies indeed that we can accurately evaluate the heat transported by mantle plumes from a careful estimation of the swell morphology. We show that the heat transported by the South Pacific plumes accounts for 13% of the total plume heat flux.

  11. Acute parotitis and hyperamylasemia following whole-brain radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cairncross, J.G.; Salmon, J.; Kim, J.H.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Parotitis, an infrequent, previously unreported complication of whole-brain radiation therapy, was observed in 4 patients. The acute symptoms, which include fever, dry mouth, pain, swelling, and tenderness, are accompanied by hyperamylasemia. Among 10 patients receiving whole-brain irradiation, 8 had serum amylase elevations without symptoms. Both acute parotitis and asymptomatic hyperamylasemia result from irradiation of the parotid glands.

  12. Papilledema Due to Mirtazapine

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Evrensel, Alper; Cömert, Gökçe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mirtazapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant that enhances both noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission. The most common cause of papilledema is increased intracranial pressure due to brain tumor. Also it may occur as a result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, pseudo tumor cerebri). Moreover, papilledema may also develop due to retinitis, vasculitis, Graves’ disease, hypertension, leukemia, lymphoma, diabetes mellitus and radiation. Case Report: In this article, a patient who developed papilledema while under treatment with mirtazapine (30 mg/day) for two years and recovered with termination of mirtazapine treatment was discussed to draw the attention of clinicians to this side effect of mirtazapine. Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and papilledema due to psychotropic drugs has been reported in the literature. Mirtazapine may rarely cause peripheral edema. However, papilledema due to mirtazapine has not been previously reported. Although papilledema is a very rare side effect of an antidepressant treatment, fundoscopic examinations of patients must be performed regularly. PMID:27308085

  13. DCPIB is a novel selective blocker of ICl,swell and prevents swelling-induced shortening of guinea-pig atrial action potential duration

    PubMed Central

    Decher, Niels; Lang, Hans J; Nilius, Bernd; Brüggemann, Andrea; Busch, Andreas E; Steinmeyer, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    We identified the ethacrynic-acid derivative DCPIB as a potent inhibitor of ICl,swell, which blocks native ICl,swell of calf bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells with an IC50 of 4.1 μM. Similarly, 10 μM DCPIB almost completely inhibited the swelling-induced chloride conductance in Xenopus oocytes and in guinea-pig atrial cardiomyocytes. Block of ICl,swell by DCPIB was fully reversible and voltage independent.DCPIB (10 μM) showed selectivity for ICl,swell and had no significant inhibitory effects on ICl,Ca in CPAE cells, on chloride currents elicited by several members of the CLC-chloride channel family or on the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (hCFTR) after heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. DCPIB (10 μM) also showed no significant inhibition of several native anion and cation currents of guinea pig heart like ICl,PKA, IKr, IKs, IK1, INa and ICa.In all atrial cardiomyocytes (n=7), osmotic swelling produced an increase in chloride current and a strong shortening of the action potential duration (APD). Both swelling-induced chloride conductance and AP shortening were inhibited by treatment of swollen cells with DCPIB (10 μM). In agreement with the selectivity for ICl,swell, DCPIB did not affect atrial APD under isoosmotic conditions.Preincubation of atrial cardiomyocytes with DCPIB (10 μM) completely prevented both the swelling-induced chloride currents and the AP shortening but not the hypotonic cell swelling.We conclude that swelling-induced AP shortening in isolated atrial cells is mainly caused by activation of ICl,swell. DCPIB therefore is a valuable pharmacological tool to study the role of ICl,swell in cardiac excitability under pathophysiological conditions leading to cell swelling. PMID:11724753

  14. Tuning Smart Microgel Swelling and Responsive Behavior through Strong and Weak Polyelectrolyte Pair Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Eunice; Lloyd, Margaret M.; Chopko, Caroline; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-01-01

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolyte pairs on temperature and pH-sensitive cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid), poly(NIPAAm-co-MAA), microgels enabled a fine tuning of the gel swelling and responsive behavior according to the mobility of the assembled polyelectrolyte (PE) pair and the composition of the outermost layer. Microbeads with well-defined morphology were initially prepared by synthesis in supercritical carbon dioxide. Upon LbL assembly of polyelectrolytes, interactions between the multilayers and the soft porous microgel led to differences in swelling and thermoresponsive behavior. For the weak PE pairs, namely poly(L-lysine) / poly(L-glutamic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) / poly(acrylic acid), polycation-terminated microgels were less swollen and more thermoresponsive than native microgel; while polyanion-terminated microgels were more swollen and not significantly responsive to temperature, in a quasi-reversible process with consecutive PE assembly. For the strong PE pair, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) / poly(sodium styrene sulfonate), the differences among polycation and polyanion-terminated microgels are not sustained after the first PE bilayer due to extensive ionic cross-linking between the polyelectrolytes. The tendencies across the explored systems became less noteworthy in solutions with larger ionic strength due to overall charge shielding of the polyelectrolytes and microgel. ATR FT-IR studies correlated the swelling and responsive behavior after LbL assembly on the microgels with the extent of H-bonding and alternating charge distribution within the gel. Thus, the proposed LbL strategy may be a simple and flexible way to engineer smart microgels in terms of size, surface chemistry, overall charge and permeability. PMID:22676290

  15. Swellings of the angle of the mandible in 32 horses (1997-2011).

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Loh, N; Barakzai, S Z

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the horizontal ramus (body) of the equine mandible are well reported, but there is minimal documentation of disorders of the angle of mandible. A retrospective examination of the records of Edinburgh University Equine Hospital (1997-2011) showed that 32 horses were referred due to swellings of the angle of the mandible. The aetiology of these swellings was identified in just 13/32 cases (41%) including fractures (n=2), traumatic, localised periosteal/cortical lesions (n=4), traumatic soft tissue lesions (n=2), neoplasia (n=3), and inflammation of the adjacent salivary gland (n=1) and masseter muscle (n=1). The remaining 19 (59%) cases without a definitive diagnosis showed two patterns of lesions. Twelve cases had localised periosteal/cortical lesions of the ventral aspect of the angle of mandible that were most likely traumatic in origin. The remaining seven undiagnosed cases without mandibular bony changes all had sinus tracts/chronic soft tissue infections on the medial aspect of the angle of the mandible which were believed to be caused by a draining retro-pharyngeal lesion in five cases. Surgical excision of abnormal soft tissues (if present) and bone curettage was the most successful treatment. It was concluded that the aetiology of swellings of the angle of the equine mandible are often obscure; most appear to be traumatic in origin, yet horses seldom develop gross fractures at this site due to the support of the dense surrounding musculo-tendinous structures. A smaller proportion are caused by draining retropharyngeal lesions that respond poorly to medical therapy, but respond well to surgical treatment. PMID:24290988

  16. COAL CLEANING VIA LIQUID-FLUIDIZED CLASSIFICAITON (LFBC) WITH SELECTIVE SOLVENT SWELLING

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    2000-12-01

    The concept of coal beneficiation due to particle segregation in water-fluidized beds, and its improvement via selective solvent-swelling of organic material-rich coal particles, was investigated in this study. Particle size distributions and their behavior were determined using image analysis techniques, and beneficiation effects were explored via measurements of the ash content of segregated particle samples collected from different height locations in a 5 cm diameter liquid-fluidized bed column (LFBC). Both acetone and phenol were found to be effective swelling agents for both Kentucky No.9 and Illinois No.6 coals, considerably increasing mean particle diameters, and shifting particle size distributions to larger sizes. Acetone was a somewhat more effective swelling solvent than phenol. The use of phenol was investigated, however, to demonstrate that low cost, waste solvents can be effective as well. For unswollen coal particles, the trend of increasing particle size from top to bottom in the LFBC was observed in all cases. Since the organic matter in the coal tends to concentrate in the smaller particles, the larger particles are typically denser. Consequently, the LFBC naturally tends to separate coal particles according to mineral matter content, both due to density and size. The data for small (40-100 {micro}m), solvent-swollen particles clearly showed improved beneficiation with respect to segregation in the water-fluidized bed than was achieved with the corresponding unswollen particles. This size range is quite similar to that used in pulverized coal combustion. The original process concept was amply demonstrated in this project. Additional work remains to be done, however, in order to develop this concept into a full-scale process.

  17. Acute penile pain and swelling in a 4-year-old child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Kishor Kumar; Khodaghalian, Bernadette; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common vasculitis found in children. It usually affects the small vessels of the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and, more rarely, kidneys, brain, lungs and genitalia. Apart from classical presentation with purpuric rashes around buttocks and lower extremities, features such as arthralgia, abdominal pain, haematuria and proteinuria as well as scrotal swelling have been described in the literature. Penile involvement is rare and is not commonly described. We describe a child with HSP who developed penile involvement. We review the literature of all the cases reported in detail, in order to highlight useful clinical presentation, management and prognosis of this rare manifestation. PMID:25858918

  18. Swelling and drug release behavior of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/itaconic acid) copolymeric hydrogels obtained by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomić, S. Lj.; Mićić, M. M.; Filipović, J. M.; Suljovrujić, E. H.

    2007-05-01

    The new copolymeric hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and itaconic acid (IA) were prepared by gamma irradiation, in order to examine the potential use of these hydrogels in controlled drug release systems. The influence of IA content in the gel on the swelling characteristics and the releasing behavior of hydrogels, and the effect of different drugs, theophylline (TPH) and fenethylline hydrochloride (FE), on the releasing behavior of P(HEMA/IA) matrix were investigated in vitro. The diffusion exponents for swelling and drug release indicate that the mechanisms of buffer uptake and drug release are governed by Fickian diffusion. The swelling kinetics and, therefore, the release rate depends on the matrix swelling degree. The drug release was faster for copolymeric hydrogels with a higher content of itaconic acid. Furthermore, the drug release for TPH as model drug was faster due to a smaller molecular size and a weaker interaction of the TPH molecules with(in) the P(HEMA/IA) copolymeric networks.

  19. A rapid, non-invasive and non-destructive method for studying swelling behavior and microstructure variations of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Li, Xiunan; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Dawei; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui; Yu, Rong

    2016-10-20

    A new method for studying swelling behavior of hydrogels was developed based on low field NMR (LF-NMR). This method is established on these facts: firstly, internal water (water trapped in hydrogel) and external water (water outside of hydrogel) correspond to different components of transverse relaxation time (T2); secondly, T2 component amplitude is proportional to relative water content; and finally, T2 value is closely related to mesh size of hydrogel network, the main effect being due to the overall concentration (degree of swelling). This method was successfully applied to swelling ratio determination of chitosan/glutaraldehyde (CS/GA) hydrogels in situ, and the results had better accuracy and repeatability compared with that of weighing method. Furthermore, swelling kinetics at different pH and microstructure of CS/GA hydrogels was well elucidated based on T2. It is clearly showed that LF-NMR provides a powerful tool for probing processes related to water transport and microstructure variation of hydrogels. PMID:27474678

  20. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  1. Malonate induces cell death via mitochondrial potential collapse and delayed swelling through an ROS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Galindo, Maria F; Gómez-Lázaro, Maria; Yuste, Victor J; Comella, Joan X; Aguirre, Norberto; Jordán, Joaquín

    2005-01-01

    Herein we study the effects of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate on its primary target, the mitochondrion. Malonate induces mitochondrial potential collapse, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c (Cyt c) release and depletes glutathione (GSH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme (NAD(P)H) stores in brain-isolated mitochondria. Although, mitochondrial potential collapse was almost immediate after malonate addition, mitochondrial swelling was not evident before 15 min of drug presence. This latter effect was blocked by cyclosporin A (CSA), Ruthenium Red (RR), magnesium, catalase, GSH and vitamin E. Malonate added to SH-SY5Y cell cultures produced a marked loss of cell viability together with the release of Cyt c and depletion of GSH and NAD(P)H concentrations. All these effects were not apparent in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Bcl-xL. When GSH concentrations were lowered with buthionine sulphoximine, cytoprotection afforded by Bcl-xL overexpression was not evident anymore. Taken together, all these data suggest that malonate causes a rapid mitochondrial potential collapse and reactive oxygen species production that overwhelms mitochondrial antioxidant capacity and leads to mitochondrial swelling. Further permeability transition pore opening and the subsequent release of proapoptotic factors such as Cyt c could therefore be, at least in part, responsible for malonate-induced toxicity. PMID:15655518

  2. Brain Science, Brain Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruer, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Three big ideas from brain science have arisen during the past 20 to 30 years: neural connections form rapidly early in life; critical periods occur in development; and enriched environments profoundly affect brain development during the early years. Current brain research has little to offer educational practice or policy. (10 references) (MLH)

  3. Regional Distribution of Copper, Zinc and Iron in Brain of Wistar Rat Model for Non-Wilsonian Brain Copper Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies, we have reported first in vivo evidence of copper deposition in the choroid plexus, cognitive impairments, astrocytes swelling (Alzheimer type II cells) and astrogliosis (increase in number of astrocytes), and degenerated neurons coupled with significant increase in the hippocampus copper and zinc content in copper-intoxicated Wistar rats. Nonetheless, hippocampus iron levels were not affected by chronic copper-intoxication. Notwithstanding information on distribution of copper, zinc and iron status in different regions of brain due to chronic copper exposure remains fragmentary. In continuation with our previous study, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneally injected copper lactate (0.15 mg Cu/100 g body weight) daily for 90 days on copper, zinc and iron levels in different regions of the brain using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Copper-intoxicated group showed significantly increased cortex, cerebellum and striatum copper content (76, 46.8 and 80.7 % increase, respectively) compared to control group. However, non-significant changes were observed for the zinc and iron content in cortex, cerebellum and striatum due to chronic copper exposure. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that chronic copper toxicity causes differential copper buildup in cortex, cerebellum and striatum region of central nervous system of male Wistar rats; signifying the critical requirement to discretely evaluate the effect of copper neurotoxicity in different brain regions, and ensuing neuropathological and cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:26855494

  4. Hydration and swelling of amorphous cross-linked starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wojtasz, Joanna; Carlstedt, Jonas; Fyhr, Peter; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of cross-linked starch microspheres, commercially available as a medical device, was investigated using a multi-method approach. We found that the uptake of water is accompanied by substantial swelling and changes of the polymer structure. Sorption calorimetry provided information about thermodynamics of water sorption, revealed presence of isothermal glass transition and absence of hydration-induced crystallization, observed in non-cross linked starch material. The changes in the surface and bulk properties of microspheres at different water-starch concentrations were investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering and analyzed using concept of fractals. The obtained information, combined with the results of differential scanning calorimetry, was used to construct a phase diagram of the studied material. Finally, hydration induced evolution of polymer structure revealed by the X-ray scattering was linked to the changes observed during swelling with optical microscopy. PMID:26453872

  5. Reactivity, swelling and aggregation of mixed-size silicate nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segad, M.; Cabane, B.; Jönsson, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Montmorillonite is a key ingredient in a number of technical applications. However, little is known regarding the microstructure and the forces between silicate platelets. The size of montmorillonite platelets from different natural sources can vary significantly. This has an influence on their swelling behavior in water as well as in salt solutions, particularly when tactoid formation occurs, that is when divalent counterions are present in the system. A tactoid consists of a limited number of platelets aggregated in a parallel arrangement with a constant separation. The tactoid size increases with platelet size and with very small nanoplatelets, ~30 nm, no tactoids are observed irrespectively of the platelet origin and concentration of divalent ions. The formation and dissociation of tactoids seem to be reversible processes. A large proportion of small nanoplatelets in a mixed-size system affects the tactoid formation, reduces the aggregation number and increases the extra-lamellar swelling in the system.

  6. Hybrid composites prepared from Industrial waste: Mechanical and swelling behavior.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2015-03-01

    In this assessment, hybrid composites were prepared from the combination of industrial waste, as marble waste powder (MWP) with conventional fillers, carbon black (CB) as well as silica as reinforcing material, incorporated with natural rubber (NR). The properties studied were curing, mechanical and swelling behavior. Assimilation of CB as well as silica into MWP containing NR compound responded in decreasing the scorch time and cure time besides increasing in the torque. Additionally, increasing the CB and silica in their respective NR hybrid composite increases the tensile, tear, modulus, hardness, and cross-link density, but decreases the elongation and swelling coefficient. The degradation property e.g., thermal aging of the hybrid composite was also estimated. The overall behavior at 70 °C aging temperature signified that the replacement of MS by CB and silica improved the aging performance. PMID:25750756

  7. The trumpet player with a swelling in the neck.

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Rachel; Hariri, Ahmad; Karagama, Yakubu

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral neck swelling in patients following valsalva manouveres could lead to a diagnosis of either a pharyngocele or laryngocele. Distinguishing between them can be complicated but is vital given the possibility for an acute airway in patients with laryngoceles. A 20-year-old trumpet player presents with a 5-year history of neck swelling. Clinical suspicion is that of a pharyngocele but imaging introduces some confusion with the diagnosis. Both pharyngoceles and laryngoceles can occur as a result of prolonged positive pressure. Accurate assessment with fibreoptic examination and imaging is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Pharyngoceles are often misdiagnosed as laryngoceles. Though treatment is similar between the two patient groups it is vital that a distinction is made to enable careful observation of the airway in patients with laryngoceles. PMID:25795752

  8. Ion implantation induced swelling in 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, R.; Albertazzi, E.; Bianconi, M.; Lotti, R.; Lulli, G.; Cervera, M.; Carnera, A.

    1997-06-01

    Ion implantation induced surface expansion (swelling) of 6H-SiC was investigated through the measurement of the step height between implanted and unimplanted areas. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with 500 keV Al{sup +} ions in the dose range 1.25{times}10{sup 14}{endash}3{times}10{sup 15}ionscm{sup {minus}2}. Swelling was related to dose and the area density of ion-induced damage measured by Rutherford backscattering channeling technique. The observed trend is consistent with the hypothesis that the volume expansion of the ion damaged crystal is proportional to the area density of displaced atoms, plus an additional relaxation occurring at the onset of the crystalline to amorphous transition. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Modeling the rapid de-swelling of toroidal hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Chang, Ya-Wen; Alexeev, Alexander; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The utilization of synthetic hydrogel networks as 3-D cell culture platforms has allowed researchers to more effectively study how epigenetic factors affect cell growth and physiology. As a whole, this has emphasized the biomechanical role of scaffold structures and led to a number of advances in tissue engineering. Our current research focuses on modeling temperature activated shape transformations of toroidal poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) pNIPAM gels. We use dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to simulate the steady (slow heating rates) and unsteady (fast heating rates) de-swelling behavior of these thermo-sensitive gels. Our simulations show that for slow heating rates the aspect ratio of the tori remains constant during de-swelling. For rapid heating rates we observe buckling instabilities. Our simulations agree with the experimental observations. Financial support by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1255288 is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Hybrid composites prepared from Industrial waste: Mechanical and swelling behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    In this assessment, hybrid composites were prepared from the combination of industrial waste, as marble waste powder (MWP) with conventional fillers, carbon black (CB) as well as silica as reinforcing material, incorporated with natural rubber (NR). The properties studied were curing, mechanical and swelling behavior. Assimilation of CB as well as silica into MWP containing NR compound responded in decreasing the scorch time and cure time besides increasing in the torque. Additionally, increasing the CB and silica in their respective NR hybrid composite increases the tensile, tear, modulus, hardness, and cross-link density, but decreases the elongation and swelling coefficient. The degradation property e.g., thermal aging of the hybrid composite was also estimated. The overall behavior at 70 °C aging temperature signified that the replacement of MS by CB and silica improved the aging performance. PMID:25750756

  11. Contribution to the understanding of cathodic carbon swelling under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desclaux, Paul

    2001-04-01

    Many laboratory experiments on carbon swelling under pressure with a Rapoport and Samoilenko type apparatus were performed using different carbon samples and experimental conditions. The Young’s modulus, characterizing the mechanical properties of carbon, was measured at different temperatures, mainly at 970 °C under electrolysis conditions. Cathodic carbon swelling was interpreted in terms of partial molar volumes, and the observed results were rationalized by the compressibility of the sodium in solution in the carbon lattice. Its compressibility coefficient was found to be 1.43 · 10-7 MPa-1. The relationship between the apparent Young’s modulus of impregnated carbon and the sodium content was derived. The consequence of this peculiar behavior on the mechanical properties of carbon blocks was discussed.

  12. Scatter imaging of injured brain slices: detection of mitochondrial injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lee J.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    1999-06-01

    Stroke has been shown to cause exitotoxic injury, two of its manifestations being cellular and mitochondrial swelling. In vitro models of stroke attempt to reproduce the effects of stroke by treating brain tissue with excitotoxins or hypotonic solutions. To further resolve the mechanism of stroke injury, we have designed a dual-angle scatter imaging (DASI) system sensitive to particle size. The DASI system has been used with a hippocampal slice preparation to contrast cellular swelling, induced by hypotonicity, and combined cellular and mitochondrial swelling caused by excitotoxicity. We found that both hypotonic end excitotoxic treatments caused changes in light scatter. However, only excitotoxic treatment caused a significant change in DASI.

  13. Effect of bulk density of coking coal on swelling pressure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jinfeng; Yang, Chunwang; Zhao, Zhenning; Zhong, Xiangyun; Zhang, Yaru; Xu, Jun; Xi, Bai; Liu, Hongchun

    2013-12-01

    Coking coals are the important raw materials for the iron and steel industries and play an important role on its sustainable development, especially on the stamp-charging coke making with the characteristics of increasing the bulk density. There is a significance on the reasonable usage of the coking coal resource with the reduced production cost, improved efficiency of the economy to develop the stamp-charging coke making technology. Important effects of the density of coking coal on the coking and caking properties were investigated. In the article, the maximum values of swelling pressure and variation of Laowan gas coal and Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, Longhu fat coal and Didao coking coal, which were mined at Shenyang and Qitaihe respectively, were investigated under different bulk densities during the coking. The results showed that when the values of density increased from 0.85 ton/m(3) to 1.05 ton/m(3), for the Laowan gas coal, swelling pressure variation and even the maximum value changed slightly. The swelling pressure was 3.63 KPa when the density was improved to 1.05 ton/m(3); for the Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, the values of swelling pressure changed significantly and the maximum values was 82.88 KPa with the density improved to 1.05 when the coal was heated to 600°C. The coke porosity, which was investigated by automatic microphotometer, decreased from 47.4% to 33.1% with the increasing of the density from 0.85 ton/m(3) to 1.05 ton/m(3), and the decreased value was 14.3%. Meanwhile, the pore structures of four cokes were characterized by an optical microscope. PMID:25078833

  14. Stress-enhanced swelling of metal during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.; Porter, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    Data are available which show that stress plays a major role in the development of radiation-induced void growth in AISI 316 and many other alloys. Earlier experiments came to the opposite conclusion and are shown to have investigated stress levels which inadvertantly cold-worked the material. Stress-affected swelling spans the entire temperature range in fast reactor irradiations and accelerates with increasing irradiatin temperature. It also appears to operate in all alloy starting conditions investigated. Two major microstructural mechanisms appear to be causing the enhancement of swelling, which for tensile stresses is manifested primarily as a decrease in the incubation period. These mechanisms are stress-induced changes in the interstitial capture efficiency of voids and stress-induced changes in the vacancy emission rate of various microstructural components. There also appears to be an enhancement of intermetallic phase formation with applied stress and this is shown to increase swelling by accelerating the microchemical evolution that precedes void growth at high temperature. This latter consideration complicates the extrapolation of these data to compressive stress states.

  15. Adrenergic activation attenuates astrocyte swelling induced by hypotonicity and neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Horvat, Anemari; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Croom, Deborah; Zeng, Xiang; Lužnik, Zala; Kreft, Marko; Teng, Yang D; Kirov, Sergei A; Zorec, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Edema in the central nervous system can rapidly result in life-threatening complications. Vasogenic edema is clinically manageable, but there is no established medical treatment for cytotoxic edema, which affects astrocytes and is a primary trigger of acute post-traumatic neuronal death. To test the hypothesis that adrenergic receptor agonists, including the stress stimulus epinephrine protects neural parenchyma from damage, we characterized its effects on hypotonicity-induced cellular edema in cortical astrocytes by in vivo and in vitro imaging. After epinephrine administration, hypotonicity-induced swelling of astrocytes was markedly reduced and cytosolic 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was increased, as shown by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensor. Although, the kinetics of epinephrine-induced cAMP signaling was slowed in primary cortical astrocytes exposed to hypotonicity, the swelling reduction by epinephrine was associated with an attenuated hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) excitability, which may be the key to prevent astrocyte swelling. Furthermore, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, epinephrine applied locally markedly reduced neural edema around the contusion epicenter. These findings reveal new targets for the treatment of cellular edema in the central nervous system. GLIA 2016;64:1034-1049. PMID:27018061

  16. Influence of different alcohols on the swelling behaviour of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althans, Daniel; Langenbach, Kai; Enders, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    The swelling equilibrium of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels in alcohol solutions as a function of temperature, alcohol concentration, kind of alcohol (C1OH-C3OH) and gel properties was investigated experimentally. Additionally, the swelling degree as a function of the alcohol concentration was modelled with the UNIQUAC-Free Volume model in combination with the Phantom Network theory. The experiments show that, in pure water, the transition temperature is between 303.15 and 308.15 K depending on the properties of the gel and hence on the polymerization conditions. The transition from a swollen to a shrunken state is caused by the polymeric network and the change of polymer chain localization. In a system with hydrogel + water + alcohol, the swelling degree decreases with increasing alcohol concentration until the shrunken state is reached and increases again by further addition of alcohol at constant temperature. With increasing carbon number of the alcohols, the transition from a swollen to a shrunken state and vice versa shifts to lower concentrations at constant temperature. The use of the UNIQUAC-Free Volume model with Phantom Network theory leads to results in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  18. Dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of maleated hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-06-01

    A series of maleated hyaluronan (MaHA) are developed by modification with maleic anhydride. The degrees of substitution (DS) of MaHA vary between 7% and 75%. The DS of MaHA is both higher and wider than methacrylated HA derivatives (MeHA) reported in the literature. MaHA hydrogels are then prepared by photopolymerization and their dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of the hydrogels are investigated. The results showed that MaHA hydrogels with moderate DS (25%, 50% and 65%) have higher storage modulus and lower equilibrium swelling ratios than those with either low or high DS (7%, 15% and 75%). Theoretical analyses also suggest a similar pattern among hydrogels with different DS. The results confirm that the increased cross-linking density enhances the strength of hydrogels. Meanwhile, the hydrophilicity of introduced groups during modification and the degree of incomplete crosslinking reaction might have negative impact on the mechanical and swelling properties of MaHA hydrogels. PMID:25843871

  19. Swelling equilibria for cationic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.P.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    Cationic HEMA-based hydrogels were synthesized by copolymerizing HEMA with [(methacrylamido)propyl]trimethylammonium chloride (MAPTAC). Swelling equilibria were measured in pure water an in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Hydrogel swelling is an increasing function of the MAPTAC content. A Flory-type swelling model using a concentration-dependent Flory {Chi} parameter semi-qualitatively describes poly(HEMA co-MAPTAC) hydrogel swelling in aqueous sodium chloride.

  20. Non toxic, antibacterial, biodegradable hydrogels with pH-stimuli sensitivity: Investigation of swelling parameters.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, S; Franklin, D S; Sakthivel, M; Guhanathan, S

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a series of pH-sensitive hydrogels were synthesized from Sodium alginate (SA), Ethylene glycol (EG) and Acrylic acid (AA). Biodegradability of hydrogel was tested against soil burial test for 35days and in vitro phosphate buffer solution test for 10days respectively. Degradation of the sample might be due to the breakdown of ester linkage and hydrophilic pendant functionality present in hydrogel. The progression of biodegradation was examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Detailed swelling parameters such as swelling equilibrium Seq (%) at various pH, biological fluids (distilled water (DW), physiological saline 0.89% NaCl (PS), iso-osmotic phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 (PB)) and equilibrium water content (EWC) have also been investigated, which revealed that dynamic compassion of hydrogels. The hydrogel has shown strong antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (gram negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram positive) bacteria's. Cytotoxic assays, using MTT Assay in 3T3 fibroblast Cell line was performed. At 10μg/ml, cell viability was in the range of 92-94%. However, the cell viability (%) decreases with increasing concentration of sample. The synergistic effect of biodegradable hydrogels possessing excellent swelling properties, high water content, biocompatibility and wound healing tendency using in vivo test can be made as suitable candidate for biomedical applications. In vivo wound healing studies conducted on a Wister albino rat model of incision wound performed for 9days. The results revealed that more accelerated wound healing have been observed even in shorter duration. Thus, the synthesized hydrogel with great pH-responsiveness and excellent drug delivery may have a great opening for biomedical applications. PMID:27185133

  1. Neutron Diffraction of Aqueous Tetramethylammonium Chloride (TMA) Solutions and TMA Intercalated Swelling Clays Under Burial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R.; Howard, C. A.; Greenwell, C.; Youngs, T.; Soper, A. K.; Skipper, N. T.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for the improvement and optimisation of clay swelling inhibitors for the enhancement of oil and gas exploration. The hydration region of both ions and the possibility of ion pairing in 1 molar aqueous solution of clay swelling inhibitor, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl), in D2O, under elevated hydrostatic-pressures and temperatures has been determined with unprecedented detail using a combination of neutron diffraction and small-angle scattering in conjunction with hydrogen/deuterium isotopic labeling. The O-H correlation function (H-bonds) for the water in the 1.0M solution is measured and compared with that for pure D2O. Also investigated is the effect of burial conditions on the d-spacing of TMA-intercalated vermiculite. Contrary to expectations, no aggregation of TMA ions due to hydrophobic interactions is observed, nor are any ionic pairs of TMA+ and Cl- at these burial conditions. The data revealed a more ordered water-water structure with the addition of TMACl from bulk D2O. There is no change in the hydration structure measured at the applied elevated conditions. This is in remarkable contrast to pure water at the same conditions which is well known to be compressible. The dry d-spacing of the TMA-exchanged Eucatex vermiculite is measured at 13.66 Å which increases to 14.03 Å with the addition of D2O. Beyond this, there is no change in d-spacing with increasing pressure and temperature indicating the strength of the TMA ions binding to the clay interlayers and therefore its performance as a clay-swelling inhibitor.

  2. Inversion and assessment of swell waveheights from HF radar spectra in the Iroise Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2016-04-01

    As an extension of previous work in Wang et al. (Ocean Dyn 64:1447-1456, 2014), this article presents significant waveheights of swell inverted from a 13 month dataset of two high-frequency (HF) phased array radars. As an important intermediate variable in the calculation of significant waveheights, relative swell directions obtained by two different methods from a single radar station are also presented. The impact of the inaccuracy of relative swell direction on the calculation of waveheight is investigated and an alternative way of using constant swell direction is proposed. Radar-inverted swell significant waveheights using different ranges of relative swell directions are investigated. Results are assessed by WAVEWATCH III model hind casts. Analysis of the complete database shows that radar-inverted swell significant waveheights agree reasonably well with model estimates with large scatter. Standard deviation of the difference between the two estimations increases with waveheight, whereas the relative standard deviation, normalized by waveheight, keeps nearly constant. The constant direction scheme of waveheight inversion gives good estimations except for energetic swell exceeding the small perturbation assumption. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains a considerable part of the difference between radar and model estimates. Swell estimates from both radar stations are consistent. This enables combined use of both radar spectra at common radar cells. Use of double spectra solves the ambiguity of relative swell direction, i.e., absolute swell direction is obtained, and effectively improves the accuracy of swell direction by the least-squares method.

  3. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  4. Osmotic Swelling Pressure Response of Smart Hydrogels Suitable for Chronically-Implantable Glucose Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, G.; Chang, S.; Hao, H.; Tathireddy, P.; Orthner, M.; Magda, J.; Solzbacher, F.

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, a new type of glucose-sensitive hydrogel (GSH) has been developed that shrinks with increasing glucose concentration due to the formation of reversible crosslinks The first osmotic swelling pressure results measured for any member of this new class of GSH are reported, so that their suitability for use in sensors combining pressure transducers and smart gels can be evaluated. Comparison is also made with results obtained for an older type of GSH that expands with increasing glucose concentration due to an increase in the concentration of counterions within the gel. The newer type of GSH exhibits both faster kinetics and weaker fructose interference, and therefore is more suitable for in vivo glucose sensing. PMID:20161690

  5. Age-related axonal swellings precede other neuropathological hallmarks in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Martina; Adalbert, Robert; Janeckova, Lucie; Patrick, Jane; Kohli, Jaskaren; Coleman, Michael P; Conforti, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Axon degeneration precedes cell body death in many age-related neurodegenerative disorders, often determining symptom onset and progression. A sensitive method for revealing axon pathology could indicate whether this is the case also in Huntington's disease (HD), a fatal, devastating neurodegenerative disorder causing progressive deterioration of both physical and mental abilities, and which brain region is affected first. We studied the spatio-temporal relationship between axon pathology, neuronal loss, and mutant Huntingtin aggregate formation in HD mouse models by crossing R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ140 knock-in mice with YFP-H mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in a subset of neurons. We found large axonal swellings developing age-dependently first in stria terminalis and then in corticostriatal axons of HdhQ140 mice, whereas alterations of other neuronal compartments could not be detected. Although mutant Huntingtin accumulated with age in several brain areas, inclusions in the soma did not correlate with swelling of the corresponding axons. Axon abnormalities were not a prominent feature of the rapid progressive pathology of R6/2 mice. Our findings in mice genetically similar to HD patients suggest that axon pathology is an early event in HD and indicate the importance of further studies of stria terminalis axons in man. PMID:24906892

  6. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    dominated deformation at relatively high extensional strains in the pinches. The numerical simulations indicate that viscosity weakening due to dissipated heat from grain size reduction marks the onset of localization, resulting in continuous necking of the layer. Interestingly, there exist multiple steady states, i.e. a first homogeneous state out of which localization arises, steady states of the stable end-member structure, expressed by homogeneous conditions in both pinches and swells, and in the surrounding matrix, the latter obeying a linear rheology. Based on our microstructural and numerical results, we suggest that the onset of localization represents a fundamental material bifurcation. This implies that the studied structures can be described as ductile instabilities. Finally, we discuss the profound role of the energy theory of localization described here, which allows deriving the paleo-deformation conditions, as well as fundamental material properties in a self-consistent manner. REFERENCES Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (2014): Journal of Geophysical Research 119, doi:10.1002/2013JB010701 Peters, M., Veveakis, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A., Herwegh, M. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (2015): Journal of Structural Geology 78, doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2015.06.005

  7. Combined infragravity wave and sea-swell runup over fringing reefs by super typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimozono, Takenori; Tajima, Yoshimitsu; Kennedy, Andrew B.; Nobuoka, Hisamichi; Sasaki, Jun; Sato, Shinji

    2015-06-01

    Super typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines on 8 November 2013, marking one of the strongest typhoons at landfall in recorded history. Extreme storm waves attacked the Pacific coast of Eastern Samar where the violent typhoon first made landfall. Our field survey confirmed that storm overwash heights of 6-14 m above mean sea level were distributed along the southeastern coast and extensive inundation occurred in some coastal villages in spite of natural protection by wide fringing reefs. A wave model based on Boussinesq-type equations is constructed to simulate wave transformation over shallow fringing reefs and validated against existing laboratory data. Wave propagation and runup on the Eastern Samar coast are then reproduced using offshore boundary conditions based on a wave hindcast. The model results suggest that extreme waves on the shore are characterized as a superposition of the infragravity wave and sea-swell components. The balance of the two components is strongly affected by the reef width and beach slope through wave breaking, frictional dissipation, reef-flat resonances, and resonant runup amplification. Therefore, flood characteristics significantly differ from site to site due to a large variation of the two topographic parameters on the hilly coast. Strong coupling of infragravity waves and sea swells produces extreme runup on steep beaches fronted by narrow reefs, whereas the infragravity waves become dominant over wide reefs and they evolve into bores on steep beaches.

  8. Surface Fractal Dimension of Bentonite and its Application in Calculation of Swelling Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, G. S.; Xu, Y. F.; Jiang, H.

    2014-09-01

    The correlation between the void ratio of swelled montmorillonite and the vertical overburden pressure can be expressed as {e}{ m} = Kp{ s}{D{ s}-3}. The surface fractal dimension Ds of five bentonites were estimated from the swelling deformation tests according to this fractal correlation. The reliability of surface fractal dimension obtained from the swelling deformation test was confirmed by nitrogen adsorption test, with identical values of surface fractal dimension obtained from both tests. The surface fractal dimension can also be used to estimate the swelling deformation of bentonite, after calculating the swelling coefficient K from the parameters of diffuse double layer (DDL) model in the osmotic swelling phase. Comparison of the model predictions with a number of experimental results on swelling deformation of both Na dominant and Ca dominant bentonites suggests that the surface fractal model works excellent in the cases tested.

  9. Evaluation of the swelling behaviour of iota-carrageenan in monolithic matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, András; Buchholcz, Gyula; Sovány, Tamás; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2015-08-10

    The swelling properties of monolithic matrix tablets containing iota-carrageenan were studied at different pH values, with measurements of the swelling force and characterization of the profile of the swelling curve. The swelling force meter was linked to a PC by an RS232 cable and the measured data were evaluated with self-developed software. The monitor displayed the swelling force vs. time curve with the important parameters, which could be fitted with an Analysis menu. In the case of iota-carrageenan matrix tablets, it was concluded that the pH and the pressure did not influence the swelling process, and the first section of the swelling curve could be fitted by the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation. PMID:25966465

  10. Surface Strains Associated with the Evolution of Mercury's Domical Swells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, P. B.; Byrne, P. K.; Solomon, S. C.; Zuber, M. T.; Phillips, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Topography and gravity data recovered by the MESSENGER mission have revealed the existence of 3-4 domical topographic swells on Mercury that are characterized by diameters of ~1000 km and coincident geoid highs. A number of mechanisms may explain the formation of these swells, including uplift associated with deep-seated buoyancy or voluminous intrusion of magma. A domical swell within the northern smooth plains (NSP), informally called the northern rise (NR), is perhaps a type example because, unlike the others, it is not obscured by large variations in crustal thickness. The floors of impact craters partially infilled by volcanic plains deposits are tilted by amounts that match the long-wavelength topographic slope, indicating that the growth of the rise largely postdates plains emplacement. Further, high values of low-degree admittance indicate that the NR is either supported by buoyancy near the base of the mantle or is elastically supported under top loading of the lithosphere. The latter of these two scenarios predicts compression at the NR and extension elsewhere in the NSP. The magnitudes of these surface stresses decrease with increasing lithospheric thickness. We use horizontal surface strain, as accommodated by contractional landforms (primarily wrinkle ridges), as a proxy for the stress state subsequent to the emplacement of the NSP. Specifically, we consider the areal density of wrinkle ridges to reflect the distribution of horizontal stress-induced strains in the region. We do not observe higher ridge densities on the NR than across the rest of the NSP, which indicates that any stresses associated with top loading of the lithosphere were less than the global compressive stresses associated with the radial contraction of Mercury. If the NR did form through top loading, the elastic lithosphere must have been at least 100 km thick at the time of NR formation. Fig. 1. Wrinkle ridge densities, calculated with a 200-km smoothing radius and plotted in a

  11. On sorption and swelling of CO2 in clays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Busch, A.; Bertier, P.; Gensterblum, Y.; Rother, G.; Spiers, C. J.; Zhang, M.; Wentinck, H. M.

    2016-03-23

    One well-studied technology is the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), and a number of demonstration projects around the world have proven its feasibility and challenges. Storage conformance and seal integrity are among the most important aspects, as they determine risk of leakage as well as limits for storage capacity and injectivity. By providing evidence for safe storage is critical for improving public acceptance. Most caprocks are composed of clays as dominant mineral type which can typically be illite, kaolinite, chlorite or smectite. A number of recent studies addressed the interaction between CO2 and these different clays and it wasmore » shown that clay minerals adsorb considerable quantities of CO2. For smectite this uptake can lead to volumetric expansion followed by the generation of swelling pressures. On the one hand CO2 adsorption traps CO2, on the other hand swelling pressures can potentially change local stress regimes and in unfavourable situations shear-type failure is assumed to occur. Moreover, for storage in a reservoir having high clay contents the CO2 uptake can add to storage capacity which is widely underestimated so far. Smectite-rich seals in direct contact with a dry CO2 plume at the interface to the reservoir might dehydrate leading to dehydration cracks. Such dehydration cracks can provide pathways for CO2 ingress and further accelerate dewatering and penetration of the seal by supercritical CO2. At the same time, swelling may also lead to the closure of fractures or the reduction of fracture apertures, thereby improving seal integrity. Finally, the goal of this communication is to theoretically evaluate and discuss these scenarios in greater detail in terms of phenomenological mechanisms, but also in terms of potential risks or benefits for carbon storage.« less

  12. Painful Chest Wall Swellings: Tietze Syndrome or Chest Wall Tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Gunal, Nesimi; Gulbahar, Gultekin; Kocer, Bulent; Han, Serdar; Eryazgan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsoy, Arzu; Naldoken, Seniha; Alhan, Aslıhan; Sakinci, Unal

    2016-04-01

    Background Tietze syndrome (TS) is an inflammatory condition characterized by chest pain and swelling of costochondral junction. Primary chest wall tumors may mimic TS. In this article, we report our experience of approximately 121 patients initially diagnosed as TS and determined chest wall tumor in some cases at the follow-up. Methods This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed as TS by clinical examination, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, routine laboratory tests, and computed tomography (CT) of chest: all treated and followed up between March 2001 and July 2012. There were 121 cases (41 males and 80 females; mean age, 39.6 ± 3.2 years) of TS. Results In 27 patients with initial normal radiological findings, the size of swellings had doubled during the follow-up period (mean, 8.51 ± 2.15 months). These patients were reevaluated with chest CT and bone scintigraphy and then early diagnostic biopsy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed primary chest wall tumor in 13 patients (5 malignant, 8 benign). CT had a sensitivity of 92.3% and a specificity of 64.2% in detection of tumors (kappa: 0.56, p = 0.002), whereas the sensitivity and the specificity of bone scan were 84.6 and 35.7%, respectively (kappa: 0.199, p = 0.385). Conclusion Primary chest wall tumors could mimic TS. Bone scintigraphy or CT is not specific enough to determine malignant and other benign disorders of costochondral junction. Therefore, clinicians should follow TS patients more closely, and in case of increasing size of swelling, early diagnostic biopsy should be considered. PMID:25742551

  13. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  14. Swelling-based method for preparing stable, functionalized polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anthony J; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Crocker, John C

    2005-02-16

    We describe a swelling-based method to prepare sterically stabilized polymer colloids with different functional groups or biomolecules attached to their surface. It should be applicable to a variety of polymeric colloids, including magnetic particles, fluorescent particles, polystyrene particles, PMMA particles, and so forth. The resulting particles are more stable in the presence of monovalent and divalent salt than existing functionalized colloids, even in the absence of any surfactant or protein blocker. While we use a PEG polymer brush here, the method should enable the use of a variety of polymer chemistries and molecular weights. PMID:15700965

  15. [Labial recurrent swelling revealing median congenital upper-lip fistula].

    PubMed

    Rohart, J; Nicot, R; Myon, L; Elbaz, J; Raoul, G; Ferri, J

    2015-11-01

    Midline upper-lip fistulas are an extremely rare variant of congenital facial malformations. Less than 30 cases have been reported in the literature since 1970. We report the case of a 2 and a half-year-old girl presenting with a median congenital blind fistula of the upper lip, without any relation with the oral cavity. A recurrent swelling of the upper lip was the main symptom. Complete surgical excision of the cyst or of the fistulous tract must be obtained to avoid recurrence. PMID:26138739

  16. Dynamic measurement of starch granule swelling during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, Johnny; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2016-10-20

    The size of starch granules in dilute aqueous suspension was measured in-line during gelatinization in a microwave-heated, well-mixed system. The results were compared with those of a previous study conducted with conventional heating. For the starches used (common corn, waxy maize, and cross-linked waxy maize), no significant difference was found between microwave and conventional heating in terms of maximum diameter, temperature of maximum rate of diameter increase, or diameter vs. temperature behavior. These results suggest that there are no differences in the swelling behavior of common and modified maize starches between microwave and conventional heating. PMID:27474654

  17. Submandibular gland mucocele presenting as a lateral neck swelling.

    PubMed

    Felstead, Am; Patel, Pm; Revington, Pj

    2012-01-01

    Mucus extravasation cysts or mucoceles are an extremely rare occurrence in the major salivary glands. We report upon an unusual case of a submandibular gland mucocele presenting as a neck lump. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of swellings in the lateral neck. Diagnosis and management are complicated by their similarity to the plunging or cervical ranula and differentiation may be potentially difficult. Detailed imaging often reveals the plunging ranula as being characterised by a so -called 'tail' sign. In our case this sign was absent and subsequent excision confirmed origin from the submandibular gland. We discuss potential treatment modalities and propose a rationale for definitive management. PMID:24960677

  18. Magnetic relaxation--coal swelling, extraction, pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The grant activities during this period fall into four categories: (1) Completion of preparatory work, (2) Procedure refinement and actual preparation of whole coal, coal residue, coal extract and swelled coal samples for NMR studies, (3) Related studies of coal photolysis that employ materials from preliminary extractions and that examine the u.v.-visible and mass spectra of the extracts and (4) Continued investigations of the pulsed EPR characteristics of the whole coal samples that were prepared in the first quarter of the grant.

  19. A young boy with a maxillary swelling and closed rhinolalia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shaji; Nair, Preeti; Kumar, Anil; Hegde, Karthik; Singh, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma belongs to a group of lymphoid neoplasia that is diverse in the manner of presentation, response to therapy and progress. The most common region for extranodal lymphoma is the gastrointestinal tract while for oral cavity buccal vestibule, posterior hard palate or gingiva is the common site. The maxilla is affected more commonly than the mandible. The oral picture being the sole manifestation highlights the importance of bearing this entity in the differential diagnosis of swelling in the jaws. PMID:22715226

  20. Cornea, and the swelling of polyelectrolyte gels of biological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Gerald F.; Hodson, Stuart A.

    1998-10-01

    Biological polyelectrolyte gels consist of insoluble aggregates of molecules which collectively form structural fibrils and these fibrils, or their chemically bound side chains, have a net electrical charge. These gels may be visualized as negatively charged fibrils immersed in aqueous solutions which include free diffusible ions (mainly sodium, potassium and chloride). All living cells and most of the extracellular spaces of the body are polyelectrolyte gels and they strive to swell by the absorption of additional fluid because of the Donnan potentials generated by their fixed charge. We review Donnan swelling using the cornea of the eye as prime material. Donnan swelling requires knowledge of only one parameter such as: (a) the electrical potential within the gel or (b) the distribution of any mobile ion inside and outside the gel or (c) measurement of the gel pressure or (d) the fixed charge density on the fibrils, in order to calculate all the other relevant factors. We describe the conditions (which usually exist in biological tissue) when the microscopic distribution of the fixed charge density within the gel is not important to the Donnan phenomena. Fixed charge density is generated by two sources: permanent negative charges in the structural fibrils and transient mobile ion binding to the fibrils. Ion binding to large molecules is reviewed. In the case of the cornea, transient mobile ion binding is the predominant factor in generating fixed charge density under physiological conditions. An irreversible thermodynamic treatment of gel swelling shows the intrinsic instability of polyelectrolyte gels and suggests new ways of approaching a microscopic model for osmosis. In order to stabilize the two forces (osmotic potential and chemical potential) which generate the polyelectrolyte gel instability we review the types of third forces which must be present in order to stabilize biological gels. These third forces include van der Waal's force, metabolically driven

  1. Rhinosporidiosis of lacrimal sac: An interesting case of orbital swelling

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip Kanti; Bain, Jayanta; Maity, Kuntal; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Baitalik, Debasis; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar; Gupta, Vivek; Kumar, Ashwini; Dalal, Bibhas Saha; Malik, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic localized granulomatous disease caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi, an aquatic protistan parasite belonging to a clade, Mesomycetozoea. Infestation of Rhinosporidiosis to the eye and adnexa is termed oculosporidiosis, in such cases, conjunctival mucosa is mostly involved; however in our case, it involved only the lacrimal sac and deeper periorbital tissue and presented as a case of orbital swelling. Surgical excision of the lesion was done, postoperatively dapsone therapy was given for 6 months, and the patient responded very well with no recurrence till date. PMID:27003980

  2. Brain water mobility decreases after astrocytic aquaporin-4 inhibition using RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Badaut, Jérôme; Ashwal, Stephen; Adami, Arash; Tone, Beatriz; Recker, Rebecca; Spagnoli, David; Ternon, Béatrice; Obenaus, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging with diffusion-weighted imaging is routinely used for clinical diagnosis/prognosis. Its quantitative parameter, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), is thought to reflect water mobility in brain tissues. After injury, reduced ADC values are thought to be secondary to decreases in the extracellular space caused by cell swelling. However, the physiological mechanisms associated with such changes remain uncertain. Aquaporins (AQPs) facilitate water diffusion through the plasma membrane and provide a unique opportunity to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying water mobility. Because of this critical role and the recognition that brain AQP4 is distributed within astrocytic cell membranes, we hypothesized that AQP4 contributes to the regulation of water diffusion and variations in its expression would alter ADC values in normal brain. Using RNA interference in the rodent brain, we acutely knocked down AQP4 expression and observed that a 27% AQP4-specific silencing induced a 50% decrease in ADC values, without modification of tissue histology. Our results demonstrate that ADC values in normal brain are modulated by astrocytic AQP4. These findings have major clinical relevance as they suggest that imaging changes seen in acute neurologic disorders such as stroke and trauma are in part due to changes in tissue AQP4 levels. PMID:20877385

  3. [Brain abscess - overview].

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, Olafur Arni; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Olafsson, Ingvar H

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a life threatening illness, demanding rapid diagnosis and treatment. Its development requires seeding of an organism into the brain parenchyma, often in an area of damaged brain tissue or in a region with poor microcirculation. The lesion evolves from a cerebritis stage to capsule formation. Brain abscesses can be caused by contiguous or haematogenous spread of an infection, or by head trauma/ neurosurgical procedure. The most common presentation is that of headache and vomiting due to raised intracranial pressure. Seizures have been reported in up to 50% of cases. Focal neurological deficits may be present, depending on the location of the lesion. Treatment of a brain abscess involves aspiration or excision, along with parenteral antibiotic therapy. The outcome has improved dramatically in the last decades due to improvement in diagnostic techniques, neurosurgery, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. The authors provide an overview of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of brain abscesses. PMID:23341403

  4. Effect of defect imbalance on void swelling distributions produced in pure iron irradiated with 3.5 MeV self-ions

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lin; Wei, C. -C.; Gigax, J.; Aitkaliyeva, A.; Chen, D.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.

    2014-06-10

    Ion irradiation has been widely used to simulate radiation damage induced by neutrons. However, there are a number of features of ion-induced damage that differ from neutron-induced damage, and these differences require investigation before behavior arising from neutron bombardment can be confidently predicted from ion data. In this study 3.5 MeV self-ion irradiation of pure iron was used to study the influence on void swelling of the depth-dependent defect imbalance between vacancies and interstitials that arises from various surface effects, forward scattering of displaced atoms, and especially the injected interstitial effect. The depth dependence of void swelling was observed not to follow the behavior anticipated from the depth dependence of the damage rate. Void nucleation and growth develop first in the lower-dose, near-surface region, and then, during continued irradiation, move to progressively deeper and higher-damage depths. This indicates a strong initial suppression of void nucleation in the peak damage region that continued irradiation eventually overcomes. This phenomenon is shown by the Boltzmann transport equation method to be due to depth-dependent defect imbalances created under ion irradiation. These findings thus demonstrate that void swelling does not depend solely on the local dose level and that this sensitivity of swelling to depth must be considered in extracting and interpreting ion-induced swelling data.

  5. Effect of defect imbalance on void swelling distributions produced in pure iron irradiated with 3.5 MeV self-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lin; Wei, C.-C.; Gigax, J.; Aitkaliyeva, A.; Chen, D.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.

    2014-10-01

    Ion irradiation has been widely used to simulate neutron-induced radiation damage. There are a number of features of ion-induced damage that differ from neutron-induced damage, however, and these differences require investigation before ion data can be confidently used to predict behavior arising from neutron bombardment. In this study 3.5 MeV self-ion irradiation of pure iron was used to study the influence on void swelling of the depth-dependent defect imbalance between vacancies and interstitials that arises from various surface effects, forward scattering of displaced atoms, and especially the injected interstitial effect. It was observed that the depth dependence of void swelling does not follow the behavior anticipated from the depth dependence of the damage rate. Void nucleation and growth develop first in the lower-dose, near-surface region, and then moves to progressively deeper and higher-damage depths during continued irradiation. This indicates a strong initial suppression of void nucleation in the peak damage region that is eventually overcome with continued irradiation. Using the Boltzmann transport equation method, this phenomenon is shown to be due to depth-dependent defect imbalances created under ion irradiation. These findings demonstrate that void swelling does not depend solely on the local dose level and that this sensitivity of swelling to depth must be considered in extraction and interpretation of ion-induced swelling data.

  6. Swelling of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) P(NIPA)-based hydrogels with bacterial-synthesized prodigiosin for localized cancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Danyuo, Y; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Obayemi, J D; Ani, C J; Odusanya, O S; Oni, Y; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Soboyejo, W O

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of swelling experiments on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) P(NIPA)-based hydrogels. The swelling characteristics of P(NIPA)-based homo-polymer and P(NIPA)-based co-polymers with Acrylamide (AM) and Butyl Methacrylate (BMA), were studied using weight gain experiments. The swelling due to the uptake of biosynthesized cancer drug, prodigiosin (PG), was compared to swelling in controlled environments (distilled water (DW), paclitaxel™ (PT) and bromophenol blue (BB)). PG was synthesized with Serratia marcescens (SM) subsp. marcescens bacteria. The mechanisms of drug diffusion and swelling of P(NIPA)-based hydrogels are also elucidated along with characterizing the heterogeneous porous structure of the P(NIPA)-based hydrogels. High Performance Liquefied Chromatography (HPLC) analysis revealed the purity of the biosynthesized prodigiosin to be 92.8%. PG was then absorbed by P(NIPA)-based hydrogels at temperatures between 28-48°C. This is a temperature range that might be encountered during the implantation of biomedical devices for localized cancer treatment via drug delivery and hyperthermia. The results obtained are shown to provide insights for the design of implantable biomedical devices for the localized treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26652344

  7. Effect of defect imbalance on void swelling distributions produced in pure iron irradiated with 3.5 MeV self-ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shao, Lin; Wei, C. -C.; Gigax, J.; Aitkaliyeva, A.; Chen, D.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.

    2014-06-10

    Ion irradiation has been widely used to simulate radiation damage induced by neutrons. However, there are a number of features of ion-induced damage that differ from neutron-induced damage, and these differences require investigation before behavior arising from neutron bombardment can be confidently predicted from ion data. In this study 3.5 MeV self-ion irradiation of pure iron was used to study the influence on void swelling of the depth-dependent defect imbalance between vacancies and interstitials that arises from various surface effects, forward scattering of displaced atoms, and especially the injected interstitial effect. The depth dependence of void swelling was observed notmore » to follow the behavior anticipated from the depth dependence of the damage rate. Void nucleation and growth develop first in the lower-dose, near-surface region, and then, during continued irradiation, move to progressively deeper and higher-damage depths. This indicates a strong initial suppression of void nucleation in the peak damage region that continued irradiation eventually overcomes. This phenomenon is shown by the Boltzmann transport equation method to be due to depth-dependent defect imbalances created under ion irradiation. These findings thus demonstrate that void swelling does not depend solely on the local dose level and that this sensitivity of swelling to depth must be considered in extracting and interpreting ion-induced swelling data.« less

  8. Influence of boron on void swelling in model austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, T.; Wolfer, W. G.; Garner, F. A.; Sekimura, N.

    2004-08-01

    Model austenitic steels based on Fe-15Cr-16Ni with additions of 0.25Ti, 500 appm B, or 0.25Ti-500 appm B were irradiated in FFTF/MOTA over a wide range of dose rates at ˜400 °C. In addition to the effect of dose rate on swelling, it was desired to study the effect of boron addition to produce variations in He/dpa ratio. A strong effect of dose rate was observed, so strong that the relatively small distances separating the boron-free and doped alloys introduced a complication into the experiment. For specimens irradiated within the core, boron addition had no significant effect. For irradiations conducted near or outside the core edge, swelling appeared to be either enhanced or decreased by boron. The variability was a consequence of a strong dose rate effect overwhelming the influence of boron and helium. It is shown that helium exerted little influence relative to other important factors in these alloys.

  9. Shape instability on swelling of a stretched nematic elastomer filament.

    PubMed

    Cheewaruangroj, N; Terentjev, E M

    2015-10-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers combine the ordering properties of liquid crystals with elasticity of crosslinked polymer networks. In monodomain (permanently aligned) elastomers, altering the orientational (nematic) order causes changes in the equilibrium sample length, which is the basis of the famous effect of large-amplitude reversible mechanical actuation. The stimulus for this effect could be a change in temperature, or illumination by light in photosensitized elastomers, but equally the nematic order changes by mixing with a solvent. This work theoretically investigates a competition between the spontaneous contraction on swelling of a monodomain nematic elastomer and the externally imposed stretching. We find that this competition leads to bistability in the system and allows a two-phase separation between a nematic state with lower swelling and an isotropic state with higher solvent concentration. We calculated the conditions in which the instability occurs as well as the mechanical and geometric parameters of equilibrium states. Being able to predict how this instability arises will provide opportunities for exploiting nematic elastomer filaments. PMID:26565260

  10. Swelling Behavior of Ultrathin Polymer Films in Supercritical Ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuan; Koga, Tadanori; Seo, Young-Soo; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Satija, Sushil

    2003-03-01

    Swelling behavior of ultrathin polymer films in supercritical ethane (T_c=32^oC, P_c=4.86MPa) was investigated by using in situ neutron reflectivity (NR). The polymers used in this study were deuterated polystyrene(dPS), deuterated styrene-butadiene copolymer(dSBR), deuterated polymethylmethacrylate(dPMMA), deuterated polybutadiene(dPB) and the films were spun cast on the HF etched cleaned silicon wafers. NR experiments were conducted with the pressure range of 0.1-15 MPa at T=37^oC by using NG7 reflectometer at NIST. As a result, we found that all the polymers used showed anomalous peak in the linear dilation (S_f) curve at P=5.5MPa, i.e., the density fluctuation ridge of ethane while the Sf values for the rubbery polymers were significantly larger (0.8) than those of glassy polymers (0.3). In this presentation, we will also discuss about the universality in the swelling behavior of the polymer thin films in the presence of the supercritical fluids.

  11. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Seçkin D.

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  12. The measurement of ox corneal swelling pressure by osmometry.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, S; O'Leary, D; Watkins, S

    1991-01-01

    1. Ox corneal stromal swelling pressure (gel pressure) may be measured by osmometry: polyethylene glycol of nominal molecular mass 10,000 Da (PEG 10K) is a suitable non-penetrating solute. 2. Corneal hydrations equilibrate within 4 h of exposure to 154 mM-NaCl including various concentrations (2-8%) of PEG 10K, providing that the epithelium covers the anterior surface and Descemet's membrane covers the posterior surface. At equilibrium hydration, corneal gel pressure equals the external osmotic pressure contributed by PEG 10K. 3. The osmotic pressure of PEG 10K may be calibrated using Descemet's membrane as the semi-permeable membrane. 4. Corneal gel pressure decreases with increasing hydration. 5. The relationship may be adequately explained by the Donnan theory of corneal swelling with a fixed negative matrix charge of 39.5 +/- 0.8 mequiv l-1 at physiological hydration of 3.2 at this salt concentration (154 mM-NaCl). PMID:2023123

  13. Induced swelling in radiation damaged ZrSiO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarhos, G. J.

    1984-02-01

    A hydrothermal gelation method was used to prepare phase pure polycrystalline ZrSiO 4 which was sintered to 95% theoretical density. Actinide doped samples containing 10 wt% 238Pu were prepared by an analogous procedure and incurred bulk radiation damage through internal alpha-decay processes. Undoped samples were subjected to external irradiation from 5.5 MeV alpha sources, and from a 60Co gamma source. Actinide doped ZrSiO 4 exhibits dose dependent swelling caused by displacement processes leading to ingrowth of amorphous regions. Bulk density and XRD measurements, as a function of dose, showed first order exponential ingrowth behavior similar to that observed in other actinide doped materials. Results are compared with reported data for naturally damaged crystals subjected to significantly lower alpha decay rates. No significant dose rate dependence on damage ingrowth has been observed. Kinetic models for the observed dose dependent swelling are proposed and rate constants for damage ingrowth in synthetic and natural crystals are compared. To study localized damage induced by both external alpha and gamma irradiation, vibrational Raman measurements were obtained for several accumulated doses. Results indicate that the initial stage of damage ingrowth is confined to the silicate sublattice. Vibrational results will be discussed in terms of microstructural changes which result from irradiation.

  14. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths.

    PubMed

    Günay, Seçkin D

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  15. Pore-scale Modelling of Capillarity in Swelling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Sweijen, T.; Nikooee, E.; Chareyre, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillarity in granular porous media is a common and important phenomenon in earth materials and industrial products, and therefore has been studied extensively. To model capillarity in granular porous media, one needs to go beyond current models which simulate either two-phase flow in porous media or mechanical behaviour in granular media. Current pore-scale models for two-phase flow such as pore-network models are tailored for rigid pore-skeletons, even though in many applications, namely hydro-mechanical coupling in soils, printing, and hygienic products, the porous structure does change during two-phase flow. On the other hand, models such as Discrete Element Method (DEM), which simulate the deformable porous media, have mostly been employed for dry or saturated granular media. Here, the effects of porosity change and swelling on the retention properties was studied, for swelling granular materials. A pore-unit model that was capable to construct the capillary pressure - saturation curve was coupled to DEM. Such that the capillary pressure - saturation curve could be constructed for varying porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The study material was super absorbent polymer particles, which are capable to absorb water 10's to 200 times their initial weight. We have simulated quasi-static primary imbibition for different porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The results reveal a 3 dimensional surface between capillary pressure, saturation, and porosity, which can be normalized by means of the entry pressure and the effective water saturation to a unique curve.

  16. Polymer-Induced Swelling of Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Martin; Trapp, Marcus; Dahint, Reiner; Steitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction of charged polymers with solid-supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes by in-situ neutron reflectivity. We observe an enormous swelling of the oligolamellar lipid bilayer stacks after incubation in solutions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) in D2O. The positively charged polyelectrolyte molecules interact with the lipid bilayers and induce a drastic increase in their d-spacing by a factor of ~4. Temperature, time, and pH influence the swollen interfacial lipid linings. From our study, we conclude that electrostatic interactions introduced by the adsorbed PAH are the main cause for the drastic swelling of the lipid coatings. The DMPC membrane stacks do not detach from their solid support at T > Tm. Steric interactions, also introduced by the PAH molecules, are held responsible for the stabilizing effect. We believe that this novel system offers great potential for fundamental studies of biomembrane properties, keeping the membrane’s natural fluidity and freedom, decoupled from a solid support at physiological conditions. PMID:26703746

  17. Textureless Macula Swelling Detection with Multiple Retinal Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect

    Giancardo, Luca; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Grisan, Enrico; Favaro, Paolo; Ruggeri, Alfredo; Chaum, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Retinal fundus images acquired with non-mydriatic digital fundus cameras are a versatile tool for the diagnosis of various retinal diseases. Because of the ease of use of newer camera models and their relatively low cost, these cameras can be employed by operators with limited training for telemedicine or Point-of-Care applications. We propose a novel technique that uses uncalibrated multiple-view fundus images to analyse the swelling of the macula. This innovation enables the detection and quantitative measurement of swollen areas by remote ophthalmologists. This capability is not available with a single image and prone to error with stereo fundus cameras. We also present automatic algorithms to measure features from the reconstructed image which are useful in Point-of-Care automated diagnosis of early macular edema, e.g., before the appearance of exudation. The technique presented is divided into three parts: first, a preprocessing technique simultaneously enhances the dark microstructures of the macula and equalises the image; second, all available views are registered using non-morphological sparse features; finally, a dense pyramidal optical flow is calculated for all the images and statistically combined to build a naiveheight- map of the macula. Results are presented on three sets of synthetic images and two sets of real world images. These preliminary tests show the ability to infer a minimum swelling of 300 microns and to correlate the reconstruction with the swollen location.

  18. In situ characterization of structural dynamics in swelling hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Sepulveda, J R; Deng, J; Fang, J Y; Dogariu, A

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the structural morphology and the local viscoelastic properties of soft complex systems raises significant challenges. Here we introduce a dynamic light scattering method capable of in situ, continuous monitoring of structural changes in evolving systems such as swelling gels. We show that the inherently non-stationary dynamics of embedded probes can be followed using partially coherent radiation, which effectively isolates only single scattering contributions even during the dramatic changes in the scattering regime. Using a simple and robust experimental setup, we demonstrate the ability to continuously monitor the structural dynamics of chitosan hydrogels formed by the Ag(+) ion-triggered gelation during their long-term swelling process. We demonstrate that both the local viscoelastic properties of the suspending medium and an effective cage size experienced by diffusing probe particles loaded into the hydrogel can be recovered and used to describe the structural dynamics of hydrogels with different levels of cross-linking. This characterization capability is critical for defining and controlling the hydrogel performance in different biomedical applications. PMID:27336408

  19. Swelling, Compressibility, and Phase Behavior of Soft Ionic Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan

    Soft colloids have inspired great attention recently for their rich and tunable materials properties. Particular interest has focused on microgels - microscopic cross-linked polymer gel particles that, when dispersed in water, become swollen and can acquire charge through dissociation of counterions. Electrostatic interparticle interactions strongly influence the structure and thermodynamics of ionic microgel suspensions*. Permeability to solvent molecules and small ions creates a competition between elastic and electrostatic forces that determines equilibrium particle sizes. Swelling can be controlled by adjusting temperature, pH, and salt concentration, with applications to chemical/biosensing and targeted drug delivery. By combining molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation with Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics and Flory-Rehner theory of swollen polymer networks, we investigate swelling and compressibility of ionic microgel particles and implications for thermodynamic phase behavior of bulk suspensions at concentrations approaching and exceeding hard-sphere close packing. Predictions for particle size and osmotic pressure are compared with available experimental data. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  20. Swelling assisted photografting of itaconic acid onto sodium alginate membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkın, Gülşen; Şanlı, Oya; Asman, Gülsen

    2011-09-01

    Grafting of itaconic acid (IA) was achieved onto sodium alginate (NaAlg) membranes by using UV-radiation. Process was performed under nitrogen atmosphere and benzophenone (BP) was used as a photoinitiator. Membranes were preswelled before the polymerization process and ethanol was determined as the best swelling agent among the studied solvents. The effect of polymerization time, initiator and monomer concentrations on the grafting efficiency were investigated. The best conditions for optimum grafting were obtained with IA concentration of 1.0 M, a BP concentration of 0.1 M and a reaction time of 4 h at 25 °C. Under these conditions grafting efficiency for NaAlg-g-IA membranes was found to be 14% (w/w). To obtain further increase in grafting efficiency membranes were also preswelled in IA and BP solutions and polymerization was carried out at different temperatures after UV polymerization. Grafted membranes were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Effect of grafting on membrane properties such as intrinsic viscosity and swelling percentage were also determined.

  1. Hereditary Angioedema Attacks: Local Swelling at Multiple Sites.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Zonne L M; Relan, Anurag; Hack, C Erik

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent local swelling in various parts of the body including painful swelling of the intestine and life-threatening laryngeal oedema. Most HAE literature is about attacks located in one anatomical site, though it is mentioned that HAE attacks may also involve multiple anatomical sites simultaneously. A detailed description of such multi-location attacks is currently lacking. This study investigated the occurrence, severity and clinical course of HAE attacks with multiple anatomical locations. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. Visual analog scale scores filled out by the patients for various symptoms at various locations and investigator symptoms scores during the attack were analysed. Data of 219 eligible attacks in 119 patients was analysed. Thirty-three patients (28%) had symptoms at multiple locations in anatomically unrelated regions at the same time during their first attack. Up to five simultaneously affected locations were reported. The observation that severe HAE attacks often affect multiple sites in the body suggests that HAE symptoms result from a systemic rather than from a local process as is currently believed. PMID:25527240

  2. Swelling and osmotic flow in a potential host rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horseman, S. T.; Harrington, J. F.; Noy, D. J.

    Measurements of osmotic and hydraulic permeability are reported for a series of tests conducted on Opalinus Clay samples from the Mt. Terri underground research laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NE Switzerland. Osmotic flow was observed across discs of this clayshale separating 0.245 M NaCl solution from distilled water. Pressure transients monitored during constant flow rate testing were analysed to give permeability and specific storage values. The mean permeability normal to bedding of the two Opalinus Clay specimens was 7.9 × 10 -21 m 2. The mean specific storage based on all reliable determinations was 4.1 × 10 -4 m -1. Values calculated from the steady-state pressure gradients established during constant flow rate testing were very close to those obtained by mathematical analysis of pressure transients. The calculation of the transients was carried out using a new model of flow and solute transport which included terms for the osmotic coupling. The form of the pressure transients and the magnitude of the strain seen during the tests lead to a revision to the definition of solid phase compressibility to incorporate a term dependent upon the osmotic coupling coefficient. Steady-state osmotic flow rates were in the range 0.1-0.6 μL h -1 when the specimens were placed between a sodium chloride solution with a theoretical osmotic pressure of 1.19 MPa and distilled water. Transient flow rates were substantially larger. Membrane efficiencies were found to be relatively low, ranging from 1% to 6% (mean around 4%). The mean osmotic permeability normal to bedding was 3.5 × 10 -22 m 2. Specific storage and pore compressibility values were substantially larger than anticipated, suggesting that the volumetric strain of the clayshale under the conditions of laboratory testing must be largely determined by quasi-elastic deformation processes such as swelling and crack dilation. To test this hypothesis, a 3-D swelling test was performed on a cubic specimen of the same

  3. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but

  4. Swell dissipation from 10 years of Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar in wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Husson, Romain; Jiang, Haoyu; Chapron, Bertrand; Collard, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Swells are found in all oceans and strongly influence the wave climate and air-sea processes. The poorly known swell dissipation is the largest source of error in wave forecasts and hindcasts. We use synthetic aperture radar data to identify swell sources and trajectories, allowing a statistically significant estimation of swell dissipation. We mined the entire Envisat mission 2003-2012 to find suitable storms with swells (13 < T < 18 s) that are observed several times along their propagation. This database of swell events provides a comprehensive view of swell extending previous efforts. The analysis reveals that swell dissipation weakly correlates with the wave steepness, wind speed, orbital wave velocity, and the relative direction of wind and waves. Although several negative dissipation rates are found, there are uncertainties in the synthetic aperture radar-derived swell heights and dissipation rates. An acceptable range of the swell dissipation rate is -0.1 to 6 × 10-7 m-1 with a median of 1 × 10-7 m-1.

  5. Near Real-Time Computer Assisted Surgery for Brain Shift Correction Using Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Weis, Jared A.; Thompson, Reid C.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional image-guided neurosurgery relies on preoperative images to provide surgical navigational information and visualization. However, these images are no longer accurate once the skull has been opened and brain shift occurs. To account for changes in the shape of the brain caused by mechanical (e.g., gravity-induced deformations) and physiological effects (e.g., hyperosmotic drug-induced shrinking, or edema-induced swelling), updated images of the brain must be provided to the neuronavigation system in a timely manner for practical use in the operating room. In this paper, a novel preoperative and intraoperative computational processing pipeline for near real-time brain shift correction in the operating room was developed to automate and simplify the processing steps. Preoperatively, a computer model of the patient’s brain with a subsequent atlas of potential deformations due to surgery is generated from diagnostic image volumes. In the case of interim gross changes between diagnosis, and surgery when reimaging is necessary, our preoperative pipeline can be generated within one day of surgery. Intraoperatively, sparse data measuring the cortical brain surface is collected using an optically tracked portable laser range scanner. These data are then used to guide an inverse modeling framework whereby full volumetric brain deformations are reconstructed from precomputed atlas solutions to rapidly match intraoperative cortical surface shift measurements. Once complete, the volumetric displacement field is used to update, i.e., deform, preoperative brain images to their intraoperative shifted state. In this paper, five surgical cases were analyzed with respect to the computational pipeline and workflow timing. With respect to postcortical surface data acquisition, the approximate execution time was 4.5 min. The total update process which included positioning the scanner, data acquisition, inverse model processing, and image deforming was ∼ 11–13 min. In

  6. Role of dietary polyphenols in attenuating brain edema and cell swelling in cerebral ischemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are enriched in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. Recent interest...

  7. Swelling behavior of O-alkylated APCS coals as examined by the EPR spin probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ruisong; Tucker, D.; Kispert, L.D.

    1995-12-31

    Known O-alkylation procedures have been used to derivatize the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups in the APCS coals Lewiston-Stockton, Wyodak-Anderson, Beulah-Zap, Illinois {number_sign}6, Upper Freeport, and Pittsburgh {number_sign}8. In general the resulting decrease in hydrogen bonding reduced the cyclical variation in nitroxide spin probe retention observed for nonalkylated coals when small amounts (<1%) of pyridine are present in the toluene swelling solvent. An increase in spin probe retention by the O-alkylated coals relative to the underivatized coals indicates a more open arrangement in the coal due to a decrease in attractive forces, confirming that microporosity increases with increasing rank.

  8. [Cervical actinomycosis due to Actinomyces naeslundii].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii, an oral biofilm bacterium of, can be cured using intravenous piperacillin, clindamycin, and surgery. We report a case of cervical actinomycosis due to Actinomyces naeslundii. A 56-year-old man seen for right cervical swelling had undergone dental work. Computed tomography indicated an abscess, from which we aspirated pus using a needle. Although no sulfur granules were found, pus yielded Actinomyces naeslundii. This case is, to our knowledge, the first reported in Japan of cervical actinomycosis due to A. naeslundii. PMID:21838058

  9. Liquid crystalline systems of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate containing a hydrophilic protein: Characterisation, swelling and release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, S B; Hanley, T; Boyd, B J; Rades, T; Hook, S

    2009-11-01

    Swelling and phase behaviour of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) matrices with varying water loadings were investigated. Release of a model protein, FITC-Ova was subsequently examined. Polarised light microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering analysis showed that the addition of FITC-Ova only altered the liquid crystalline structure of phytantriol matrices at low water loadings, and that postrelease study, the phase structure of matrices at both low and high loading reflected that of the binary system. Addition of FITC-Ova to GMO matrices also altered the liquid crystalline structure when compared to the respective binary system at low but not at high loading. All samples analysed after the release study had transformed to the reverse hexagonal phase (H(II)). Swelling studies revealed a faster and more extensive swelling of GMO when compared to phytantriol. Release of FITC-Ova from phytantriol matrices was faster and occurred to a greater extent most likely due to the conversion of GMO matrices into the H(II) phase. No effect on release as a function of initial water content was observed for either lipid. We have confirmed that phytantriol based liquid crystalline matrices can sustain the release of a hydrophilic protein, suggesting its suitability as a potential sustained antigen-delivery system. PMID:19340889

  10. Longitudinal design for sonographic measurement of median nerve swelling with controlled exposure to physical work using an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Evans, Kevin D.; Volz, Kevin R.; Sommerich, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a longitudinal design to sonographically measure swelling of the median nerve due to controlled exposure to a work task and to evaluate the relationship of changes in morphology to diagnostic standards. Fifteen macaca fascicularis pinched a lever in various wrist positions at a self-regulated pace (8 hours/day, 5 days/week, 18–20 weeks). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and cross-sectional area (CSA) were obtained every two weeks from baseline through working and a 6-week recovery. Trending across all subjects showed that NCV slowed and CSA at the carpal tunnel increased in the working arm, while no changes were observed in CSA either at the forearm or for any measure in the non-working arm. There was a small negative correlation between NCV and CSA in the working arm. This study provides validation that swelling can be observed using a longitudinal design. Longitudinal human studies are needed to describe the trajectory of nerve swelling for early identification of median nerve pathology. PMID:24139197

  11. Radiation-induced swelling and softening in magnesium aluminate spinel irradiated with high-flux Cu - ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. G.; Ohmura, T.; Takeda, Y.; Matsuoka, S.; Kishimoto, N.

    2004-03-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel of single crystal was irradiated with 60 keV Cu - at a flux up to 6.2 × 10 18 ions/m 2 s, to a total fluence of 3 × 10 20 ions/m 2, in order to study changes in hardness and step-height swelling by high-flux implantation. Hardness determined by nano-indentation measurements steeply decreased with implantation. There is a strong negative correlation between flux dependences of the hardness and the step-height swelling: the former decreases as the latter increases. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/channeling measurements showed that the spinel is not completely amorphized over the flux range in this study, and the radiation-induced softening observed is not due to amorphization. Results of optical absorbance suggested that radiation-induced point defects and their clusters on the anion sublattices of the spinel played an important role in the radiation-induced swelling under high-flux ion implantation.

  12. Effect of pre-implanted helium on void swelling evolution in self-ion irradiated HT9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Jiao, Z.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Sun, K.; Was, G. S.

    2015-07-01

    Void evolution in Fe++-irradiated ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 was characterized in the temperature range of 400-480 °C between doses of 25 and 375 displacements per atom (dpa) with pre-implanted helium levels of 0-100 appm. A systematic study using depth profiling in cross-section samples was conducted to determine a valid region of analysis between 300 and 700 nm from the surface, which excluded effects due to the injected interstitial and the surface. Pre-implanted helium was found to promote void swelling at low doses by shortening the nucleation regime and to retard void growth at doses in the transient regime by enhancement of nucleation of small voids. Swelling was found to peak at a temperature of 460 °C. The primary effect of temperature was on the nucleation regime; nucleation regime was the shortest at 460 °C compared to that at 440 and 480 °C. The growth rate of voids was temperature-invariant. Steady state swelling was reached at 460 °C between 188 and 375 dpa at a rate of 0.02%/dpa.

  13. Free swell characteristics of PCC bottom ash-bentonite mixtures with curing for use as fill or liner material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Burrus, N.

    2005-07-01

    Bottom ash is a coal combustion product (CCP) obtained from burning of pulverized coal to produce electricity. Most of the bottom ash from pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants is disposed of in landfills and/or ash ponds. Over the last decade, there has been increased attention aimed toward the use of PCC bottom ash in geotechnical applications. The particle size distribution of pulverized coal combustion (PCC) bottom ash is similar to that of natural sand. Naturals and is commonly used in the construction industry in place of cohesive soils by adding admixtures to amend its properties. Several studies have been completed to determine the properties of bottom ash amended with bentonite. However, due to significant volume change characteristics of bentonite, soils or similar granular materials amended with it need to be evaluated for their swelling behavior. In addition, studies all bottom ash-bentonite mixtures have shown that strength and stiffness characteristics of these mixtures change significantly with curing. Therefore, in order to evaluate the use of bottom ash as a fill or landfill liner material, this study was initiated to investigate the effect of curing and moisture content on the swelling: characteristics of pulverized coal combustion bottom ash amended with bentonite. Bottom ash specimens containing 15 and 20 percent bentonite and prepared at 14, 16 and 18 percent initial moisture content were tested in this investigation. Results presented show the swelling characteristics of bottom ash-bentonite mixtures with curing age up to 60 days.

  14. Swelling and dislocation evolution in simple ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence in FFTF/MOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira; Gelles, David S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructures of a series of Fe sbnd Cr binary ferritic alloys were examined following neutron irradiation to 140 dpa at 698 K in FFTF/MOTA. The chromium concentration ranged from 3 to 18% in 3% increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. The swelling varied from 0.4 to 2.9% depending on chromium concentration, and the highest swelling was found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr alloy. The cavity microstructures corresponded to transient to early steady-state swelling regime. Dislocations were composed of networks with both a<100> and ( a/2)<111> Burgers vector and a<100> type interstitial loops. The dislocation density was negatively correlated with swelling. Explanation for the observed chromium concentration dependence of microstructural development and low swelling in the ferritic alloys will be studied in connection with the dislocation bias efficiency and the theory of sink strength ratio.

  15. The correlation between swelling and radiation-induced segregation in iron-chromium-nickel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.; Kenik, E. A.; Was, G. S.

    1998-03-05

    The magnitudes of both void swelling and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in iron-chromium-nickel alloys are dependent on bulk alloy composition. Because the diffusivity of nickel via the vacancy flux is slow relative to chromium, nickel enriches and chromium depletes at void surfaces during irradiation. This local composition change reduces the subsequent vacancy flux to the void, thereby reducing void swelling. In this work, the resistance to swelling from major element segregation is estimated using diffusivities derived from grain boundary segregation measurements in irradiated iron-chromium-nickel alloys. The resistance to void swelling in iron- and nickel-base alloys correlates with the segregation and both are functions of bulk alloy composition. Alloys that display the greatest amount of nickel enrichment and chromium depletion are found to be most resistant to void swelling, as predicted. Additionally, swelling is shown to be greater in alloys in which the RIS profiles are slow to develop.

  16. Swelling and erosion of pectin matrix tablets and their impact on drug release behavior.

    PubMed

    Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Thirawong, Nartaya; Weerapol, Yossanun; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate swelling and erosion behaviors of hydrophilic matrix tablets using pectin and their impact on drug release. The matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression using different types of pectin. Swelling and erosion studies of pectin matrix tablets were carried out in various media. The pectin matrix tablets formed a continuous gel layer while in contact with the aqueous medium undergoing a combination of swelling and erosion. The swelling action of pectin matrices was controlled by the rate of its hydration in the medium. Release studies showed that the swelling and erosion of matrices influenced the drug release. The extent of matrix swelling, erosion and diffusion of drug determined the kinetics as well as mechanism of drug release from pectin-based matrix tablets. The release data showed a good fit into the power law or the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation indicating the combined effect of diffusion and erosion mechanisms of drug release. PMID:17267193

  17. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  18. Roles of changes in active glutamine transport in brain edema development during hepatic encephalopathy: an emerging concept.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Popek, Mariusz; Albrecht, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Excessive glutamine (Gln) synthesis in ammonia-overloaded astrocytes contributes to astrocytic swelling and brain edema, the major complication of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Much of the newly formed Gln is believed to enter mitochondria, where it is recycled to ammonia, which causes mitochondrial dysfunction (a "Trojan horse" mode of action). A portion of Gln may increase osmotic pressure in astrocytes and the interstitial space, directly and independently contributing to brain tissue swelling. Here we discuss the possibility that altered functioning of Gln transport proteins located in the cellular or mitochondrial membranes, modulates the effects of increased Gln synthesis. Accumulation of excess Gln in mitochondria involves a carrier-mediated transport which is activated by ammonia. Studies on the expression of the cell membrane N-system transporters SN1 (SNAT3) and SN2 (SNAT5), which mediate Gln efflux from astrocytes rendered HE model-dependent effects. HE lowered the expression of SN1 at the RNA and protein level in the cerebral cortex (cc) in the thioacetamide (TAA) model of HE and the effect paralleled induction of cerebral cortical edema. Neither SN1 nor SN2 expression was affected by simple hyperammonemia, which produces no cc edema. TAA-induced HE is also associated with decreased expression of mRNA coding for the system A carriers SAT1 and SAT2, which stimulate Gln influx to neurons. Taken together, changes in the expression of Gln transporters during HE appear to favor retention of Gln in astrocytes and/or the interstitial space of the brain. HE may also affect arginine (Arg)/Gln exchange across the astrocytic cell membrane due to changes in the expression of the hybrid Arg/Gln transporter y(+)LAT2. Gln export from brain across the blood-brain barrier may be stimulated by HE via its increased exchange with peripheral tryptophan. PMID:24072671

  19. [Steroid therapy for hydrocephalus due to acute cerebellitis in a child].

    PubMed

    Tabarki, B; Thabet, F

    2007-08-01

    Severe acute inflammatory cerebellitis is a rare but life threatening disease. We report the case of a 8-year-old boy presenting with cerebellitis and acute cerebellar swelling complicated by brain stem compression and hydrocephalus. Outcome was good on steroid therapy. PMID:17498931

  20. Mechanical and swelling properties of PDMS interpenetrating polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Claude; Yoo, Seong Hyun

    2006-03-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of a large and a small molar mass PDMS were prepared. Six series of IPNs were obtained by first tetra-functionally end-linking long vinyl-terminated PDMS neat or in a 50 per cent solution with unreactive PDMS chains. These networks were then dried and swollen with short reactive telechelic PDMS that were subsequently end-linked. We found that the correlation between modulus (E) and equilibrium swelling (Q) in toluene of the PDMS IPNs obeys a scaling relation identical to that of normal uni-modal PDMS networks. The results of the toughness of the networks represented by the energy required to rupture them were analyzed in terms of a recent model by Okumura (Europhysics Letters 67(3), 470, 2004). A modified version of this model that assumes each component of the double network to be subjected to an equal stress gives a good representation of the data.

  1. Simulation study of sulfonate cluster swelling in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Taylor, Philip L.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2009-12-01

    We have performed simulations to study how increasing humidity affects the structure of Nafion-like ionomers under conditions of low sulfonate concentration and low humidity. At the onset of membrane hydration, the clusters split into smaller parts. These subsequently swell, but then maintain constant the number of sulfonates per cluster. We find that the distribution of water in low-sulfonate membranes depends strongly on the sulfonate concentration. For a relatively low sulfonate concentration, nearly all the side-chain terminal groups are within cluster formations, and the average water loading per cluster matches the water content of membrane. However, for a relatively higher sulfonate concentration the water-to-sulfonate ratio becomes nonuniform. The clusters become wetter, while the intercluster bridges become drier. We note the formation of unusual shells of water-rich material that surround the sulfonate clusters.

  2. Influence of pressure on pyrolysis of black liquor: 1. Swelling.

    PubMed

    Whitty, Kevin; Backman, Rainer; Hupa, Mikko

    2008-02-01

    This is the first of two papers concerning the behavior of black liquor during pyrolysis under pressurized conditions. Two industrial kraft liquors were pyrolyzed in a laboratory-scale pressurized single particle reactor and a pressurized grid heater at temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 degrees C and at pressures between 1 and 20 bar. The dimensions of the chars produced were measured and the specific swollen volume was calculated. Swelling decreased roughly logarithmically over the pressure range 1-20 r. An expression is developed to predict the specific swollen volume at elevated pressure when the volume at 1 bar is known. The bulk density of the char increased with pressure, indicating that liquors will be entrained less easily at higher pressures. PMID:17349790

  3. Microscale Patterning of Thermoplastic Polymer Surfaces by Selective Solvent Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid; Chen, Chien-Fu; DeVoe, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the fabrication of microscale features in thermoplastic substrates is presented. Unlike traditional thermoplastic microfabrication techniques, in which bulk polymer is displaced from the substrate by machining or embossing, a unique process termed orogenic microfabrication has been developed in which selected regions of a thermoplastic surface are raised from the substrate by an irreversible solvent swelling mechanism. The orogenic technique allows thermoplastic surfaces to be patterned using a variety of masking methods, resulting in three-dimensional features that would be difficult to achieve through traditional microfabrication methods. Using cyclic olefin copolymer as a model thermoplastic material, several variations of this process are described to realize growth heights ranging from several nanometers to tens of microns, with patterning techniques include direct photoresist masking, patterned UV/ozone surface passivation, elastomeric stamping, and noncontact spotting. Orogenic microfabrication is also demonstrated by direct inkjet printing as a facile photolithography-free masking method for rapid desktop thermoplastic microfabrication. PMID:22900539

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    measure of clay distribution in extended samples during different physical processes such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years [1-3]. To characterize the state of colloids that form after/during clay swelling the water self-diffusion coefficient was measured on a spatially resolved manner. Both natural clays and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. These results have a significant impact for engineering barriers for storage of spent nuclear fuel where clay erosion by low salinity water must be addressed. Presented methods were developed under the motivation of using bentonite clays as a buffer medium to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. Nevertheless, the same approaches can be found suitable in other applications in soil and environmental science to study other types of materials as they swell, dissolve, erode, or sediment. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) and the Swedish Research Council VR. [1] N. Nestle, T. Baumann, R. Niessner, Magnetic resonance imaging in environmental science. Environ. Sci. Techn. 36 154A (2002). [2] S. V. Dvinskikh, K. Szutkowski, I. Furó. MRI profiles over a very wide concentration ranges: application to swelling of a bentonite clay. J. Magn. Reson. 198 146 (2009). [3] S. V. Dvinskikh, I. Furó. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems. Technical Report, TR-09-27, SKB (2009), www.skb.se.

  5. Fibromatosis colli - a rare cytological diagnosis in infantile neck swellings.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabina; Jetley, Sujata; Jairajpuri, Zeeba; Husain, Musharraf

    2014-11-01

    Fibromatosis colli or sternocleidomastoid tumour is a rare cause of benign neck mass in infants. It is a self limiting fibroblastic lesion usually presenting with torticollis and a history of birth trauma.It is one of the few causes in which Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) is indicated in a neonate to confirm the diagnosis and to differentiate it from other congenital, inflammatory and neoplastic causes. FNAC provides a rapid, cost-effective, reliable, non invasive method of diagnosis resulting in conservative management of these lesions. We present two interesting cases of neck swelling in infants where FNAC performed as the first diagnostic procedure was instrumental in establishing the diagnosis of fibromatosis colli thus avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention. PMID:25584233

  6. Phase chirality and stereo-selective swelling of cholesteric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, S.; Tajbakhsh, A. R.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2003-12-01

    Cholesteric elastomers possess a macroscopic “phase chirality” as the director n rotates in a helical fashion along an optical axis z and can be described by a chiral order parameter α. This parameter can be tuned by changing the helix pitch p and the elastic properties of the network at formation. The cholesterics also possess a local nematic order, changing with temperature or during solvent swelling. In this paper, by measuring the power of optical rotation d Psi/d z, we discover how these two parameters vary as functions of temperature or solvent adsorbed by the network. The main result is a finding of pronounced stereo-selectivity of cholesteric elastomers, demonstrating itself in the retention of the “correct” chirality component of a racemic solvent. It has been possible to quantify the amount of such stereo-separation, and the basic dynamics of the effect.

  7. The swelling of mitochondria from nitrogen gas; a possible cause of reperfusion damage.

    PubMed

    VanDeripe, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Electron photomicrograph evidence is presented which suggests that the in vivo swelling of mitochondria may result from the uptake of nitrogen gas bubbles which coalesce to fill the intramitochondrial space during tissue anoxia. These observations have led to the hypothesis that nitrogen-filled mitochondria are unable to take up oxygen resulting in cell death. A test of this hypothesis also represents a probable treatment for stroke, namely the total body washout of nitrogen. This can be achieved by the inhalation of an oxygen-helium mixture with exhaled gases shunted to ambient atmosphere. This washout should facilitate nitrogen egress from the interior of affected mitochondria, allow oxygen uptake and a resumption of oxidative metabolism. This hypothesis generally fits well with the literature on luxury perfusion following stroke. In cases of luxury perfusion the venous blood exiting the lesion is red indicating a decreased transfer of oxygen to the extracellular and cytosolic fluids. However, whereas luxury perfusion assumes blood flow adequate for delivery of oxygen to the tissues, this hypothesis interjects a blockade at the level of oxygen uptake into mitochondria, and unless this blockade is reversed it will lead to cell death and brain tissue necrosis in the affected regions. PMID:14962642

  8. Study of swelling behavior in ArF resist during development by the QCM method (3): observations of swelling layer elastic modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    The QCM method allows measurements of impedance, an index of swelling layer viscosity in a photoresist during development. While impedance is sometimes used as a qualitative index of change in the viscosity of the swelling layer, it has to date not been used quantitatively, for data analysis. We explored a method for converting impedance values to elastic modulus (Pa), a coefficient expressing viscosity. Applying this method, we compared changes in the viscosity of the swelling layer in an ArF resist generated during development in a TMAH developing solution and in a TBAH developing solution. This paper reports the results of this comparative study.

  9. Effects of titanium additions to austenitic ternary alloys on microstructural evolution and void swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T; Wolfer, W G; Garner, F A; Sekimura, N

    2003-12-01

    Ternary austenitic model alloys were modified with 0.25 wt.% titanium and irradiated in FFTF reactor at dose rates ranging over more than two orders in magnitude. While lowering of dose rate strongly increases swelling by shortening the incubation dose, the steady state swelling rate is not affected by dose rate. Although titanium addition strongly alters the void microstructure, swelling at {approx} 420 C does not change with titanium additions, but the sensitivity to dose rate is preserved.

  10. Specimen Machining for the Study of the Effect of Swelling on CGR in PWR Environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the preparation of ten specimens to be used for the study of the effect of swelling on the propagation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking cracks. Four compact tension specimens, four microscopy plates and two tensile specimens were machined from a AISI 304 material that was irradiated up to 33 dpa. The specimens had been machined such as to represent the behavior of materials with 3.7%swelling and <2% swelling.

  11. Kinetics of swelling of polyelectrolyte gels: Fixed degree of ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Swati; Kundagrami, Arindam

    2015-12-01

    The swelling kinetics of uncharged and charged polymer (polyelectrolyte) gels in salt-free conditions is studied in one dimension by solving the constitutive equation of motion (Newton's law for the elementary gel volume) of the displacement variable by two theoretical methods: one in which the classical definition of stress is used with the bulk modulus taken as a parameter, and the other in which a phenomenological expression of the osmotic stress as a function of polymer density and degree of ionization is taken as an input to the dynamics. The time-evolution profiles for spatially varying polymer density and stress, along with the location of the gel-solvent interface, are obtained from the two methods. We show that both the polymer density (volume fraction) and stress inside the gel follow expected behaviours of being maximum for the uniformly shrunken gel, and relaxing slowly to the lowest values as the gel approaches equilibrium. We further show that, by comparing the temporal profiles of the gel-solvent interface and other variables between the two methods, one may attempt to assign an effective bulk modulus to the polyelectrolyte gel as a function of the degree of ionization and other parameters of the gel such as hydrophobicity, cross-link density, and the temperature. The major result we get is that the effective bulk modulus of a polyelectrolyte gel increases monotonically with its degree of ionization. In the process of identifying the parameters for a monotonic swelling, we calculated using a well-known expression of the free energy the equilibrium results of two-phase co-existence and the critical point of a polyelectrolyte gel with a fixed degree of ionization.

  12. Comment on 'Large Swelling and Percolation in Irradiated Zircon'

    SciTech Connect

    Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin; Crocombette, J.-P.

    2003-09-24

    A recent model for the large radiation-induced swelling behavior in irradiated zircon (ZrSiO4) is partially based on results of molecular dynamics simulations of the partial overlap of two collision cascades that predict a densified boundary of polymerized silica and the scattering of the second cascade away from the densified boundary (Trachenko K, Dove M T and Salje E K H 2003 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 15 L1). These MD simulations are based on an atomic interaction potential for zircon (Trachenko K, Dove MT and Salje EKH 2001 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13 1947) for which, according to our analysis, only reproduces some of the crystallographic properties at equilibrium and do not adequately describe the scattering physics for zircon, and on simulation methodologies for which the standard procedures for boundary conditions of energetic events are ill-defined. In fact, the interatomic potential model used by Tranchenko et al yields a significantly more rigid structure, with very high Frenkel defect formation energies and extremely low entropy and specific heat capacity. The synergy of all these unphysical properties for zircon, naturally leads to highly localized collision cascades. Consequently, the reported results of the cascade simulations, which are events far from equilibrium, may be artifacts of both the potential model and simulation methodologies employed. Thus, the structural changes predicted by the simulations must be viewed cautiously, and these simulations results cannot be taken as confirmation of a new scattering physics process that is the basis for the proposed swelling model. In this comment, the deficiencies in the atomic interaction potential and methodologies employed by these authors are critically reviewed, and the validity of the cascade overlap simulations and proposed physics is discussed.

  13. Kinetics of swelling of polyelectrolyte gels: Fixed degree of ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Swati; Kundagrami, Arindam

    2015-12-14

    The swelling kinetics of uncharged and charged polymer (polyelectrolyte) gels in salt-free conditions is studied in one dimension by solving the constitutive equation of motion (Newton’s law for the elementary gel volume) of the displacement variable by two theoretical methods: one in which the classical definition of stress is used with the bulk modulus taken as a parameter, and the other in which a phenomenological expression of the osmotic stress as a function of polymer density and degree of ionization is taken as an input to the dynamics. The time-evolution profiles for spatially varying polymer density and stress, along with the location of the gel-solvent interface, are obtained from the two methods. We show that both the polymer density (volume fraction) and stress inside the gel follow expected behaviours of being maximum for the uniformly shrunken gel, and relaxing slowly to the lowest values as the gel approaches equilibrium. We further show that, by comparing the temporal profiles of the gel-solvent interface and other variables between the two methods, one may attempt to assign an effective bulk modulus to the polyelectrolyte gel as a function of the degree of ionization and other parameters of the gel such as hydrophobicity, cross-link density, and the temperature. The major result we get is that the effective bulk modulus of a polyelectrolyte gel increases monotonically with its degree of ionization. In the process of identifying the parameters for a monotonic swelling, we calculated using a well-known expression of the free energy the equilibrium results of two-phase co-existence and the critical point of a polyelectrolyte gel with a fixed degree of ionization.

  14. Kinetics of swelling of polyelectrolyte gels: Fixed degree of ionization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Swati; Kundagrami, Arindam

    2015-12-14

    The swelling kinetics of uncharged and charged polymer (polyelectrolyte) gels in salt-free conditions is studied in one dimension by solving the constitutive equation of motion (Newton's law for the elementary gel volume) of the displacement variable by two theoretical methods: one in which the classical definition of stress is used with the bulk modulus taken as a parameter, and the other in which a phenomenological expression of the osmotic stress as a function of polymer density and degree of ionization is taken as an input to the dynamics. The time-evolution profiles for spatially varying polymer density and stress, along with the location of the gel-solvent interface, are obtained from the two methods. We show that both the polymer density (volume fraction) and stress inside the gel follow expected behaviours of being maximum for the uniformly shrunken gel, and relaxing slowly to the lowest values as the gel approaches equilibrium. We further show that, by comparing the temporal profiles of the gel-solvent interface and other variables between the two methods, one may attempt to assign an effective bulk modulus to the polyelectrolyte gel as a function of the degree of ionization and other parameters of the gel such as hydrophobicity, cross-link density, and the temperature. The major result we get is that the effective bulk modulus of a polyelectrolyte gel increases monotonically with its degree of ionization. In the process of identifying the parameters for a monotonic swelling, we calculated using a well-known expression of the free energy the equilibrium results of two-phase co-existence and the critical point of a polyelectrolyte gel with a fixed degree of ionization. PMID:26671401

  15. Swelling of Clay-Sulfate Rocks: A Review of Processes and Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butscher, Christoph; Mutschler, Thomas; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling problem is also known from other geotechnical fields, such as road and bridge construction, and in conjunction with geothermal drillings. The planning of counter measures that would stop or minimize the swelling is extremely difficult, and it is currently impossible to predict the swelling behavior of an actual geotechnical project. One of the reasons is our limited knowledge of the processes involved in the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks, and of the geological, mineralogical, chemical, hydraulic and mechanical controls of the swelling. This article presents a literature review of processes in swelling clay-sulfate rocks and associated controls. Numerical models that aim at simulating the processes and controls are also included in this review, and some of the remaining open questions are pointed out. By focusing on process-related work in this review, the article intends to stimulate further research across disciplines in the field of swelling clay-sulfate rocks to finally get a step further in managing the swelling problem in geotechnical projects.

  16. Computer Simulation of Bubble Growth in Metals Due to He

    SciTech Connect

    FOILES, STEPHEN M.; HOYT, JEFFREY J.

    2001-03-01

    Atomistic simulations of the growth of helium bubbles in metals are performed. The metal is represented by embedded atom method potentials for palladium. The helium bubbles are treated via an expanding repulsive spherical potential within the metal lattice. The simulations predict bubble pressures that decrease monotonically with increasing helium to metal ratios. The swelling of the material associated with the bubble growth is also computed. It is found that the rate of swelling increases with increasing helium to metal ratio consistent with experimental observations on the swelling of metal tritides. Finally, the detailed defect structure due to the bubble growth was investigated. Dislocation networks are observed to form that connect the bubbles. Unlike early model assumptions, prismatic loops between the bubbles are not retained. These predictions are compared to available experimental evidence.

  17. LRRC8A protein is indispensable for swelling-activated and ATP-induced release of excitatory amino acids in rat astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hyzinski-García, María C; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Mongin, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, cellular swelling activates release of small organic osmolytes, including the excitatory amino acids (EAA) glutamate and aspartate, via a ubiquitously expressed volume-regulated chloride/anion channel (VRAC). Pharmacological evidence suggests that VRAC plays plural physiological and pathological roles, including excitotoxic release of glutamate in stroke. However, the molecular identity of this pathway was unknown. Two recent studies discovered that LRRC8 gene family members encode heteromeric VRAC composed of LRRC8A plus LRRC8B-E, which mediate swelling-activated Cl− currents and taurine release in human non-neural cells (Z. Qiu et al. Cell 157: 447, 2014; F.K. Voss et al. Science 344: 634, 2014). Here, we tested the contribution of LRRC8A to the EAA release in brain glia. We detected and quantified expression levels of LRRC8A-E in primary rat astrocytes with quantitative RT-PCR and then downregulated LRRC8A with gene-specific siRNAs. In astrocytes exposed to hypo-osmotic media, LRRC8A knockdown dramatically reduced swelling-activated release of the EAA tracer d-[3H]aspartate. In parallel HPLC assays, LRRC8A siRNA prevented hypo-osmotic media-induced loss of the endogenous intracellular l-glutamate and taurine. Furthermore, downregulation of LRRC8A completely ablated the ATP-stimulated release of d-[3H]aspartate and [14C]taurine from non-swollen astrocytes. Overall, these data indicate that LRRC8A is an indispensable component of a permeability pathway that mediates both swelling-activated and agonist-induced amino acid release in brain glial cells. PMID:25172945

  18. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain ... targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get ...

  19. Brain components

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The brain is composed of more than a thousand billion neurons. Specific groups of them, working in concert, provide ... of information. The 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The ...

  20. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  1. Brain Malformations

    MedlinePlus

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  2. An extremely rare case of metastatic retinoblastoma of parotids presenting as a massive swelling in a child

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelam; Pathak, Abhishek; Kapur, Bhupendra Nath; Dutta, Vibha

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a common childhood malignancy but bilateral Rb with metastasis to parotids is very uncommon. To the best of our knowledge, bilateral Rb metastasizing to parotids is very rare and this is the fifth such case reported in world literature till date in a 2-year-old male child who underwent exenteration of left eye for bilateral Rb and later developed recurrent metastasis to left parotid requiring parotidectomy. A year later he presented again with swelling left parotid region extending from occipital region reaching upto left anterior chest wall with intra-cranial extension on magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathological examination of the parotid swelling and immunohistochemistry showed metastasis from Rb. He was treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to local site and brain to which he responded well. Presently on regular follow up without any signs of locoregional and distal metastasis. Till date different types of primary parotid tumors have been reported in literature but a metastatic parotid tumor is extremely rare and therefore this case is being reported to highlight the extreme rarity, the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the highly aggressive nature and overall dismal prognosis of this disease entity. PMID:27186527

  3. An extremely rare case of metastatic retinoblastoma of parotids presenting as a massive swelling in a child.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Abhishek; Sharma, Neelam; Pathak, Abhishek; Kapur, Bhupendra Nath; Dutta, Vibha

    2016-04-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a common childhood malignancy but bilateral Rb with metastasis to parotids is very uncommon. To the best of our knowledge, bilateral Rb metastasizing to parotids is very rare and this is the fifth such case reported in world literature till date in a 2-year-old male child who underwent exenteration of left eye for bilateral Rb and later developed recurrent metastasis to left parotid requiring parotidectomy. A year later he presented again with swelling left parotid region extending from occipital region reaching upto left anterior chest wall with intra-cranial extension on magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathological examination of the parotid swelling and immunohistochemistry showed metastasis from Rb. He was treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to local site and brain to which he responded well. Presently on regular follow up without any signs of locoregional and distal metastasis. Till date different types of primary parotid tumors have been reported in literature but a metastatic parotid tumor is extremely rare and therefore this case is being reported to highlight the extreme rarity, the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, the highly aggressive nature and overall dismal prognosis of this disease entity. PMID:27186527

  4. Distributed microbend optical sensor with directional swelling and optimal bending frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Antonio; Rosas Molina, Armando T.; Marquez Lucero, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    This work describes the performance of a new optical distributed sensor. This new sensor is capable of detecting and locating liquid hydrocarbon leakage on long pipelines. It is an improvement over the current fiber bending distributed sensors that use a polymeric filament that interacts with an optical fiber by means of a helicoidal wire. When a liquid or gas compatible with the polymeric filament within this type of sensor comes in contact with it, the liquid is absorbed and causes the swelling of the filament and the concomitant compression of the optical fiber against the helicoidal wire. This phenomena cause the fiber to bend and generate an increase on the optical attenuation signal that travels through the fiber. The signal attenuation permits the detection of a specific liquid presence in the vicinity of the sensor and the reflection of the same signal allows to pinpoint the location of this event. The new sensor has the following advantages over similar devices: a) the swelling of the polymeric filament is conducted in a preferential direction permitting to concentrate the osmotic pressure towards the optical fiber. This improves significantly the response speed of the sensor. b) The fiber is placed within a capillary channel located eccentrically in the polymer filament; therefore, no additional protection is needed to prevent damage to the fiber. Of even greater importance, the signal attenuation provoked by stress and deformations due to direct contact of the fiber with the helicoidal wire is avoided. And finally, c) an optimal bending period that take in count the polymer nature to improve the sensor response was found and employed. An experimental prototype of this sensor was fabricated using a multimode optical fiber attached to a polybutadiene filament. The experimental results confirm the benefits of this new design.

  5. Propagation of damage in brain tissue: coupling the mechanics of oedema and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Lang, Georgina E; Vella, Dominic; Waters, Sarah L; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Brain tissue swelling, or oedema, is a dangerous consequence of traumatic brain injury and stroke. In particular, a locally swollen region can cause the injury to propagate further through the brain: swelling causes mechanical compression of the vasculature in the surrounding tissue and so can cut off that tissue's oxygen supply. We use a triphasic mathematical model to investigate this propagation, and couple tissue mechanics with oxygen delivery. Starting from a fully coupled, finite elasticity, model, we show that simplifications can be made that allow us to express the volume of the propagating region of damage analytically in terms of key parameters. Our results show that performing a craniectomy, to alleviate pressure in the brain and allow the tissue to swell outwards, reduces the propagation of damage; this finding agrees with experimental observations. PMID:25822263

  6. Quantitative Mapping of Trimethyltin Injury in the Rat Brain Using Magnetic Resonance Histology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. Allan; Calabrese, Evan; Little, Peter B.; Hedlund, Laurence; Qi, Yi; Badea, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing exposure to chemicals in our environment and the increasing concern over their impact on health have elevated the need for new methods for surveying the detrimental effects of these compounds. Today’s gold standard for assessing the effects of toxicants on the brain is based on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained histology, sometimes accompanied by special stains or immunohistochemistry for neural processes and myelin. This approach is time-consuming and is usually limited to a fraction of the total brain volume. We demonstrate that magnetic resonance histology (MRH) can be used for quantitatively assessing the effects of central nervous system toxicants in rat models. We show that subtle and sparse changes to brain structure can be detected using magnetic resonance histology, and correspond to some of the locations in which lesions are found by traditional pathological examination. We report for the first time diffusion tensor image-based detection of changes in white matter regions, including fimbria and corpus callosum, in the brains of rats exposed to 8 mg/Kg and 12 mg/Kg trimethyltin. Besides detecting brain-wide changes, magnetic resonance histology provides a quantitative assessment of dose-dependent effects. These effects can be found in different magnetic resonance contrast mechanisms, providing multivariate biomarkers for the same spatial location. In this study, deformation-based morphometry detected areas where previous studies have detected cell loss, while voxel-wise analyses of diffusion tensor parameters revealed microstructural changes due to such things as cellular swelling, apoptosis, and inflammation. Magnetic resonance histology brings a valuable addition to pathology with the ability to generate brain-wide quantitative parametric maps for markers of toxic insults in the rodent brain. PMID:24631313

  7. The swelling of nitrile rubber by selected species in a synthetic jet turbine fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Lynn

    The swelling of nitrile O-ring seals in petroleum distillate fuels has long been attributed to the aromatic species in these fuels. This presents a problem for synthetic fuels as they typically do not contain these aromatic species and thus may cause O-ring seals to shrink and fail. The composition of petroleum distillate fuels is extremely complex and it is not clear whether the swelling property originates from the aromatics in general, or if certain aromatics contribute more swelling character than others. Consequently, developing a general description of an efficient swelling promoter for O-rings in liquid hydrocarbon fuels will allow an unambiguous selection of candidate swelling agents for synthetic fuels. To accomplish this, a study was undertaken of the swelling of nitrile rubber (the most widely used O-ring material) in JP-5 (the jet propulsion fuel used by the U.S. Navy) and its synthetic equivalent S-5. Briefly, examining the molecular structure of nitrile rubber showed the fuel resistance of this polymer resides in the polar character of the cyano group suggesting that polar species in general, and hydrogen-bonded species in particular, should serve as efficient swelling promoters. A thorough test program utilizing a unique optical dilatometry method to provide temporal volume swell data, a GC-MS method for measuring the polymer/fuel partitioning, and a spectroscopic examination of thin nitrile rubber films confirmed this hypothesis. This program also showed that swelling character increases with decreasing molar volume which is consistent with previous work and general theories of solubility. Overall, this study showed that the most efficient aromatic swelling promoters for nitrile rubber are naphthalenes and asymmetrically substituted alkyl benzenes. However, polar species such as ketones and alcohols can be more efficient than aromatics while phenols and aromatic alcohols represent the most efficient potential swelling promoters for nitrile rubber in

  8. Can fertility signals lead to quality signals? Insights from the evolution of primate sexual swellings

    PubMed Central

    Huchard, Elise; Courtiol, Alexandre; Benavides, Julio A.; Knapp, Leslie A.; Raymond, Michel; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2009-01-01

    The sexual swellings of female primates have generated a great deal of interest in evolutionary biology. Two hypotheses recently proposed to elucidate their functional significance argue that maximal swelling size advertises either female fertility within a cycle or female quality across cycles. Published evidence favours the first hypothesis, and further indicates that larger swellings advertise higher fertility between cycles. If so, a male preference for large swellings might evolve, driving females to use swellings as quality indicators, as proposed by the second hypothesis. In this paper, we explore this possibility using a combination of empirical field data and mathematical modelling. We first test and find support for three key predictions of the female-quality hypothesis in wild chacma baboons (Papio ursinus): (i) inter-individual differences in swelling size are maintained across consecutive cycles, (ii) females in better condition have larger swellings and higher reproductive success, and (iii) males preferentially choose females with large swellings. We then develop an individual-based simulation model that indicates that females producing larger swellings can achieve higher mating success even when female–female competition is low and within-female variance in the trait is high. Taken together, our findings show that once sexual swellings have evolved as fertility signals, they might, in certain socio-sexual systems, be further selected to act as quality signals. These results, by reconciling two hypotheses, help to clarify the processes underlying sexual swelling evolution. More generally, our findings suggest that mate choice for direct benefits (fertility) can lead to indirect benefits (good genes). PMID:19324772

  9. Controversies in the Management of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Sayuri; Boone, M Dustin

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a physical insult (a bump, jolt, or blow) to the brain that results in temporary or permanent impairment of normal brain function. TBI describes a heterogeneous group of disorders. The resulting secondary injury, namely brain swelling and its sequelae, is the reason why patients with these vastly different initial insults are homogenously treated. Much of the evidence for the management of TBI is poor or conflicting, and thus definitive guidelines are largely unavailable for clinicians at this time. A substantial portion of this article focuses on discussing the controversies in the management of TBI. PMID:27521198

  10. Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia caused brain death in a 10-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, A Ra; Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Hypotonic hyponatremia by primary polydipsia can cause severe neurologic complications due to cerebral edema. A 10-year-and-4-month-old boy with a psychiatric history of intellectual disability and behavioral disorders who presented with chief complaints of seizure and mental change showed severe hypotonic hyponatremia with low urine osmolality (serum sodium, 101 mmol/L; serum osmolality, 215 mOsm/kg; urine osmolality, 108 mOsm/kg). The patient had been polydipsic for a few months prior, and this had been worse in the previous few days. A diagnosis of hypotonic hyponatremia caused by primary polydipsia was made. The patient was in a coma, and developed respiratory arrest and became brain death shortly after admission, despite the treatment. The initial brain magnetic resonance imaging showed severe brain swelling with tonsillar and uncal herniation, and the patient was declared as brain death. It has been reported that antidiuretic hormone suppression is inadequate in patients with chronic polydipsia, and that this inadequate suppression of antidiuretic hormone is aggravated in patients with acute psychosis. Therefore, hyponatremia by primary polydipsia, although it is rare, can cause serious and life-threatening neurologic complications. PMID:26512354

  11. Non-monotonic swelling of surface grafted hydrogels induced by pH and/or salt concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Szleifer, I.

    2014-09-28

    We use a molecular theory to study the thermodynamics of a weak-polyacid hydrogel film that is chemically grafted to a solid surface. We investigate the response of the material to changes in the pH and salt concentration of the buffer solution. Our results show that the pH-triggered swelling of the hydrogel film has a non-monotonic dependence on the acidity of the bath solution. At most salt concentrations, the thickness of the hydrogel film presents a maximum when the pH of the solution is increased from acidic values. The quantitative details of such swelling behavior, which is not observed when the film is physically deposited on the surface, depend on the molecular architecture of the polymer network. This swelling-deswelling transition is the consequence of the complex interplay between the chemical free energy (acid-base equilibrium), the electrostatic repulsions between charged monomers, which are both modulated by the absorption of ions, and the ability of the polymer network to regulate charge and control its volume (molecular organization). In the absence of such competition, for example, for high salt concentrations, the film swells monotonically with increasing pH. A deswelling-swelling transition is similarly predicted as a function of the salt concentration at intermediate pH values. This reentrant behavior, which is due to the coupling between charge regulation and the two opposing effects triggered by salt concentration (screening electrostatic interactions and charging/discharging the acid groups), is similar to that found in end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers. Understanding how to control the response of the material to different stimuli, in terms of its molecular structure and local chemical composition, can help the targeted design of applications with extended functionality. We describe the response of the material to an applied pressure and an electric potential. We present profiles that outline the local chemical composition of the

  12. Non-monotonic swelling of surface grafted hydrogels induced by pH and/or salt concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Gabriel S.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Szleifer, I.

    2014-09-01

    We use a molecular theory to study the thermodynamics of a weak-polyacid hydrogel film that is chemically grafted to a solid surface. We investigate the response of the material to changes in the pH and salt concentration of the buffer solution. Our results show that the pH-triggered swelling of the hydrogel film has a non-monotonic dependence on the acidity of the bath solution. At most salt concentrations, the thickness of the hydrogel film presents a maximum when the pH of the solution is increased from acidic values. The quantitative details of such swelling behavior, which is not observed when the film is physically deposited on the surface, depend on the molecular architecture of the polymer network. This swelling-deswelling transition is the consequence of the complex interplay between the chemical free energy (acid-base equilibrium), the electrostatic repulsions between charged monomers, which are both modulated by the absorption of ions, and the ability of the polymer network to regulate charge and control its volume (molecular organization). In the absence of such competition, for example, for high salt concentrations, the film swells monotonically with increasing pH. A deswelling-swelling transition is similarly predicted as a function of the salt concentration at intermediate pH values. This reentrant behavior, which is due to the coupling between charge regulation and the two opposing effects triggered by salt concentration (screening electrostatic interactions and charging/discharging the acid groups), is similar to that found in end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers. Understanding how to control the response of the material to different stimuli, in terms of its molecular structure and local chemical composition, can help the targeted design of applications with extended functionality. We describe the response of the material to an applied pressure and an electric potential. We present profiles that outline the local chemical composition of the

  13. Reversible Swelling of Chitosan and Quaternary Ammonium Modified Chitosan Brush Layers: Effect of pH and Counter Anion Size and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Yee, Michael Q; Eckmann, Yonaton Y; Hickok, Noreen J; Eckmann, David M; Composto, Russell J

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the swelling of grafted polycationic brushes as a function of pH and anion type. The brushes are chitosan (CH) and chitosans with 27% and 51% degree of substitution (DS) of quaternary ammonium salt, denoted as CH-Q(25) and CH-Q(50), respectively. The water content and swelling behaviors are monitored using in situ quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The pH varies from ~3.5 to 8.5, and the counter anion types include chloride, acetate, and citrate. At fixed pH, the water content and brush swelling increase as the DS increases. Whereas the CH-Q(50) brush layer shows symmetric swelling with a minimum near pH = 4.5, the swelling of CH and CH-Q(25) is relatively constant as pH decreases from 8.2 to 5.5, and then begins to increase near pH 4. These studies indicate that the symmetric swelling of CH-Q(50) is likely attributed to increasing protonation of primary amines for pH values below pH 6.5 and the quaternary ammonium salts above pH 6.5. At pH 4, the swelling of the CH brush increases upon exchanging the smaller chloridewith a bulkier acetate anion, which is less effective at screening intra/inter molecular repulsion. In contrast, upon exchanging the acetate with trifunctional citrate, CH and CH-Q(25) brushes collapse by 53 and 42%, respectively, because the citrate forms ionic cross-links. To test antibacterial properties, silicon oxide, CH and CH-Q(50) brush layers are exposed to 10(7)-10(8) cfu/ml of S. aureus for two days at 37 °C and exposed to stepped shear stresses in 2 min intervals. Whereas an S. aureus biofilm adheres strongly to silicon oxide and CH for stresses up to 12 dyne/cm(2), biofilms on CH-Q(50) detach at a relatively low shear stress, 1.5 dyne/cm(2). Due to their high degree of swelling that can be tuned via pH, counterion size and type, chitosan and quaternary modified chitosans have potential as responsive coatings for applications including MEMS/NEMS devices and drug eluting implants. PMID:23209343

  14. Reversible Swelling of Chitosan and Quaternary Ammonium Modified Chitosan Brush Layers: Effect of pH and Counter Anion Size and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Yee, Michael Q.; Eckmann, Yonaton Y.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the swelling of grafted polycationic brushes as a function of pH and anion type. The brushes are chitosan (CH) and chitosans with 27% and 51% degree of substitution (DS) of quaternary ammonium salt, denoted as CH-Q25 and CH-Q50, respectively. The water content and swelling behaviors are monitored using in situ quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The pH varies from ~3.5 to 8.5, and the counter anion types include chloride, acetate, and citrate. At fixed pH, the water content and brush swelling increase as the DS increases. Whereas the CH-Q50 brush layer shows symmetric swelling with a minimum near pH = 4.5, the swelling of CH and CH-Q25 is relatively constant as pH decreases from 8.2 to 5.5, and then begins to increase near pH 4. These studies indicate that the symmetric swelling of CH-Q50 is likely attributed to increasing protonation of primary amines for pH values below pH 6.5 and the quaternary ammonium salts above pH 6.5. At pH 4, the swelling of the CH brush increases upon exchanging the smaller chloridewith a bulkier acetate anion, which is less effective at screening intra/inter molecular repulsion. In contrast, upon exchanging the acetate with trifunctional citrate, CH and CH-Q25 brushes collapse by 53 and 42%, respectively, because the citrate forms ionic cross-links. To test antibacterial properties, silicon oxide, CH and CH-Q50 brush layers are exposed to 107–108 cfu/ml of S. aureus for two days at 37 °C and exposed to stepped shear stresses in 2 min intervals. Whereas an S. aureus biofilm adheres strongly to silicon oxide and CH for stresses up to 12 dyne/cm2, biofilms on CH-Q50 detach at a relatively low shear stress, 1.5 dyne/cm2. Due to their high degree of swelling that can be tuned via pH, counterion size and type, chitosan and quaternary modified chitosans have potential as responsive coatings for applications including MEMS/NEMS devices and drug eluting implants. PMID:23209343

  15. Void swelling in binary Fe sbnd Cr alloys at 200 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1995-08-01

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe sbnd Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425°C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported to date in neutron-irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3 to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe sbnd 9Cr and sbnd 6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is found to completely explain the results.

  16. Factors which control the swelling of FeCrNi ternary austenitic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Black, C. A.; Edwards, D. J.

    1997-06-01

    In agreement with limited earlier studies, a comprehensive irradiation experiment conducted in both EBR-II and FFTF demonstrates that while cold-working usually decreases void swelling of ternary FeCrNi alloys at relatively low irradiation temperatures, it in general increases swelling at higher irradiation temperatures. Aging of cold-worked specimens to produce cellular dislocation networks tends to further increase swelling, especially at higher nickel levels. The swelling of ternary alloy at lower nickel levels also appears to be sensitive to details of the preirradiation annealing treatment. The differences in the details of reactor operating conditions also exert an influence on void nucleation and thereby on the duration of the transient regime of swelling. In the current irradiation series this leads to the swelling developed in EBR-II at ˜ 30 dpa being consistently larger than that in FFTF. All of these results confirm an earlier conclusion that the primary variability of void swelling of FeCrNi alloys lies in the incubation and transient regimes, rather than in the steady-state swelling rate regime. Under certain conditions, the transient regime can be made to approach 0 dpa.

  17. Calcium-alginate hydrogel swelling models are not pH-dependent.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent article by Koc et al. (2008) reports predictive models for the swelling behavior of calcium-alginate hydrogels in response to changes in pH and temperature. We submit that the reported effect of “pH” on hydrogel swelling is unsupported by the data and is more properly interpreted as the ...

  18. MECHANISM FOR THE LARGE ANISOTROPIC SWELLING OF DNA FILMS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet spun films of DNA show a large anisotropic swelling when hydrated, changing little along the fiber axis but swelling by a factor of 10 or more perpendicular to the axis. High resolution electron microscopy has been performed on films with 1 gram NaCl content per gram DNA (1% ...

  19. Polymerization of alanine in the presence of a non-swelling montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.; Lahav, N.

    1977-01-01

    Alanine, starting from alanine-adenylate, has been polymerized in the presence of non-swelling Al-montmorillonite. The yield of polymerization is much lower than that obtained in the presence of swelling Na-montmorillonite. The possibility that the changing interlayer spacing in Na-montmorillonite might be responsible for its catalytic properties, is discussed.

  20. Interaction between Sorption of Organic Compounds, Clay Swelling, and Cation Exchange Selectivity in Smectites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smectites are the most commonly found mineral in temperate region soils. Smectites exhibit variability in shrink–swell behavior and sorption of organic molecules. Previous research has established the inter-relation between extent of swelling and sorption of organic compounds by smectites. The effec...

  1. Cavity Swelling and Dislocation Evolution in SiC at Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sosuke; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    The temperature and fluence dependence of cavity swelling and dislocation development in CVD SiC irradiated with fast neutrons at high temperatures (1050-1460 C, up to 9.6 dpa) were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. The cavity swelling was very limited below 1300 C (<0.01% at 1300 C, 9.3 dpa). Temperature and fluence dependent swelling became visible above ~1400 C. The maximum value of the cavity swelling was 0.25% at 1460 C, 9.6 dpa, but this appeared to be below the peak swelling temperature. Frank loops were the dominant dislocation structure in this temperature regime, and the number density decreased and the size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The loop microstructures depended less significantly on both the irradiation temperature and fluence below 1200 C. A significant decrease in the number density and increase in the size were observed at 1300-1460 C.

  2. Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

  3. Influence of layer charge and charge location on the swelling pressure of dioctahedral smectites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linlin; Ling, Chian Ye; Lavikainen, Lasse P.; Hirvi, Janne T.; Kasa, Seppo; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-07-01

    Swelling pressure of dioctahedral smectites in the montmorillonite - beidellite series was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The pressure was found to correlate inversely with the magnitude of the layer charge in the range of -0.5 to -1.0 per unit cell. The beidellite type smectites were found to have lower swelling pressure than the montmorillonite type smectites. A clear effect of the type of interlayer cations on the swelling pressure was found. The sodium smectites sustained significant pressure even at longer interlayer distances, while in calcium smectites the pressure decreased soon after the initial swelling. The simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations and provide a tool for predicting macroscopic swelling behavior in smectites.

  4. Blockade of swelling-induced chloride channels by phenol derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Gschwentner, M.; Jungwirth, A.; Hofer, S.; Wöll, E.; Ritter, M.; Susanna, A.; Schmarda, A.; Reibnegger, G.; Pinggera, G. M.; Leitinger, M.; Frick, J.; Deetjen, P.; Paulmichl, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. In NIH3T3 fibroblasts, the chloride channel involved in regulatory volume decrease (RVD) was identified as ICln, a protein isolated from a cDNA library derived from Madin Darby canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. ICln expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes gives rise to an outwardly rectifying chloride current, sensitive to the extracellular addition of nucleotides and the known chloride channel blockers, DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) and NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid). We set out to study whether substances structurally similar to NPPB are able to interfere with RVD. 2. RVD in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MDCK cells is temperature-dependent. 3. RVD, the swelling-dependent chloride current and the depolarization seen after reducing extracellular osmolarity can be blocked by gossypol and NDGA (nordihydroguaiaretic acid), both structurally related to NPPB. 4. The cyclic AMP-dependent chloride current elicited in CaCo cells is less sensitive to the two substances tested while the calcium-activated chloride current in fibroblasts is insensitive. 5. The binding site for the two phenol derivatives onto ICln seems to be distinct but closely related to the nucleotide binding site identified as G x G x G, a glycine repeat located at the predicted outer mouth of the ICln channel protein. PMID:8733574

  5. Increased Hydrogel Swelling Induced by Absorption of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Nam, Changwoo; Zimudzi, Tawanda J; Geise, Geoffrey M; Hickner, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    The water and small molecule uptake behavior of amphiphilic diacrylate terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMSDA)/poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) (PEGDA) cross-linked hydrogels were studied using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. These hydrogel networks absorbed more water as the PEGDA content of the network increased. In contrast to typical osmotic deswelling behavior that occurs when liquid water equilibrated hydrogels are immersed in small molecule solutions with water activities less than unity, water-swollen gels immersed in 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS-H) solutions rapidly regained their water content within 4 min following an initial deswelling response. In situ ATR-FTIR analysis of the hydrogel film during the dynamic swelling experiment indicated that small molecule absorption into the gel played an important role in inducing gel reswelling in low water activity solutions. This aspect of polymer gel water uptake and interaction with small molecules is important for optimizing hydrogel coatings and hydrophilic polymer applications where there is an interaction between the internal chemical structure of the gel and electrolytes or other molecules in solution. PMID:27159118

  6. Mechanical and swelling behaviour of well characterized polybutadiene networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenna, Gregory B.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    1986-01-01

    Endlinking of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene with the appropriate isocyanate has been used to prepare well characterized networks. Two networks have been studied with molecular weights of the prepolymers being 6100 and 2400 g/mole by g.p.c. Cylindrical specimens were prepared and the derivatives of the stored energy function with respect to the stretch invariants were determined by torque and normal force measurements in torsion. From these data the Valanis-Landel (1967) stored energy function derivatives w-prime(lambda) were determined for both networks. The stored energy function for the junction constraint model of Flory (1953, 1977, 1979, 1985) which is a special form of the Valanis-Landel function, has been fitted to that determined from the experiments. The contributions to the stored energy function from the phantom network and from the junction constraints respectively do not agree with predictions from the topologies of the networks. In spite of this, the form of w-prime(lambda) for the junction constraint model gives an excellent 'curve fit' to the data. Comparison is also made with equilibrium swelling.

  7. Anisotropic swelling behavior of hot-extruded beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Jang, Jinsung; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jung, Myung Hwan; Lee, Jae Sang

    2016-04-01

    The lifetime of beryllium reflector assemblies is usually determined by neutron irradiation induced swelling, which results in mechanical interferences or fractures of the beryllium elements. Therefore, the dimensional stability and microstructure variations of beryllium during irradiation are important issues to study. In this paper, the microstructure characteristics of S-200-F and EHP-56 beryllium blocks, which were manufactured by using vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and hot extrusion (HE), respectively, were investigated. BeO distributions, grain shapes, and preferred orientations were investigated by using SEM-EPMA and SEM-EBSD systems. Dissimilarly to S-200-F, a strong fiber texture developed in the EHP-56 during the HE process; the basal planes in the majority of grains were arranged along the extrusion direction. To emulate the microstructure evolution during neutron irradiation, we irradiated the electro-polished surface of EHP-56 with protons at room temperature, where the acceleration voltage and the number of protons were 120 keV and 2.0 × 1018 ions/cm2, respectively. Irradiation-induced cavities were observed to be considerably longer along the basal plane in the EHP-56 specimen. Correspondingly, the amount of dimensional change was smaller along the direction parallel to the basal plane.

  8. Void swelling of Japanese candidate martensitic steels under FFTF/MOTA irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimura, T.; Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1996-12-01

    Microstructural observations of six Japanese candidate 7-9% Cr reduced activation martensitic steels were carried out after heavy neutron irradiation in order to investigate the void swelling behavior of each steel. Neutron irradiations were performed in the FFTF/MOTA up to 67 dpa at temperatures between 638 and 873 K. Transmission electron microscope observations revealed that voids were formed in all the steels irradiated to 67 dpa at 703 K, and the highest void swelling was observed in JLM-1 which was added with 30 wt.ppm of boron (0.74%), and the minimum void swelling was observed in F82H steel (0.12%). The 9% Cr martensitic steels showed the peak of void swelling at temperatures around 700 K, where void swelling gradually increased with increasing irradiation fluence to 30 dpa and increased rapidly above it. It is considered that the incubation period of void swelling of 9% Cr martensitic steels (JLM series) is about 30 dpa. JLM-1 showed the highest void swelling rate (0.045%/dpa at most). The addition of 30 wt.ppm of boron enhanced void swelling, while it was suppressed by the addition of 100 wt.ppm Ti in the 9% Cr martensitic steel. The JLF-3 steel (7.03% Cr) and F82H (7.65% Cr) showed less void swelling than JLF-I (9.04% Cr). The alloying effects on the swelling behavior of the steels were interpreted in terms of the difference in the precipitation morphology of carbides.

  9. Monitoring austral and cyclonic swells in the "Iles Eparses" (Mozambique channel) from microseismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barruol, Guilhem; Davy, Céline; Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Schlindwein, V.; Sigloch, K.

    2016-04-01

    We deployed five broadband three-components seismic stations in the Iles Eparses in the south-west Indian Ocean and on Mayotte Island, between April 2011 and January 2014. These small and remote oceanic islands suffer the effects of strong ocean swells that affect their coastal environments but most islands are not instrumented by wave gauges to characterize the swells. However, wave action on the coast causes high levels of ground vibrations in the solid earth, so-called microseismic noise. We use this link between the solid earth and ocean wave activity to quantify the swells locally. Spectral analyses of the continuous seismic data show clear peaks in the 0.05-0.10 Hz frequency band (periods between 10 and 20 s), corresponding to the ocean wave periods of the local swells. We analyze an example of austral swell occurring in August 2013 and a cyclonic event (Felleng) that developed in January 2013, and quantify the ground motion at each station induced by these events. In both cases, we find a linear polarization in the horizontal plane with microseismic amplitude directly correlated to the swell height (as predicted by the global swell model WaveWatchIII), and a direction of polarization close to the predicted swell propagation direction. Although this analysis has not been performed in real time, it demonstrates that terrestrial seismic stations can be efficiently used as wave gauges, and are particularly well suited for quantifying extreme swell events. This approach may therefore provide useful and cheaper alternatives to wave buoys for monitoring swells and the related environmental processes such as beach erosion or coral reef damages.

  10. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, R L; Kizer, N; Barry, E L; Friedman, P A; Hruska, K A

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS. PMID:8700850

  11. Bowers Swell: Evidence for a zone of compressive deformation concentric with Bowers Ridge, Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marlow, M. S.; Cooper, A. K.; Dadisman, S.V.; Geist, E.L.; Carlson, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    Bowers Swell is a newly discovered bathymetric feature which is up to 90 m high, between 12 and 20 km wide, and which extends arcuately about 400 km along the northern and eastern sides of Bowers Ridge. The swell was first revealed on GLORIA sonographs and subsequently mapped on seismic reflection and 3.5 kHz bathymetric profiles. These geophysical data show that the swell caps an arcuate anticlinal ridge, which is composed of deformed strata in an ancient trench on the northern and eastern sides of Bowers Ridge. The trench fill beneath the swell is actively deforming, as shown by faulting of the sea floor and by thinning of the strata across the crest of the swell. Thinning and faulting of the trench strata preclude an origin for the swell by simple sediment draping over an older basement high. We considered several models for the origin of Bowers Swell, including folding and uplift of the underlying trench sediment during the interaction between the Pacific plate beneath the Aleutian Ridge and a remnant oceanic slab beneath Bowers Ridge. However, such plate motions should generate extensive seismicity beneath Bowers Ridge, which is aseismic, and refraction data do not show any remnant slab beneath Bowers Ridge. Another origin considered for Bowers Swell invokes sediment deformation resulting from differential loading and diapirism in the trench fill. However, diapirism is not evident on seismic reflection profiles across the swell. We favour a model in which sediment deformation and swell formation resulted from a few tens of kilometers of low seismicity motion by intraplate crustal blocks beneath the Aleutian Basin. This motion may result from the translation of blocks in western Alaska to the south-west, forcing the movement of the Bering Sea margin west of Alaska into the abyssal Aleutian Basin. ?? 1990.

  12. Inversion of swell frequency from a 1-year HF radar dataset collected in Brittany (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Forget, Philippe; Guan, Changlong

    2014-10-01

    This article presents long period ocean wave (swell) frequencies inverted from a 13-month dataset of high-frequency (HF) phased array radars and an assessment of these estimates by comparison with WAVEWATCH III model data. The method of swell frequency inversion from high-frequency radar sea echo Doppler spectra is described. Radar data were collected from a two-site HF Wellen Radar (WERA) radar system on the west coast of Brittany (France) operating at 12 MHz. A standard beam-forming processing technique has been used to obtain Doppler spectra of processed radar cells. Swell frequencies are obtained from the frequencies of particular spectral peaks of the second-order continuum in hourly averaged Doppler spectra. The data coverage of effective Doppler spectra considered for swell frequency estimates shows the influence of islands and shallow water effects. Swell estimates from both radar stations are in good agreement. The comparison of radar-derived results to WAVEWATCH III (WW3) estimates shows that radar measurements agree quite well with model results. The bias and standard deviation between two estimates are very small for swells with frequency less than 0.09 Hz (period >11 s), whereas radar estimates are generally lower than model estimates for shorter swells, along with higher standard deviation. Statistical analysis suggests that radar measurement uncertainty explains most of the difference between radar and model estimates. For each swell event, time series of frequency exhibits a quasi-linear frequency increase which is associated with the dispersive property of wave phase velocity. The use of swell frequency estimates from both radars on common radar cells only slightly increases the accuracy of swell frequency measurement.

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of a swelling-activated cation channel in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Kizer, N.; Barry, E. L.; Friedman, P. A.; Hruska, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    By patch-clamp analysis, we have shown that chronic, intermittent mechanical strain (CMS) increases the activity of stretch-activated cation channels of osteoblast-like UMR-106.01 cells. CMS also produces a swelling-activated whole-cell conductance (Gm) regulated by varying strain levels. We questioned whether the swelling-activated conductance was produced by stretch-activated cation channel activity. We have identified a gene involved in the increase in conductance by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) derived from the alpha 1-subunit genes of calcium channels found in UMR-106.01 cells (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D). We demonstrate that alpha 1C antisense ODNs abolish the increase in Gm in response to hypotonic swelling following CMS. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S and alpha1D, sense ODNs to alpha1C, and sham permeabilization had no effect on the conductance increase. In addition, during cell-attached patch-clamp studies, antisense ODNs to alpha1c completely blocked the swelling-activated and stretch-activated nonselective cation channel response to strain. Antisense ODNs to alpha1S treatment produced no effect on either swelling-activated or stretch-activated cation channel activity. There were differences in the stretch-activated and swelling-activated cation channel activity, but whether they represent different channels could not be determined from our data. Our data indicate that the alpha1C gene product is involved in the Gm and the activation of the swelling-activated cation channels induced by CMS. The possibility that swelling-activated cation channel genes are members of the calcium channel superfamily exists, but if alpha1c is not the swelling-activated cation channel itself, then its expression is required for induction of swelling-activated cation channel activity by CMS.

  14. A theory for species migration in a finitely strained solid with application to polymer network swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Fernando P.; Souza, Angela C.; Fried, Eliot

    2010-04-01

    We present a theory for the behavior of a solid undergoing two interdependent processes, a macroscopic or mechanical process due to the deformation of the solid and a microscopic or chemical process due to the migration of a chemical species through the solid. The principle of virtual power is invoked to deduce the basic balances of the theory, namely the mechanical force balance and the transport balance for the chemical species. In combination with thermodynamically consistent constitutive relations, these balances generate the basic equations of the theory. Keeping in mind applications involving the swelling of polymer networks by liquids, a specialization of the theory is presented and applied to study the influences of mechanical and chemical interactions on equilibrium states and diffusive dynamical processes. It is shown that the possibility of a mechanically induced phase transition is governed by two parameters: the Flory interaction parameter and a parameter given by the product between the number of cross-linked units per unit reference volume and the molecular volume of the liquid molecule. As for diffusion, it is shown that the theory is able to describe the pressure-induced diffusion in swollen membranes.

  15. Shrinking and swelling clays under droughts: measurements at the Mormoiron test-site and first analyses (Vaucluse, South-East of France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdier, Sébastien; Vandromme, Rosalie; Grandjean, Gilles

    2013-04-01

    In France, exceptional periods of rainfall deficit (1976, 1989 to 1991 and 1996 to 1997) have caused damages to houses due to their vulnerability to shrinking and swelling clays phenomenon. Between 1998 and 2010, BRGM has been producing a national hazard map related to shrinking and swelling clays, built by crossing geological data and information on density of damages for each geological formation (methodology developed since 1995). The intense drought of summer 2003 has pointed out the necessity of a better understanding of this phenomenon. At the request of the French Ministry of Environment, BRGM has developed a new method for measuring the moisture evolution with depth in order to study its impact on the swelling capacity of clayed soil. The site of Mormoiron (Vaucluse, South-East of France) has then been instrumented for that purpose, with moisture sensors (since December 2004) and extensometers (since March 2009) at different depths. These data have been used to test and improve existing empirical models which are supposed to assess settlements and swellings, depending on the soil water content. Compilations of different measurements have shown, after basic processing made on the data (filtering, resampling, etc.), evident correlations between rain and surface displacements. The model finally obtained gives quite good dependence between these two quantities for the uppermost soil layers (0.2m and 0.5m). More research are being undertaken to physically explain this relationship, particularly for deeper layers. These results should lead to propose a calibrated model for predicting soil deformations from climatic data.

  16. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  17. Erratum for: Master equation and Fokker-Planck methods for void nucleation and growth in irradiation swelling, Vacancy cluster evolution and swelling in irradiated 316 stainless steel and Radiation swelling behavior and its dependence on temperature, dose

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-01-03

    We have recently discovered an error in our void nucleation code used in three prior publications [1-3]. A term was omitted in the model for vacancy re-emission that (especially at high temperature) affects void nucleation and growth during irradiation as well as void annealing and Ostwald ripening of the size distribution after irradiation. The omission was not immediately detected because the calculations predict reasonable void densities and swelling behaviors when compared to experiment at low irradiation temperatures, where void swelling is prominent. (Comparable neutron irradiation experiments are less prevalent at higher temperatures, e.g., > 500 C.)

  18. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling rates, and

  19. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    [125I]transferrin in the brain. Some of the 59Fe was detected in CSF in a fraction less than 30 kDa (III). It was estimated that the iron-binding capacity of transferrin in CSF was exceeded, suggesting that iron is transported into the brain in a quantity that exceeds that of transferrin. Accordingly, it was concluded that the paramount iron transport across the BBB is the result of receptor-mediated endocytosis of iron-containing transferrin by capillary endothelial cells, followed by recycling of transferrin to the blood and transport of non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain. It was found that retrograde axonal transport in a cranial motor nerve is age-dependent, varying from almost negligible in the neonatal brain to high in the adult brain. The principle sources of extracellular transferrin in the brain are hepatocytes, oligodendrocytes, and the choroid plexus. As the passage of liver-derived transferrin into the brain is restricted due to the BBB, other candidates for binding iron in the interstitium should be considered. In vitro studies have revealed secretion of transferrin from the choroid plexus and oligodendrocytes. The second part of the thesis encompasses the circulation of iron in the extracellular fluids of the brain, i.e. the brain interstitial fluid and the CSF. As the latter receives drainage from the interstitial fluid, the CSF of the ventricles can be considered a mixture of these fluids, which may allow for analysis of CSF in matters that relate to the brain interstitial fluid. As the choroid plexus is known to synthesize transferrin, a key question is whether transferrin of the CSF might play a role for iron homeostasis by diffusing from the ventricles and subarachnoid space to the brain interstitium. Intracerebroventricular injection of [59Fe125I]transferrin led to a higher accumulation of 59Fe than of [125I]transferrin in the brain. Except for uptake and axonal transport by certain neurons with access to the ventricular CSF, both iron and

  20. The swelling behavior of ionic polymers in the presence of diffusion and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungik

    During the past few decades, ionic polymers have attracted much attention due to their unique properties, i.e., a stimulus-sensitive swelling behavior. The use of ionic polymers in biotechnology and medicine is increasingly attractive for applications such as controlled drug delivery, biomimetic actuators, and chemical valves. The ability to model and predict the swelling behavior of polymers and mass flux with respect to external environmental conditions is very important in such applications. The focus of this dissertation is on developing a continuum model for the behavior of a swollen solid and diffusion of a fluid through it in the presence of chemical reactions. To model diffusion through an ionic/nonionic polymer in the presence of mechanical deformation, we develop a variational procedure based on a thermodynamic framework for a swollen solid subject to constraints. This thermodynamic framework was mainly developed by Rajagopal and Srinivasa as a general thermodynamic framework for inelastic behavior of materials. First, a model for the mechanical behavior of a rubber-like solid in the presence of mass diffusion is developed using the variational procedure. By assuming a specific form for the Helmholtz potential function, we obtain an equilibrium equation that is identical to the equation suggested by Flory, Huggins, and Rehner. For the non-equilibrium problem, we assume a specific form for the rate of dissipation function and obtain the relation between pressure difference and mass flux. The numerical results show very good agreement with experimental data for the diffusion of organic solvents through a rubber slab. Hysteresis response of the swollen solid due to time-dependent loads is also simulated by the model. The variational procedure is also applied to pH-sensitive ionic polymers, which not only yields the equations for the deformation of a swollen solid and mass flux, but also the equations for chemical equilibrium. As a specific example, an

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the ischemic brain under lithium treatment. Link to mitochondrial disorders under stroke.

    PubMed

    Silachev, Denis N; Gulyaev, Mikhail V; Zorova, Ljubava D; Khailova, Ljudmila S; Gubsky, Leonid V; Pirogov, Yury A; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2015-07-25

    Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria are one of the main factors in the pathogenesis in different organs including brain. The pathogenesis after brain damage is caused not only by the change in bioenergetics, but also involves impairment of alternative functions of mitochondria, particularly those related to the control of cell death. In this study we evaluated partial metabolic pathways under the simulation of a stroke by using the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats. The analysis shows that the induced switch to a non-oxidative energy metabolism (glycolysis) due to the block of tissue oxygen supply does not ensure the adequate supply of the tissue with ATP. Moreover, the well-known acidification of the ischemic tissue is not associated with the so-called traditionally and incorrectly considered "lactic acidosis" (the generation of lactate from glucose by itself does not lead to excessive generation of protons), but occurs because of the consumption of tissue ATP under its reduced resynthesis. Incubation of mitochondria isolated from normal rat brain at neutral and slightly acidic pH, mimicking the intracellular pH of normal and ischemic tissues correspondingly, revealed serious changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics, partially reflected in the magnitude of respiratory control and the basal and maximally stimulated respiration rates. Measurement of available metabolites by (1)H MR spectra of normal and ischemia-damaged brains showed a significant increase in lactate and myo-inositol and a moderate decrease in N-acetylaspartate 24h after reperfusion. Remarkably, the administration of lithium chloride in the reperfusion phase normalized the levels of metabolites. Moreover, the introduction of lithium salts (chloride or succinate) in the bloodstream, restored after ischemia, reduced both the size of the ischemia-induced brain damage and the degree of brain swelling. Besides, post-ischemic introduction of lithium salts largely restored the

  2. Investigation of Swelling Behavior and Mechanical Properties of a pH-Sensitive Superporous Hydrogel Composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, N. Vishal; Shivakumar, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop and investigate the swelling behavior of pH-sensitive Superporous Hydrogel (SPH) and SPH composite (SPHC). A novel superporous hydrogel containing poly (methacrylic acid-co-acrylamide) was synthesized from methacrylic acid and acrylamide through the aqueous solution polymerization, using N,N-methylenebisacrylamide as a crosslinker and ammonium persulfate as an initiator. SPHCs were made in the same way, except for the using of Ac-Di-Sol as a stabilizer. The synthesized SPH and SPHC were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, swelling kinetics, porosity, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy. The swelling of SPH and SPHC was sensitive towards the pH, ionic strength, and temperature stimuli. The study of the surface morphology of SPH using scanning electron microscopy showed a highly porous structure. SPH polymers showed higher swelling ratio but less mechanical stability compared to SPHC polymers, which showed lower swelling ratio but a higher mechanical stability. With a change in pH from acidic to basic, a considerable increase in swelling was observed. Since the prepared SPH and SPHC swell only in the basic pH, it may be concluded that SPH and SPHC can be used as the pH-sensitive drug delivery system. PMID:24250471

  3. Episodic swell growth inferred from variable uplift of the Cape Verde hotspot islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramalho, R.; Helffrich, G.; Cosca, M.; Vance, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Schmidt, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    On the Beagle voyage, Charles Darwin first noted the creation and subsidence of ocean islands, establishing in geology's infancy that island freeboard changes with time. Hotspot ocean islands have an obvious mechanism for freeboard change through the growth of the bathymetric anomaly, or swell, on which the islands rest. Models for swell development indicate that flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions, as well as spreading of melt residue from the hotspot, can all contribute to island uplift. Here we test various models for swell development using the uplift histories for the islands of the Cape Verde hotspot, derived from isotopic dating of marine terraces and subaerial to submarine lava-flow morphologies. The island uplift histories, in conjunction with inter-island spacing, uplift rate and timing differences, rule out flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions. We also find that uplift cannot be reconciled with models that advocate the spreading of melt residue in swell development unless swell growth is episodic. Instead, we infer from the uplift histories that two processes have acted to raise the islands during the past 6 Myr. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions at the island edifice caused 350 m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100 m of surface rise.

  4. Deformation mechanisms in a coal mine roadway in extremely swelling soft rock.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Shi, Weiping; Yang, Renshu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of roadway support in swelling soft rock was one of the challenging problems during mining. For most geological conditions, combinations of two or more supporting approaches could meet the requirements of most roadways; however, in extremely swelling soft rock, combined approaches even could not control large deformations. The purpose of this work was to probe the roadway deformation mechanisms in extremely swelling soft rock. Based on the main return air-way in a coal mine, deformation monitoring and geomechanical analysis were conducted, as well as plastic zone mechanical model was analysed. Results indicated that this soft rock was potentially very swelling. When the ground stress acted alone, the support strength needed in situ was not too large and combined supporting approaches could meet this requirement; however, when this potential released, the roadway would undergo permanent deformation. When the loose zone reached 3 m within surrounding rock, remote stress p ∞ and supporting stress P presented a linear relationship. Namely, the greater the swelling stress, the more difficult it would be in roadway supporting. So in this extremely swelling soft rock, a better way to control roadway deformation was to control the releasing of surrounding rock's swelling potential. PMID:27547684

  5. Late onset distal axonal swelling in YFP-H transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Katherine E; Berg, Nicola; Adalbert, Robert; Babetto, Elisabetta; Dias, Tatyana; Spillantini, Maria-Grazia; Ribchester, Richard R; Coleman, Michael P

    2009-02-01

    Axonal swellings, or spheroids, are a feature of central nervous system (CNS) axon degeneration during normal aging and in many disorders. The direct cause and mechanism are unknown. The use of transgenic mouse line YFP-H, which expresses yellow-fluorescent protein (YFP) in a subset of neurons, greatly facilitates longitudinal imaging and live imaging of axonal swellings, but it has not been established whether long-term expression of YFP itself contributes to axonal swelling. Using conventional methods to compare YFP-H mice with their YFP negative littermates, we found an age-related increase in swellings in discrete CNS regions in both genotypes, but the presence of YFP caused significantly more swellings in mice aged 8 months or over. Increased swelling was found in gracile tract, gracile nucleus and dorsal roots but not in lateral columns, olfactory bulb, motor cortex, ventral roots or peripheral nerve. Thus, long-term expression of YFP accelerates age-related axonal swelling in some axons and data reliant on the presence of YFP in these CNS regions in older animals needs to be interpreted carefully. The ability of a foreign protein to exacerbate age-related axon pathology is an important clue to the mechanisms by which such pathology can arise. PMID:17658198

  6. Phenomenological force and swelling models for rechargeable lithium-ion battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Epureanu, Bogdan I.; Siegel, Jason B.; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.

    2016-04-01

    Three phenomenological force and swelling models are developed to predict mechanical phenomena caused by Li-ion intercalation: a 1-D force model, a 1st order relaxation model, and a 3-D swelling model. The 1-D force model can estimate the Li-ion intercalation induced force for actual pack conditions with preloads. The model incorporates a nonlinear elastic stiffness to capture the mechanical consequences of Li-ion intercalation swelling. The model also separates the entire state of charge range into three regions considering phase transitions. The 1st order relaxation model predicts dynamic swelling during relaxation periods. A coefficient of relaxation is estimated from dynamic and quasi-static swelling at operational conditions. The 3-D swelling model predicts the swelling shape on the battery surface for all states of charge. This model introduces an equivalent modulus of elasticity, which is dependent on the state of charge, to capture material transformations of the electrodes, and the orthotropic expansion of the jellyroll in a direction perpendicular to the electrode surfaces. Considering the simplicity of the measurements and direct physical correlations between stress and strain, the proposed models can enhance battery management systems and power management strategies.

  7. Episodic swell growth inferred from variable uplift of the Cape Verde hotspot islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, R.; Helffrich, G.; Cosca, M.; Vance, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Schmidt, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    On the Beagle voyage, Charles Darwin first noted the creation and subsidence of ocean islands, establishing in geology's infancy that island freeboard changes with time. Hotspot ocean islands have an obvious mechanism for freeboard change through the growth of the bathymetric anomaly, or swell, on which the islands rest. Models for swell development indicate that flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions, as well as spreading of melt residue from the hotspot, can all contribute to island uplift. Here we test various models for swell development using the uplift histories for the islands of the Cape Verde hotspot, derived from isotopic dating of marine terraces and subaerial to submarine lava-flow morphologies. The island uplift histories, in conjunction with inter-island spacing, uplift rate and timing differences, rule out flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions. We also find that uplift cannot be reconciled with models that advocate the spreading of melt residue in swell development unless swell growth is episodic. Instead, we infer from the uplift histories that two processes have acted to raise the islands during the past 6Myr. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions at the island edifice caused 350m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100m of surface rise.

  8. Paternal care and the evolution of exaggerated sexual swellings in primates

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The exaggerated sexual swellings exhibited by females of some primate species have been of interest to evolutionary biologists since the time of Darwin. We summarize existing hypotheses for their function and evolution and categorize these hypotheses within the context of 3 types of variation in sexual swelling size: 1) variation within a single sexual cycle, 2) variation between the sexual cycles of a single female, and 3) differences between females. We then propose the Paternal Care Hypothesis for the function of sexual swellings, which posits that exaggerated sexual swellings function to elicit the right quantity and quality of male care for a female's infant. As others have noted, swellings may allow females to engender paternity confusion, or they may allow females to confer relative paternal certainty on one male. Key to our hypothesis is that both of these scenarios create an incentive for one or more males to provide care. This hypothesis builds on previous hypotheses but differs from them by highlighting the elicitation of paternal care as a key function of swellings. Our hypothesis predicts that true paternal care (in which males accurately differentiate and provide assistance to their own offspring) will be most common in species in which exaggerated swellings accurately signal the probability of conception, and males can monopolize females during the window of highest conception probability. Our hypothesis also predicts that females will experience selection to behave in ways that either augment paternity confusion or enhance paternal certainty depending on their social and demographic contexts. PMID:24771988

  9. Experimentally determined swelling pressures and geochemical interactions of compacted Wyoming bentonite with highly alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Nilsson, Ulf; Sellin, Patrik

    The estimated quantity of cement for construction and sealing purposes is around 9E5 kg in the planned Swedish KBS3 repository for nuclear waste. The highly alkaline cement pore fluid (pH > 12) may affect other components in the repository, and especially the bentonite buffer is of concern. In this study, we simulated possible interactions between cement and bentonite by contacting highly compacted bentonite with high molar hydroxide solutions in a series of laboratory experiments. Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and purified homo-ionic Na- and Ca-montmorillonite were used for tests with 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 M NaOH, and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions. Pressure cells with permeable filters were loaded with compacted discs of bentonite at the proposed buffer density (2000 kg/m 3 at full water saturation). A hydroxide solution was circulated on one side of the cell and an isotonic chloride solution on the other during a minimum of 45 days. Swelling pressure and solution pH were monitored during the tests and the change in the solution composition and bentonite mineralogy were determined after completed tests. No effect on swelling pressure was observed in tests with 0.1 M NaOH (pH 12.9) or saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions (pH 12.4) and the mineralogical/chemical changes of the clay were minimal. The bentonite swelling pressure was significantly reduced in the tests with 0.3 (pH 13.3) and 1.0 M (pH 13.8) NaOH solutions. The reduction seems to be due to an instant osmotic effect, and to a continuous dissolution of silica minerals, resulting in mass loss and, consequently, a decrease in density. At these high pH, the release of silica was dominating and the CEC of the clay increased by 20-25%. The structural formula of the smectite and X-ray diffraction tests for non-expandability (Greene-Kelly test) provided strong evidence that the dissolution of montmorillonite proceeds incongruently through an initial step of beidellitization. The calculated rate of silica release from

  10. Towards a system-paced near-infrared spectroscopy brain-computer interface: differentiating prefrontal activity due to mental arithmetic and mental singing from the no-control state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Sarah D.; Kushki, Azadeh; Chau, Tom

    2011-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has recently been investigated as a non-invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) for individuals with severe motor impairments. For the most part, previous research has investigated the development of NIRS-BCIs operating under synchronous control paradigms, which require the user to exert conscious control over their mental activity whenever the system is vigilant. Though functional, this is mentally demanding and an unnatural way to communicate. An attractive alternative to the synchronous control paradigm is system-paced control, in which users are required to consciously modify their brain activity only when they wish to affect the BCI output, and can remain in a more natural, 'no-control' state at all other times. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a system-paced NIRS-BCI with one intentional control (IC) state corresponding to the performance of either mental arithmetic or mental singing. In particular, this involved determining if these tasks could be distinguished, individually, from the unconstrained 'no-control' state. Deploying a dual-wavelength frequency domain near-infrared spectrometer, we interrogated nine sites around the frontopolar locations (International 10-20 System) while eight able-bodied adults performed mental arithmetic and mental singing to answer multiple-choice questions within a system-paced paradigm. With a linear classifier trained on a six-dimensional feature set, an overall classification accuracy of 71.2% across participants was achieved for the mental arithmetic versus no-control classification problem. While the mental singing versus no-control classification was less successful across participants (62.7% on average), four participants did attain accuracies well in excess of chance, three of which were above 70%. Analyses were performed offline. Collectively, these results are encouraging, and demonstrate the potential of a system-paced NIRS-BCI with one IC state corresponding to

  11. Structure within thin epoxy films revealed by solvent swelling: A neutron reflectivity study

    SciTech Connect

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MCNAMARA,WILLIAM FRERE; IVKOV,R.; SATIJA,S.; MAJEWSKI,J.

    2000-03-02

    The focus of this work is the structure within highly crosslinked, two component epoxy films. The authors examine variations in crosslink density within thin epoxy films on silicon substrates by solvent swelling. The method is based on the fact that the equilibrium volume fraction of a swelling solvent is strongly dependent upon the local crosslink density. The authors examine the volume fraction profile of the good solvent nitrobenzene through the epoxy films by neutron reflection. Isotopic substitution is used to provide contrast between the epoxy matrix and the swelling solvent.

  12. The influence of temperature on the swelling of polyacrylic and polymethacrylic cationites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpyuk, E. A.; Korotkikh, O. I.; Gavlina, O. T.; Ivanov, V. A.

    2011-03-01

    Temperature was shown to substantially influence the swelling of KB-2e3 polyacrylic and KB-4P2 polymethacrylic ionites cross-linked by triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDM) and divinylbenzene (DVB). Maximum swelling changes as the temperature increased were observed for the Ca form of the KB-4P2 ionite. Swelling and contraction of polymethacrylic cationite grains as the temperature decreased and increased occurred at equal fairly high rates, whereas the sorption of water by the polyacrylic cationite in the calcium form cross-linked by TEGDM occurred much more slowly than desorption.

  13. Modeling swelling and absorption dynamics for holographic sensing in analytes sensitive photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Yu, Dan; Mao, Dongyao; Geng, Yaohui; Wang, Weibo

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical model is developed to describe holographic sensing and swelling of grating fringe in photopolymer. In experiments, diffraction spectrum responses of grating are characterized to exhibit holographic sensing processes. Analytic expressions between swelling of grating fringe and environmental factors, such as relative humidity and organic vapor concentrations, are extracted based on experimental results. The primary factors are introduced into the model to simulate the sensing process, including swelling ratio, nanozeolites dispersion, and organic vapor absorption. Finally, numerical results are presented for improving the sensitivity of holographic sensor. This work can accelerate the development of holographic sensor and provide a theoretical base for exploring sensing mechanism of polymer.

  14. Hypoosmotic swelling test for quality control of sperm prepared for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, I; Mićić, S; Genbaćev, O; Papić, N

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates the clinical usefulness of one additional parameter for assessment of human sperm cell function in vitro--the hypoosmotic swelling test. The hypoosmotic swelling test evaluated the functional integrity of the sperm plasma membrane. The investigation included a comparison of the hypoosmotic swelling test in samples containing motile and immotile spermatozoa and their correlation with the intrauterine insemination outcome. Motile spermatozoa expressed better membrane characteristics, without any importance of the hypoosmotic conditions. Positive correlation exists between HOS results and the outcome of IUI. This test can be a useful addition to the standard battery of semen analyzing tests. PMID:7625880

  15. Analysis of Biophysical Mechanisms of Gilgai Microrelief Formation in Dryland Swelling Soils Using Ultra-High Resolution Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krell, N.; DeCarlo, K. F.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Microrelief formations ("gilgai"), which form due to successive wetting-drying cycles typical of swelling soils, provide ecological hotspots for local fauna and flora, including higher and more robust vegetative growth. The distribution of these gilgai suggests a remarkable degree of regularity. However, it is unclear to what extent the mechanisms that drive gilgai formation are physical, such as desiccation-induced fracturing, or biological in nature, namely antecedent vegetative clustering. We investigated gilgai genesis and pattern formation in a 100 x 100 meter study area with swelling soils in a semiarid grassland at the Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Our ongoing experiment is composed of three 9m2 treatments: we removed gilgai and limited vegetative growth by herbicide application in one plot, allowed for unrestricted seed dispersal in another, and left gilgai unobstructed in a control plot. To estimate the spatial frequencies of the repeating patterns of gilgai, we obtained ultra-high resolution (0.01-0.03m/pixel) images with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) from which digital elevation models were also generated. Geostatistical analyses using wavelet and fourier methods in 1- and 2-dimensions were employed to characterize gilgai size and distribution. Preliminary results support regular spatial patterning across the gilgaied landscape and heterogeneities may be related to local soil properties and biophysical influences. Local data on gilgai and fracture characteristics suggest that gilgai form at characteristic heights and spacing based on fracture morphology: deep, wide cracks result in large, highly vegetated mounds whereas shallow cracks, induced by animal trails, are less correlated with gilgai size and shape. Our experiments will help elucidate the links between shrink-swell processes and gilgai-vegetation patterning in high activity clay soils and advance our understanding of the mechanisms of gilgai formation in drylands.

  16. Anomalous Shrinking-Swelling of Nanoconfined End-Charged Polyelectrolyte Brushes: Interplay of Confinement and Electrostatic Effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-07-14

    In this article, we model the structure and configuration of the end-charged polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes grafted on the inner walls of a nanochannel. When the confinement effect is weak, that is, d0 < h/2 (d0 is the PE brush height without electrostatic effects and h is the nanochannel half-height), d < d0 (d is the brush height with the electrostatic effects), that is, the brushes shrink due to the electrostatic effects. Furthermore, for this case, an increase in salt concentration increases d. On the contrary, for the case in which the confinement effect is strong (i.e., d0 > h/2), d > d0 (i.e., the electrostatic effects swell the brushes), and an increase in salt concentration decreases the brush height. These findings reveal that the behavior of the end-charged brushes shows three unique differences when compared to that of the standard PE brushes with charges along their entire backbone. These differences are (a) the presence of a distinct role of the confinement in dictating how the electrostatic effects mediated by the electric double layer govern the height of end-charged brushes, (b) electrostatic-effect-driven shrinking of end-charged brushes for d0 < h/2 (for backbone-charged brushes, the electrostatic effects always swell the brushes), and (c) swelling of end-charged brushes with an increase in salt concentration for d0 < h/2 (backbone-charged brushes always shrink with an increase in salt concentration). Such unique effects of confinement and electrostatics on PE brushes have not been reported previously, and we anticipate that these findings will shed new light on the structure and properties of PE-brush-functionalized nanochannels with implications in applications such as fabrication of functionalized-nanochannel-based nanofluidic diodes, valves, biosensors, current rectifiers, and so forth. PMID:27322913

  17. Stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks – A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Simon; Blum, Philipp; Butscher, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunnel engineering, causing serious damage to tunnels and producing high additional costs during tunnel construction and operation. The swelling leads to geomechanical processes that may result in heave of the tunnel invert, destruction of the lining or uplift of the entire tunnel section. Heave-pressure-time relations are needed when predictions should be made about the mechanical behavior of swelling rock. For pure clay rocks, there is a linear relation between the swelling heave (strain) and the logarithm of pressure (Grob 1972). A generally accepted relation for clay-sulfate rocks, however, is still lacking to date. Therefore, finding appropriate and sustainable counter measures for an actual tunneling project affected by swelling remains extremely difficult. Grob (1972) proposed the linear relation between heave and the logarithm of pressure ("semi-logarithmic swelling law") not only for clay rocks, but also for clay-sulfate rocks. Pimentel (2007), however, presented laboratory experiments indicating that the semi-logarithmic swelling law may be inadequate for describing the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks. The laboratory tests revealed three different stages in the swelling process, including minimal deformation and prevented gypsum crystallization at high pressures (> 6 MPa); large deformation and gypsum crystallization at medium pressures; and only small deformation, possibly along with gypsum dissolution, at low pressures (< 4 MPa). He pointed at a "tri-linear" relation to describe the different stages. Kirschke (1995) generally doubts the existence of a fixed relation between swelling strain and (final) pressure. According to him, swelling pressures and their temporal development are controlled by water inflow into the rock, which cannot be reflected by general strain-stress relations. The present study critically reviews stress-strain relations for swelling anhydritic clay rocks proposed by various

  18. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Images Amebic brain ...

  19. Brain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  20. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Before surgery, the hair on part of the scalp is shaved and the area is cleaned. The doctor makes ...

  1. Brain Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise, diet and nutrition, cognitive activity, and social engagement — can help keep your body and brain ... Stay Mentally Active > Mentally challenging activities and social engagement may support brain health. Learn More Plan ahead ...

  2. The Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  3. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  4. Visual loss and optic nerve head swelling in thiamine deficiency without prolonged dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Sean M; Lam, Byron L

    2014-01-01

    Visual loss due to optic neuropathy is a rare manifestation of thiamine deficiency. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 29 kg/m2 who developed visual loss and bilateral optic nerve head swelling after a short, self-limited gastrointestinal illness. She was disoriented and inattentive and had absent ankle jerk reflexes, diminished sensation in both legs below the knees, and marked truncal ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increased T2-signal in the medial thalami and mammillary bodies. The serum thiamine level was 8 nmol/L (normal 8–30). The diagnosis of thiamine deficiency was made, and the patient’s vision and neurologic symptoms improved significantly with intramuscular thiamine treatment. Thiamine deficiency can occur in the absence of an obvious predisposing factor such as alcoholism or low body weight. The clinician must be aware of the factors that govern vitamin availability and maintain a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:24899800

  5. An analytical approach to the characterization of swelling in clay-bearing stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonen, P.; Wangler, T.

    2015-10-01

    Clay minerals that swell when exposed to water play an important role in the deterioration of buildings and monuments, as well as in a number of civil engineering problems. A novel method for the in situ determination of the key properties governing these phenomena has been recently proposed by Scherer and Gonzalez [Geol. Soc. Am. Spec. Pap. 390 (2005) p.51]. A comprehensive relation between the experimental observations and the material properties could however not be established up to now. The present study develops an analytical model in which the interplay between geometrical factors and material properties, as well as initial and boundary conditions is accounted for. An extensive parametric study reveals that the discrepancies between the observations and the modelling approach by Scherer and Gonzalez is due to initial and boundary conditions on the one hand and the dispersion of the moisture front on the other hand. Based on the developed model, recommendations for performing in situ tests are formulated and conditions for the applicability of the more simplified modelling strategy by Scherer and Gonzalez are derived. A comparison with experimental data supports these conclusions.

  6. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  7. Comprehensive Prediction of Large-height Swell-like Waves in East Coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. J.; Lee, C.; Ahn, S. J.; Kim, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    There have been growing interests in the large-height swell-like wave (LSW) in the east coast of Korea because such big waves have caused human victims as well as damages to facilities such as breakwaters in the coast. The LSW was found to be generated due to an atmospherically great valley in the north area of the East Sea and then propagate long distance to the east coast of Korea in prominently southwest direction (Oh et al., 2010).In this study, we will perform two methods, real-time data based and numerical-model based predictions in order to predict the LSW in the east coast of Korea. First, the real-time data based prediction method uses information which is collected by the directional wave gauge installed near Sokcho. Using the wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) and the wave ray method (Munk and Arthur, 1952), we will estimate wave data in open sea from the real-time data and predict the travel time of LSW from the measurement site (near Sokcho) to several target points in the east coast of Korea. Second, the numerical-model based method uses three different numerical models; WW3 in deep water, SWAN in shallow water, and CADMAS-SURF for wave run-up (CDIT). The surface winds from the 72 hours prediction system of NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) GFS (Global Forecast System) will be inputted in finer grids after interpolating these in certain domains of WW3 and SWAN models. The significant wave heights and peak wave directions predicted by the two methods will be compared to the measured data of LSW at several target points near the coasts. Further, the prediction method will be improved using more measurement sites which will be installed in the future. ReferencesBooij, N., Ris, R.C., and Holthuijsen, L.H. (1999). A third-generation wave model for coastal regions 1. Model description and validation. J. of Geophysical Research, 103(C4), 7649-7666.Munk, W.H. and Arthur, R.S. (1952). Gravity Waves. 13. Wave Intensity along a Refracted Ray

  8. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  9. Real-time imaging of exocytotic mucin release and swelling in Calu-3 cells using acridine orange

    PubMed Central

    Shumilov, Dmytro; Popov, Alexander; Fudala, Rafal; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Mucus secretion is the first-line of defence against the barrage of irritants inhaled into human lungs, but abnormally thick and viscous mucus results in many respiratory diseases. Understanding the processes underlying mucus pathology is hampered, in part, by lack of appropriate experimental tools for labeling and studying mucin granule secretion from live cells with high sensitivity and temporal resolution. In this report we present original spectroscopic properties of acridine orange (AO) which could be utilized to study granule release and mucin swelling with various advanced fluorescence imaging approaches. Low concentration (<200 μM) AO solutions presented absorption maximum at 494 nm, emission maximum at 525 nm and only ~1.76 ns fluorescence lifetime. By contrast at high concentrations (4–30 mM) favoring formation of AO aggregates, a very different absorption with maximum at ~440 nm, dramatically red-shifted emission with maximum at 630 nm, and over 10-fold increased fluorescence lifetime (~20 ns) was observed. To verify potential utility of AO for real-time imaging we have performed confocal, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of AO-stained Calu-3 cells. We found similar red-shifted fluorescence spectra and long fluorescence lifetime in intracellular granules as compared to that in the cytoplasm consistent with granular AO accumulation. Mechanical stimulation of Calu-3 cells resulted in multiple exocytotic secretory events of AO-stained granules followed by post-exocytotic swelling of their fluorescently-labeled content that was seen in single-line TIRF images as rapidly-expanding bright-fluorescence patches. The rate of their size expansion followed first-order kinetics with diffusivity of 3.98 ± 0.07 × 10−7 cm2/s, as expected for mucus gel swelling. This was followed by fluorescence decrease due to diffusional loss of AO that was ~10-fold slower in the secreted mucus compared to bulk aqueous

  10. Real-time imaging of exocytotic mucin release and swelling in Calu-3 cells using acridine orange.

    PubMed

    Shumilov, Dmytro; Popov, Alexander; Fudala, Rafal; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-03-15

    Mucus secretion is the first-line of defence against the barrage of irritants inhaled into human lungs, but abnormally thick and viscous mucus results in many respiratory diseases. Understanding the processes underlying mucus pathology is hampered, in part, by lack of appropriate experimental tools for labeling and studying mucin granule secretion from live cells with high sensitivity and temporal resolution. In this report we present original spectroscopic properties of acridine orange (AO) which could be utilized to study granule release and mucin swelling with various advanced fluorescence imaging approaches. Low concentration (<200 μM) AO solutions presented absorption maximum at 494 nm, emission maximum at 525 nm and only ∼1.76 ns fluorescence lifetime. By contrast at high concentrations (4-30 mM) favoring formation of AO aggregates, a very different absorption with maximum at ∼440 nm, dramatically red-shifted emission with maximum at 630 nm, and over 10-fold increased fluorescence lifetime (∼20 ns) was observed. To verify potential utility of AO for real-time imaging we have performed confocal, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of AO-stained Calu-3 cells. We found similar red-shifted fluorescence spectra and long fluorescence lifetime in intracellular granules as compared to that in the cytoplasm consistent with granular AO accumulation. Mechanical stimulation of Calu-3 cells resulted in multiple exocytotic secretory events of AO-stained granules followed by post-exocytotic swelling of their fluorescently-labeled content that was seen in single-line TIRF images as rapidly-expanding bright-fluorescence patches. The rate of their size expansion followed first-order kinetics with diffusivity of 3.98±0.07×10(-7)c m(2)/s, as expected for mucus gel swelling. This was followed by fluorescence decrease due to diffusional loss of AO that was ∼10-fold slower in the secreted mucus compared to bulk aqueous

  11. Lower eyelid swelling as a late complication of Bio-Alcamid filler into the malar area

    PubMed Central

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H.; Alfawaz, Nawaf

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To report the late complications associated with permanent filler injections into the malar area for rejuvenation. Methods A retrospective case series of three patients who presented with lower eyelid swelling several years following injection of polyalkylimide (Bio-Alcamid) into the malar area. Results All patients presented with lower eyelid swelling which developed as a result of spontaneous migration of filler to the lower eyelid. Iatrogenic migration of the filler from the lower eyelid following a trial to remove resulted in an abscess formation which further complicated the removal. Conclusions Lower eyelid swelling may be one of the late complications associated with the permanent fillers into the malar area. An attempt at removal of filler by aspiration or bimanual expression may result in late migration of the product and the development of eyelid swelling. PMID:23960905

  12. Bilayer mass transport model for determining swelling and diffusion in coated, ultrathin membranes.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole K; Chan, Edwin P; Stafford, Christopher M

    2015-02-18

    Water transport and swelling properties of an ultrathin, selective polyamide layer with a hydrophilic polymer coating, i.e., a polymer bilayer, are studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Specifically, QCM-D is used to measure the dynamic and equilibrium change in mass in a series of differential sorption experiments to determine the dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient and equilibrium swelling of the bilayer as a function of the water vapor activity. To determine transport properties specific to the polyamide layer, sorption kinetics of the bilayer was modeled with a bilayer mass transport model. The swelling and water diffusion coefficients are interpreted according to the Painter-Shenoy polymer network swelling model and the solution-diffusion model, respectively. PMID:25597964

  13. Coupling behavior of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, H.; Baghani, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a model is developed to continuously predict homogeneous and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of pH/temperature sensitive PNIPAM hydrogels. Employing the model, homogeneous swelling of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogel is investigated for free and biaxial constrained swelling cases. Comparing the model results with the experimental data available in the literature, the validity of the model is confirmed. The model is then employed to investigate inhomogeneous swelling of a spherical shell on a hard core both analytically and numerically for pH or temperature variations. In this regard, numerical tools are developed via preparing a user defined subroutine in ABAQUS software. Then, the complicated problem of contact between the hydrogel shell and a micro-channel with rigid walls is also investigated. Considering the results, we can say that the model is applicable for solving engineering boundary value problem of pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels.

  14. Effects of granule swelling on starch saccharification by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofeng; Cai, Liming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-08-13

    The effects of granule swelling on enzymatic saccharification of normal corn starch by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme were investigated. After swelling, Km values for the saccharification of granular starch decreased compared with native granular starch, indicating that granule swelling caused granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme to have higher affinity for starch granules. The partial swelling of starch granules enhanced starch saccharification. Furthermore, the enhancement at an earlier stage of enzymatic reaction was much more significant than that at later stages. For granular starch pretreated at 67.5 °C for 30 min, conversions to glucose after incubation with the enzyme at 32 °C for 4 and 24 h were approximately 3-fold and 26% higher than for native granular starch, respectively. As a result, proper heat pretreatment of granular starch before simultaneous saccharification and fermentation has great potential to facilitate industrial production of ethanol by use of granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme. PMID:25039418

  15. Influence of nickel and beryllium content on swelling behavior of copper irradiated with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.; Edwards, D.J.; Evans, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    In the 1970`s, the effects of nickel content on the evolution of dislocation microstructures and the formation and growth of voids in Cu-Ni alloys were studied using 1 MeV electrons in a high voltage electron microscope. The swelling rate was found to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. The decrease in the swelling rate was associated with a decreasing void growth rate with increasing nickel content at irradiation temperatures up to 450{degrees}C. At 500{degrees}C, both void size and swelling rate were found to peak at 1 and 2% Ni, respectively, and then to decrease rapidly with increasing nickel content. However, recent work has demonstrated that the swelling behavior of Cu-5%Ni irradiated with fission neutrons is very similar for that of pure copper. The present experiments were designed to investigate this apparent discrepancy.

  16. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  17. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact sheet is a basic introduction to the human brain. It may help you understand how the healthy ... largest and most highly developed part of the human brain: it consists primarily of the cerebrum ( 2 ) and ...

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Swelling and Elastic Property Changes Resulting from Carbon Dioxide Injection into Prismatic Coal Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlamini, Bongani

    sample, where corresponding transducers on the other end of the sample receive the signal. Pre-injection measurements of sonic velocity (Vp and Vs) were taken. From sonic velocities (Vp and Vs), other pre-injection properties such as Poisson’s Ratio, shear, bulk and Young’s modulus (dynamic) were calculated. Digital deformation gauges were also strategically placed on the samples to measure strain (swelling) during the injection phase. CO2 was injected into the first sample at high confining pressure and high injection pressure. Injection proceeded for five days for each of the samples (25 hours of actual injection). A maximum increase in compressional velocity of 21% was measured at 12 MPa confining pressure and 4 MPa injection pressure. Increases in elastic moduli were also observed due to CO2 injection. A maximum adsorption strain (swelling) of 0.9% was measured at 12 MPa confining pressure and 4 MPa injection pressure. At high injection pressure (4 MPa) and high confining pressure (12 MPa), the coal started to swell at 5 hours of injection. At low injection pressure (1.8MPa) and low confining pressure (1.8MPa), the coal only started to swell at 10 hours of injection.

  19. Pinch and swell structures: evidence for brittle-viscous behaviour in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, R.; Piazolo, S.; Daczko, N.

    2015-04-01

    The flow properties of middle to lower crustal rocks are commonly represented by viscous flow. However, examples of pinch and swell structures found in a mid-crustal high strain zone at St. Anne Point (Fiordland, New Zealand) suggest pinch and swell structures are initiated by brittle failure of the more competent layer in conjunction with material softening. On this basis we develop a flexible numerical model using brittle-viscous flow where Mohr-Coulomb failure is utilised to initiate pinch and swell structure development. Results show that pinch and swell structures develop in a competent layer in both Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow provided the competent layer has enough viscosity contrast and initially fails brittlely. The degree of material softening after initial failure is shown to impact pinch and swell characteristics with high rates of material softening causing the formation of thick necks between swells by limiting the successful localisation of strain. The flow regime and yielding characteristics of the matrix do not impact pinch and swell structure formation itself, so long as the matrix is less competent. To aid analysis of the structures and help derive the flow properties of rocks in the field, we define three stages of pinch and swell development and offer suggestions for measurements to be made in the field. Our study suggests that Mohr-Coulomb behaviour combined with viscous flow is an appropriate way to represent the heterogeneous rocks of the middle to lower crust. This type of mid-crustal rheological behaviour has significant influence on the localization of strain at all scales. For example, inclusion of Mohr-Coulomb brittle failure with viscous flow in just some mid-crustal layers within a crustal scale model will result in strain localisation throughout the whole crustal section allowing the development of through-going high strain structures from the upper crust into the middle and lower crust. This localization then has a significant

  20. A swelling-suppressed Si/SiOx nanosphere lithium storage material fabricated by graphene envelopment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyundong; Park, Eunjun; Kim, Hyekyoung; Bae, Juhye; Chang, Hankwon; Jang, Hee Dong; Kim, Hansu

    2016-06-28

    A swelling-suppressed, Si nanocrystals-embedded SiOx nanospheres lithium storage material was prepared by graphene envelopment. The free void spaces formed between the graphene envelope and Si/SiOx nanospheres effectively accommodated the volume changes of Si/SiOx nanospheres during cycling, which significantly suppresses the swelling behavior and improves the capacity retention up to 200 cycles. PMID:27264845

  1. Calculation of the evolution of the fuel microstructure in UMo alloys and implications for fuel swelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G. L.; Konovalov, I.; Maslov, A.

    1999-10-01

    The evolution of a cellular dislocation structure and subsequent recrystallization have been identified as important aspects of the irradiated UMo alloy microstructure that can have a strong impact on dispersion fuel swelling. Dislocation kinetics depends on the preferential bias of dislocations for interstitial compared to vacancies. This paper presents theoretical calculations for the evolution of a cellular dislocation structure, and recrystallization in U-10Mo. Implications for fuel swelling are discussed.

  2. Calculation of radiation induced swelling of uranium mononitride using the digital computer program CYGRO 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, H. W.; Fiero, I. B.

    1971-01-01

    Fuel volume swelling and clad diametral creep strains were calculated for five fuel pins, clad with either T-111 (Ta-8W-2.4Hf) or PWC-11 (Nb-1Zr-0.1C). The fuel pins were irradiated to burnups between 2.7 and 4.6%. Clad temperatures were between 1750 and 2400 F (1228 and 1589 K). The maximum percentage difference between calculated and experimentally measured values of volumetric fuel swelling is 60%.

  3. The disturbed blood-brain barrier in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan; Fallier-Becker, Petra; Mack, Andreas F; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in gliomas. The main clinical problem of human gliomas is the edematous swelling and the dramatic increase of intracerebral pressure, also compromising healthy areas of the brain. According to our concept, one of the main reasons on the cellular level for these clinical problems is the loss or reduction of astroglial polarity. Astroglial polarity means the specific accumulation of potassium and water channels in the superficial and perivascular astroglial endfeet membranes. The most important water channel in the CNS is the astroglial water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) which is arranged in a morphologically spectacular way, the so-called orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) to be observed in freeze-fracture replicas. In brain tumors, but also under conditions of trauma or inflammation, these OAPs are redistributed to membrane domains apart from endfeet areas. Probably, this dislocation might be due to the degradation of the proteoglycan agrin by the matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3). Agrin binds to the dystrophin-dystroglycan-complex (DDC), which in turn is connected to AQP4. As a consequence, agrin loss may lead to a redistribution of AQP4 and a compromised directionality of water transport out of the cell, finally to cytotoxic edema. This in turn is hypothesized to lead to a breakdown of the BBB characterized by disturbed tight junctions, and thus to the development of vasogenic edema. However, the mechanism how the loss of polarity is related to the disturbance of microvascular tight junctions is completely unknown so far. PMID:22387049

  4. Multi-hollow polymer microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids prepared by seeded swelling polymerization method.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiong; Yu, Demei; Zhu, Kaiming; Hu, Guohe; Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Yuhang

    2016-07-01

    Multi-hollow particles have drawn extensive research interest due to their high specific areas and abundant inner voids, whereas their convenient synthesis still remains challenging. In this paper, we report a simple and convenient method based on seeded swelling polymerization to prepare the multi-hollow microspheres with enclosed surfaces and compartmentalized voids using monodisperse poly (styrene-co-sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate) microspheres as seed particles. A formation mechanism of the multi-hollow structure was proposed involving the processes of water absorption, coalescence and stabilization of water domains, immobilization of multi-hollow structure, and coverage of surface dimples. The influencing parameters on the morphology of the microspheres, including weight ratio of sodium 4-vinylbenzenesulfonate to styrene in the seed particles, dosage of the swelling monomer and the crosslinking agent were systematically investigated. The internal structure of the resultant microspheres could be tuned from solid to multi-hollow by controlling over these parameters. Multi-hollow microspheres with compartmentalized chambers, smooth surfaces and narrow size distributions were obtained as a result. PMID:27046772

  5. Simulation of the effect of different parameters on the swelling characteristics of a pH-sensitive hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthar, Kamlesh J.; Mancini, Derrick C.; Ghantasala, Muralidhar K.

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogels are 3-D network polymeric materials that exhibit a large volume phase-transition due to a of change in their environment so that the response causes the hydrogel to swell or shrink. Since hydrogels have been found to be useful for chemical sensing and delivery, there is a growing interest in their use for medicine. This ,requires a thorough understanding of the hydrogels characteristic response to pH. The hydrogel response can be explained by various physical equations which are often challenging to solve. We discuss the simulation of such phase-transitions in steady-state conditions emphasizing the response to solvent pH and other environmental stimuli. We demonstrate a method for simulating pH response of hydrogels and describe numerical model and its implementation in detail. Though a few models have been developed for simulation of these hydrogel characteristics, these have been based on custom programs implemented in individual laboratories and often not generally accessible. Hence, our modeling effort is implemented using the generic finite element software COMSOL and the method can be used with any software having similar capabilities. The effect of buffer solution concentration, fixed charge density, the solution pH on the swelling characteristics are studied. Results are compared with published experimental data.

  6. The Brains Behind the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Arcangelo, Marcia

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with five neuroscientists--Martin Diamond, Pat Wolfe, Robert Sylwester, Geoffrey Caine, and Eric Jensen--disclose brain-research findings of practical interest to educators. Topics include brain physiology, environmental enrichment, memorization, windows of learning opportunity, brain learning capacity, attention span, student interest,…

  7. Coupled instabilities of surface crease and bulk bending during fast free swelling of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Riku; Ikura, Yumihiko; King, Daniel R; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Hirotoshi; Tonegawa, Yoshihiro; Gong, Jian Ping

    2016-06-21

    Most studies on hydrogel swelling instability have been focused on a constrained boundary condition. In this paper, we studied the mechanical instability of a piece of disc-shaped hydrogel during free swelling. The fast swelling of the gel induces two swelling mismatches; a surface-inner layer mismatch and an annulus-disc mismatch, which lead to the formation of a surface crease pattern and a saddle-like bulk bending, respectively. For the first time, a stripe-like surface crease that is at a right angle on the two surfaces of the gel was observed. This stripe pattern is related to the mechanical coupling of surface instability and bulk bending, which is justified by investigating the swelling-induced surface pattern on thin hydrogel sheets fixed onto a saddle-shaped substrate prior to swelling. A theoretical mechanism based on an energy model was developed to show an anisotropic stripe-like surface crease pattern on a saddle-shaped surface. These results might be helpful to develop novel strategies for controlling crease patterns on soft and wet materials by changing their three-dimensional shape. PMID:27108760

  8. Swelling and Softening of the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus in Response to pH Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) forms highly elastic icosahedral protein capsids that undergo a characteristic swelling transition when the pH is raised from 5 to 7. Here, we performed nano-indentation experiments using an atomic force microscope to track capsid swelling and measure the shells’ Young’s modulus at the same time. When we chelated Ca2+ ions and raised the pH, we observed a gradual swelling of the RNA-filled capsids accompanied by a softening of the shell. Control experiments with empty wild-type virus and a salt-stable mutant revealed that the softening was not strictly coupled to the swelling of the protein shells. Our data suggest that a pH increase and Ca2+ chelation lead primarily to a loosening of contacts within the protein shell, resulting in a softening of the capsid. This appears to render the shell metastable and make swelling possible when repulsive forces among the capsid proteins become large enough, which is known to be followed by capsid disassembly at even higher pH. Thus, softening and swelling are likely to play a role during inoculation. PMID:25992732

  9. A novel thermal swelling model for a rechargeable lithium-ion battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2016-01-01

    The thermal swelling of rechargeable lithium-ion battery cells is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. The thermal swelling shows significant dependency on the state of charge and the charge rate. The thermal swelling follows a quadratic form at low temperatures, and shows linear characteristics with respect to temperature at high temperatures in free-swelling conditions. Moreover, the equivalent coefficient of thermal expansion is much larger than that of each electrode and host materials, suggesting that the separator and the complex shape of the cell play a critical role in thermal expansion. Based on the experimental characterization, a novel thermal swelling model is proposed. The model introduces an equivalent coefficient of thermal expansion for the cell and also considers the temperature distribution throughout the battery by using heat transfer theory. The comparison between the proposed model and experiments demonstrates that the model accurately predicts thermal swelling at a variety of charge/discharge rates during operation and relaxation periods. The model is relatively simple yet very accurate. Hence, it can be useful for battery management applied to prolong the cycle life of cells and packs.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of montmorillonite crystalline swelling: Roles of interlayer cation species and water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linlin; Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Hirvi, Janne T.; Kasa, Seppo; Schatz, Timothy; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are employed to study the crystalline swelling behavior of montmorillonites (MMTs) with different interlayer Na+ and Ca2+ ion compositions, and the effect of temperature and pressure on the swelling behavior. Non-linear increases in d-spacing are observed with increasing water content. Plateaus in the swelling curve for Na-MMT around d-spacings of 12 and 15 Å demonstrate the formation of 1- and 2-layer hydrate structures. Ca-MMT and mixed Na/Ca-MMTs exhibit similar swelling behavior with exception of showing stronger swelling at water contents corresponding to the 1-layer hydrate in Na-MMT. The stronger swelling in the calcium containing systems is attributed to the preference of Ca2+ to be fully coordinated to water molecules, which favors a 2-layer hydrate structure and increased d-spacings. The larger hydration energy of Ca2+ ions relative to Na+ ions promotes increased water coordination numbers and more pronounced association of water molecules with Ca2+ ions. The 1- and 2-layer hydrates for Na-MMT and the 2-layer hydrate for Ca-MMT were relatively stable to changes in temperature and pressure.

  11. Influence of Water Content on the Mechanical Properties of an Argillaceous Swelling Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Maximiliano R.; Triantafyllidis, Theodoros

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental investigation aimed to study the effect of water on the mechanical properties of a partially saturated argillaceous swelling rock. The mineralogical composition of the rock, in particular the portion of swelling clays, was determined with X-ray diffraction. The water retention curve was estimated using a dew-point potential meter and the swelling behavior of the studied rock was examined by unconfined and oedometric swelling tests. The influence of water on the rock mechanical properties was assessed by means of triaxial tests. The experimental results indicate a strong decrease of strength and stiffness with increasing saturation or decreasing suction. This occurs only within a certain range of saturation. Degradation of the rock properties can be expected for small increments in the water content within this range. At low suction and close to the air-entry value, the stiffness remained constant. As the rock desaturates, the strength and stiffness increase approaching constant values. For suction greater than about 76 MPa, low increase of strength and stiffness was observed. The specimens in the swelling tests reached a saturation degree of 70 % which corresponds to a decrease of strength and stiffness of approximately 80 %. Rock swelling occurring simultaneously with reduction of strength and stiffness, increases deformations and it is an important issue for the stability of excavations.

  12. Swelling and softening of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus in response to pH shifts.

    PubMed

    Wilts, Bodo D; Schaap, Iwan A T; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2015-05-19

    Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) forms highly elastic icosahedral protein capsids that undergo a characteristic swelling transition when the pH is raised from 5 to 7. Here, we performed nano-indentation experiments using an atomic force microscope to track capsid swelling and measure the shells' Young's modulus at the same time. When we chelated Ca(2+) ions and raised the pH, we observed a gradual swelling of the RNA-filled capsids accompanied by a softening of the shell. Control experiments with empty wild-type virus and a salt-stable mutant revealed that the softening was not strictly coupled to the swelling of the protein shells. Our data suggest that a pH increase and Ca(2+) chelation lead primarily to a loosening of contacts within the protein shell, resulting in a softening of the capsid. This appears to render the shell metastable and make swelling possible when repulsive forces among the capsid proteins become large enough, which is known to be followed by capsid disassembly at even higher pH. Thus, softening and swelling are likely to play a role during inoculation. PMID:25992732

  13. All-atom Multiscale Simulation of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Johnson, John E.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An all-atom multiscale computational modeling approach, Molecular Dynamics/Order Parameter eXtrapolation (MD/OPX), has recently been developed for simulating large bionanosystems. It accelerates MD simulations and addresses rapid atomistic fluctuations and slowly-varying nanoscale dynamics of bionanosystems simultaneously. With modules added to account for water molecules and ions, MD/OPX is applied to simulate the swelling of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid solvated in a host medium in this study. Simulation results show that the N-terminal arms of capsid proteins undergo large deviations from the initial configurations with their length extended quickly during the early stage of capsid swelling. The capsid swelling is a symmetry-breaking process involving local initiation and front propagation. The capsid swelling rate is ~0.25 nm/ns (npn) during early stage of the simulation and propagation of the structural transition across the capsid is roughly 0.6npn. The system conditions that affect swelling of the capsid are analyzed. Prospects for creating a phase diagram for CCMV capsid swelling and using predictions to guide experiments are discussed. PMID:20695471

  14. NMR observation of the swelling process of polydimethylsiloxane networks. Average orientational order of monomeric units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, J. P.; Domard, M.; Herz, J.

    1982-03-01

    The swelling process of several polydimethylsiloxane gels was observed from the relaxation process of the magnetization transverse component of protons bound to elementary chains. Polymeric gels were studied in equilibrium with solvent vapor, using chloroform. A model of progressive swelling process from the dry gel to the equilibrium with pure solvent liquid is proposed from observed elementary chain properties. At small swelling degrees, gels behave like strongly entangled chains in concentrated solutions; then, elementary chains are desinterspersed and a packing condition may be applied from a characteristic swelling degree to equilibrium swelling. In this concentration range, gels swollen by different solvents behave the same way at a given swelling degree. Trapped entanglements are perceived. All these properties are derived from residual dipolar interactions associated with average orientational order of monomeric units induced by chain elongation. This residual energy is shown to be proportional to (r/N)2, with r the end-to-end vector and N the number of links of a chain. The C theorem proposed by De Gennes is extended to NMR properties. It is clearly shown that NMR observed on a chain segment may be sensitive to both its overall dimensions (30 Å) and its internal isomerization properties.

  15. Reliability and validity of measurements of facial swelling with a stereophotogrammetry optical three-dimensional scanner.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Visser, Anita; Vissink, Arjan; Ren, Yijin

    2014-12-01

    Volume changes in facial morphology can be assessed using the 3dMD DSP400 stereo-optical 3-dimensional scanner, which uses visible light and has a short scanning time. Its reliability and validity have not to our knowledge been investigated for the assessment of facial swelling. Our aim therefore was to assess them for measuring changes in facial contour, in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-four healthy volunteers with and without an artificial swelling of the cheek were scanned, twice in the morning and twice in the afternoon (in vivo measurements). A mannequin head was scanned 4 times with and without various externally applied artificial swellings (in vitro measurements). The changes in facial contour caused by the artificial swelling were measured as the change in volume of the cheek (with and without artificial swelling in place) using 3dMD Vultus software. In vivo and in vitro reliability expressed in intraclass correlations were 0.89 and 0.99, respectively. In vivo and in vitro repeatability coefficients were 5.9 and 1.3 ml, respectively. The scanner underestimated the volume by 1.2 ml (95% CI -0.9 to 3.4) in vivo and 0.2 ml (95% CI 0.02 to 0.4) in vitro. The 3dMD stereophotogrammetry scanner is a valid and reliable tool to measure volumetric changes in facial contour of more than 5.9 ml and for the assessment of facial swelling. PMID:25219776

  16. Size distribution of black spot defects and their contribution to swelling in irradiated SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Zhai, Y.; He, L.; Liu, C.; Boulle, A.; Voyles, P. M.; Szlufarska, I.; Sridharan, K.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental and modeling efforts were combined to investigate the role of black spot defects (BSD) in swelling of carbon- and krypton-irradiated 4H-SiC. Samples were exposed to conditions favoring BSD formation: irradiation at temperatures 600-950 °C and damage levels of 0.4-0.8 dpa. The maximum XRD swelling values, corrected for the effect of the rigid substrate, of 0.58% for C and 0.75% for Kr-irradiation were measured at the lowest irradiation temperature of 600 °C and decreased with increasing temperature. The swelling values estimated from TEM are on the same order of magnitude, but usually 40-70% lower than those measured by XRD. The contribution of BSDs to the overall swelling is 62% and the remainder of the swelling is caused by isolated point defects. The obtained results contribute to understanding of what defect types account for swelling and how their concentration evolves with the irradiation temperature and damage level.

  17. [Surgery of brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Métellus, P; Reyns, N; Voirin, J; Menei, P; Bauchet, L; Faillot, T; Loiseau, H; Pallud, J; Guyotat, J; Mandonnet, E

    2015-02-01

    Surgical excision of brain metastases has been well evaluated in unique metastases. Two randomized phase III trial have shown that combined with adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy, it significantly improves overall survival. However, even in the presence of multiple brain metastases, surgery may be useful. Also, even in lesions amenable to radiosurgery, surgical resection is preferred when tumors displayed cystic or necrotic aspect with important edema or when located in highly eloquent areas or cortico-subcortically. Furthermore, surgery may have a diagnostic role, in the absence of histological documentation of the primary disease, to rule out a differential diagnosis (brain abscess, lymphoma, primary tumor of the central nervous system or radionecrosis). Finally, the biological documentation of brain metastatic disease might be useful in situations where a specific targeted therapy can be proposed. Selection of patients who will really benefit from surgery should take into account three factors, clinical and functional status of the patient, systemic disease status and characteristics of intracranial metastases. Given the improved overall survival of cancer patients partially due to the advent of effective targeted therapies on systemic disease, a renewed interest has been given to the local treatment of brain metastases. Surgical resection currently represents a valuable tool in the armamentarium of brain metastases but has also become a diagnostic and decision tool that can affect therapeutic strategies in these patients. PMID:25640217

  18. Response of PWR Baffle-Former Bolt Loading to Swelling, Irradiation Creep and Bolt Replacement as Revealed Using Finite Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Edward P.; Garner, Francis A.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2005-10-01

    Baffle-former bolts in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) tend to degrade with aging, partially due to radiation-induced hardening and also due to the often complex stress history of the bolt in response to time-dependent and spatial gradients in temperature and neutron flux-spectra that can alter the stress distribution of the bolts. The time-integrated stresses must play some role in bolt cracking, however, and therefore it is of interest to study the time dependence of bolt stresses even for idealized cases. These stresses have been quantified in the present analysis using newly developed material constitutive equations for swelling and creep at light-water reactor (LWR)-relevant temperatures and dose rates. ABAQUS finite element calculations demonstrate that irradiation creep in the absence of void swelling tends to relax bolt tension before 10 dpa. Subsequent differential swelling leads to an increase in bolt tension, but only to stresses below the yield strength and usually below the initial bolt loading. Various assumed bolt replacement scenarios are considered with respect to their consequences on future failure possibilities.

  19. Over-estimation of glucose-6-phosphatase activity in brain in vivo. Apparent difference in rates of [2-3H]glucose and [U-14C]glucose utilization is due to contamination of precursor pool with 14C-labeled products and incomplete recovery of 14C-labeled metabolites.

    PubMed

    Dienel, G A; Nelson, T; Cruz, N F; Jay, T; Crane, A M; Sokoloff, L

    1988-12-25

    Significant dephosphorylation of glucose 6-phosphate due to glucose-6-phosphatase activity in rat brain in vivo was recently reported (Huang, M., and Veech, R.L. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 11358-11363). The evidence was an apparent more rapid 3H than 14C loss from the glucose pool and faster [2-3H]glucose than [U-14C]glucose utilization following pulse labeling of the brain with [2-3H,U-14C]glucose. Radiochemical purity of the glucose and quantitative recovery of the labeled products of glucose metabolism isolated from the brain were obviously essential requirements of their study, but no evidence for purity and recovery was provided. When we repeated these experiments with the described isolation procedures, we replicated the results, but found that: 1) the precursor glucose pool contained detritiated, 14C-labeled contaminants arising from glucose metabolism, particularly 2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid derived from [14C]glutamine; 2) [14C]glucose metabolite were not quantitatively recovered; 3) the procedure used to isolate the glucose itself produced detritiated, 14C-labeled derivatives of [2-3H,U-14C]glucose. These deficiencies in the isolation procedures could fully account for the observations that were interpreted as evidence of significant glucose 6-phosphate dephosphorylation by glucose-6-phosphatase activity. When glucose was isolated by more rigorous procedures and its purity verified in the present studies, no evidence for such activity in rat brain was found. PMID:2848837

  20. A novel multiple drug release system in vitro based on adjusting swelling core of emulsion electrospun nanofibers with core-sheath structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhou; Li, Zong; Shao, Pengyu; Hao, Shilei; Wang, Wei; Yang, Qian; Wang, Bochu

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a novel drug delivery system with the swelling core for differential release of multiple drugs by emulsion electrospinning, in which the aqueous phase is composed of polyvinyl alcohol and the oil phase consists of poly(ε-caprolactone). The microscopy images indicate that the W/O nanofibers with swelling core structure are successfully prepared and the model drugs, Rhodamine B and bovine serum albumin, were encapsulated in the fibers. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that this core-sheath structure could significantly alleviate the initial drug burst release and provided a differential diffusion pathway to release. It could be found that the postponement of the maximum accumulated release of bovine serum albumin was found due to the presence of sodium citrate and different types of polyvinyl alcohol. This study would provide a basis for optimization of encapsulation conditions to control the release of multiple agents and ultimately be applied in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25280686

  1. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  2. Integrated hydrogeological and geochemical processes in swelling clay-sulfate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Daniel; Butscher, Christoph; Blum, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a well-known problem in tunnel engineering where it poses a severe threat to important infrastructure. However, recently it was also encountered in an entirely different setting: The inaccurate implementation of geothermal installations in the town Staufen, Germany, led to water inflow into clay-sulfate rocks, resulting in heavy swelling. The swelling caused uplift rates of the ground surface exceeding 1 cm month-1, and severely damaged over 250 houses. The underlying processes of clay-sulfate rock swelling are complex and not yet sufficiently understood. In particular, hydraulic and geochemical processes in the zone of swelling are difficult to assess and the additional impact of constructional measures, such as borehole drilling, remains mostly unknown. The transformation of anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water influx is considered to be the main mechanism contributing to the swelling process, leading to an increase in volume of up to 60 %. This transformation process is decoupled: Anhydrite is dissolved and the pore-water concentration of sulfate increases; the dissolved sulfate may be transported with groundwater flow and finally precipitates as gypsum. Hence, groundwater flow and geochemistry of the pore-water play an essential role in the swelling processes. In fact, the swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is likely initiated by a change in geochemistry brought about by a change in hydraulic conditions. Thus, the main objective of this project is to quantify groundwater flux and geochemical reactions within swelling zones influenced by engineering activities, such as geothermal drillings. Additionally, reaction rates of anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation at the field scale are to be compared with reaction rates determined in laboratory experiments. This study investigates the significance of (1) the local geological setting, (2) hydrology and geochemistry of the swelling zone and (3) their modification upon

  3. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  4. Potential sources of intrinsic optical signals imaged in live brain slices.

    PubMed

    Andrew, R D; Jarvis, C R; Obeidat, A S

    1999-06-01

    Changes in how light is absorbed or scattered in biological tissue are termed intrinsic optical signals (IOSs). Imaging IOSs in the submerged brain slice preparation provides insight into brain activity if it involves significant water movement between intracellular and extracellular compartments. This includes responses to osmotic imbalance, excitotoxic glutamate agonists, and oxygen/glucose deprivation, the latter leading to spreading depression. There are several misconceptions regarding these signals. (1) IOSs are not generated by glial swelling alone. Although neuronal and glia sources cannot yet be directly imaged, several lines of evidence indicate that neurons contribute significantly to the changes in light transmittance. (2) Excitotoxic swelling and osmotic swelling are physiologically different, as are their associated IOSs. Hyposmotic swelling involves no detectable neuronal depolarization of cortical pyramidal neurons, only the passive drawing in of water from a dilute medium across the cell membrane. In contrast excitotoxic swelling involves sustained membrane depolarization associated with inordinate amounts of Na+ and Cl- entry followed by water. IOSs demonstrate substantial damage in the latter case. (3) Osmotic perturbations do not induce volume regulatory mechanisms as measured by IOSs. The osmotic responses measured by IOSs in brain slices are passive, without the compensatory mechanisms that are assumed to be active on a scale suggested by studies of cultured brain cells under excessive osmotic stress. (4) Spreading depression (SD) can cause neuronal damage. Innocuous during migraine aura, SD induces acute neuronal damage in brain slices that are metabolically compromised by oxygen/glucose deprivation, as demonstrated by IOSs. Neighboring tissue where SD does not spread remains relatively healthy as judged by a minimal reduction in light transmittance. IOSs show that the metabolic stress of SD combined with the compromise of energy resources

  5. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschanels, X.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A. M.; Magnin, V.; Mesbah, A.; Tribet, M.; Moloney, M. P.; Serruys, Y.; Peuget, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with 238Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 1018 α g-1 (i.e. ∼1.3 × 1021 keV cm-3). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the 238Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these 238Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 1018 α g-1 (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of 238Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  6. Overnight corneal swelling with high and low powered silicone hydrogel lenses☆

    PubMed Central

    Moezzi, Amir M.; Fonn, Desmond; Varikooty, Jalaiah; Simpson, Trefford L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare central corneal swelling after eight hours of sleep in eyes wearing four different silicone hydrogel lenses with three different powers. Methods Twenty-nine neophyte subjects wore lotrafilcon A (Dk, 140), balafilcon A (Dk, 91), galyfilcon A (Dk, 60) and senofilcon A (Dk, 103) lenses in powers −3.00, −10.00 and +6.00 D on separate nights, in random order, and on one eye only. The contra-lateral eye (no lens) served as the control. Central corneal thickness was measured using a digital optical pachometer before lens insertion and immediately after lens removal on waking. Results For the +6.00 D and −10.00 D, lotrafilcon A induced the least swelling and galyfilcon A the most. The +6.00 D power, averaged across lens materials, induced significantly greater central swelling than the −10.00 and −3.00 D (Re-ANOVA, p < 0.001), (7.7 ± 2.9% vs. 6.8 ± 2.8% and 6.5 ± 2.5% respectively) but there was no difference between −10.00 and −3.00 D. Averaged for power, lotrafilcon A induced the least (6.2 ± 2.8%) and galyfilcon A the most (7.6 ± 3.0%) swelling at the center (Re-ANOVA, p < 0.001). Central corneal swelling with +6.00 D was significantly greater than −10.00 D lens power despite similar levels of average lens transmissibility of these two lens powers. Conclusions The differences in corneal swelling of the lens wearing eyes are consistent with the differences in oxygen transmission of the silicone hydrogel lenses. In silicone hydrogel lenses central corneal swelling is mainly driven by central lens oxygen transmissibility. PMID:25649637

  7. Modeling the controllable pH-responsive swelling and pore size of networked alginate based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ariel W; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2009-10-01

    Semisynthetic network alginate polymer (SNAP), synthesized by acetalization of linear alginate with di-aldehyde, is a pH-responsive tetrafunctionally linked 3D gel network, and has potential application in oral delivery of protein therapeutics and active biologicals, and as tissue bioscaffold for regenerative medicine. A constitutive polyelectrolyte gel model based on non-Gaussian polymer elasticity, Flory-Huggins liquid lattice theory, and non-ideal Donnan membrane equilibria was derived, to describe SNAP gel swelling in dilute and ionic solutions containing uni-univalent, uni-bivalent, bi-univalent or bi-bi-valent electrolyte solutions. Flory-Huggins interaction parameters as a function of ionic strength and characteristic ratio of alginates of various molecular weights were determined experimentally to numerically predict SNAP hydrogel swelling. SNAP hydrogel swells pronouncedly to 1000 times in dilute solution, compared to its compact polymer volume, while behaving as a neutral polymer with limited swelling in high ionic strength or low pH solutions. The derived model accurately describes the pH-responsive swelling of SNAP hydrogel in acid and alkaline solutions of wide range of ionic strength. The pore sizes of the synthesized SNAP hydrogels of various crosslink densities were estimated from the derived model to be in the range of 30-450 nm which were comparable to that measured by thermoporometry, and diffusion of bovine serum albumin. The derived equilibrium swelling model can characterize hydrogel structure such as molecular weight between crosslinks and crosslinking density, or can be used as predictive model for swelling, pore size and mechanical properties if gel structural information is known, and can potentially be applied to other point-link network polyelectrolytes such as hyaluronic acid gel. PMID:19660810

  8. Swelling in commercial Fe-Cr-Ni based alloys under electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. E.; Gelles, D. S.

    1982-08-01

    Electron irradiation in a 1 MeV electron microscope has been used to study the void swelling response of several commercial austenitic stainless steels and iron-nickel based superalloys. Use of the 1 MeV microscope permits direct, continuous observation of the void development during elevated-temperature irradiations at displacement rates about 10 000 times greater then those in a fast breeder reactor. The alloys examined in this work included AISI 310, RA 330, A286, M813, Nimonic PE16, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Incoloy 901. Both helium preinjected specimens and uninjected specimens were studied. In all of the above alloys, swelling proceeds by formation of irradiation-induced dislocations and voids, followed by growth of the voids. The swelling rates and peak swelling temperatures vary considerably with alloy composition, heat treatment and helium preinjection. Comparisons of these results with recently reported swelling data from the same alloys after high fluence neutron irradiation in the EBR-II reactor shows good qualitative agreement in most cases. Helium preinjection of the electron irradiated specimens generally produced a poorer simulation than no helium preinjection. In one or two cases where the electron and neutron irradiation results strongly disagree, the differences appear to result from differences in irradiation-induced precipitation. Although the correlations between neutron and electron irradiation results are inadequate to obtain reliable engineering data by simulation, in-reactor swelling behavior is in general qualitatively well-represented by swelling response in the 1 MeV electron microscope. Nimonic is the registered trademark of Henry Wiggin and Company, UK. Inconel and Incoloy are registered trademarks of the International Nickel Company, Inc.

  9. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information. PMID:26904841

  10. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  11. Swell effect correction for the high-resolution marine seismic data acquired using an airgun and an 8-channel streamer cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Wonsik; Kim, Byoung-yeop; Cheong, Snons; Kim, Young-Jun

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution marine seismic surveys are used for the imaging of the detailed subsurface geological structure in engineering and marine geological survey. When the sea state gets worse, the quality of the seismic data become worse due to the sea swell. We corrected the swell effect to enhance the quality of seismic data. To remove the swell effect, we picked the sea bottom location automatically, averaged the picked sea bottom times of the adjacent traces and corrected the differences between the calculated and averaged sea bottom location. To make high quality seismic section, we used high-resolution marine 8-channel airgun seismic data acquired off Yeosu, Korea. The energy source was a 30 in3 airgun and the receiver was a 40 m long 8 channel streamer cable with a group interval of 5 m. The offset distance between the source and the first channel was 20 m. The shot interval was 2 seconds corresponding to ~5 m in distance, assuming ship's speed 5 knots. The data were digitally recorded with a sample interval of 0.1 ms and a record length of 1 s. The processing sequence includes basic processing procedures such as gain recovery, deconvolution, frequency filtering, CMP sorting, NMO correction, swell effect correction and stacking. To select sea bottom location for the swell effect correction, we pick maximum amplitude within the expected range including sea bottom location and find the first location at which the amplitude is larger than the threshold that is 40% of the maximum amplitude. We averaged these two-way travel times of sea bottom and corrected the differences. The range of the swell effect correction was -0.5 ~ 0.4 ms. After correction the continuity of reflectors were improved and high quality of the seismic data was produced. This study is a part of a Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), a National Research Laboratory (NRL) project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), and

  12. Prediction of void swelling in the baffle ring of WWER-1000 reactors for service life of 30-60 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, A. S.; Bryk, V. V.; Lazarev, N. P.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Garner, F. A.

    2013-06-01

    Major internal components of WWER-type nuclear reactors are made from annealed 18Cr10NiTi steel, a close analog to AISI 321. Void swelling of the baffle ring in particular could be a major factor limiting operation of the reactor beyond the current 30 years license. A predictive swelling equation is needed to forecast the spatial variation of swelling so as to identify those areas requiring additional attention. Available data on the swelling of this steel arising from irradiation in the BOR-60 fast reactor was combined with data from a heavy ion accelerator at higher displacement rates to formulate a predictive equation of swelling for the WWER-relevant range of temperature, irradiation dose and dose rates. This equation was used to estimate the swelling distribution over a cross-section of the baffle ring of a WWER reactor during a service life up to 60 years, reaching a local maximum of ˜30% swelling. It was shown that void swelling extends over a larger portion of the baffle ring than previously expected and exhibits a very complex and irregular distribution in response to complex distributions of temperature and dpa rate. Most importantly, as operation is extended beyond 30 years several areas of the ring may experience swelling in excess of 10% where void-induced embrittlement begins and one area may exceed 20% after 45 years, a swelling level where a complete loss of ductility is known to occur.

  13. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Quarterly report, [April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-08-01

    The effect of weathering (oxidation and dehydration upon exposure to air) on the molecular accessibility of potential catalysts was studied by the EPR spin probe technique. Fresh samples of all 8 APCS coals were exposed to air for periods up to 36 days. Weathering produced significant effects on the retention of spin probes in most of the APCS coals under 91 % carbon (dmmf). It was determined that the lower ranked coal (Beulah Zap and Wyodak) under went a structural collapse which precluded retention of even spin probe VIII. However, medium ranked coals exhibited improved retention upon weathering when swelled in toluene. Swelling with pyridine opened up small pores for 81--86% carbon which is not observed for swelling with toluene. Changes in coal structure were successfully followed by the EPR spin probe method. A detailed analysis of the data collected from the swelling of coals oxidized in a moisture free environment was completed to differentiate between weathering and oxidation. Eight vacuum dried APCS coals were oxidized in an enclosed, pure oxygen, moisture free environment, and the effects of oxidation alone on coal structure were studied by the intercalation of EPR spin probes. The data shows a factor of 5 increase in spin probe retention for some coals oxidized in O{sub 2} versus air., suggesting a large increase in oxidized material. Particular care was taken during the swelling procedures to avoid exposure of the coal samples to air or moisture. EPR spectra were then obtained for these 300 samples.

  14. Inhibitors of swelling-activated chloride channels increase infarct size and apoptosis in rabbit myocardium.

    PubMed

    Souktani, Rachid; Ghaleh, Bijan; Tissier, Renaud; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Alexandra; Aouam, Karim; Bedossa, Pierre; Charlemagne, Danièle; Samuel, Janelyse; Henry, Patrick; Berdeaux, Alain

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis is a significant contributor to myocardial cell death during ischemia-reperfusion and swelling-activated chloride channels (I(Cl,swell)) contribute to apoptosis. However, the relationship between I(Cl,swell) ischemia-reperfusion and apoptosis remains unknown. To further investigate this, New Zealand rabbits underwent a 20-min coronary artery occlusion (CAO) followed by 72 h of coronary artery reperfusion (CAR). Two I(Cl,swell) blockers, 5-nitro-2-[3-phenylpropylamino]benzoic acid (NPPB) and indanyloxyacetic acid 94 (IAA-94) (both 1 mg/kg), were administered prior to CAO and throughout the 72 h CAR. Infarct size (IS) was increased with NPPB and IAA-94 compared with control (vehicle) rabbits (51 +/- 2% and 48 +/- 3% and vs. 35 +/- 2%, respectively, P < 0.05). Similar results were found when NPPB was administered only during the reperfusion period. The percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei in the border zone of the infarct was increased with NPPB compared with control (37 +/- 2% vs. 25 +/- 31%, P < 0.05) as well as the number of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments (0.45 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.33 +/- 0.04 absorbance units, P < 0.05). These findings support the concept that I(Cl,swell) channels play an important role in the determination of myocardial infarct size and apoptosis during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:14703716

  15. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  16. Characterization and swelling-deswelling properties of wheat straw cellulose based semi-IPNs hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Li, Qian; Su, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2014-07-17

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly(potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) hydrogel was prepared by polymerizing wheat straw and an aqueous solution of acrylic acid (AA), and further semi-interpenetrating with PVA occurred during the chemosynthesis. The swelling and deswelling properties of WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel and WSC-g-PKA hydrogel were studied and compared in various pH solutions, salt solutions, temperatures, particle sizes and ionic strength. The results indicated that both hydrogels had the largest swelling capacity at pH=6, and the effect of ions on the swelling of hydrogels was in the order: Na(+)>K(+)>Mg(2+)>Ca(2+). The Schott's pseudo second order model can be effectively used to evaluate swelling kinetics of hydrogels. Moreover, the semi-IPNs hydrogel had improved swelling-deswelling properties compared with that of WSC-g-PKA hydrogel. PMID:24702940

  17. Perineal swelling, intermenstrual cycle, and female sexual behavior in bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Paoli, T; Palagi, E; Tacconi, G; Tarli, S Borgognini

    2006-04-01

    Many reports have claimed that the duration of the swelling cycle in female bonobos (Pan paniscus) is longer than that of chimpanzees, and that the bonobo maximum swelling phase is markedly prolonged. Field data on intermenstrual intervals (IMIs) in female bonobos are limited and restricted to interswelling intervals (ISIs), which are assumed to reflect the IMI, though a direct comparison between the duration of ISIs and IMIs is still lacking. Reports on bonobo sexual activity as a function of the swelling phase are often contradictory. Moreover, the function of female homosexual interactions (genito-genital (GG) rubbing) is still debated. This study examines the reliability of the ISI as an approximation of the IMI, and the attractivity of female sexual swellings for other individuals. An analysis of 51 ISI-IMI pairs showed that ISIs are a fair representation of the reproductive cycle. The cycle length was 35.6+/-1.1 SE days relying on the ISI, whereas it was 35.0+/-1.1 SE days considering the IMI. This result is similar to the cycle length reported for chimpanzees. Female homosexual interactions and copulatory rates were higher during maximum tumescence, suggesting that the sexual swelling may be attractive for both males and other females. Furthermore, the GG-rubbing was performed free of a hierarchical postural imposition, and was not correlated with affinitive interactions. We suggest that GG-rubbing, which is generally the most frequent female sexual interaction, is a tool for social assessments among females. PMID:16534808

  18. Stress state dependence of in-reactor creep and swelling. Part 2: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M., Jr.; Flinn, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation creep constitutive equations, which were developed in Part I, are used here to analyze in-reactor creep and swelling data obtained ca. 1977-1979 as part of the US breeder reactor program. The equations were developed according to the principles of incremental continuum plasticity for the purpose of analyzing data obtained from a novel irradiation experiment that was conducted, in part, using Type 304 stainless steel that had been previously irradiated to significant levels of void swelling. Analyses of these data support an earlier observation that all stress states, whether tensile, compressive, shear or mixed, can affect both void swelling and interactions between irradiation creep and swelling. The data were obtained using a set of five unique multiaxial creep-test specimens that were designed and used for the first time in this study. The data analyses demonstrate that the constitutive equations derived in Part I provide an excellent phenomenological representation of the interactive creep and swelling phenomena. These equations provide nuclear power reactor designers and analysts with a first-of-its-kind structural analysis tool for evaluating irradiation damage-dependent distortion of complex structural components having gradients in neutron damage rate, temperature and stress state.

  19. Starch-free grewia gum matrices: Compaction, swelling, erosion and drug release behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nep, E I; Asare-Addo, K; Ghori, M U; Conway, B R; Smith, A M

    2015-12-30

    Polysaccharides are suitable for application as hydrophilic matrices because of their ability to hydrate and swell upon contact with fluids, forming a gel layer which controls drug release. When extracted from plants, polysaccharides often contain significant quantities of starch that impacts upon their functional properties. This study aimed to evaluate differences in swelling, erosion and drug release from matrix tablets prepared from grewia gum (GG) and starch-free grewia gum (GDS) extracted from the stems of Grewia mollis. HPMC was used as a control polymer with theophylline as a model drug. Swelling, erosion, and in-vitro release were performed in deionized water, pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 media. The Vergnaud and Krosmeyer-Peppas model were used for swelling and drug release kinetics, respectively. However, linear regression technique was used to determine the erosion rate. GDS compacts were significantly harder than the native GG and HPMC compacts. GDS matrices exhibited the fastest erosion and drug release in deionised water and phosphate buffer compared with the GG and HPMC. At pH 1.2, GDS exhibited greater swelling than erosion, and drug release was similar to GG and HPMC. This highlights the potential of GDS as a matrix for controlled release similar to HPMC and GG at pH 1.2 but with a more rapid release at pH 6.8. GDS may have wider application in reinforcing compacts with relatively low mechanical strength. PMID:26536530

  20. Water swelling properties of the electron beam irradiated PVA-g-AAc hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingguo; Zhou, Xue; Zeng, Jinxia; Wang, Jizeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the electron beam irradiation technology being more suitable for the industry application is explored to fabricate the acrylic acid (AAc) monomer-grafted polyvinyl alcohol (PVA-g-AAc) hydrogels. ATR-IR spectra of the PVA-g-AAc hydrogels shows an obvious absorption peak of the sbnd Cdbnd O group at 1701 cm-1, indicating that the AAc monomers were grafted onto the PVA macromolecules. This paper also studied some effects of the mass ratio of PVA/AAc, pH of buffer solution and irradiation dosage on the water swelling properties of the electron beam irradiated PVA-g-AAc hydrogels. The water swelling ratio of PVA-g-AAc hydrogels decreases with increased irradiation dosage and mass ratio of PVA/AAc, whereas swelling ratio increases with increased pH of buffer solution and soaking time. The water-swelling behavior of PVA-g-AAc hydrogels occurred easily in an alkaline environment, particularly in a buffer solution with pH 9.2. Both PVA-g-AAc hydrogels (PVA/AAc = 1/5, w/w) irradiated with 5 kilogray (kGy) and PVA-g-AAc hydrogels (PVA/AAc = 1/1, w/w) irradiated with 15 kGy could easily absorb water and lead to high water swelling ratios (up to about 600%), which are potential candidates to meet the requirements for some biomedical applications.