Science.gov

Sample records for breast cancer care

  1. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  2. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  3. Quality indicators in breast cancer care.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, M Rosselli; Ponti, A; Bick, U; Biganzoli, L; Cserni, G; Cutuli, B; Decker, T; Dietel, M; Gentilini, O; Kuehn, T; Mano, M P; Mantellini, P; Marotti, L; Poortmans, P; Rank, F; Roe, H; Scaffidi, E; van der Hage, J A; Viale, G; Wells, C; Welnicka-Jaskiewicz, M; Wengstöm, Y; Cataliotti, L

    2010-09-01

    To define a set of quality indicators that should be routinely measured and evaluated to confirm that the clinical outcome reaches the requested standards, Eusoma has organised a workshop during which twenty four experts from different disciplines have reviewed the international literature and selected the main process and outcome indicators available for quality assurance of breast cancer care. A review of the literature for evidence-based recommendations have been performed by the steering committee. The experts have identified the quality indicators also taking into account the usability and feasibility. For each of them it has been reported: definition, minimum and target standard, motivation for selection and level of evidence (graded according to AHRO). In overall 17 main quality indicators have been identified, respectively, 7 on diagnosis, 4 on surgery and loco-regional treatment, 2 on systemic treatment and 4 on staging, counselling, follow-up and rehabilitation. Breast Units in Europe are invited to comply with these indicators and monitor them during their periodic audit meetings. PMID:20675120

  4. Navigating the Needs of Rural Women with Breast Cancer: A Breast Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Depke, Jill L.; Boreen, Amanda; Onitilo, Adedayo A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development and establishment of a breast care program (BCP) with service for rural breast cancer patients. Our program is a comprehensive program serving rural communities in Wisconsin. Our BCP is committed to breast health throughout the continuum from breast cancer risk assessment and prevention, advanced diagnostics, and screening tools to genetic testing and state-of-the-art surgical techniques. To provide the highest level of care, we coordinate a breast care team involving collaboration of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. Experts from various departments, including radiologists, pathologists, breast surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists, genetic counselors, clinical trial specialists, and our breast care navigator, all work together to provide cutting edge cancer treatment and management. Our distinctive BCP allows patients to see multiple providers without having to make multiple appointments and promotes discussion of treatment recommendations and creation of a personalized treatment plan for each patient by a team of specialists. PMID:26056376

  5. Surgical leadership and standardization of multidisciplinary breast cancer care: the evolution of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.

    PubMed

    Bensenhaver, Jessica; Winchester, David P

    2014-07-01

    Evidence has shown that multidisciplinary specialist team evaluation and management for cancer results in better patient outcomes. For breast cancer, breast centers are where this evaluation and management occurs. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers has helped standardize multidisciplinary breast cancer care by defining services and standards required of accredited breast centers. PMID:24882354

  6. [Breast cancer update in primary care: (V/V)].

    PubMed

    Díaz García, Noiva; Cuadrado Rouco, Carmen; Vich, Pilar; Alvarez-Hernandez, Cristina; Brusint, Begoña; Redondo Margüello, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians ought to know thoroughly this pathology to optimize the health care services for these patients making the best use of available resources. A series of five articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last ten years. In this final section, the social, psychological, occupational and family issues related to the disease will be reviewed, as well as presenting some special situations of breast cancer, including breast cancer in men, during pregnancy and last stages of life. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this disease, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:25002350

  7. Breast Cancer Survivors' Perceptions of Survivorship Care Options

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erica L.; Gropper, Adrienne B.; Neville, Bridget A.; Partridge, Ann H.; Cameron, Danielle B.; Winer, Eric P.; Earle, Craig C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, a durable model of comprehensive survivor care is needed, incorporating providers and/or visit types both within and outside of oncology. The objective of this study was to explore survivors' comfort with different clinician types or with a telephone/Internet-based virtual visit as components of survivorship care. Methods Breast cancer survivors participating in a general survivorship survey completed an additional breast cancer–specific questionnaire evaluating the self-perceived impact of follow-up visits to various clinician types, or follow-up by a virtual visit, on survival, worrying, and stress related to cancer. Results A total of 218 breast cancer survivors completed the questionnaire. Most favored medical oncologist follow-up visits over those with primary care physicians (PCPs) or nurse practitioners (NPs) in terms of reduced worrying about cancer (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; P < .001), reduced stress around the visit (OR, 1.40; P = .002), and improved effect on cancer survival (OR, 2.38; P < .001). However, the majority also displayed substantial comfort with both PCPs and NPs in the same domains. Patients rated a virtual visit as having a less favorable impact on cancer survival and cancer-related worrying compared with in-person visits with clinicians. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors are comfortable with both PCPs and NPs providing follow-up care, although they indicate a preference for medical oncologists. Given patients' negative impressions of a virtual visit, increased familiarity with and research investigating this emerging concept are needed. The NP-led survivorship clinic model, with increased guidance for PCPs, offers a promising route for improving quality of and satisfaction with survivor care. PMID:22162585

  8. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  9. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  10. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  11. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  12. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness. PMID:24837185

  13. U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159242.html U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer ... 7, 2016 TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black breast cancer survivors in the United States are ...

  14. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  15. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. PMID:26641959

  16. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  17. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  18. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  19. Optimal delivery of male breast cancer follow-up care: improving outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ferzoco, Raina M; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease. There are limited data to inform optimal treatment and follow-up strategies in this population. Currently, most follow-up guidelines are drawn from the vast literature on female breast cancer, despite the fact that male breast cancer has unique biological characteristics. In this review, we discuss clinical characteristics of male breast cancer as well as current best practices for long-term care with a focus on surveillance, screening, and treatment-related symptom management in male breast cancer survivors. PMID:26648754

  20. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  1. Challenges in the Gynecologic Care of Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Laughlin, Shannon K.; Jensen, Jani R.; Akogyeram, Clement O.; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2011-01-01

    Premenopausal women with a new diagnosis of breast cancer are faced with many challenges. Providing health care for issues such as gynecologic comorbidities, reproductive health concerns, and vasomotor symptom control can be complicated because of the risks of hormone treatments and the adverse effects of adjuvant therapies. It is paramount that health care professionals understand and be knowledgeable about hormonal and nonhormonal treatments and their pharmacological parameters so they can offer appropriate care to women who have breast cancer, with the goal of improving quality of life. Articles for this review were identified by searching the PubMed database with no date limitations. The following search terms were used: abnormal uterine bleeding, physiologic sex steroids, endometrial ablation, hysteroscopic sterilization, fertility preservation in endometrial cancer, tranexamic acid and breast cancer, menorrhagia treatment and breast cancer, abnormal uterine bleeding and premenopausal breast cancer, levonorgestrel IUD and breast cancer, tamoxifen and gynecologic abnormalities, tamoxifen metabolism, hormones and breast cancer risk, contraception and breast cancer, pregnancy and breast cancer, and breast cancer and infertility treatment. PMID:21307388

  2. Are Primary Care Providers Prepared To Care For Breast Cancer Survivors In The Safety Net?

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron J.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Nguyen, David K.; Sacks, Greg D.; Clayton, Sheilah; Cope, Jacqueline; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the growing number of breast cancer survivors outpacing the capacity of oncology providers, there is pressure to transition patients back to primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) working in safety-net settings may have less experience treating survivors, and little is known about their knowledge and views on survivorship care. Objective To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and confidence of PCPs in the safety net at delivering care to breast cancer survivors. Participants A modified version of the National Cancer Institute’s Survey of Physician Attitudes Regarding Care of Cancer Survivors (SPARCCS) was given to providers at 2 county hospitals and 5 associated clinics (n=59). Focus groups were held to understand barriers to survivorship care. Results While most providers believed PCPs have the skills necessary to provide cancer-related follow-up, the vast majority were not comfortable providing these services themselves. Providers were adherent to American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for mammography (98%) and physical exam (87%); less than 1/3 were guideline-concordant for lab testing and only 6 providers (10%) met all recommendations. PCPs universally requested additional training on clinical guidelines and the provision of written survivorship care plans prior to transfer. Concerns voiced in qualitative sessions included unfamiliarity with the management of endocrine therapy and confusion regarding who would be responsible for certain aspects of care. Conclusion Safety-net providers currently lack knowledge and confidence at providing survivorship care to breast cancer patients. Opportunities exist for additional training in evidence-based guidelines and improved coordination of care between PCPs and oncology specialists. PMID:25536301

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  4. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  5. Caring for the breast cancer survivor’s health and well-being

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Petra M; Faubion, Stephanie S; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Long, Margaret E; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer care continuum entails detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. During this time, focus on the whole woman and medical concerns beyond the breast cancer diagnosis itself is essential. In this comprehensive review, we critically review and evaluate recent evidence regarding several topics pertinent to and specific for the woman living with a prior history of breast cancer. More specifically, we discuss the most recent recommendations for contraceptive options including long-acting reversible contraception and emergency contraception, fertility and pregnancy considerations during and after breast cancer treatment, management of menopausal vasomotors symptoms and vulvovaginal atrophy which often occurs even in young women during treatment for breast cancer. The need to directly query the patient about these concerns is emphasized. Our focus is on non-systemic hormones and non-hormonal options. Our holistic approach to the care of the breast cancer survivor includes such preventive health issues as sexual and bone health,which are important in optimizing quality of life. We also discuss strategies for breast cancer recurrence surveillance in the setting of a prior breast cancer diagnosis. This review is intended for primary care practitioners as well as specialists caring for female breast cancer survivors and includes key points for evidence-based best practice recommendations. PMID:25302171

  6. Racial Differences in Physical Activity among Breast Cancer Survivors: Implications for Breast Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Hair, BY; Hayes, S; Tse, CK; Bell, M; Olshan, A

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis is associated with improved survival. This study examines levels of and changes in physical activity following breast cancer diagnosis, overall and by race. Methods The Carolina Breast Cancer Study, Phase III, assessed pre- and post-diagnosis physical activity levels in a cohort of 1,735 women, aged 20–74, diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2008 and 2011 in 44 counties of North Carolina. Logistic regression and analysis of variance were used to examine whether demographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics were associated with activity levels. Results Only 35% of breast cancer survivors met current physical activity guidelines post-diagnosis. A decrease in activity following diagnosis was reported by 59% of patients, with the average study participant reducing their activity by 15 metabolic equivalent (MET) hours (95% CI: 12, 19). Following adjustment for potential confounders, when compared to white women, African-American women were less likely to meet national physical activity guidelines post-diagnosis (odds ratio: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.88) and reported less weekly post-diagnosis physical activity (12 vs. 14 MET-hours; p=0.13). In adjusted, stratified analyses, receipt of treatment was significantly associated with post-diagnosis activity in African-American women (p<0.01). Conclusion Despite compelling evidence demonstrating the benefits of physical activity post-breast cancer, it is clear that more work needs to be done to promote physical activity in breast cancer patients, especially among African-American women. PMID:24911404

  7. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  8. U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer Return Genetic testing, risk-reducing surgery more likely ... 2016 TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black breast cancer survivors in the United States are less likely ...

  9. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  10. The timely diagnosis of breast cancer. Principles of risk management for primary care providers and surgeons.

    PubMed

    Osuch, J R; Bonham, V L

    1994-07-01

    Alleged delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer is one of the most common reasons for medical malpractice claims in the United States, accounting for the largest indemnity payments of any single medical condition. Although the diagnosis of breast cancer can be challenging and sometimes difficult, principles of management exist to assist health providers in pursuing a resolution of any breast complaint. Studies have shown that when litigation is pursued for alleged failure to diagnose breast cancer, multiple specialists are named in the suit. In most cases, patients filing claims of alleged failure to diagnose breast cancer are premenopausal, while the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer are postmenopausal. This reflects, in part, the challenge of diagnosing the disease in women who have difficult clinical exams to interpret, as well as dense parenchyma on mammograms, which decreases the sensitivity of the radiograph interpretation. Principles of risk management to avoid a delay in diagnosis include (1) pursuing every breast complaint to resolution, (2) following breast cancer screening guidelines, (3) establishing an office tracking system for breast cancer screening reminders, (4) tracking results of all mammograms and follow-up studies ordered, (5) referring premenopausal women for the evaluation of any breast mass that persists through a menstrual cycle, (6) considering any asymmetrical breast finding as a cause for concern, (7) referring every woman with a breast finding on physical examination for consultation, regardless of the mammogram report, and (8) carefully documenting patient history, physical exam findings, clinical impression, and follow-up plans. PMID:8004597

  11. Quality of Life among Immigrant Latina Breast Cancer Survivors: Realities of Culture and Enhancing Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Class, Maria; Perret-Gentil, Monique; Kreling, Barbara; Caicedo, Larisa; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Graves, Kristi D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Latinas. This study examined social, cultural, and health care system factors that impact quality of life and survivorship experiences of Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors. Design We interviewed Latina breast cancer survivors (n=19) and, based on the interview findings, conducted two focus groups (n=9). Research staff translated transcripts from Spanish into English. Two trained raters reviewed the content and identified themes. Thematic content analysis was used to categorize and organize data. Results Participants were largely mono-lingual in Spanish, predominantly from Central and South America and most (68%) had lived in the U.S. for 10 or more years. All women were diagnosed and treated in the U.S. and were an average of 3.1 years from diagnosis. Women’s survivorship experiences appeared to be shaped by cultural beliefs and experiences as immigrants such as secrecy/shame about a breast cancer diagnosis, feelings of isolation, importance of family support (familism), challenges with developing social relationships in the U.S. (less personalismo), and, for some, their partner’s difficulty with showing emotional support (machismo). Navigating the U.S. medical system and language barriers were additional challenges in participants’ health care interactions. Conclusion Latina breast cancer survivors adhere to certain cultural values and face unique issues as immigrants, potentially influencing overall quality of life and doctor-patient communication. Efforts to improve Latina immigrant breast cancer survivors’ quality of life could include increased assessment of psychosocial functioning and referral to social support services, culturally-sensitive navigation programs and consistent use of appropriately trained interpreters. PMID:21706194

  12. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  13. Residential racial composition, spatial access to care, and breast cancer mortality among women in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Russell, Emily; Kramer, Michael R; Cooper, Hannah L F; Thompson, Winifred Wilkins; Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob

    2011-12-01

    We explored the association between neighborhood residential racial composition and breast cancer mortality among Black and White breast cancer patients in Georgia and whether spatial access to cancer care mediates this association. Participants included 15,256 women living in 15 metropolitan statistical areas in Georgia who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1999 and 2003. Residential racial composition was operationalized as the percent of Black residents in the census tract. We used gravity-based modeling methods to ascertain spatial access to oncology care. Multilevel Cox proportional hazards models and mediation analyses were used to test associations. Black women were 1.5 times more likely to die from breast cancer than White women. Residential racial composition had a small but significant association with breast cancer mortality (hazard ratios [HRs] = 1.04-1.08 per 10% increase in the percent of Black tract residents). Individual race did not moderate this relationship, and spatial access to care did not mediate it. Residential racial composition may be part of the socioenvironmental milieu that produces increased breast cancer mortality among Black women. However, there is a lack of evidence that spatial access to oncology care mediates these processes. PMID:21847712

  14. [History and care of malignant wounds in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Alran, Séverine; Cassoux, Nathalie

    2013-11-01

    The first descriptions of ulcerated breast cancer date back to ancient Egypt. From the Greek and Roman periods to the Renaissance, fungating wounds were described, excised, cauterized and necrotized using various techniques and unguents. The foundations of some of the therapeutic strategies we still use today were developed.Today the management of inoperable malignant wounds that are not amenable to anti-cancer treatment remains complex and the symptoms are difficult to control. PMID:24409606

  15. Adaptation of a Psycho-Oncology Intervention for Black Breast Cancer Survivors: Project CARE

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Suzanne C.; Ennis-Whitehead, Nicole; Robertson, Belinda Ryan; Annane, Debra W.; Vargas, Sara; Carver, Charles S.; Antoni, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Black women are traditionally underserved in all aspects of cancer care. This disparity is particularly evident in the area of psychosocial interventions where there are few programs designed to specifically meet the needs of Black breast cancer survivors. Cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention (CBSM) has been shown to facilitate adjustment to cancer. Recently, this intervention model has been adapted for Black women who have recently completed treatment for breast cancer. We outline the components of the CBSM intervention, the steps we took to adapt the intervention to meet the needs of Black women (Project CARE) and discuss the preliminary findings regarding acceptability and retention of participants in this novel study. PMID:25544778

  16. Core communication components along the cancer care process: the perspective of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prades, Joan; Ferro, Tàrsila; Gil, Francisco; Borras, Josep M

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to assess the impact of health care professional (HCP) communication on breast cancer patients across the acute care process as perceived by patients. Methodological approach was based on eight focus groups conducted with a sample of patients (n = 37) drawn from 15 Spanish Regions; thematic analysis was undertaken using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) framework of HCP communication as the theoretical basis. Relevant results of this study were the identification of four main communication components: (1) reassurance in coping with uncertainty after symptom detection and prompt access until confirmed diagnosis; (2) fostering involvement before delivering treatments, by anticipating information on practical and emotional illness-related issues; (3) guidance on the different therapeutic options, through use of clinical scenarios; and, (4) eliciting the feeling of emotional exhaustion after ending treatments and addressing the management of potential treatment-related effects. These communication-related components highlighted the need for a comprehensive approach in this area of cancer care. PMID:24980292

  17. Acupuncture care for breast cancer patients during chemotherapy: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah; Lewith, George; Thomas, Kate

    2006-12-01

    Acupuncture care delivered pragmatically as an adjunct to conventional care may lead to improvements in quality of life and alleviation of conventional treatment-related side effects among breast cancer patients. Patient perceptions and expectations of treatment and the therapeutic relationship inherent to acupuncture care could modify treatment effects. The aim of this study was to design a rigorous feasibility study in preparation for trial to evaluate the effects of acupuncture care (a whole system) on the fatigue experienced by patients undergoing conventional treatment of their breast cancer. Phase 1 included the development of a treatment protocol for a short course of acupuncture care for patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Defining best practice in this context will ensure that the intervention tested will have meaning and validity for all professional acupuncturists. Phase 2 will be a randomized feasibility pilot study using the acupuncture treatment protocol for 40 patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The study will use a mixed-methods approach involving both qualitative and quantitative assessments. Outcome assessment will include validated measures for fatigue, quality of life, and depression. The proposed study will tell us what effects of acupuncture care are important to the patient and address acupuncture as it is practiced in the real world. Results from thisstudy will enable a definitive randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of accupuncture care for fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:17101759

  18. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  19. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery: an evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Thijs-Boer, F M; de Kruif, A T; van de Wiel, H B

    1999-04-01

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals that provide surgical treatment for these patients. Nursing care was defined to be optimal if it met the following criteria: (a) Specialized nursing support is provided to all patients during admission and in the outpatient departments both before and after surgery. (b) A protocol is in place outlining standard nursing procedures for breast cancer patients. (c) Formal communication about each breast cancer patient exists between the nurses involved. On the basis of this definition, it was found that optimal nursing care was provided in only 6% of the hospitals. Nursing care fell short mainly in the outpatient setting. This shortcoming also was recognized by most respondents, and many were already planning improvements. Nurses had varying opinions about their responsibility to provide the patient with information about the disease and its treatment, and consensus was lacking. In summary, nursing care for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in Dutch hospitals needs improvement, especially in the outpatient setting. PMID:10217034

  20. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  1. Promoting Quality and Evidence-Based Care in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel F.; Ramsey, Scott D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Barlow, William E.; Gralow, Julie R.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for long-term follow-up of early-stage breast cancer patients developed by oncology societies in the United States and Europe recommend that breast cancer survivors undergo regular evaluation with history and physical examination, as well as annual mammography. Routine blood tests, circulating tumor markers, and/or surveillance imaging studies beyond mammography are not recommended in the absence of concerning symptoms or physical examination findings because of lack of supportive clinical evidence. Despite these guidelines, studies have shown that 20% to 40% of oncologists assess serum tumor markers as part of routine monitoring of early-stage breast cancer patients. As part of efforts to both address the financial challenges confronting the health-care system and optimize patient outcomes, the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Cost of Care Task Force identified adherence to breast cancer surveillance guidelines as an opportunity to improve care and reduce cost. However, these recommendations are based on trials done in an era of outdated technology and limited therapeutic options. It is possible that recent improvements in diagnostics and treatments could make earlier detection of recurrent disease important for improving both survival and quality of life outcomes. Research is necessary to further inform optimal breast cancer follow-up strategies, which could impact these recommendations. At this time, outside of well-conducted clinical trials, there is no role for ordering routine serial blood or imaging tests in monitoring for recurrence in early-stage breast cancer patients. PMID:24627271

  2. Does Multidisciplinary Care Enhance the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer?: Evaluation of Advanced Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Craike, Melinda; Gray, Christine; Watty, Kathy; Mileshkin, Linda; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the contribution of the advanced breast cancer (ABC) multidisciplinary team meetings (MDMs) to patient care and clinical outcomes. Methods: Members of ABC MDMs at two health services completed questionnaires in November 2007. The questionnaire asked about the performance of the MDMs and their contribution to improvement in patient care in five domains: medical management, psychosocial care, palliative care, care in the community, and benefits for team members. A final section covered the perceived value and importance of the MDM in patient management. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) were used to summarize the performance, improvement, and importance scores. Results: A total of 27 multidisciplinary team members (73%) completed the questionnaire. The MDM performed best in medical management (mean performance score out of 5 [M] = 3.78) and palliative care (M = 3.77). These were also the areas that were most improved through the MDM. Benefits to team members and care in the community (both M = 3.05) ranked lowest by both measures. The MDM provided the most benefit for patient management in the areas of “awareness of services available” (M = 4.32), “efficiency of referrals” (M = 4.27) and “supportive care for patients” (M = 4.27). “Awareness of services available,” “psychological care for patients,” and “continuity of care” were considered the most important (M = 4.64). Conclusion: The study provides evidence that MDMs make an important contribution to the logistical and medical management of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21358959

  3. Mammographic Breast Density and Breast Cancer Risk: Implications of the Breast Density Legislation for Health Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Green, Victoria L

    2016-06-01

    Breast density has emerged as a critical phenotypic marker of increased breast cancer risk. The breast density legislation, passed in multiple states, requires patient notification of the implications of the breast density on breast cancer risk and screening. Supplemental screening may be suggested in the state regulation; however, there are limited data to guide conversations with patients. This article will review the current state of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts and discuss theories of the mechanism of action. Guidance is provided to assist in shared decision making and appropriate patient counseling. PMID:26992182

  4. Patterns of seeking medical care among Egyptian breast cancer patients: relationship to late-stage presentation.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Shimaa M; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Hablas, Ahmed; Elbana, Eman S; Soliman, Amr S

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Egyptian women, accounting for 37.6% of female tumors, and is often diagnosed at later stages. The objective of this study was to investigate breast cancer patient navigation through the health care system in the Nile Delta. Interviews were conducted with 163 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients at the Tanta Cancer Center (TCC), the major cancer center of the region. Patients described their medical care pathway from the initial symptom experienced until their arrival at TCC. Patients whose initial contact was with a general surgeon (OR: 7.6, 95% CI: 2.1, 27.6), primary care provider (OR: 12.2, 95% CI: 2.9, 51.0), or gynecologist (OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 1.4, 53.4) were significantly more likely to experience a delay in reaching the TCC as compared to those visiting a surgical oncologist. Overcoming health care system and patient navigation barriers in developing countries may reduce the time for breast cancer patients to reach a cancer center for early management. PMID:21807518

  5. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  6. Patient satisfaction with breast cancer follow-up care provided by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Amardeep; Liu, Yihang; Maly, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There is little evidence to document patient satisfaction with follow up care provided by family physicians/general practitioners (FP/GP) to breast cancer patients. We aimed to identify determinants of satisfaction with such care in low-income medically underserved women with breast cancer. Methods Cross sectional study of 145 women who reported receiving follow up care from a FP/GP. Women were enrolled in California’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program and were interviewed by phone 3 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Cleary and McNeil’s model, which states that patient satisfaction is a function of patient characteristics, structure of care, and processes of care, was used to understand the determinants of satisfaction. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors. Results 73.4% reported that they were extremely satisfied with their treatment by the family physician/general practitioner. Women who were able to ask their family physicians questions about their breast cancer had six times greater odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who were not able to ask any questions. Women who scored the family physician higher on the ability to explain things in a way she could understand had a higher odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who scored their family physicians lower. Conclusions FP/GPs providing follow up care for breast cancer patients should encourage patients to ask questions, and must communicate in a way that patients understand. These recommendations are congruent with the characteristics of patient centered communication for cancer patients enunciated in a recent NCI monograph. PMID:22086814

  7. Periodontal Health, Perceived Oral Health and Dental Care Utilization of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Inglehart, Marita R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This population-based analysis examined the prevalence of periodontal diseases along with the self-perceived oral health and patterns of dental care utilization of breast cancer survivors in the U.S. METHODS Data from the 1999–2004 NHANES were utilized, examining information from 3,354 women between 50–85 years of age. Primary outcomes were gingivitis and periodontitis, self-perceived oral health and dental care utilization. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate relationships of breast cancer diagnosis and primary outcomes, while controlling for confounding factors. RESULTS Breast cancer survivors were more likely to be older than 55 years, white, non-smokers, have higher levels of education and income and a higher prevalence of osteoporosis. Breast cancer survivors were significantly less likely to have dental insurance (p=0.04). Utilization of dental services and reason for last dental visit did not significantly differ between groups. A history of a breast cancer diagnosis did not increase the odds of gingivitis (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 0.53–3.63), periodontitis (OR=1.82; 95% CI = 0.89–4.01) or poor self-perceived oral health (OR=0.89; 95% CI: 0.61–1.33) after adjusting for age, race, education, dental care utilization, and smoking status. CONCLUSIONS In this sample, a history of breast cancer does not significantly impact periodontal health, self-perceived oral health and dental care utilization. However, efforts should be made to assure that breast cancer survivors have dental insurance. PMID:25648337

  8. Differences in Breast Cancer Survival between Public and Private Care in New Zealand: Which Factors Contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Elwood, J. Mark; Lawrenson, Ross; Campbell, Ian; Harvey, Vernon; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who received private health care appear to have better survival from breast cancer compared to those who received public care. This study investigated if this applied to New Zealand women and identified factors that could explain such disparities. Methods This study involved all women who were diagnosed with primary breast cancer in two health regions in New Zealand, covering about 40% of the national population, between June 2000 and May 2013. Patients who received public care for primary treatment, mostly surgical treatment, were compared with those who received private care in terms of demographics, mode of presentation, disease factors, comorbidity index and treatment factors. Cox regression modelling was performed with stepwise adjustments, and hazards of breast cancer specific mortality associated with the type of health care received was assessed. Results Of the 14,468 patients, 8,916 (61.6%) received public care. Compared to patients treated in private care facilities, they were older, more likely to be Māori, Pacifika or Asian and to reside in deprived neighbourhoods and rural areas, and less likely to be diagnosed with early staged cancer and to receive timely cancer treatments. They had a higher risk of mortality from breast cancer (hazard ratio: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.75, 2.17), of which 80% (95% CI: 63%, 100%) was explained by baseline differences, particularly related to ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy. After controlling for these demographic, disease and treatment factors, the risk of mortality was still 14% higher in the public sector patients. Conclusions Ethnicity, stage at diagnosis and type of loco-regional therapy were the three key contributors to survival disparities between patients treated in public and private health care facilities in New Zealand. The findings underscore the need for more efforts to improve the quality, timeliness and equitability of public cancer care services. PMID:27054698

  9. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  10. Adherence to Surveillance Care Guidelines after Breast and Colorectal Cancer Treatment with Curative Intent

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Ramzi G.; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Fishman, Paul A.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.; Rossetti, Maureen C. O’Keeffe; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence-based guidelines recommend routine surveillance, including office visits and testing, to detect new and recurrent disease among breast and colorectal cancer survivors. The extent to which surveillance practice is consistent with guideline recommendations or may vary by age is not known. Methods Cohorts of adult patients diagnosed with breast (n=6,205) and colorectal (n=2,297) cancer between 2000 and 2008 and treated with curative intent in four, geographically diverse, managed care environments were identified via tumor registries. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to describe time to initial and subsequent surveillance service receipt. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the relationship between patient characteristics and receipt of metastatic screening. Results Within 18-months of treatment, 87.2% of breast cancer survivors received recommended mammograms, with significantly higher rates for patients aged 50–65. Among colorectal cancer survivors, only 55.0% received recommended colon examinations, with significantly lower rates for those ≥ aged 75. Most breast (64.7%) and colorectal (73.3%) cancer survivors received non-recommended metastatic disease testing. In breast cancer, factors associated with metastatic disease testing include white race (HR=1.13), comorbidities (HR=1.17), and younger age. In colorectal cancer, these factors included younger age and comorbidities (HR=1.10). Conclusions Among an insured population, we found wide variation in the use of surveillance care by age and relative to guideline recommendations. Breast cancer survivors have high rates of both guideline recommended recurrence testing and non-guideline recommended metastatic testing. Only about half of colorectal cancer survivors receive recommended tests but over two thirds received metastatic testing. PMID:22434568

  11. Supportive care during treatment for breast cancer: resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Fatima; Bese, Nuran; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; Ginsburg, Ophira; Grunberg, Steven M; Gralla, Richard J; Steyn, Ann; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Knaul, Felicia Marie; Aapro, Matti S; Andersen, Barbara L; Thompson, Beti; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer patients may have unmet supportive care needs during treatment, including symptom management of treatment-related toxicities, and educational, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. Delivery of supportive care is often a low priority in low- and middle-income settings, and is also dependent on resources available. This consensus statement describes twelve key recommendations for supportive care during treatment in low- and middle-income countries, identified by an expert international panel as part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit for Supportive Care, which was held in October 2012, in Vienna, Austria. Panel recommendations are presented in a 4-tier resource-stratified table to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services during treatment to breast cancer patients, starting at a basic level of resource allocation and incrementally adding program resources as they become available. These recommendations include: health professional and patient and family education; management of treatment related toxicities, management of treatment-related symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and non-specific pain, and management of psychosocial and spiritual issues related to breast cancer treatment. Establishing supportive care during breast cancer treatment will help ensure that breast cancer patients receive comprehensive care that can help 1) improve adherence to treatment recommendations, 2) manage treatment-related toxicities and other treatment related symptoms, and 3) address the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer and breast cancer treatments. PMID:24001709

  12. Effect of self-care education on the quality of life in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Matory, Pegah; Zare, Zahra; Taleghani, Fariba; Kaji, Mohammad Akbari

    2015-01-01

    Context: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Iranian women. Although survival rate of breast cancer patients has been increased some distresses affect the patients’ quality of life negatively. the effectiveness of self-care education, particularly in the sociocultural context of Iran, has not been adequately investigated. Aims: This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of nurse-led self-care education program on quality of life in this patients. Settings and Design: A controlled trial as pretest and posttest design was conducted in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital in Isfahan in 2012. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with breast cancer were assigned to either the nurse-led self-care education program (n = 30), or to routine care (n = 30). Quality of life was measured at the time of recruitment and also 3 months after the intervention by the instrument of the National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 16) software using T-independent, T-paired and χ2, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: The intervention group had significantly greater improvements in quality of life status (P < 0.05). Furthermore, self-care education caused a significant increase in the quality of life score related to physical (P = 0.00), psychological (P = 0.00), social (P = 0.00), and emotional (P = 0.00) dimensions. Conclusions: Quality of life in patients with breast cancer can be improved by participating in a nurse-led self-care education program. It is suggested that self-care education to be added to the routine nursing care delivered to these patients. PMID:27462612

  13. Risk Factors, Preventive Practices, and Health Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors, United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Noaman; Yun, Shumei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We compared behavioral risk factors and preventive measures among female breast cancer survivors, female survivors of other types of cancers, and women without a history of cancer. Survivorship health care indicators for the 2 groups of cancer survivors were compared. Methods Using data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we calculated the proportion of women with risk factors and their engagement in preventive practices, stratified by cancer status (cancer survivors or women with no history of cancer), and compared the proportions after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results A significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors had mammography in the previous year (79.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76.0%–83.0%) than did other cancer survivors (68.1%; 95% CI, 65.6%–70.7%) or women with no history of cancer (66.4%; 95% CI, 65.5%–67.3%). Breast cancer survivors were also more likely to have had a Papanicolaou (Pap) test within the previous 3 years than women with no history of cancer (89.4%; 95% CI, 85.9%–93.0 vs 85.1%; 95% CI, 84.4%–85.8%) and a colonoscopy within the previous 10 years (75.4%; 95% CI, 71.7%–79.0%) than women with no history of cancer (60.0%; 95% CI, 59.0%–61.0%). Current smoking was significantly lower among survivors of breast cancer (10.3%; 95% CI, 7.4%–13.2%) than other cancer survivors (20.8%; 95% CI, 18.4%–23.3%) and women with no history of cancer (18.3%; 95% CI, 17.5%–19.1%). After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, we found that breast cancer survivors were significantly more likely to have had mammography, a Pap test, and colonoscopy, and less likely to be current smokers. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors are more likely to engage in cancer screening and less likely to be current smokers than female survivors of other types of cancer or women with no history of cancer. PMID:26796517

  14. Patterns of Care for Localized Breast Cancer in Oklahoma, 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Janis E; Janitz, Amanda E; Vesely, Sara K; Lloyd, Dana; Pate, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established clinical guidelines for breast cancer treatment, Standard of Care (SOC) is not universal in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which patients receive guideline-based, stage-specific treatments for localized female breast cancer in Oklahoma. Data were obtained from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry for the period 2003-2006. We included localized, invasive female breast cancers and analyzed both treatment and demographic factors. We used the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines to determine SOC. Among women who received breast conserving surgery (BCS), we used logistic regression to evaluate factors related to SOC. In Oklahoma, 92 percent of the 4,177 localized breast cancer patients were treated with recognized SOC. In women aged ≥65 years with BCS, those ≥75 years had a lower adjusted odds of meeting SOC than did those without insurance, with comorbid conditions, or whose comorbid status was unknown. Among women aged <65 years, those with Medicare/Medicaid, Medicare only, or without insurance, along with comorbid conditions, had a lower adjusted odds of meeting SOC. Overall, 92 percent of women met SOC. Factors such as age, insurance type, and comorbid conditions were associated with meeting SOC. PMID:26133913

  15. Patterns of Care for Localized Breast Cancer in Oklahoma, 2003–2006

    PubMed Central

    CAMPBELL, JANIS E.; JANITZ, AMANDA E.; VESELY, SARA K.; LLOYD, DANA; PATE, ANNE

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-established clinical guidelines for breast cancer treatment, Standard of Care (SOC) is not universal in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which patients receive guideline-based, stage-specific treatments for localized female breast cancer in Oklahoma. Data were obtained from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry for the period 2003–2006. We included localized, invasive female breast cancers and analyzed both treatment and demographic factors. We used the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines to determine SOC. Among women who received breast conserving surgery (BCS), we used logistic regression to evaluate factors related to SOC. In Oklahoma, 92 percent of the 4,177 localized breast cancer patients were treated with recognized SOC. In women aged ≥65 years with BCS, those ≥75 years had a lower adjusted odds of meeting SOC than did those without insurance, with comorbid conditions, or whose comorbid status was unknown. Among women aged <65 years, those with Medicare/Medicaid, Medicare only, or without insurance, along with comorbid conditions, had a lower adjusted odds of meeting SOC. Overall, 92 percent of women met SOC. Factors such as age, insurance type, and comorbid conditions were associated with meeting SOC. PMID:26133913

  16. Are we ready for personalized cancer risk management? The view from breast-care providers.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Yagasaki, Kaori

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine, the tailoring of prevention and treatment, is the future of routine clinical practice. This approach has started to appear in genetic testing for predisposition to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). We explored how breast-care providers perceived HBOC risk management, using grounded theory. This study found that the frontline healthcare providers perceived HBOC risk management as still being neglected in breast cancer care. Emerging challenges included treatment priority, hesitancy to deal with sensitive issues, easily missed risks, genetic data not being shared among multidisciplinary professionals, and patients being lost to follow-up. Oncology nurses are ideally placed to facilitate communication and utilization of genetic information among multidisciplinary professionals. Specialized outpatient clinics need to be established to follow up individuals at high risk. There is a need to create a system to meet the future demands of personalized medicine in nursing practice. PMID:24580974

  17. Stage at Diagnosis and Delay in Seeking Medical Care Among Women With Breast Cancer, Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Pakseresht, Sedigheh; Ingle, Gopal Krishna; Garg, Suneela; Sarafraz, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with cancer often delay seeking medical advice in developing countries. It can adversely influence the outcome of disease. Objectives: The present study was performed to determine the stage at diagnosis and delay in seeking medical care among women with breast cancer in Delhi, India. Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on a census (case series) approach to reach all women (172) diagnosed with primary breast cancer “detected in surgery Out Patient Department (OPD) from January 2007 to December 2009” at Lok Nayak Hospital, Delhi, India. Patients were interviewed using a self-structure questionnaire. Seeking behavior variables were awareness of problem, first consultation, followed physician's advice, detection of problem, system of medicine and gap between knowing the problem and consultation (patient delay). Statistical Analysis was performed using the Microsoft SPSS-pc version 14.0 statistical program. The analytic methods were used (mean, standard deviation, X2, Fisher's Exact Test, K-S, Kruskal-Wallis) for variables. All statistical tests were performed at a significance level of 5% (P < 0.05). Results: the mean age of women was 46.99 years. 38.4% of women were ≤ 40 years. 61% of women were in stage IV of cancer at the time of diagnosis. The mean duration of gap between knowing the problem and consulting a physician (patients delay) was 10.90 months. There was no significant association between stage of cancer and consultation gap. A significant association was found between the stage of breast cancer and income; women with lower income had a higher stage of breast cancer (P < 005). Conclusions: A significant association was found between ages of women with their delays in consultation. Delay is still prevalent amongst women with breast cancer. It seems necessary to design educating programs for women in both clinical and community settings, about breast cancer and early detection practices. PMID:25763229

  18. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  19. Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture for Breast Cancer Palliative Care and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a life-threatening disease among women worldwide with annual rates of reported incidence and death increasing alarmingly. Chemotherapy is a recommended and effective treatment option for breast cancer; however, the narrow therapeutic indices and varied side effects of currently approved drugs present major hurdles in increasing its effectiveness. An increasing number of literature evidence indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) used in treatment-related symptom control and alleviation of side effects plays an important role in increasing survival rate and quality of life in breast cancer patients. This review focuses on the use of herbal medicines and acupuncture in palliative care and as adjuvants in the treatment of breast cancer. Herbal medicinal treatments, the correlation of clinical use with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of action, and the use of certain acupoints in acupuncture are summarized. The aim of this review is to facilitate an understanding of the current practice and usefulness of herbal medicine and acupuncture as adjuvants in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23840256

  20. Impact of Preexisting Mental Illnesses on Receipt of Guideline-Consistent Breast Cancer Treatment and Health Care Utilization.

    PubMed

    Mahabaleshwarkar, Rohan; Khanna, Rahul; Banahan, Benjamin; West-Strum, Donna; Yang, Yi; Hallam, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-01

    This study determined the impact of preexisting mental illnesses on guideline-consistent breast cancer treatment and breast cancer-related health care utilization. This was a retrospective, longitudinal, cohort study conducted using data from the 2006-2008 Medicaid Analytic Extract files. The target population for the study consisted of female Medicaid enrollees who were aged 18-64 years and were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. Guideline-consistent breast cancer treatment was defined according to established guidelines. Breast cancer-related health care use was reported in the form of inpatient, outpatient, and emergency room visits. Statistical analyses consisted of multivariable hierarchical regression models. A total of 2142 newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer were identified. Approximately 38% of these had a preexisting mental illness. Individuals with any preexisting mental illness were less likely to receive guideline-consistent breast cancer treatment compared to those without any preexisting mental illness (adjusted odds ratio: 0.793, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.646-0.973). A negative association was observed between preexisting mental illness and breast cancer-related outpatient (adjusted incident rate ratio (AIRR): 0.917, 95% CI: 0.892-0.942) and emergency room utilization (AIRR: 0.842, 95% CI: 0.709-0.999). The association between preexisting mental illnesses and breast cancer-related inpatient utilization was statistically insignificant (AIRR: 0.993, 95% CI: 0.851-1.159). The findings of this study indicate that breast cancer patients with preexisting mental illnesses experience disparities in terms of receipt of guideline-consistent breast cancer treatment and health care utilization. The results of this study highlight the need for more focused care for patients with preexisting mental illness. PMID:26106925

  1. Opportunistic screening actions for breast cancer performed by nurses working in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Débora Cherchiglia de; Almeida, Ana Maria de; Figueiredo, Elisabeth Niglio de; Loyola, Edilaine Assunção Caetano de; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify opportunistic screening actions for breast cancer performed by nurses working in primary health care units in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo. METHOD Cross-sectional study with 60 nurses from 28 units, who had been working for at least one year in the public municipal health care network. Data were collected between December 2013 and March 2014, by means of a questionnaire, using descriptive analysis and the software IBM SPSS version 20 and Microsoft Excel 2010. RESULTS The results showed that 71.7% of the participants questioned their female patients as for risk factors for breast cancer, mainly during nursing consultation; 70.0% oriented users about the age to perform clinical breast exam, whereas 30.0% did not due to lack of knowledge and time; 60.0% explained about the age to perform mammogram; 73.3% did not refer patients with suspicious breast exam results to the referral department, citing scheduling as the main obstacle to referral. Educational activities were not performed by 78.3% of participants. CONCLUSION Investment is needed in professional training and management of breast cancer screening. PMID:27007415

  2. Impact of a primary care based intervention on breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah S.; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Gregorich, Steven; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Pasick, Rena J.; Chen, Alice; Quinn, Jessica; Kaplan, Celia P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the effects of a tablet-based, breast cancer risk education intervention for use in primary care settings (BreastCARE) on patients' breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. Methods From June 2011–August 2012, we enrolled women from two clinics, aged 40–74 years with no personal breast cancer history, and randomized them to the BreastCARE intervention group or to the control group. All patients completed a baseline telephone survey and risk assessment (via telephone for controls, via tablet computer in clinic waiting room prior to visit for intervention). All women were categorized as high or average risk based on the Referral Screening Tool, the Gail model or the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium model. Intervention patients and their physicians received an individualized risk report to discuss during the visit. All women completed a follow-up telephone survey 1–2 weeks after risk assessment. Post-test comparisons estimated differences at follow-up in breast cancer knowledge, risk perception and concern. Results 580 intervention and 655 control women completed follow-up interviews. Mean age was 56 years (SD = 9). At follow-up, 73% of controls and 71% of intervention women correctly perceived their breast cancer risk and 22% of controls and 24% of intervention women were very concerned about breast cancer. Intervention patients had greater knowledge (≥75% correct answers) of breast cancer risk factors at follow-up (24% vs. 16%; p = 0.002). In multivariable analysis, there were no differences in correct risk perception or concern, but intervention patients had greater knowledge ([OR] = 1.62; 95% [CI] = 1.19–2.23). Conclusions A simple, practical intervention involving physicians at the point of care can improve knowledge of breast cancer without increasing concern. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01830933. PMID:26476466

  3. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  4. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  5. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  8. A Review of Breast Cancer Care and Outcomes in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Wilking, Nils; Jönsson, Bengt; Luciani, Silvana; Cazap, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an overview of breast cancer care, burden, and outcomes in Latin America, as well as the challenges and opportunities for improvement. Information was gleaned through a review of the literature, public databases, and conference presentations, in addition to a survey of clinical experts and patient organizations from the region. Breast cancer annual incidence (114,900 cases) and mortality (37,000 deaths) are the highest of all women's cancers in Latin America, and they are increasing. Twice as many breast cancer deaths are expected by 2030. In Peru, Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil, diagnosis and death at younger ages deprives society of numerous productive years, as does high disease occurrence in Argentina and Uruguay. Approximately 30%–40% of diagnoses are metastatic disease. High mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs) in Latin America indicate poor survival, partly because of the late stage at diagnosis and poorer access to treatment. Between 2002 and 2008, MIRs decreased in all countries, albeit unevenly. Costa Rica's change in MIR outpaced incidence growth, indicating impressive progress in breast cancer survival. The situation is similar, although to a lesser extent, in Colombia and Ecuador. The marginal drops of MIRs in Brazil and Mexico mainly reflect incidence growth rather than progress in outcomes. Panama's MIR is still high. Epidemiological data are scattered and of varying quality in Latin America. However, one could ascertain that the burden of breast cancer in the region is considerable and growing due to demographic changes, particularly the aging population, and socioeconomic development. Early diagnosis and population-wide access to evidence-based treatment remain unresolved problems, despite progress achieved by some countries. PMID:23442305

  9. [Breast Care Nurses - nursing experts for breast cancer care. A path to "Advanced Nursing Practice" in Germany?].

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Anja; Wiedemann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    The role of Breast Care Nurses (BCNs) has been discussed since Breast Centres have been opened in Germany. This article introduces the concept of the Breast Care Nurses on a national and an international level in the context of Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP). Within a descriptive study, graduates of a German BCN-education programme were interrogated regarding their current work, their main activities as a BCN, about general conditions in their work environment, experienced barriers, and supporting factors. 122 questionnaires were evaluated. The return rate was 71 % (n = 171). Results showed that 58.1 % (n = 71) of the graduates were employed as a Breast Care Nurse, however only 28.1 % (n = 20) in a full-time and 35.2 % (n = 25) in a part-time position. This first German study about BCN-services showed a lack of basic work conditions, for example regarding a consultation room, access to literature, or templates for documentation. In the discussion part, the situation of the BCNs is reviewed in the German context and in relation to ANP concepts as well as regarding future demands for the position of a BCN. PMID:21154250

  10. [Case report: coordination of the care provided to patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Peinado-Barraso, M del Carmen; Cabrerizo-Cordero, M del Rosario; Granados-Matute, Ana Eva; Contreras-Fariñas, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    In Spain, cancer is the leading cause of death in absolute terms. Statistically, the most frequent type of cancer in women in developed countries is breast cancer, which is becoming the leading cause of death from cancer among women. The breast cancer is statistically the most frequent in women and it is getting the first reason of death by cancer between the feminine population, in most of developed countries. This health problem is usually associated with psychological dependency, which can be aggravated in elderly patients without adequate family support. TThe nursing process is the most commonly used tool to establish interaction among the nurse, the patient and the family. Through this interaction, the nurse can identify the patient's health objectives and energy limitations, as well as the resources available to obtain optimal health status. The nursing process is a systematic method for providing efficient humanistic care aimed at achieving expected outcomes. In the case presented herein, we employed Marjory Gordon's Functional Patterns and the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). The nursing diagnoses detected were fear, anxiety, self-care deficit, impaired mobility, risk of low self-esteem, ineffective coping, and potential complications (pain and infection). The care session is one of the main interventions to improve the effectiveness of the care provided. During this session, methodological adjustments of the nursing process are analyzed, with special attention paid to the appropriateness of the interventions, the possible alternatives and encouragement of reflective practice Essential elements to improve quality of life in these elderly oncology patients are the role of nursing through the care provided and coordination among professionals in different disciplines and healthcare levels. PMID:18840337

  11. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. mHealth self-care interventions: managing symptoms following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R.; Axelrod, Deborah; Guth, Amber A.; Rampertaap, Kavita; El-Shammaa, Nardin; Hiotis, Karen; Scagliola, Joan; Yu, Gary; Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women suffer from daily distressing symptoms related to lymphedema following breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema, an abnormal accumulation of lymph fluid in the ipsilateral body area or upper limb, remains an ongoing major health problem affecting more than 40% of 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Patient-centered care related to lymphedema symptom management is often inadequately addressed in clinical research and practice. mHealth plays a significant role in improving self-care, patient-clinician communication, and access to health information. The-Optimal-Lymph-Flow health IT system (TOLF) is a patient-centered, web-and-mobile-based educational and behavioral mHealth interventions focusing on safe, innovative, and pragmatic electronic assessment and self-care strategies for lymphedema symptom management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and test of TOLF system. Methods The development of TOLF was guided by the Model of Self-Care for Lymphedema Symptom Management and designed based on principles fostering accessibility, convenience, and efficiency of mHealth system to enhance training and motivating assessment of and self-care for lymphedema symptoms. Test of TOLF was accomplished by conducting a psychometric study to evaluate reliability, validity, and efficiency of the electronic version of Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Symptom Experience Index (BCLE-SEI), a usability testing and a pilot feasibility testing of mHealth self-care interventions. Results Findings from the psychometric study with 355 breast cancer survivors demonstrated high internal consistency of the electronic version of the instrument: a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.959 for the total scale, 0.919 for symptom occurrence, and 0.946 for symptom distress. Discriminant validity of the instrument was supported by a significant difference in symptom occurrence (z=−6.938, P<0.000), symptom distress (z=−5.894, P<0.000), and total

  13. MCF-7 cells--changing the course of breast cancer research and care for 45 years.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adrian V; Oesterreich, Steffi; Davidson, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    It is 45 years since a pleural effusion from a patient with metastatic breast cancer led to the generation of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. MCF-7 is the most studied human breast cancer cell line in the world, and results from this cell line have had a fundamental impact upon breast cancer research and patient outcomes. But of the authors for the nearly 25000 scientific publications that used this cell line, how many know the unique story of its isolation and development? In this commentary we will review the past, present, and future of research using MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PMID:25828948

  14. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Buist, Diana S M; Gold, Laura S; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08-2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17-2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  15. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Gold, Laura S.; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D.; Sullivan, Sean D.; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  16. C2-4: Implementing an Evidence-based Breast Cancer Support Tool for Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients as Standard Care at Two Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Dearing, James; Barela, Breanne; Hawkins, Robert; Pingree, Suzanne; McDowell, Helene; Morse, Erica; Lomax, Jana Bolduan

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims While many women turn to the Internet to obtain information, it is unlikely that unstructured internet use provides optimal benefit to women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, due to uneven quality, conflicting claims, redundancy, and search engine idiosyncrasies which may make finding desired information more difficult. To answer the need for information and support, an Interactive Cancer Communication System (“CHESS”) was developed, validated in several randomized trials, and is now being implemented to provide access to integrated information for decision-making, behavior change, and emotional support. We implemented a program to offer CHESS to all newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients as part of standard care (not as part of a research study) at two Denver healthcare systems: Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO), and Exempla Health Care (EHC), which serves a larger proportion of minorities and those without insurance. Methods All women who receive a breast cancer diagnosis at KPCO and EHC are to be offered access to CHESS during or very shortly after notification of their diagnosis and throughout the treatment process, thus making CHESS a part of standard care for hundreds of breast cancer patients. By qualitatively tracking the contextual factors related to CHESS implementation by date and occurrence, and through patient and provider interviews and surveys, this study is evaluating the real-world feasibility of CHESS integration into standard care. Results We will report on the process of real-world implementation of CHESS at KPCO and EHC, the barriers to and facilitators of integrating the CHESS resource into standard care, and the expected and final process of how CHESS was finally integrated into standard care at each institution as a case-study example. We will also report on the initial impact of CHESS integration on the breast cancer care process and on providers at each institution. Conclusions This case-study example demonstrates how

  17. Primary health care nurses’ knowledge practice and client teaching of early detection measures of breast cancer in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early detection of breast cancer is vital to effective management and outcome of breast cancer. It has been suggested that women given information and instruction about breast self- examination and breast awareness by health care professionals demonstrated higher knowledge and confidence and tend to practice breast self-examination more than those who received information from other sources. Breast Self-Examination (BSE) and Clinical Breast Examination (CBE) have been recommended as Early Detection Measures (EDM) for developing countries. This study evaluated Primary Health Care (PHC) nurses’ knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDM of breast cancer. Methods A descriptive study that utilized stratified random method to select PHC settings for the study. Data was collected from 120 trained nurses in selected settings. This represented 66.3% of total population of PHC nurses (181) in Ibadan. The instrument for data collection was a structured questionnaire that explored the bio data of participants, knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDMs of breast cancer. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of Oyo State Ministry of Health, Nigeria. Results The mean age of the participants was 44.4±7.5 years. About half (52.2%) were double qualified (Registered Nurse and Midwife). Only 23 (20.0%) of the participants considered painless lump as an early sign of breast cancer while 47 (40.9%) considered pain as an early sign. BSE was listed as EDM of breast cancer by 80.9% of the participants while 40% and 30% listed CBE and mammogram respectively. Only eight (7.9%) have had a mammogram. The logistic regression of client teaching on four variables showed that for every increase in knowledge of breast cancer the odds of client teaching significantly increased by 7.5% (95% CI = 1.27 - 1.125). There were also significant relationships between knowledge of EDM, practice of BSE and client teaching. Conclusions It is vital that

  18. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  19. Assessment of fatigue in and care needs of Turkish women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Can, Gülbeyaz; Durna, Zehra; Aydiner, Adnan

    2004-01-01

    Using Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model, this research project was planned to determine the level of fatigue experienced by Turkish women with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy, to discover the factors affecting fatigue, and to provide a reference by means of which an effective nursing care for such patients could be planned. In assessing the level of fatigue and factors affecting it, a patient information form, the Piper Fatigue Scale, and the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist were used. The reliability tests performed afterwards showed that the scales are appropriate tools for use in Turkish women with breast cancer. Before treatment, psychological symptoms' distress was higher than physical symptoms' distress. However, following treatment, the latter was found to be closer to the former. When pretreatment and posttreatment physical and psychological symptoms were compared, it was noticed that fatigue, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, constipation, depression, and loss of hope for the future were among the symptoms observed to increase the most in the posttreatment period. Different from the other studies, we determined that all of the patients experienced fatigue 7 to 10 days after the chemotherapy cycle and the sensory/affective fatigue scores were high. Breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy experienced a moderate level of fatigue, which was influenced by level of income, stage of disease, and symptoms related to chemotherapy, showing compliance with similar studies. Following up patients individually and keeping the treatment-related symptoms under control were noticed to help prevent fatigue. PMID:15253173

  20. Breast Cancer among Women Living in Poverty: Better Care in Canada than in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gorey, Kevin M.; Richter, Nancy L.; Luginaah, Isaac N.; Hamm, Caroline; Holowaty, Eric J.; Zou, GuangYong; Balagurusamy, Madhan K.

    2014-01-01

    This historical study estimated the protective effects of a universally accessible, single-payer health care system versus a multi-payer system that leaves many uninsured or underinsured by comparing breast cancer care of women living in high poverty neighborhoods in Ontario or California between 1996 and 2011. Women in Canada experienced better care particularly as compared to women who were inadequately insured in the United States. Women in Canada were diagnosed earlier (rate ratio [RR] = 1.12) and enjoyed better access to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.48), radiation (RR = 1.60) and hormone therapies (RR = 1.78). Women living in high poverty Canadian neighborhoods even experienced shorter waits for surgery (RR = 0.58) and radiation therapy (RR = 0.44) than did such women in the US. Consequently, women in Canada were much more likely to survive longer. Regression analyses indicated that health insurance could explain most of the better care and better outcomes in Canada. Over this study’s 15-year timeframe 31,500 late diagnoses, 94,500 sub-optimum treatment plans and 103,500 early deaths were estimated in high poverty US neighborhoods due to relatively inadequate health insurance coverage. Implications for social work practice, including advocacy for future reforms of US health care are discussed. PMID:26180488

  1. Pregnancy and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, R; Harvey, V

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) presents a challenging clinical situation. This article reviews the current evidence around the management of PABC and the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. The trend towards later age at first childbirth has resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer cases coexistent with pregnancy. The management of breast cancer during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Breast surgery can be safely performed during any trimester of pregnancy. Radiation therapy, if required, must be delayed until after delivery. The majority of patients with PABC require chemotherapy. The timing of delivery in relation to chemotherapy administration should be carefully considered. There is no evidence to date that pregnancy termination influences overall survival for the mother. To date, there is no clear evidence that subsequent pregnancy after breast cancer is associated with worse maternal survival. There is a suggestion that subsequent pregnancy may in fact be associated with an improved survival. However, the available studies are limited by potential biases.

  2. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  3. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  4. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  5. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  6. Closing the global cancer divide- performance of breast cancer care services in a middle income developing country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer is the leading cause of deaths in the world. A widening disparity in cancer burden has emerged between high income and low-middle income countries. Closing this cancer divide is an ethical imperative but there is a dearth of data on cancer services from developing countries. Methods This was a multi-center, retrospective observational cohort study which enrolled women with breast cancer (BC) attending 8 participating cancer centers in Malaysia in 2011. All patients were followed up for 12 months from diagnosis to determine their access to therapies. We assess care performance using measures developed by Quality Oncology Practice Initiative, American Society of Clinical Oncology/National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American College of Surgeons’ National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers as well as our local guideline. Results Seven hundred and fifty seven patients were included in the study; they represent about 20% of incident BC in Malaysia. Performance results were mixed. Late presentation was 40%. Access to diagnostic and breast surgery services were timely; the interval from presentation to tissue diagnosis was short (median = 9 days), and all who needed surgery could receive it with only a short wait (median = 11 days). Performance of radiation, chemo and hormonal therapy services showed that about 75 to 80% of patients could access these treatments timely, and those who could not were because they sought alternative treatment or they refused treatment. Access to Trastuzumab was limited to only 19% of eligible patients. Conclusions These performance results are probably acceptable for a middle income country though far below the 95% or higher adherence rates routinely reported by centres in developed countries. High cost trastuzumab was inaccessible to this population without public funding support. PMID:24650245

  7. Information and communication needs of Chinese American breast cancer patients: perspectives on survivorship care planning

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuang-Yi; Hu, Angela; Ma, Grace X; Fang, Carolyn Y; Daly, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    Background The existing knowledge on the survivorship experiences of Chinese American breast cancer survivors (CABCS) has arisen largely from aggregated data across multiethnic or multicancer studies that have focused on quality of life. Little is known about Chinese American perspectives and preferences for survivorship care. Objective To examine the experiences of CABCS to better understand their information and communication needs and their preferences for survivorship care plans (SCPs). Methods 16 CABCS, aged 37-72 years, were recruited through community-based organizations in the Northeast United States to participate in one-on-one telephone interviews about their breast cancer survivorship experience. The semistructured interviews were conducted in Mandarin, Cantonese, or English. Two investigators transcribed and translated the audio recordings into English and analyzed the interview transcripts using established methods of qualitative content analysis. Results Three main themes were identified through analysis of interview transcripts: the need for evidence-based and culturally and linguistically appropriate health information; the role of language or communication barriers and culture in accessing care and communicating with providers; and preferences for SCP elements and format. Limitations The sample may not be representative of the entire population of CABCS. Conclusions The findings provide insight into the information and communication needs and SCP preferences of CABCS. Understanding the cultural nuances that underlie these needs and preferences is critical for improving CABCS's quality of life after treatment for cancer. SCPs that incorporate Chinese-language resources and address the unique cultural needs of this population should be developed and they should include information about diet and nutrition as well as traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:25811036

  8. Perceptions of Primary Care Among Breast Cancer Survivors: The Effects of Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Allison; Hudson, Shawna V.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Bator, Alicja; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Somer, Robert A.; Ferrante, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Obese breast cancer survivors (BCSs) are impacted by diminished quality of life (QOL), multiple comorbid conditions, and poor disease outcomes. Despite national guidelines recommending a healthy weight to improve QOL and outcomes posttreatment, support and education are not routinely provided to BCSs in primary care. To fill this gap, we assessed perceptions of primary care received among BCSs by weight status. Methods Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage BCSs (N = 188) from 2 New Jersey cancer centers between May 2012 and July 2013. Sociodemographics, medical history, functional health status, perceived satisfaction with one's primary care provider (PCP), and PCP involvement in follow-up care were assessed. Results In total, 82% of overweight BCSs and 30% of obese BCSs reported not being told by their doctor that they were overweight or obese, despite these conditions being highly prevalent (35% and 35%, respectively). Obese BCSs were more likely than healthy weight BCSs to be African American, have a higher comorbidity score, poorer functional health, and greater satisfaction with their PCPs. Conclusion The PCP–patient encounter may represent an opportunity for PCPs to correct misperceptions and promote weight reduction efforts among BCSs, thus improving QOL and disease outcomes. PMID:26120589

  9. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  10. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  11. Breast cancer fatalism: The role of women's perceptions of the health care system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer fatalism, which can be understood as the belief that cancer is a death sentence, has been found to be a deterrent to preventive cancer screening participation. This study examines factors associated with breast cancer fatalism among women. We analyzed data from a 2003 survey of women 40 years...

  12. A Study on the knowledge, perception and use of breast cancer screening methods and quality of care among women from central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Castillo, Andrea B.; Hernández-Valero, María A.; Hovick, Shelly R.; Campuzano-González, Martha Elva; Karam-Calderón, Miguel Angel; Bustamante-Montes, L. Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Studies on health behaviors have observed several barriers to breast cancer screening, including lack of breast cancer knowledge, distrust of health care providers, long waiting times to be screened or to receive screening results. We conducted a nested case-control study among a subsample of 200 women 21 years of age and older (100 cases, who had been diagnosed with breast cancer, and 100 controls, who were screened and found to be free of breast cancer), all residing in the Toluca metropolitan area in central Mexico. We examined how knowledge of breast cancer screening guidelines, perceptions of screening methods, and quality of health care influenced the use of breast cancer screening among study participants. Our study found that the most important factors associated with the decision to have breast cancer screenings was having a positive perception of the quality of care provided by the local health care centers, such as having competent clinic personnel, sufficient screening equipment, and reasonable waiting times to receive screening and to receive the screening results. Therefore, individual health care centers need to focus on the patients’ perception of the services received by optimizing the care provided, and in so doing increase the rates of early diagnosis, reduce the rate of mortality from breast cancer as well as its associated treatment costs. PMID:25182506

  13. Patient Barriers to Follow-Up Care for Breast and Cervical Cancer Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Julie S.; Cho, Young I.; Stolley, Melinda R.; Markossian, Talar W.; Calhoun, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Women with breast or cervical cancer abnormalities can experience barriers to timely follow-up care, resulting in delays in cancer diagnosis. Patient navigation programs that identify and remove barriers to ensure timely receipt of care are proliferating nationally. The study used a systematic framework to describe barriers, including differences between African American and Latina women; to determine recurrence of barriers; and to examine factors associated with barriers to follow-up care. Methods Data originated from 250 women in the intervention arm of the Chicago Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP). The women had abnormal cancer screening findings and navigator encounters. Women were recruited from a community health center and a publicly owned medical center. After describing proportions of African American and Latina women experiencing particular barriers, logistic regression was used to explore associations between patient characteristics, such as race/ethnicity, and type of barriers. Results The most frequent barriers occurred at the intrapersonal level (e.g., insurance issues and fear), while institutional-level barriers such as system problems with scheduling care were the most commonly recurring over time (29%). The majority of barriers (58%) were reported in the first navigator encounter. Latinas (81%) reported barriers more often than African American women (19%). Differences in race/ethnicity and employment status were associated with types of barriers. Compared to African American women, Latinas were more likely to report an intrapersonal level barrier. Unemployed women were more likely to report an institutional level barrier. Conclusion In a sample of highly vulnerable women, there is no single characteristic (e.g., uninsured) that predicts what kinds of barriers a woman is likely to have. Nevertheless, navigators appear able to easily resolve intrapersonal-level barriers, but ongoing navigation is needed to address

  14. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  15. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  16. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  17. Building an Integrative Outpatient Care Program for Breast Cancer Patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chen, Fang-Pey; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2016-09-01

    Background Breast cancer patients may experience various symptoms that affect the quality of life significantly and they seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). To meet the needs of patients, we developed an integrative outpatient care program. Methods This program provided CAM consultation and acupuncture for breast cancer patients at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. The outcome measures included Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and patient satisfaction questionnaires on the first visit (baseline) and at 6 months. Results Forty-five breast cancer patients were enrolled. All patients completed the study. The median age was 53.3 (±8.3). The symptoms most often experienced during previous cancer treatments were fatigue (35.6%), arthralgia (20%), nausea (6.7%), and insomnia (6.7%). The symptoms most wished to be diminished by the patients were arthralgia (22.2%), insomnia (17.8%), and fatigue (15.6%). Thirty-four patients (75.6%) had sought CAM therapy to reduce these symptoms. Fifteen patients (33.3%) received CAM consultation only and 30 (66.7%) received acupuncture in addition. Sixteen patients completed at least 6 sessions of acupuncture. No serious adverse effect was reported. In the SF-12 Questionnaire on all the patients, physical component summary (PCS) was 49.6 (±5.6) at baseline and 44.9 (±7.6) at 6 months (P = .001); the mental component summary (MCS) was 44.7 (±6.1) at baseline and 52.3 (±9.3) at 6 months (P < .001). For patients who had completed acupuncture, PCS was 49.2 (±4.9) at baseline and 41.4 (±7.6) at 6 months (P = .148); the MCS was 45.6 (±6.2) at baseline and 49.7 (±11) at 6 months (P = .07). Thirty-eight (84.4%) patients were satisfied with this program. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that an integrative outpatient care program of conventional and Chinese medicine is feasible. Most patients were satisfied with this program and the quality of life was improved. It is important to conduct

  18. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements in Breast Cancer Quality Indicators During a 3-Year Interval

    PubMed Central

    Laronga, Christine; Gray, Jhanelle E; Siegel, Erin M; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William J; Fletcher, Michelle; Schreiber, Fred; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Phillip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David; Malafa, Mokenge; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care (FIQCC), composed of 11 practice sites across Florida, conducted its initial evaluation of adherence to breast cancer quality of care indicators (QCI) in 2006, with feedback provided to encourage quality improvement efforts at participating sites. In this study, our objective was to reassess changes over time resulting from these efforts. STUDY DESIGN Quality care indicators were derived from the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American College of Surgeons, and expert panel consensus. Medical records were reviewed for breast cancer patients first seen by medical oncologists in 2009 at the FIQCC sites, using the same performance indicators as in 2006. Statistical comparisons of 2006 vs 2009 data across sites were made by Pearson chi-square exact test using Monte Carlo estimation. RESULTS Charts of 602 patients in 2006 and 636 patients in 2009 were compared. Performance on medical oncology QCI improved over time for documentation of clinical trial participation discussion (p = 0.001), documentation of consent for chemotherapy (p = 0.047), definitive surgery done after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.017), and planned dose of chemotherapy consistent with published regimens (p = 0.02). Improvements in surgical QCI were seen for documentation of specimen orientation (p < 0.001), inking of margins (p < 0.0001), and performance of sentinel lymph node biopsy (p = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS The 2006 FIQCC study identified several medical and surgical oncology QCI improvement needs. Quality improvement efforts resulted in better performance for numerous metrics, therefore speaking to the benefits of reassessment of adherence to performance indicators to guide QCI efforts. PMID:25086813

  19. A prospective cohort study of early discontinuation of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer: the breast cancer quality of care study (BQUAL).

    PubMed

    Neugut, Alfred I; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Kushi, Lawrence H; Lamerato, Lois; Buono, Donna L; Nathanson, S David; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Jacobson, Judith S; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-07-01

    For many women with non-metastatic breast cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy prevents recurrence and extends survival. Women who discontinue chemotherapy early may reduce those benefits, but little is known about what predicts early discontinuation. We sought to determine prospectively the rate and reasons for early discontinuation of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective cohort study among three U.S. health care organizations. Of 1158 women with newly diagnosed non-metastatic breast cancer, 2006-2010, we analyzed 445 (38.4 %) patients who initiated standard adjuvant chemotherapy as defined by accepted guidelines. We interviewed patients at baseline and twice during treatment regarding sociodemographic/psychosocial factors and treatment decision-making and collected clinical data. They were categorized according to the number of cycles required by the chemotherapy regimen they had initiated. The outcome was early discontinuation (<80 % of planned cycles). Of patients analyzed, 392 (88.1 %) completed the prescribed therapy. The strongest predictor was receipt of a regimen entailing >4 cycles of therapy (18.1 % for longer regimens, 7.4 % for 4 cycles) (odds ratio [OR] 2.59, 95 % CI 1.32-5.08), controlling for race, age, stage, hormone receptor status, social support, optimism, spirituality, stress, and physical symptoms. Higher levels of psychological symptoms on the Memorial symptom assessment scale also increased the odds of early discontinuation (OR 1.92, 95 % CI 0.998-3.68). The large majority of patients who initiated adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer completed their prescribed regimens, but early discontinuation was associated with lengthier regimens and, with borderline statistical significance, for those with psychological side effects. PMID:27287779

  20. [Medroxyprogesterone Acetate as Part of Palliative Care for Terminal-Stage Breast Cancer Patients--A Report of Two Cases].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akiko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Akiko; Okada, Megumi; Nakasone, Arisa; Hatano, Takahiko; Harada, Akiho; Taniguchi, Ayano; Onishi, Keiko; Kwon, Chul; Fukazawa, Keita; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Amaya, Fumimasa; Hosokawa, Toyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Various effective strategies have recently been described in the treatment of breast cancer, including endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and molecular-targeted therapy, providing long-term survival benefits even after cancer recurrence. However, terminal-stage patients experience side effects and worse quality of life (QOL), in addition to deterioration of their general condition caused by the progression of the disease itself. When providing the best supportive care, use of anti-cancer drugs is not taboo and can represent a good option as long as physical, social, psychological, and spiritual supports are provided to both the patients and their families. Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is an endocrine therapeutic drug. In Japan, MPA is used only as a late-line endocrine therapy for breast cancer recurrence because many other endocrine therapy drugs are much more effective and MPA increases the risk of thrombosis and obesity. Here, we report 2 patients with breast cancer who reached terminal stage more than 10 years after the first diagnosis. MPA was administered as the final-line treatment. During that time, their appetite and QOL improved and the patients became more active than when they had been undergoing aggressive anticancer treatment. Both patients spent quality time with their families until their death. MPA may be a good option as part of palliative care of breast cancer patients in terminal stage. PMID:27067852

  1. Views of family physicians about survivorship care plans to provide breast cancer follow-up care: exploration of results from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, M.A.; Grunfeld, E.; Sussman, J.; Porter, G.; Mobilio, M. Hammond

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. Institute of Medicine recommends that cancer patients receive survivorship care plans, but evaluations to date have found little evidence of the effectiveness of such plans. We conducted a qualitative follow-on study to a randomized controlled trial (rct) to understand the experiences of family physicians using survivorship care plans to support the follow-up of breast cancer patients. Methods A subset of family physicians whose patients were enrolled in the parent rct in Ontario and Nova Scotia were eligible for this study. In interviews, the physicians discussed survivorship care plans (intervention) or usual discharge letters (control), and their confidence in providing follow-up cancer care. Results Of 123 eligible family physicians, 18 (10 intervention, 8 control) were interviewed. In general, physicians receiving a survivorship care plan found only the 1-page care record to be useful. Physicians who received only a discharge letter had variable views about the letter’s usefulness; several indicated that it lacked information about potential cancer- or treatment-related problems. Most physicians were comfortable providing care 3–5 years after diagnosis, but desired timely and informative communication with oncologists. Conclusions Although family physicians did not find extensive survivorship care plans useful, discharge letters might not be sufficiently comprehensive for follow-up breast cancer care. Effective strategies for two-way communication between family physicians and oncologists are still lacking. PMID:26300663

  2. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  3. Temporal representation of care trajectories of cancer patients using data from a regional information system: an application in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring that all cancer patients have access to the appropriate treatment within an appropriate time is a strategic priority in many countries. There is in particular a need to describe and analyse cancer care trajectories and to produce waiting time indicators. We developed an algorithm for extracting temporally represented care trajectories from coded information collected routinely by the general cancer Registry in Poitou-Charentes region, France. The present work aimed to assess the performance of this algorithm on real-life patient data in the setting of non-metastatic breast cancer, using measures of similarity. Methods Care trajectories were modeled as ordered dated events aggregated into states, the granularity of which was defined from standard care guidelines. The algorithm generates each state from the aggregation over a period of tracer events characterised on the basis of diagnoses and medical procedures. The sequences are presented in simple form showing presence and order of the states, and in an extended form that integrates the duration of the states. The similarity of the sequences, which are represented in the form of chains of characters, was calculated using a generalised Levenshtein distance. Results The evaluation was performed on a sample of 159 female patients whose itineraries were also calculated manually from medical records using the same aggregation rules and dating system as the algorithm. Ninety-eight per cent of the trajectories were correctly reconstructed with respect to the ordering of states. When the duration of states was taken into account, 94% of the trajectories matched reality within three days. Dissimilarities between sequences were mainly due to the absence of certain pathology reports and to coding anomalies in hospitalisation data. Conclusions These results show the ability of an integrated regional information system to formalise care trajectories and automatically produce indicators for time-lapse to care

  4. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  5. Skeletal Manifestations of Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M.; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  6. Identifying Women at Risk for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome Utilizing Breast Care Nurse Navigation at Mammography and Imaging Centers.

    PubMed

    Appel, Susan J; Cleiment, Rosemary J

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancer cases appear in families at a higher rate and at an earlier onset than in the average population. Two known gene defects, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for the majority of these hereditary related breast cancers. Additionally, BRCA1 and BRCA2 are related to the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC), where risk for other related cancers are increased. Various health-care professional organizations provide guidelines that speak to the need for conducting risk assessments, but little research has been conducted focusing on the initial screening for this syndrome. This quality improvement project attempts to determine if Nurse Navigators can effectively perform the initial education and screening for HBOC syndrome within a mammography and women's breast imaging setting using a simplified patient history tool. E. M. Rodgers' Diffusion of Innovation model, a map of how new ideas and programs have become adopted and accepted, guided this project's development and implementation. Over the course of 8 weeks, 1,420 women seeking service at 3 mammography and imaging sites were given a new risk assessment tool for HBOC. Additionally, the use of Nurse Navigation to identify women who may be at risk for HBOC was implemented. Two populations seeking service at the study sites were evaluated: (1) women obtaining breast screening/imaging services and (2) women receiving breast biopsy results. Patients identified as "at-risk" were defined by evidence-based practice guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and were referred for further genetic evaluation by a genetic professional. During this initial implementation of the HBOC risk assessment program, low participation of screening/imaging patients requesting HBOC education and evaluation occurred (129 screening patients or 9%). High rates of positive biopsy patients (5 patients or 34.7%) werefound to be at risk for HBOC compared to similar studies. Identifying HBOC risk

  7. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  8. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Jane M.; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W.; Zagar, Eris A.; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  9. Costs of breast cancer care in Mexico: analysis of two insurance coverage scenarios

    PubMed Central

    González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Wong, Rebeca; Ornelas, Héctor Arreola; Knaul, Felicia Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is a major cause of disease and death worldwide. In addition to its contribution to mortality and disability, it is a major economic burden both public and private. Objective To estimate the average direct medical cost/year of care for the diagnosis and treatment of BC in two coverage scenarios in Mexico: What is ‘ideal’ based on service usage patterns according to international guidelines and what is ‘current’ using the service usage patterns of suppliers in Mexico. Material and Methods The pattern and intensity of use of procedures for the care of BC in the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) for 2009 were identified and prices were associated using the guidelines from the System of Social Protection in Health (SPSS) and the IMSS for the current scenario and the ideal scenario, international patterns (Breast Health Global Initiative BHGI after its acronym in English) were used and prices were associated from the SPSS guidelines. Results The annual average direct medical cost per patient in the ‘current’ scenario was 8557 US$, while the cost in the ‘ideal’ scenario was 4554 US$. There are differences in costs between ‘what we do’ and ‘what should be done’, due to differences in the implementation of the interventions for the treatment of the different stages of the disease. A proportional increase in the average cost was also identified as the diagnosis stage advanced (from I to III). Conclusions Given that in Mexico there is universal insurance coverage for the treatment of BC, it is necessary to use economic resources more efficiently. It is necessary to continue to examine this topic in more depth and the next step will be to assess the effectiveness of both scenarios in order to provide enough evidence for the decision-making process. PMID:26557885

  10. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-17

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  11. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha; Deng, Gary; Hershman, Dawn; Mumber, Matthew; Perlmutter, Jane; Seely, Dugald; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.; Tripathy, Debu

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. Methods Following the Institute of Medicine’s guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. Results The search (January 1, 1990–December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). Conclusions Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well

  12. A perfect storm: How tumor biology, genomics, and health care delivery patterns collide to create a racial survival disparity in breast cancer and proposed interventions for change.

    PubMed

    Daly, Bobby; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that there is a significant racial divide in breast cancer incidence and mortality rates. African American women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women but are more likely to die from it. This review explores the factors that may contribute to the racial survival disparity. Consideration is paid to what is known about the role of differences in tumor biology, genomics, cancer screening, and quality of cancer care. It is argued that it is the collision of 2 forces, tumor biology and genomics, with patterns of care that leads to the breast cancer mortality gap. The delays, misuse, and underuse of treatment for African American patients are of increased significance when these patients are presenting with more aggressive forms of breast cancer. In the current climate of health care reform ushered in by the Affordable Care Act, this article also evaluates interventions to close the disparity gap. Prior interventions have been too narrowly focused on the patient rather than addressing the system and improving care across the continuum of breast cancer evaluation and treatment. Lastly, areas of future investigation and policy initiatives aimed at reducing the racial survival disparity in breast cancer are discussed. PMID:25960198

  13. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  14. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  15. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johnson KC, Olsson H, Casagrande JT, et al. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer: ... D, Ferlay J, Brinton LA, Cook MB. An international comparison of male and female breast cancer incidence ...

  16. Health Behaviors, Disparities and Deterring Factors for Breast Cancer Screening of Immigrant Women - A Challenge to Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Bejerano, Ivy Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Background This literature review was made to provide comprehensive to provide comprehensive understanding of health disparities as well as factors and barriers to cancer screening of immigrant women in multicultural societies. Methods: Published articles from 1990–2013 were searched using databases such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and Science Direct showing evidence of contributing factors and barriers to breast cancer screening practices of immigrant women in developed and developing countries. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 45 qualified articles were included in the review process. Results: Articles included were quantitative and qualitative, written in English for publication, and subjects were middle-aged, married immigrant women. The identified influential factors and barriers that prevent immigrant women from cancer screening were categorized as individual, socio-cultural and behavioral factors. Socioeconomic status, education level and knowledge, availability of health insurance and acculturation were among the individual factors. Presence of social support and recommendation from health care professionals were strongly associated with compliance with cancer screening. Cultural beliefs and practices as well as behavioral factors were among the barriers that deter women from participating in cancer screening. Conclusion: To alleviate the negative factors and barriers that affect the participation of high-risk immigrant women, a client-centered assessment and intervention approach with specific regard to cultural beliefs and practices should be considered by health care professionals. Joint effort of individuals, community, health care professionals and government institutions are recommended to further address the continuous rise of breast cancer mortality worldwide. PMID:26064855

  17. Breast cancer care compared with clinical Guidelines: an observational study in France

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great variability in breast cancer (BC) treatment practices according to patient, tumour or organisation of care characteristics has been reported but the relation between these factors is not well known. In two French regions, we measured compliance with Clinical Practice Guidelines for non-metastatic BC care management and identified factors associated with non-compliance at clinical and organisational levels. Methods Eligible patients had invasive unilateral BC without distant metastases and at least two contacts with one of the two regional healthcare systems (2003-2004) in the first year after diagnosis. Medical data were collected from patient medical records in all public and private hospitals (99 hospitals). The care process was defined by 20 criteria: clinical decisions for treatment and therapeutic procedures. Each criterion was classified according to level of compliance ("Compliant", "Justifiable" and "Not Compliant") and factors of non-compliance were identified (mixed effect logistic regression). Results 926 women were included. Non-compliance with clinical decisions for treatment was associated with older patient age (OR 2.1; 95%CI: 1.3-3.6) and region (OR 3.0; 95%CI: 1.2-7.4). Non-compliance with clinical decisions for radiotherapy was associated with lymph node involvement or the presence of peritumoural vascular invasion (OR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.01-2.3) and non-compliance with overall treatment (clinical decisions for treatment + therapeutic procedures) was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.2-3.3), grade III versus grade I (OR 2.9; 95%CI: 1.4-6.2), and one region of care versus another (OR 3.5; 95%CI: 1.7-7.1). Finally, heterogeneity of compliance in overall treatment sequence was identified between local cancer units (p < 0.05). Conclusion This study provides interesting insights into factors of non-compliance in non-metastatic BC management and could lead to quality care improvements. PMID:21251274

  18. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  19. Pattern of External Breast Prosthesis Use by Post Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients in India: Descriptive Study from Tertiary Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Ramu, D; Ramesh, Rakesh S; Manjunath, Suraj; Shivakumar; Goel, Vipin; Hemnath, G N; Alexander, Annie

    2015-12-01

    In India, Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in urban and 2nd most common in rural areas [1]. The incidence is rising, more younger women are getting affected and due to increase in survival rates there is an increase in the total number of women suffering from breast Cancer. So far there are no studies evaluating the pattern of breast prosthesis use in Indian scenario. The aim of this study is to address the patterns of external breast prosthesis used in India and view of Indian women on such prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This was a descriptive longitudinal study. In this study we interviewed (telephonic) 63 people, after three years of completing treatment under The Department of Surgical Oncology, St. Johns medical college, Bangalore. Among the study group, 27 members (40 %) were using various prosthesis, rest 36 women were not using any type of prosthesis. Among the users of prosthesis, silicon prosthesis was used by 6 women, padded cups by 8 women, cloth or cotton by 12 women and 1 woman used other type of prosthesis. Most women use simple items like cloth and cotton (44 %). Next most commonly used prosthesis are padded cups(). Only 22 % of women were found using silicon prosthesis in this study. Most of the well educated patients used external prosthesis either in the form of silicon prosthesis or padded cups. Most of women below age of 50 used external breast prosthesis. Use of prosthesis was more in urban compared to rural population (48 % vs 25 %). Prosthesis users worried more about the body image than women not using prosthesis. 25 % of women using prosthesis had body image issues where as only 5 % of non prosthesis users had such problems. Prosthesis users need improvement in terms of comfort, size, shape and affordability. Most common reasons for not using prosthesis are age, lack of motivation and awareness. Less than half of the women included in this study used external prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer

  20. Association between Lymphedema Self-Care Adherence and Lymphedema Outcomes among Women with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Kumar, Anagha; Cheville, Andrea L.; Tchou, Julia C.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Harris, Susan R.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if adherence to self-care modalities for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) predicts BCRL outcomes among 128 breast cancer (BrCa) survivors who participated in the 12-month physical activity and lymphedema (PAL) trial. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Adherence to 10 BCRL self-care modalities, as recommended in the clinical practice guidelines for the management of BCRL was assessed by questionnaire at baseline. BCRL outcomes assessed at baseline and 12-months included volumetry, circumferences, bioimpedence spectroscopy, the Norman lymphedema survey, and clinician-defined lymphedema exacerbations requiring treatment. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the relationship between adherence to BCRL self-care modalities and the likelihood of experiencing a BCRL outcome. Results Adherence to BCRL self-care activities did not predict experiencing any BCRL outcomes at 12-months. Levels of adherence to BCRL self-care modalities did not predict a ≥5% decrease in interlimb volume (Ptrend=0.79), ≥5% decrease in the sum of interlimb arm circumferences (Ptrend=0.47), ≥10% decrease in bioimpedence spectroscopy (Ptrend=0.83), ≥1 decrease in self-reported lymphedema symptoms (Ptrend=0.91), or clinician-defined lymphedema exacerbation requiring treatment (Ptrend=0.84). Conclusions Our findings suggest levels of BCRL self-care adherence do not predict BCRL outcomes among BrCa survivors with stable lymphedema who were followed for 12-months. PMID:25171662

  1. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  2. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts. PMID:26412025

  3. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk of breast ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any x-rays. ...

  4. Participation in the SUCCESS-A Trial Improves Intensity and Quality of Care for Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, U.; Kasprowicz, N. S.; Hepp, P.; Schindlbeck, C.; Harbeck, N.; Kiechle, M.; Sommer, H.; Beckmann, M. W.; Friese, K.; Janni, W.; Rack, B.; Scholz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The SUCCESS-A trial is a prospective, multicenter, phase III clinical trial for high-risk primary breast cancer. It compares disease-free survival after randomization in patients treated with fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel (FEC-D) with that of patients treated with 3 cycles of FEC followed by 3 cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel (FEC-DG). After a second randomization patients were treated with zoledronate for 2 or 5 years. A total of 251 centers took part in the trial and 3754 patients were recruited over a period of 18 months which ended in March 2007. In a questionnaire-based survey we investigated the impact of enrollment in the trial on patient care, the choice of chemotherapy protocol and access to current oncologic information as well as overall satisfaction in the respective centers. Analysis of the 78 questionnaires returned showed that 40 % of the centers had never previously enrolled patients with these indications in clinical studies. Prior to participating in the study, 4 % of the centers prescribed CMF or other protocols in patients with high-primary breast cancer risk, 46 % administered anthracycline-based chemotherapy and 50 % gave taxane-based chemotherapy. Around half of the participating centers noted that intensity of care and overall quality of care became even better and that access to breast cancer-specific information improved through participation in the trial. After their experience with the SUCCESS-A trial, all of the centers stated that they were prepared to enroll patients in clinical phase III trials again in the future. These data indicate that both patients and physicians benefit from clinical trials, as enrollment improves treatment strategies and individual patient care, irrespective of study endpoints. PMID:24771886

  5. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  6. The Machinery of Authoritarian Care: Dramatising Breast Cancer Treatment in 1970s Britain

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the professional and public response to the television play Through the Night, which aired on BBC1 in December 1975. One of the first British mass media portrayals of a woman's experience being treated for breast cancer, this play attracted a large audience and considerable attention from both critics and everyday viewers. My analysis of the play draws on sources documenting expert responses to the play in its production stages, as well as critics' and viewers' responses to what the play said about breast cancer treatment in particular, and about Britons' experiences of medical institutions more broadly. Together, I argue, these sources help us see how Through the Night's critique of what one expert called ‘the machinery of authoritarian care’ reverberated with and supported the efforts of professionals anxious to improve patient experience, and how it crystallised the concerns of activists and everyday viewers. PMID:25067891

  7. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  8. Molecular classification and prognostication of 300 node-negative breast cancer cases: A tertiary care experience

    PubMed Central

    Shemin, K. M. Zuhara; Smitha, N. V.; Jojo, Annie; Vijaykumar, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The proportion of node-negative breast cancer patients has been increasing with improvement of diagnostic modalities and early detection. However, there is a 20–30% recurrence in node-negative breast cancers. Determining who should receive adjuvant therapy is challenging, as the majority are cured by surgery alone. Hence, it requires further stratification using additional prognostic and predictive factors. Subjects and Methods: Ours is a single institution retrospective study, on 300 node-negative breast cancer cases, who underwent primary surgery over a period of 7 years (2005–2011). We excluded all cases who took NACT. Prognostic factors of age, size, lymphovascular emboli, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2neu Ki-67, grade and molecular classification were analyzed with respect to those with and without early events (recurrence, metastases or second malignancy, death) using-Pearson Chi-square method and logistic regression method for statistical analysis. Results: Majority belonged to the age group of 50–70 years. On univariate analysis, size >5 cm (P = 0.03) and ER negativity had significant association (P = 0.05) for early failures; PR negativity and lymphovascular emboli (LVE) had borderline significance (P = 0.07). Multivariate analysis showed size >5 cm to be significant (P = 0.04) and LVE positivity showed borderline significant association (P = 0.07) with early failures. About 62% belonged to luminal category followed by basal-like (25%) in molecular classification. Conclusions: ER negativity, PR negativity, LVE/lymphovascular invasion positivity and size >5 cm (T3 and T4) are associated with poor prognosis in node-negative breast cancers. PMID:26981506

  9. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  10. Psychosocial factors related to non-persistence with adjuvant endocrine therapy among women with breast cancer: the Breast Cancer Quality of Care Study (BQUAL).

    PubMed

    Hershman, Dawn L; Kushi, Lawrence H; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Coromilas, Ellie; Buono, Donna; Lamerato, Lois; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Zhong, Xiaobo; Jacobson, Judith S; Wright, Jason D; Neugut, Alfred I

    2016-05-01

    Non-adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy (ET) for breast cancer (BC) is common. Our goal was to determine the associations between psychosocial factors and ET non-persistence. We recruited women with BC receiving care in an integrated healthcare system between 2006 and 2010. Using a subset of patients treated with ET, we investigated factors related to ET non-persistence (discontinuation) based on pharmacy records (≥90 days gap). Serial interviews were conducted at baseline and every 6 months. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT), Medical Outcomes Survey, Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (TSQM), Impact of Events Scale (IES), Interpersonal Processes of Care measure, and Decision-making beliefs and concerns were measured. Multivariate models assessed factors associated with non-persistence. Of the 523 women in our final cohort who initiated ET and had a subsequent evaluation, 94 (18 %) were non-persistent over a 2-year follow-up. The cohort was primarily white (74.4 %), stage 1 (60.6 %), and on an aromatase inhibitor (68.1 %). Women in the highest income category had a lower odds of being non-persistent (OR 0.43, 95 % CI 0.23-0.81). Quality of life and attitudes toward ET at baseline were associated with non-persistence. At follow-up, the FACT, TSQM, and IES were associated with non-persistence (p < 0.001). Most women continued ET. Women who reported a better attitude toward ET, better quality of life, and more treatment satisfaction, were less likely to be non-persistent and those who reported intrusive/avoidant thoughts were more likely to be non-persistent. Interventions to enhance the psychosocial well-being of patients should be evaluated to increase adherence. PMID:27086286

  11. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Emmanuel Joseph; Cheah, Whye Lian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32–2.64). Top 10 items with “moderate to high” level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old), had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups. PMID:27239346

  12. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Fong, Emmanuel Joseph; Cheah, Whye Lian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32-2.64). Top 10 items with "moderate to high" level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old), had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups. PMID:27239346

  13. The Haiti Breast Cancer Initiative: Initial Findings and Analysis of Barriers-to-Care Delaying Patient Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ketan; Costas, Ainhoa; Damuse, Ruth; Hamiltong-Pierre, Jean; Pyda, Jordan; Ong, Cecilia T.; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Meara, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In Haiti, breast cancer patients present at such advanced stages that even modern therapies offer modest survival benefit. Identifying the personal, sociocultural, and economic barriers-to-care delaying patient presentation is crucial to controlling disease. Methods. Patients presenting to the Hôpital Bon Sauveur in Cange were prospectively accrued. Delay was defined as 12 weeks or longer from initial sign/symptom discovery to presentation, as durations greater than this cutoff correlate with reduced survival. A matched case-control analysis with multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting delay. Results. Of N = 123 patients accrued, 90 (73%) reported symptom-presentation duration and formed the basis of this study: 52 patients presented within 12 weeks of symptoms, while 38 patients waited longer than 12 weeks. On logistic regression, lower education status (OR = 5.6, P = 0.03), failure to initially recognize mass as important (OR = 13.0, P < 0.01), and fear of treatment cost (OR = 8.3, P = 0.03) were shown to independently predict delayed patient presentation. Conclusion. To reduce stage at presentation, future interventions must educate patients on the recognition of initial breast cancer signs and symptoms and address cost concerns by providing care free of charge and/or advertising that existing care is already free. PMID:23840209

  14. Breast density and breast cancer risk: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy T; Vachon, Celine M; Brandt, Kathleen R; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-04-01

    New legislation in several states requiring breast density notification in all mammogram reports has increased awareness of breast density. Estimates indicate that up to 50% of women undergoing mammography will have high breast density; thus, with increased attention and high prevalence of increased breast density, it is crucial that primary care clinicians understand the implications of dense breasts and are able to provide appropriate counseling. This review provides an overview of breast density, specifically by defining breast density, exploring the association between breast density and breast cancer risk, both from masking and as an independent risk factor, and reviewing supplemental screening options as part of a larger framework for counseling patients with dense breasts. PMID:24684876

  15. 'It is hard for mums to put themselves first': how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer manage the sociological boundaries between paid work, family and caring for the self.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine Ruth

    2014-09-01

    This paper aims to increase understanding of how mothers diagnosed with breast cancer while in the paid workforce experience and manage their multiple demands of taking care of themselves, their children and their paid work. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 women who were mothers of dependent children and in the paid workforce at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis. The sample includes women living in urban and rural Australia. The study found that after a breast cancer diagnosis, participants tended to prioritise their health and wellbeing over paid work. Yet dominance of gendered identity meant that they tended to place the needs of family, especially children, above their own health and wellbeing. The key factors that influenced mothers' decisions to continue in, return to, or leave paid work after a breast cancer diagnosis included: a change in perspective regarding what was important in their lives; level of support from the workplace and home; the extent to which participating in paid work was a financial necessity; the extent to which their identity was connected to paid work, and; ongoing level of pain or fatigue. The paper concludes that using the sociological concepts of the fateful moment, boundary maintenance and a feminist ethic of care produces a more nuanced understanding of women's participation in paid work after breast cancer than examining paid workforce participation, or unpaid responsibilities and mothering, separately. The nature of the permeability or malleability of boundaries between work, family and taking care of the self affects women's participation in paid work during and/or after breast cancer treatment. Increased boundary permeability or malleability brought about more by cooperation than conflict facilitated positive experiences of re-negotiating boundaries, whereas increased permeability or malleability brought about more by conflict than cooperation created difficulties for women in finding an

  16. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Optimisation of the continuum of supportive and palliative care for patients with breast cancer in low-income and middle-income countries: executive summary of the Breast Health Global Initiative, 2014.

    PubMed

    Distelhorst, Sandra R; Cleary, James F; Ganz, Patricia A; Bese, Nuran; Camacho-Rodriguez, Rolando; Cardoso, Fatima; Ddungu, Henry; Gralow, Julie R; Yip, Cheng-Har; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2015-03-01

    Supportive care and palliative care are now recognised as critical components of global cancer control programmes. Many aspects of supportive and palliative care services are already available in some low-income and middle-income countries. Full integration of supportive and palliative care into breast cancer programmes requires a systematic, resource-stratified approach. The Breast Health Global Initiative convened three expert panels to develop resource allocation recommendations for supportive and palliative care programmes in low-income and middle-income countries. Each panel focused on a specific phase of breast cancer care: during treatment, after treatment with curative intent (survivorship), and after diagnosis with metastatic disease. The panel consensus statements were published in October, 2013. This Executive Summary combines the three panels' recommendations into a single comprehensive document covering breast cancer care from diagnosis through curative treatment into survivorship, and metastatic disease and end-of-life care. The recommendations cover physical symptom management, pain management, monitoring and documentation, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of care, health professional education, and patient, family, and caregiver education. PMID:25752564

  18. Deep Friction Massage in Treatment of Radiation-induced Fibrosis: Rehabilitative Care for Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Warpenburg, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for invasive breast cancer usually involves some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and/or targeted therapy. For approximately 50% of patients, radiation therapy is a component of the therapies used. As a result, radiation-induced fibrosis is becoming a common and crippling side effect, leading to muscle imbalance with a lessened range of motion as well as pain and dysfunction of the vascular and lymphatic systems. No good estimates are available for how many patients experience complications from radiation. Radiation-induced fibrosis can affect the underlying fascia, muscles, organs, and bones within the primary target field and the larger secondary field that is caused by the scatter effect of radioactive elements. For breast cancer patients, the total radiation field may include the neck, shoulder, axillary, and thoracic muscles and the ribs for both the ipsilateral (cancer-affected) and contralateral sides. This case study indicates that therapy using deep friction massage can affect radiation-induced fibrosis beneficially, particularly in the thoracic muscles and the intercostals (ie, the muscles between the ribs). When delivered in intensive sessions using deep friction techniques, massage has the potential to break down fibrotic tissues, releasing the inflammation and free radicals that are caused by radiation therapy. In the course of the massage, painful and debilitating spasms resulting from fibrosis can be relieved and the progressive nature of the radiation-induced fibrosis interrupted. PMID:26770116

  19. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  20. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may result in a delay in diagnosis. Survival is highest when breast cancer is found early. If you notice any of ... chest or nipple, see a doctor right away. Survival rates are similar for men and women when breast cancer is found at the same stage. A man’s ...

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early female breast cancer: a systematic review of the evidence for the 2014 Cancer Care Ontario systemic therapy guideline

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, S.; Fletcher, G.G.; Eisen, A.; Mates, M.; Freedman, O.C.; Dent, S.F.; Trudeau, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) of Cancer Care Ontario recently created an evidence-based consensus guideline on the systemic treatment of early breast cancer. The evidence for the guideline was compiled using a systematic review to answer the question “What is the optimal systemic therapy for patients with early-stage, operable breast cancer, when patient and disease factors are considered?” The question was addressed in three parts: cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine treatment, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (her2)–directed therapy. Methods For the systematic review, the medline and embase databases were searched for the period January 2008 to May 2014. The Standards and Guidelines Evidence directory of cancer guidelines and the Web sites of major oncology guideline organizations were also searched. The basic search terms were “breast cancer” and “systemic therapy” (chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, targeted agents, ovarian suppression), and results were limited to randomized controlled trials (rcts), guidelines, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Results Several hundred documents that met the inclusion criteria were retrieved. The Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group meta-analyses encompassed many of the rcts found. Several additional studies that met the inclusion criteria were retained, as were other guidelines and systematic reviews. Chemotherapy was reviewed mainly in three classes: anti-metabolite–based regimens (for example, cyclophosphamide–methotrexate–5-fluorouracil), anthracyclines, and taxane-based regimens. In general, single-agent chemotherapy is not recommended for the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer in any patient population. Anthracycline–taxane-based polychemotherapy regimens are, overall, considered superior to earlier-generation regimens and have the most significant impact on patient survival outcomes. Regimens with varying anthracycline and taxane doses and

  2. The role of private care in the interval between diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in Northern Ireland: an analysis of Registry data

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia; Gavin, Anna; O'Neill, Ciaran

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the differences in the interval between diagnosis and initiation of treatment among women with breast cancer in Northern Ireland. Design A cross-sectional observational study. Setting All breast cancer care patients in the Northern Ireland Cancer Registry in 2006. Participants All women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer in Northern Ireland in 2006. Main outcome measure The number of days between diagnosis and initiation of treatment for breast cancer. Results The mean (median) interval between diagnosis and initiation of treatment among public patients was 19 (15) compared with 14 (12) among those whose care involved private providers. The differences between individual public providers were as marked as those between the public and private sector—the mean (median) ranging between 14 (12) and 25 (22) days. Multivariate models revealed that the differences were evident when a range of patient characteristics were controlled for including cancer stage. Conclusions A relatively small number of women received care privately in Northern Ireland but experienced shorter intervals between diagnosis and initiation of treatment than those who received care wholly in the public system. The variation among public providers was as great as that between the public and private providers. The impact of such differences on survival and in light of waiting time targets introduced in Northern Ireland warrants investigation. PMID:24302511

  3. Paying on the margin for medical care: Evidence from breast cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Einav, Liran; Finkelstein, Amy; Williams, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple graphical framework to illustrate the potential welfare gains from a “top-up” health insurance policy requiring patients to pay the incremental price for more expensive treatment options. We apply this framework to breast cancer treatments, where lumpectomy with radiation therapy is more expensive than mastectomy but generates similar average health benefits. We estimate the relative demand for lumpectomy using variation in distance to the nearest radiation facility, and estimate that the “top-up” policy increases social welfare by $700–2,500 per patient relative to two common alternatives. We briefly discuss additional tradeoffs that arise from an ex-ante perspective. PMID:26900414

  4. Barriers for the inclusion of sexuality in nursing care for women with gynecological and breast cancer: perspective of professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Simone Mara de Araújo; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: qualitative study, which aimed to identify the barriers that influence nursing care practices related to the sexuality of women with gynecological and breast cancer. METHODS: the study was conducted with 16 professionals of the nursing area (nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants) from two sectors of a university hospital situated in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected using semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews. All the interviews were recorded and the participants' responses were identified and categorized using Content Analysis. RESULTS: three major themes were identified. These are as follows: 1) barriers related to the biomedical model; 2) barriers related to institutional dynamics and 3) barriers related to the social interpretations of sexuality. CONCLUSIONS: the results of this study showed that the systematized inclusion of this issue in nursing care routines requires changes in the health paradigm and in the work dynamic, as well as reflection on the personal values and social interpretations related to the topic. A major challenge is to divest sexuality of the taboos and prejudices which accompany it, as well as to contribute to the nursing team being more aware of the difficulties faced by women with gynaecological and breast cancer. PMID:25806635

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  6. MYC and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Yinghua; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2010-01-01

    MYC is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. MYC deregulation contributes to breast cancer development and progression and is associated with poor outcomes. Multiple mechanisms are involved in MYC deregulation in breast cancer, including gene amplification, transcriptional regulation, and mRNA and protein stabilization, which correlate with loss of tumor suppressors and activation of oncogenic pathways. The heterogeneity in breast cancer is increasingly recognized. Breast cancer has been classified into 5 or more subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and each subtype has distinct biological features and clinical outcomes. Among these subtypes, basal-like tumor is associated with a poor prognosis and has a lack of therapeutic targets. MYC is overexpressed in the basal-like subtype and may serve as a target for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 inhibits MYC’s transcriptional and transforming activity. Loss of BRCA1 with MYC overexpression leads to the development of breast cancer—especially, basal-like breast cancer. As a downstream effector of estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor family pathways, MYC may contribute to resistance to adjuvant therapy. Targeting MYC-regulated pathways in combination with inhibitors of other oncogenic pathways may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for breast cancer, the basal-like subtype in particular. PMID:21779462

  7. Incorporating Patient Satisfaction Metrics in Assessing Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jennifer L.; De Costa, Anna-Maria A.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Sterba, Katherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Medical University of South Carolina implemented a patient-centered multidisciplinary breast clinic program (MDBC) in August 2012. In this study, patient satisfaction with MDBC care delivery model and communication with healthcare providers was examined to inform the refinement of the MDBC program. Methods During the first 10 months of the MDBC, patients were asked to complete a 14-question postconsultation telephone survey. A statistical analysis was performed to explore potential associations between age, race, and stage with overall patient satisfaction scores. Results Overall, patients (N = 52, 56% white, 42% African American, 2% Hispanic; mean age 61 years) rated the quality of care highly (mean 4.7, range [1 = poor to 5 = excellent]) and felt comfortable with their plan of care (mean 1.63, range [1 = extremely comfortable to 5 = not at all comfortable]). No statistically significant differences in overall satisfaction were found by age, race, or stage; however, patient responses were commonly not optimal (ie, either “no” or “yes, but not as much as I would like”) when asked if the care team addressed the impact of their diagnosis on personal relationships (40.4%) or emotional health (28.9%). Conclusions Patients were highly satisfied with the care they received in the MDBC program. Findings suggest that this model is well suited to a diverse patient population and have highlighted quality improvement targets such as increased emphasis on providers’ communication about psychosocial issues. PMID:26079465

  8. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  9. Chemobrain Experienced by Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-Ethnography Study Investigating Research and Care Implications

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Maryam Hafsah; Loh, Siew Yim; Mackenzie, Lynette; Vardy, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment, colloquially termed “chemobrain”, occurs in 10–40% of all cancer patients, and is an emerging target of cancer survivorship research. Aim This study reviews published qualitative studies to explore cognitive impairments or chemobrain among breast cancer survivors, with particular attention given to the impact on quality of life. Method Using keywords, we searched ten electronic databases (CINAHL, EMBASE, Proquest, OVID SP, MEDLINE, Oxford Journal, Science Direct, PubMED). Findings Of 457 papers, seven relevant papers were included. Data was extracted and concepts were analysed using a meta ethnography approach. Four second order intepretations were identified, on the basis of which, four third order intrepretations were constructed. Linked together in a line of argument, was a consistent account on their struggles to self-manage the chemobrain impairments that impact their daily lives. Five concepts emerged from the analysis of the primary findings: i) real experiences of cognitive changes, ii) calls for help, iii) impact of cognitive impairments, iv) coping and v) survivorship and meaning. Further synthesis resulted in four new order intepretations: i) The chemobrain struggle, ii) The substantial impact of chemobrain on life domains, iii) The struggle to readjust and to self manage, and iv) ‘thankful yet fearful’ representation. Discussion Awareness of cognitive changes were context-dependent on healthcare settings and cultural contexts as strong determinants. Subjects verified the existence of chemobrain but healthcare providers mis-recognised, under-recognised, and sometimes negated it perhaps due to its unknown aetiology. Asian breast cancer survivors appear less vocal than their western counterparts. Conclusion The current literature on the lived experiences of how women experienced chemobrain provides a consistent report that chemobrain is real, persistent and with detrimental impacts on quality of life - manifested

  10. Evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing for personalized breast cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increasing number of targeted therapies, together with a deeper understanding of cancer genetics and drug response, have prompted major healthcare centers to implement personalized treatment approaches relying on high-throughput tumor DNA sequencing. However, the optimal way to implement this transformative methodology is not yet clear. Current assays may miss important clinical information such as the mutation allelic fraction, the presence of sub-clones or chromosomal rearrangements, or the distinction between inherited variants and somatic mutations. Here, we present the evaluation of ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) to generate and interpret the molecular profile of 38 breast cancer patients from two academic medical centers. Methods We sequenced 47 genes in matched germline and tumor DNA samples from 38 breast cancer patients. The selected genes, or the pathways they belong to, can be targeted by drugs or are important in familial cancer risk or drug metabolism. Results Relying on the added value of sequencing matched tumor and germline DNA and using a dedicated analysis, UDT-Seq has a high sensitivity to identify mutations in tumors with low malignant cell content. Applying UDT-Seq to matched tumor and germline specimens from the 38 patients resulted in a proposal for at least one targeted therapy for 22 patients, the identification of tumor sub-clones in 3 patients, the suggestion of potential adverse drug effects in 3 patients and a recommendation for genetic counseling for 2 patients. Conclusion Overall our study highlights the additional benefits of a sequencing strategy, which includes germline DNA and is optimized for heterogeneous tumor tissues. PMID:24326041

  11. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  12. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  13. Practice of breast self examination: disease extent at diagnosis and patterns of surgical care. A report from an Italian study. GIVIO (Interdisciplinary Group for Cancer Care Evaluation).

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to determine whether breast self examination leads to earlier diagnosis and whether this translates into a larger utilisation of conservative surgical procedures. DESIGN--The study was a survey of a cohort of breast cancer patients diagnosed over the period September 1986-July 1988. SUBJECTS--Participants were 1315 women enrolled in a clinical trial testing the effectiveness of two follow up regimens by 30 general hospitals throughout Italy. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Overall, 511 patients (39%) reported some breast self examination practice, but only 109 (8%) did this regularly and in a way deemed correct by their physicians. Breast self examination practice was positively associated with patients' education and past history of benign breast disease and negatively with age. Self examiners were found to have a significantly greater chance of being diagnosed with a primary tumour coded as pT1 according to the 1982 TNM classification (odds ratio = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.13-1.79). This protective effect was mostly evident in the subgroup of optimal performers (odds ratio = 1.54, CI = 1.01-2.34). Nearly half the patients (319/655) eligible for conservative surgery still had an unnecessary radical procedure. CONCLUSIONS--Premorbid breast self examination seems to have a modest effect on the extent of disease at diagnosis. The still widespread use of radical surgery suggests that a careful reanalysis of priorities among possible public interventions is needed before launching massive educational campaigns targeted exclusively at consumers. PMID:2072069

  14. Surgical Patterns of Care in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy and Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Results of a Secondary Analysis of TBCRC 017

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace P.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Cantor, Alan; Golshan, Mehra; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Horton, Janet K.; Nanda, Rita; Amos, Keith D.; Forero, Andres; Hudis, Cliff A.; Meszoely, Ingrid; De Los Santos, Jennifer F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) down-stages advanced primary tumors, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being the most sensitive imaging predictor of response. However, the impact of MRI evaluation on surgical treatment decisions in the neoadjuvant setting has not been well described. We report surgical patterns of care across 8 National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer centers in women receiving both NCT and MRI to evaluate the impact of MRI findings on surgical planning. Methods Seven hundred seventy women from 8 institutions received NCT with MRI obtained both before and after systemic treatment. Univariate and multivariate analyses of imaging, patient-, and tumor-related covariates associated with choice of breast surgery were conducted. Results MRI and surgical data were available on 759 of 770 patients. A total of 345 of 759 (45 %) patients received breast-conserving surgery and 414 of 759 (55 %) received mastectomy. Mastectomy occurred more commonly in patients with incomplete MRI response versus complete (58 vs. 43 %) (p = 0.0003). On multivariate analysis, positive estrogen receptor status (p = 0.02), incomplete MRI response (p = 0.0003), higher baseline T classification (p < 0.0001), younger age (p < 0.0006), and institution (p = 0.003) were independent predictors of mastectomy. A statistically significant trend toward increasing use of mastectomy with increasing T stage at presentation (p < 0.0001) was observed in patients with incomplete response by MRI only. Among women with complete response on MRI, 43 % underwent mastectomy. Conclusions Within a multi-institutional cohort of women undergoing neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer, MRI findings were not clearly associated with extent of surgery. This study shows that receptor status, T stage at diagnosis, young age, and treating institution are more significant determinants of surgical treatment choice than MRI response data. PMID:25059792

  15. Pregnancy After Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gemignani; Petrek

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The issue of pregnancy following the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is important because the incidence of breast cancer is increasing in women of childbearing age. The fact that many women are delaying childbearing, whether for educational, professional, or personal reasons, increases the number of women who will undergo breast cancer treatment before completing childbearing. METHODS: Data on pregnancy in breast cancer survivors are limited and consist only of retrospective data. This paper reviews the published literature on the influence of subsequent pregnancy on breast cancer, including three recent large-scale population-based studies. RESULTS: The survival of women with breast carcinoma who subsequently become pregnant is not reported to be decreased in any of the published series. However, several biases may be present that justify the concern regarding the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Further research on the safety of subsequent pregnancy after breast carcinoma treatment is needed. To address these issues, patients are currently being accrued for a large, prospective, multicenter study of young breast carcinoma patients. PMID:10758557

  16. Methylxanthines and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schairer, C; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R N

    1987-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between methylxanthine consumption and breast cancer using data from a case-control study which included 1,510 cases and 1,882 controls identified through a nation-wide breast cancer screening program. There was no evidence of a positive association between methylxanthine consumption and risk of breast cancer. In fact, there was some suggestion of a negative association, particularly in women diagnosed after age 50. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk with past or recent methylxanthine consumption, or with the consumption of caffeine or specific beverages, most notably brewed or instant caffeinated coffee and tea. PMID:3117709

  17. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  18. Can We Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004–2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14–42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48–52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

  19. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  20. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  1. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Unmet supportive care needs: a cross-cultural comparison between Hong Kong Chinese and German Caucasian women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wendy W T; Au, Angel H Y; Wong, Jennifer H F; Lehmann, Claudia; Koch, Uwe; Fielding, Richard; Mehnert, Anja

    2011-11-01

    The comparison of psychosocial needs across different cultural settings can identify cultural and service impacts on psychosocial outcomes. We compare psychosocial needs in Hong Kong Chinese and German Caucasian women with breast cancer. Completed questionnaires were collected from 348 Chinese and 292 German women with breast cancer for assessing unmet psychosocial needs (Supportive Care Needs Survey Short Form), psychological distress (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale), and listed physical and psychological symptoms. Only 11% of the participants reported not needing help for any of the 34 items. More German (14%) than Chinese women (8%) reported no unmet needs (χ(2) = 6.16, P = .013). With both samples combined, the Health System and Information domain unmet needs were the most prevalent, apart from one Psychological need domain item, "Fear about the cancer spreading." Chinese and German samples differed significantly in prevalence and patterns of unmet psychosocial needs. Multivariate adjustment for demographic, clinical, and sample characteristics, psychological distress, and symptoms showed that significantly greater unmet Health system and Information, and Patient care and support domain needs, associated with the presence of symptoms (β = .232, P < .001), high HADS Anxiety (β = .187, P < .001), higher education attainment (β = .120, P = .002), and Chinese sample membership (β = .280, P < .001). Greater unmet Psychological, Physical and Daily Living, and Sexuality domain needs were associated with the presence of symptoms, psychological distress, and German group membership, among others. German women reported more anxiety (t = 10.45, P < .001) and depression (t = 3.71, P < .001). In post hoc analyses, German, but not Chinese women reporting greater anxiety and depression had greater unmet Psychological and Sexuality domain needs (P < .001). It can be concluded that culture-specific differences in supportive care needs exist. Hong Kong Chinese

  3. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  4. Breast cancer and protein biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gam, Lay-Harn

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

  5. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy and targeted therapy. This helps to increase survival. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two main types of breast ... shown lumpectomy plus radiation offers the same overall survival benefit as mastectomy for early ... (almost always followed by radiation): The surgeon ...

  6. Industrialization, electromagnetic fields, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kheifets, L I; Matkin, C C

    1999-01-01

    The disparity between the rates of breast cancer in industrialized and less-industrialized regions has led to many hypotheses, including the theory that exposure to light-at-night and/or electromagnetic fields (EMF) may suppress melatonin and that reduced melatonin may increase the risk of breast cancer. In this comprehensive review we consider strengths and weaknesses of more than 35 residential and occupational epidemiologic studies that investigated the association between EMF and breast cancer. Although most of the epidemiologic data do not provide strong support for an association between EMF and breast cancer, because of the limited statistical power as well as the possibility of misclassification and bias present in much of the existing data, it is not possible to rule out a relationship between EMF and breast cancer. We make several specific recommendations for future studies carefully designed to test the melatonin-breast cancer and EMF-breast cancer hypotheses. Future study designs should have sufficient statistical power to detect small to moderate associations; include comprehensive exposure assessments that estimate residential and occupational exposures, including shift work; focus on a relevant time period; control for known breast cancer risks; and pay careful attention to menopausal and estrogen receptor status. PMID:10229714

  7. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  8. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  9. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  10. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  12. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Delivering breast cancer care in urban India: Heterotopia, hospital ethnography and voluntarism.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Despite substantial strides to improve cancer control in India, challenges to deliver oncology services persist. One major challenge is the provision and accessibility of adequate infrastructure. This paper offers ethnographic insight on the conceptual and material conditions that are currently shaping the delivery of oncology in Mumbai, focusing specifically on the way India's socio-economic context necessitates non-biomedical acts of voluntarism or 'seva' (selfless service). Developing the premise that hospitals are not identical clones of a biomedical model, detailed attention is paid to the way 'care' emerges through 'praxis of place' (Casey, 2003) within the cancer hospital as a multi-scalar 'heterotopic' (Street and Coleman, 2012) site. Such a perspective enables global/local tensions to come into view, together with the heterogeneous confluence of juxtaposing materialities, imaginations, social practices and values that both propels and constrains the everyday delivery of care. The paper reflects on the theoretical implications of hospital seva in Mumbai in light of social science studies of hospital ethnography and health activism and contributes important ethnographic insight into the current global health debates regarding effective implementation of cancer services in India. PMID:26923731

  14. An Associative Memory Model for Integration of Fragmented Research Data and Identification of Treatment Correlations in Breast Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Khan, Mridul; Higgins, John; Giani, Annarita; Das, Amar K.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in advancing scientific discoveries using data-driven clinical research is the fragmentation of relevant data among multiple information systems. This fragmentation requires significant data-engineering work before correlations can be found among data attributes in multiple systems. In this paper, we focus on integrating information on breast cancer care, and present a novel computational approach to identify correlations between administered drugs captured in an electronic medical records and biological factors obtained from a tumor registry through rapid data aggregation and analysis. We use an associative memory (AM) model to encode all existing associations among the data attributes from both systems in a high-dimensional vector space. The AM model stores highly associated data items in neighboring memory locations to enable efficient querying operations. The results of applying AM to a set of integrated data on tumor markers and drug administrations discovered anomalies between clinical recommendations and derived associations. PMID:26958161

  15. Profilometry and subsurface imaging in point of care diagnosis in ocular disease and lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayegh, Samir I.; Taghian, Alphonse

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) can be irreversible with profound negative impact on patients' quality of life. Programs that provide screening and active surveillance for BCRL are essential to determine whether early detection and intervention influences the course of lymphedema development. Established methods of quantitatively assessing lymphedema at early stages include "volume" methods such as perometry and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate 1) Use of topographical techniques analogous to those used in corneal topography 2) Development of point-of-care lymphedema detection and characterization based on off-the-shelf hardward 3) The role of subsurface imaging 4) Multimodal diagnostics and integration yielding higher sensitivity/ specificity.

  16. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  17. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index

  18. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  19. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  20. Thoracic Paravertebral Block, Multimodal Analgesia, and Monitored Anesthesia Care for Breast Cancer Surgery in Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare idiopathic neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons and characterized by spasticity, muscle weakness, and bulbar involvement. It can sometimes mimic early stage of more common and fatal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Surgical patients with a history of neurodegenerative disorders, including PLS, may be at increased risk for general anesthesia related ventilatory depression and postoperative respiratory complications, abnormal response to muscle relaxants, and sensitivity to opioids, sedatives, and local anesthetics. We present a case of a patient with PLS and recent diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent a simple mastectomy surgery uneventfully under an ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block, multimodal analgesia, and monitored anesthesia care. Patient reported minimal to no pain or discomfort in the postoperative period and received no opioids for pain management before being discharged home. In patients with PLS, thoracic paravertebral block and multimodal analgesia can provide reliable anesthesia and effective analgesia for breast surgery with avoidance of potential risks associated with general anesthesia, muscle paralysis, and opioid use. PMID:27200193

  1. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  2. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Standard of Care and Promising New Agents for Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Patrizia; Angeloni, Antonio; Risi, Emanuela; Orsi, Errico; Mezi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a cluster of heterogeneous diseases, all of them sharing the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and HER2 protein. They are characterized by different biological, molecular and clinical features, including a poor prognosis despite the increased sensitivity to the current cytotoxic therapies. Several studies have identified important molecular features which enable further subdivision of this type of tumor. We are drawing from genomics, transcription and translation analysis at different levels, to improve our knowledge of the molecular alterations along the pathways which are activated during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. How this information should be used for the rational selection of therapy is an ongoing challenge and the subject of numerous research studies in progress. Currently, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), HSP90 and Aurora inhibitors are most used as targeting agents in metastatic setting clinical trials. In this paper we will review the current knowledge about the genetic subtypes of TNBC and their different responses to conventional therapeutic strategies, as well as to some new promising molecular target agents, aimed to achieve more tailored therapies. PMID:25347122

  4. Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David; Di Carlo, Philip A; Khouri, Nagi F

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening has become a controversial topic. Understanding the points of contention requires an appreciation of the conceptual framework underpinning cancer screening in general, knowledge of the strengths and limitations of available screening modalities, and familiarity with published clinical trial data. This review is data intense with the intention of presenting enough information to permit the reader to enter into the discussion with an ample knowledge base. The focus throughout is striking a balance between the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. PMID:26315519

  5. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... inhibitor, can do an even better job of preventing breast cancer than the SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors stop an enzyme ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  7. 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160134.html 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer' Many women found online support after their diagnosis, ... Women who communicated via social media after a breast cancer diagnosis and received information and/or support about ...

  8. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  9. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer treatment: a population-based study of quality-of-care indicators in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been documented that variations exist in breast cancer treatment despite wide dissemination of clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this population-based study was to evaluate the impact of regional guidelines (Piedmont guidelines, PGL) for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on quality-of-care indicators in the Northwestern Italian region of Piedmont. Methods We included two samples of women aged 50–69 years with incident breast cancer treated in Piedmont before and after the introduction of PGL: 600 in 2002 (pre-PGL) and 621 in 2004 (post-PGL). Patients were randomly selected among all incident breast cancer cases identified through the hospital discharge records database. We extracted clinical data on breast cancer cases from medical charts and ascertained vital status through linkage with town offices. We assessed compliance with 14 quality-of-care indicators from PGL recommendations, before and after their introduction in clinical practice. Results Among patients with invasive lesions, 77.1% (N = 368) and 77.5% (N = 383) in the pre-PGL and post-PGL groups, respectively, received breast conservative surgery (BCS) as a first-line treatment. Following BCS, 87.7% received radiotherapy in 2002, compared to 87.9% in 2004. Of all patients at medium-to-high risk of distant metastasis, 65.5% (N = 268) and 63.6% (N = 252) received chemotherapy in 2002 and in 2004, respectively. Among the 117 patients with invasive lesions and negative estrogen receptor status in 2002, hormonal therapy was prescribed in 23 of them (19.6%). The incorrect prescription of hormonal therapy decreased to 10.8% (N = 10) among the 92 estrogen receptor-negative patients in 2004 (p < 0.01). Compliance with PGL recommendations was already high in the pre-PGL group, although some quality-of-care indicators did not reach the standard. In the pre/post analysis, 8 out of 14 quality-of-care indicators showed an improvement from 2002 to 2004, but only 4 out of 14 reached

  10. Breast cancer survivorship and South Asian women: understanding about the follow-up care plan and perspectives and preferences for information post treatment

    PubMed Central

    Singh–Carlson, S.; Wong, F.; Martin, L.; Nguyen, S.K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives As more treatment options become available and supportive care improves, a larger number of people will survive after treatment for breast cancer. In the present study, we explored the experiences and concerns of female South Asian (sa) breast cancer survivors (bcss) from various age groups after treatment to determine their understanding of follow-up care and to better understand their preferences for a survivorship care plan (scp). Methods Patients were identified by name recognition from BC Cancer Agency records for sa patients who were 3–60 months post treatment, had no evidence of recurrence, and had been discharged from the cancer centre to follow-up. Three focus groups and eleven face-to-face semistructured interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, cross-checked for accuracy, and analyzed using thematic and content analysis. Participants were asked about their survivorship experiences and their preferences for the content and format of a scp. Results Fatigue, cognitive changes, fear of recurrence, and depression were the most universal effects after treatment. “Quiet acceptance” was the major theme unique to sa women, with a unique cross-influence between faith and acceptance. Emphasis on a generalized scp with individualized content echoed the wide variation in breast cancer impacts for sa women. Younger women preferred information on depression and peer support. Conclusions For sa bcss, many of the psychological and physical impacts of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment may be experienced in common with bcss of other ethnic backgrounds, but the present study also suggests the presence of unique cultural nuances such as spiritual and language-specific support resource needs. The results provide direction for designing key content and format of scps, and information about elements of care that can be customized to individual patient needs. PMID:23559888

  11. The impact of patient navigation on the delivery of diagnostic breast cancer care in the National Patient Navigation Research Program: a prospective meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Tracy A; Darnell, Julie S; Ko, Naomi; Snyder, Fred; Paskett, Electra D; Wells, Kristen J; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Griggs, Jennifer J; Karnad, Anand; Young, Heather; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Simon, Melissa A; Calhoun, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Patient navigation is emerging as a standard in breast cancer care delivery, yet multi-site data on the impact of navigation at reducing delays along the continuum of care are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of navigation on reaching diagnostic resolution at specific time points after an abnormal breast cancer screening test among a national sample. A prospective meta-analysis estimated the adjusted odds of achieving timely diagnostic resolution at 60, 180, and 365 days. Exploratory analyses were conducted on the pooled sample to identify which groups had the most benefit from navigation. Clinics from six medical centers serving vulnerable populations participated in the Patient Navigation Research Program. Women with an abnormal breast cancer screening test between 2007 and 2009 were included and received the patient navigation intervention or usual care. Patient navigators worked with patients and their care providers to address patient-specific barriers to care to prevent delays in diagnosis. A total of 4675 participants included predominantly racial/ethnic minorities (74 %) with public insurance (40 %) or no insurance (31 %). At 60 days and 180 days, there was no statistically significant effect of navigation on achieving timely diagnostic care, but a benefit of navigation was seen at 365 days (aOR 2.12, CI 1.36-3.29). We found an equal benefit of navigation across all groups, regardless of race/ethnicity, language, insurance status, and type of screening abnormality. Patient navigation resulted in more timely diagnostic resolution at 365 days among a diverse group of minority, low-income women with breast cancer screening abnormalities. Trial registrations clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00613275, NCT00496678, NCT00375024, NCT01569672. PMID:27432417

  12. Immunotherapy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmé, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment including immune cell infiltrates in breast cancer has long been recognized. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are prognostic and predictive; however, their prevalence as well as their prognostic and predictive power are subtype-dependent and appear most prominent in aggressive subtypes like triple-negative and HER2-positive disease. The immune responses observed in many cancers are attracted by tumor-associated antigens and, as suggested by recent research, by neoantigens - immunogenic antigens encoded for by non-synonymous mutations. The appealing promise of cancer vaccines has been pursued in breast cancer for over 2 decades; however, despite much effort having been put into vaccine trials, their clinical benefit, with the exception of some encouraging preliminary results, remains disappointing. The main hurdles compromising the efficacy of these vaccination strategies are the difficulties to generate broad and robust immune responses as well as to overcome immune escape mechanisms. The remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma and lung cancer has set the ground for a race in the clinical development of numerous agents targeting these immune escape mechanisms in many tumor entities. Early clinical data in metastatic breast cancer suggests at least some clinical activity. This review discusses the current status and future perspectives of immunotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27260697

  13. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  14. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk. PMID:24450034

  16. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated. PMID:12095951

  17. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  18. Surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dooley, W C

    1998-11-01

    Women with breast cancer today have many more therapeutic options available to them for their surgical therapy. Almost all patients with breast cancer have some options for breast conservation. Active patient involvement in analyzing and understanding the pros and cons of each of these options seems extremely important to the long-term emotional and psychological outcome of their breast cancer therapy. Several reports this year have reintroduced the issue of adequate local control. The common philosophy a decade ago was that because systematic therapy (adjuvant chemotherapy) was improving, local therapy would become of lesser importance. Several studies this year have indicated the extreme importance of local control in maximizing survival advantage because of the relationship of increasing local failure and deteriorating survival from systemic disease. Despite significant improvements in treatment, our screening and diagnostic approaches have still failed to identify the majority of lesions prior to the patient's own palpation of the tumor. Using new diagnostic modalities that do not involve surgery, the biopsy of lower probability lesions with great accuracy is expected to improve the efficacy of the current screening measures. Despite all the improvements, the most important therapeutic step in the management of breast cancer remains earlier diagnosis and earlier extirpation of the initial invasive focus of malignancy. PMID:9818228

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. DDT Exposure in Utero and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Krigbaum, Nickilou Y.; Yeh, Gregory; Park, June-Soo; Zimmermann, Lauren; Cirillo, Piera M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Currently no direct evidence links in utero dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure to human breast cancer. However, in utero exposure to another xenoestrogen, diethylstilbestrol, predicts an increased breast cancer risk. If this finding extends to DDT, it could have far-reaching consequences. Many women were heavily exposed in utero during widespread DDT use in the 1960s. They are now reaching the age of heightened breast cancer risk. DDT exposure persists and use continues in Africa and Asia without clear knowledge of the consequences for the next generation. Hypothesis: In utero exposure to DDT is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Design: This was a case-control study nested in a prospective 54-year follow-up of 9300 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort (n = 118 breast cancer cases, diagnosed by age 52 y and 354 controls matched on birth year). Setting and Participants: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members who received obstetric care in Alameda County, California, from 1959 to 1967, and their adult daughters participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure: Daughters' breast cancer diagnosed by age 52 years as of 2012 was measured. Results: Maternal o,p′-DDT predicted daughters' breast cancer (odds ratio fourth quartile vs first = 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5–9.0). Mothers' lipids, weight, race, age, and breast cancer history did not explain the findings. Conclusions: This prospective human study links measured DDT exposure in utero to risk of breast cancer. Experimental studies are essential to confirm results and discover causal mechanisms. Findings support classification of DDT as an endocrine disruptor, a predictor of breast cancer, and a marker of high risk. PMID:26079774

  1. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  2. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  3. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. [Breast cancer imaging].

    PubMed

    Canale, Sandra; Balleyguier, Corinne; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of breast cancer is multimodal. Mammography uses X-rays, the development of digital mammography has improved its quality and enabled implementations of new technologies such astomosynthesis (3D mammography) or contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Ultrasound is added to mammography when there is need to improve detection in high-density breast, to characterize an image, or guide apuncture or biopsy. Breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality. It detects a possible tumor angiogenesis by highlighting an early and intense contrast uptake. This method has an excellent negative predictive value, but its lack of specificity (false positives) can be problematic, thus it has to be prescribed according to published standards. An imaging breast screening report must be concluded by the BI-RADS lexicon classification of the ACR and recommendations about monitoring or histological verification. PMID:24579332

  5. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Is clinical breast examination important for breast cancer detection?

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, L.; Hogue, J.C.; Desbiens, C.; Poirier, B.; Poirier, E.; Boudreau, D.; Joyal, M.; Diorio, C.; Duchesne, N.; Chiquette, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening clinical breast examination (cbe) is controversial; the use of cbe is declining not only as a screening tool, but also as a diagnostic tool. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of cbe in breast cancer detection in a tertiary care centre for breast diseases. Methods This retrospective study of all breast cancers diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2010 at our centre categorized cases according to the mean of detection (cbe, mammography, or both). A cbe was considered “abnormal” in the presence of a mass, nipple discharge, skin or nipple retraction, edema, erythema, peau d’orange, or ulcers. Results During the study period, a complete dataset was available for 6333 treated primary breast cancers. Cancer types were ductal carcinoma in situ (15.3%), invasive ductal carcinoma (75.7%), invasive lobular carcinoma (9.0%), or others (2.2%). Of the 6333 cancers, 36.5% (n = 2312) were detected by mammography alone, 54.8% (n = 3470) by mammography and cbe, and 8.7% (n = 551) by physician-performed cbe alone (or 5.3% if considering ultrasonography). Invasive tumours diagnosed by cbe alone were more often triple-negative, her2-positive, node-positive, and larger than those diagnosed by mammography alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions A significant number of cancers would have been missed if cbe had not been performed. Compared with cancers detected by mammography alone, those detected by cbe had more aggressive features. Clinical breast examination is a very low-cost test that could improve the detection of breast cancer and could prompt breast ultrasonography in the case of a negative mammogram. PMID:27536182

  7. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  8. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically

  9. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease. PMID:27225883

  10. Topical Hyaluronic acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis after Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation (RT) compared with best supportive care. Materials and Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast RT to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel, on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast, and the control gel to the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of ≥grade 2 dermatitis. Results The study closed early based on a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed significantly higher rate of ≥grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel (61.5% [40/65] vs. 47.7% [31/65], P = 0.027). Only one patient developed grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than petrolatum gel at the end of RT (42% vs. 14%, P = 0.003). Conclusion We found no benefit from use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of grade ≥2 dermatitis after adjuvant RT for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop. PMID:22172912

  11. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study.

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. Screening and self examination for breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Austoker, J.

    1994-01-01

    Breast cancer is the major form of cancer in women, with nearly 30,000 new cases and over 15,000 deaths in the United Kingdom each year. Breast screening by mammography has been shown in randomised trials to reduce mortality from breast cancer in women aged 50 and over. An NHS breast screening programme has been in operation in the United Kingdom since 1988. Its aim is to reduce mortality from breast cancer by 25% in the population of women invited to be screened. The uptake of mammography among the eligible population may be the single most important determinant if the programme is to be effective. Primary care teams have an important part to play in encouraging women to attend for screening and in providing information, advice, and reassurance at all stages of the screening process. To date, routine breast self examination has not been shown to be an effective method of screening for breast cancer and should not therefore be promoted as a primary screening procedure. There is, however, a case to be made for women to become more "breast aware." PMID:8044097

  14. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  15. Breast cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rachetta, Eleonora; Osano, Silvia; Astegiano, Francesco; Martincich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Since several studies have demonstrated the inadequate diagnostic performance of mammography in high risk women, over the past two decades, different breast imaging tests have been evaluated as additional diagnostic methods to mammography, and the most relevant ones are the techniques that do not imply the use of X-rays, considering the young age of these patients and the higher radio-sensitivity. Breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has risen growing interest not only because of the absence of use of X-rays, but also because it provides morpho-functional features, which may depict biological characteristics of breast tissues, including invasive and in situ cancers. Different multicenter non-randomized prospective studies aimed to evaluate breast DCE-MRI as an integral part of surveillance programs, agreed about the evidence that in high risk women screening with DCE-MRI is more effective than either mammography and/or ultrasound. Moreover, this modality leads to the identifications of cancers at a more favorable stage, allowing a real advantage in terms of tumor size and nodal involvement. The medical community is evaluating to suggest DCE-MRI alone as screening modality in high-risk women, as it was reported that in these cases the sensitivity of MRI plus conventional imaging was not significantly higher than that of MRI alone. Breast MRI is now recommended as part of screening program for high risk women by both European and American guidelines. PMID:26924173

  16. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from a trained breast cancer survivor. Cancer Survivors Network : An online community of people with cancer and their loved ones that provides peer support through discussion boards, chat rooms and other ...

  17. [New targeted therapies in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Coussy, F; Teixeira, L; Giacchetti, S; Cuvier, C; Hocini, H; Espié, M

    2014-11-01

    Trastuzumab improves care of patients with HER2+ breast cancer and allows a major gain in terms of survival. T-DM1 and pertuzumab are two new treatments, which give very encouraging results in metastatic breast cancer. Their place in neo-adjuvant and adjuvant setting still remains to be defined. Bevacizumab have its place in metastatic breast cancer. In adjuvant setting, results are disappointing and in neo-adjuvant setting, we need more studies on subgroups, which can benefit more. Development of the PARP inhibitors was slowed down by recent negative results in metastatic breast cancer but studies continue with more targeted patient's. Finally, everolimus, inhibitor of mTOR, allows to by pass the hormono-resistance in metastatic phase. Its toxicity must be taken into account in particular in adjuvant setting. PMID:25442825

  18. Breast Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Lee, Jean H; Eubank, William B

    2009-10-01

    Whereas (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography has proven to be valuable for breast cancer diagnosis and response evaluation, it is likely that PET radiopharmaceuticals beyond FDG will contribute further to the understanding of breast cancer and thereby further direct breast cancer care. Increasingly specific and quantitative approaches will help direct treatment selection from an ever-expanding and increasing array of targeted breast cancer therapies. This article highlights 4 areas of ongoing research where preliminary patient results look promising: (1) tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, (2) drug delivery and transport, (3) tumor receptor imaging, and (4) early response evaluation. For each area, the biologic background is reviewed and early results are highlighted. PMID:27157306

  19. Reproduction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, Stefanos; Iatrakis, George; Navrozoglou, Iordanis

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women of developed countries, and as a result of new developments in breast cancer treatment, more women are cured after being diagnosed with this disease. It is important that fertility preservation strategies are addressed before chemotherapy, because chemotherapy may induce premature ovarian failure (depending on the woman's age, the drugs used, the dosage and duration of treatment). Among possible solutions are embryos or oocytes cryopreservation, ovarian tissue cryopreservation-freezing with a subsequent orthotopic and heterotopic autotransplantation, whole ovary cryopreservation, ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which inhibit ovarian follicular depletion induced by chemotherapeutic agents and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) after ovulation induction with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen. PMID:20170848

  20. When are breast cancer patients at highest risk of venous thromboembolism? A cohort study using English health care data

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alex J.; West, Joe; Card, Tim R.; Crooks, Colin; Kirwan, Cliona C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), particularly in the peridiagnosis period. However, no previous epidemiologic studies have investigated the relative impact of breast cancer treatments in a time-dependent manner. We aimed to determine the impact of breast cancer stage, biology, and treatment on the absolute and relative risks of VTE by using several recently linked data sources from England. Our cohort comprised 13 202 patients with breast cancer from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (linked to Hospital Episode Statistics and Cancer Registry data) diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 with follow-up continuing to the end of 2010. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine which demographic, treatment-related, and biological factors independently affected VTE risk. Women had an annual VTE incidence of 6% while receiving chemotherapy which was 10.8-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.2-14.4; absolute rate [AR], 59.6 per 1000 person-years) than that in women who did not receive chemotherapy. After surgery, the risk was significantly increased in the first month (hazard ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.4; AR, 23.5; reference group, no surgery), but the risk was not increased after the first month. Risk of VTE was noticeably higher in the 3 months after initiation of tamoxifen compared with the risk before therapy (HR, 5.5; 95% CI, 2.3-12.7; AR, 24.1); however, initiating therapy with aromatase inhibitors was not associated with VTE (HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5-1.4; AR, 28.3). In conclusion, women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer have a clinically important risk of VTE, whereas an increased risk of VTE immediately after endocrine therapy is restricted to tamoxifen. PMID:26574606

  1. When are breast cancer patients at highest risk of venous thromboembolism? A cohort study using English health care data.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alex J; West, Joe; Card, Tim R; Crooks, Colin; Kirwan, Cliona C; Grainge, Matthew J

    2016-02-18

    Patients with breast cancer are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), particularly in the peridiagnosis period. However, no previous epidemiologic studies have investigated the relative impact of breast cancer treatments in a time-dependent manner. We aimed to determine the impact of breast cancer stage, biology, and treatment on the absolute and relative risks of VTE by using several recently linked data sources from England. Our cohort comprised 13,202 patients with breast cancer from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (linked to Hospital Episode Statistics and Cancer Registry data) diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 with follow-up continuing to the end of 2010. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine which demographic, treatment-related, and biological factors independently affected VTE risk. Women had an annual VTE incidence of 6% while receiving chemotherapy which was 10.8-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.2-14.4; absolute rate [AR], 59.6 per 1000 person-years) than that in women who did not receive chemotherapy. After surgery, the risk was significantly increased in the first month (hazard ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.4; AR, 23.5; reference group, no surgery), but the risk was not increased after the first month. Risk of VTE was noticeably higher in the 3 months after initiation of tamoxifen compared with the risk before therapy (HR, 5.5; 95% CI, 2.3-12.7; AR, 24.1); however, initiating therapy with aromatase inhibitors was not associated with VTE (HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5-1.4; AR, 28.3). In conclusion, women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer have a clinically important risk of VTE, whereas an increased risk of VTE immediately after endocrine therapy is restricted to tamoxifen. PMID:26574606

  2. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Preventive Care and Evaluation of the Adolescent with a Breast Mass

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Yasmin

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents have little knowledge of preventive breast care or breast screening, yet exposures in youth influence the risk of future breast disease.Nipple piercing increases the risk of trauma and breast infection. Alcohol consumption, smoking, nutrition, obesity, reproductive factors, previous cancer and chest radiotherapy, family history of breast cancer or genetic mutation increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer is rare in adolescents and currently genetic testing is not recommended in those under 18 years, as medical surveillance is not usually recommended until around 25 years. Screening measures include clinical breast exam every 1 to 3 years, and breast self-awareness in healthy women from 20 years; and at least annual breast self examination, with annual clinical breast examination, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging in high-risk patients from 25 years. Breast ultrasound is used in diagnostic evaluation of breast masses in adolescents as mammography is less sensitive in young women. PMID:24872733

  4. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  6. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  7. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  9. Satisfaction with care among patients with non-metastatic breast cancer: development and first steps of validation of the REPERES-60 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Defossez, Gautier; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Ingrand, Isabelle; Gasquet, Isabelle; Sifer-Riviere, Lynda; Ingrand, Pierre; Salamon, Roger; Migeot, Virginie

    2007-01-01

    Background The care itinerary for cancer involves difficulties that occur in several different areas, whether in the diagnostic procedures, in surgery, or in adjuvant treatment. The aim of this work was to obtain a valid instrument measuring satisfaction among patients with breast cancer and exploring their care itinerary overall. Methods Development phase: Patient focus groups were implemented in two French regions in order to identify areas of satisfaction in relation to the different phases of care provision in breast cancer. On the basis of the literature and the themes and wordings derived from the focus groups, the patients identified several areas of satisfaction, which they found to be partially covered in an American satisfaction measure that has been validated in the French general population (the Consumer Satisfaction Survey in its French version, CSS-VF, 39 items). The patient focus groups suggested adaptation of certain dimensions of this instrument to the potential care providers (37 items) and produced 45 new items in six areas. Validation phase: Using a large sample of patients (cohort of 820 women with invasive non-metastatic breast cancer) approached one month after treatment, this phase selected items that were comprehensible (non-response rate < 10%), non-redundant (r < 0.80) and reproducible (test-retest conducted on a sub-sample of 166 patients). The dimensions were identified by factor analysis on the selected items. Divergent and discriminant validity were assessed (relationships with quality of life questionnaire, comparisons between extreme groups). Results Results were in favour of not inserting additional broken-down items into the CSS-VF and retaining 21 new items. The factor analysis found the initial structure of the CSS-VF (39 items in 9 dimensions) and the 21 new items divide up into four dimensions (listening abilities and information provided by doctors, organisation and follow-up of medical care provision, psychological support

  10. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  11. Managing Breast Cancer in the Older Patient

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Tracey; Shinde, Arvind; Doan, Caroline; Katheria, Vani; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated with aging, with almost one-half of all new breast cancer cases diagnosed annually in the United States occurring in women age 65 and older. Recent data suggest that although breast cancer outcomes in younger women have shown substantial improvement as a result of advances in treatment and screening, the benefits in older women have been less pronounced. Although older adults have been under-represented on cancer clinical trials there is an emerging body of literature to help guide treatment decisions. For early stage breast cancer, the discussion regarding treatment options involves balancing the reduction in risk of recurrence gained by specific therapies with the potential for increased treatment-related toxicity potentially exacerbated by physiological decline or comorbidities that often co-exist in the older population. A key component of care of the older adult is the recognition that chronologic age alone cannot guide the management of an older individual with breast cancer; rather, treatment decisions must also take into account an individual’s functional status, estimated life expectancy, the risks and benefits of the therapy, potential barriers to treatment, and patient preference. This article reviews the available evidence for therapeutic management of early-stage breast cancer in older adults, and highlights data from geriatric oncology literature that provides a basis on which to facilitate evidence-based treatment. PMID:24472802

  12. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  13. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Metastatic breast cancer with right ventricular erosion.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Han; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Wang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hsiang

    2016-03-01

    Cancer that has metastasized to the heart and pericardium has a dismal outcome. Individualized treatment to preserve the quality of life and reduce surgical mortality is important. We describe a 57-year old woman who had a recurrence of breast cancer 23 years after the initial complete treatment. Cardiac metastasis with poor anterior chest wall healing led to right ventricular rupture, which caused hypovolaemic shock. The right ventricular wall defect was repaired with a percutaneous patch and a myocutaneous flap without cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient was discharged home after intensive wound care. Our patient shows that even with complete initial treatment, clinicians should be alert for the recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:25890934

  17. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jepson, A S; Fentiman, I S

    1998-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, often with a late presentation and poor prognosis. The mainstay of treatment is modified radical mastectomy, with axillary node dissection to assess stage, prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. When matched for age, tumour size, grade and axillary nodal status, the prognosis is similar for males and females. Concerted efforts must be made to educate both the public and health professionals, in order to make earlier diagnoses and thereby improve prognosis. PMID:10622057

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  19. Girls' Attitudes toward Breast Care and Breast Self-Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadranyi, B. T.

    A study explored girls' emerging attitudes toward breast care and breast self-exam (BSE) and the extent to which girls had given thought to these issues. Analyses focused specifically on individual differences related to age, stage of breast development, perceived normalcy of breast development, and body image. The sample consisted of 43 white,…

  20. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  1. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, N.

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants’ ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants’ opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants’ responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  2. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  3. Tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elodia B; Pisano, Etta D

    2016-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional x-ray based breast imaging technology, has been available for clinical use in the United States since 2011. In this paper we review the literature on breast cancer screening with this new technology including where gaps in knowledge remain. PMID:26472036

  4. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  5. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  6. pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A.; Warner, E.

    2013-01-01

    Consider this scenario: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple’s relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman’s diagnosis. Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment? Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program—the first of its kind in Canada—for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

  7. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  8. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... what you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot control ... risk. Race . White women are diagnosed with breast cancer more often than African American/black, ... Can Control Risk factors you can control ...

  10. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  11. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

  13. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  15. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  16. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... men treated? Surgery for breast cancer in men Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men ... these may be used after surgery and/or radiation therapy. Regional recurrence: When breast cancer comes back in nearby lymph nodes (such as ...

  17. Breast Cancer Cause Beliefs: Chinese, Korean, and Mexican American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Patricia; Lim, Jung-Won; Wang-Letzkus, Ming; Flores, Katrina F.; Allen, Kristi M.; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined causal attribution beliefs about breast cancer and the influence that these beliefs exert on health behavior change among breast cancer survivors (BCS). Focus groups with Chinese (n = 21), Korean (n = 11), and Mexican American (n = 9) BCS recruited through community- and hospital-based support groups were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and translated into English for thematic content analysis. Three themes concerning beliefs about breast cancer cause common to all three groups included (a) stress, (b) diet, and (c) fatalism. Causal beliefs corresponded to behavioral changes with women describing efforts to improve their diet and manage their stress. Ethnic minority BCS adhere to beliefs about what caused their cancer that influence their health behaviors. Providing quality health care to ethnically diverse cancer survivors requires cultural sensitivity to patients’ beliefs about the causes of their cancer and awareness of how beliefs influence patients’ health behaviors post diagnosis. PMID:25001237

  18. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  19. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  20. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  2. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. Symptom Management in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, William; Muss, Hyman B.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 40,000 women die as a result of breast cancer each year and many more live with advanced disease. When breast cancer recurs, the goals of treatment often shift from one of cure to controlling the disease for as long as possible while palliating symptoms interfering with the patient's functional status and quality of life. This requires ongoing discussions with the patient and family about the goals of care. Many symptoms depend on the site of metastasis, with bone being the most frequent, and commonly occur with fatigue, depression, insomnia, and pain. The purpose of this paper is to identify and provide an overview of the management of the most common symptoms in patients with breast cancer metastases. PMID:21880861

  5. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ottini, Laura; Palli, Domenico; Rizzo, Sergio; Federico, Mario; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Male breast cancer (MaleBC) is a rare disease, accounting for <1% of all male tumors. During the last few years, there has been an increase in the incidence of this disease, along with the increase in female breast cancer (FBC). Little is known about the etiology of MaleBC: hormonal, environmental and genetic factors have been reported to be involved in its pathogenesis. Major risk factors include clinical disorders carrying hormonal imbalances, radiation exposure and, in particular, a positive family history (FH) for BC, the latter suggestive of genetic susceptibility. Rare mutations in high-penetrance genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) confer a high risk of BC development; low-penetrance gene mutations (i.e. CHEK-2) are more common but involve a lower risk increase. About 90% of all male breast tumors have proved to be invasive ductal carcinomas, expressing high levels of hormone receptors with evident therapeutic returns. The most common clinical sign of BC onset in men is a painless palpable retroareolar lump, which should be evaluated by means of mammography, ultrasonography and core biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA). To date, there are no published data from prospective randomized trials supporting a specific therapeutic approach in MaleBC. Tumor size together with the number of axillary nodes involved are the main prognostic factors and should guide the treatment choice. Locoregional approaches include surgery and radiotherapy (RT), depending upon the initial clinical presentation. When systemic treatment (adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic) is delivered, the choice between hormonal and or chemotherapy (CT) should depend upon the clinical and biological features, according to the FBC management guidelines. However great caution is required because of high rates of age-related comorbidities. PMID:19427229

  6. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  7. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  8. Psychiatric aspects of women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Elisabeth J Shakin; Chen, Emmie I

    2003-09-01

    Women with breast cancer face not only cancer-related taboos but also issues related to changes in sexuality, femininity, and fertility. Although increased emphasis on the woman's participation in the medical decision-making process has afforded her more treatment options, it also gives her more responsibility in determining her course of treatment through the continuum of cancer care. Patients must deal with a variety of issues related to social reintegration, long-term effects of cancer treatment, employment, disability, sexuality, family, and social networks. Screening for distress related to psychological, spiritual/religious, or social concerns can provide guidance for service delivery to those in need. PMID:14563105

  9. Breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Chase, Margot E; Lin, Kant Y; Long, William B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report on breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics is to review the evidence for the efficacy of surveillance for early detection, bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy, and chemoprevention in preventing breast cancer and improving survival of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. This collective review highlights radiologic screening of patients with this genetic predisposition for cancer as well as discusses cancer risk reduction strategies and reproductive concerns in female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. It has now been well documented that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has a higher sensitivity than mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer in patients predisposed to breast cancer. We also emphasize that a new diagnostic device, molecular breast imaging (MBI), is now available and may be as sensitive as MRI. To date, this exciting technology, MBI, has not been used in studies of patients with BRCA1/2 genes. We also discuss in more detail the unique psychological ramifications of female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. These women face unique choices regarding management of their high risk for breast and ovarian cancer that impact their reproductive options. Despite their high levels of concern, few female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers consider assisted reproduction technologies such as pregnancy surrogate, cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos, or implantation genetic diagnosis to select embryos without BCRA1/2 mutation. Further research must be undertaken to explore the risk management of patients with inherited cancer predisposition and to incorporate these preferences into clinical care. PMID:19105530

  10. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  11. Is Distance to Provider a Barrier to Care for Medicaid Patients with Breast, Colorectal, or Lung Cancer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoggins, John F.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Donahue, Sara M. A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Blough, David K.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distance to provider might be an important barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients who qualify for Medicaid coverage. Whether driving time or driving distance is a better indicator of travel burden is also of interest. Methods: Driving distances and times from patient residence to primary care provider were…

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  13. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  16. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  17. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  18. Standard of Care and Controversies in the Adjuvant Endocrine Treatment of Hormone-Responsive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschlag, Dirk O.; Maass, Nicolai; Schem, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hormone-responsive early breast cancer is a highly curable disease. In premenopausal women, tamoxifen (TAM) is still the standard treatment. Nowadays, up to 10 years of TAM can be safely administered, especially in women who remain premenopausal. Patients who are considered to be perimenopausal should be initially treated like premenopausal patients. Depending on their serum hormone levels, these patients can be safely switched to an aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy once the estradiol (E2) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels prove the established postmenopausal status. In postmenopausal women, several sequences of endocrine treatment are available. The AI therapy can be induced upfront or sequentially by switching from Tam to AI and vice versa. Extended endocrine therapy, by adding up to 5 years of letrozole after 5 years of TAM, has also been proven to be beneficial in certain patient subgroups. Genotyping of cytochromes such as CYP2D6 did not have any added value in identifying patients who are at higher risk of recurrence. Nevertheless, in all patients the side effects need to be given high consideration. New strategies developed to overcome endocrine resistance are tested in clinical studies. New co-administered drugs such as specific inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Src, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) do improve endocrine responsiveness in metastatic disease and will eventually be introduced in the treatment of early breast cancer. PMID:25404889

  19. An update on breast cancer screening and prevention.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Maria Syl D; Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard C

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this article is to provide clinical guidance on breast cancer screening and prevention in primary care. The discussion highlights the importance of risk assessment, including screening options and risk-reduction strategies, for women at average and high risk. We review recommendations for breast cancer screening, evaluate current evidence on primary prevention, examine current practice patterns, and consider the impact of recent changes within health care. PMID:24830609

  20. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family ... Risk factors you cannot control includes: Age . Your risk for breast cancer increases as you age. Most cancers are found in ...

  1. A Five-year Follow-up of Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer in Anthroposophic and Conventional Care

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Marianne; Arman, Maria; Backman, Marie; Flatters, Ursula; Hatschek, Thomas; Hamrin, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is used by many cancer patients in most parts of the world, and its use is increasing. The aim of the present study was to examine, over 5 years, the perceived quality of life/life satisfaction in two samples of women with breast cancer who were treated with anthroposophic care or conventional medical treatment only. Data from admission, after 1 year and after 5 years are used for the comparisons. On admission to the study the women in anthroposophic care perceived their quality of life to be lower than that of the women in the conventional treatment group, especially for emotional, cognitive and social functioning and overall quality of life. Sixty women who actively chose treatment with anthroposophic medicine and 60 individually matched women treated with conventional medicine participated. Quality of life was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire. Twenty-six women within anthroposophic care and 31 women within conventional medicine survived the 5 years. Effect size (ES) estimation favored the anthroposophic group in seven of the subscales mostly measuring emotional functioning. The ES for four of the subscales favored the conventional treatment group, mostly concerning physical functioning. After 5 years there were improvements in overall quality of life and in emotional and social functioning compared to admission for the women in anthroposophic care. The improvements took place between admission and 1 year, but not further on. Only minor improvements were found in the matching group. PMID:17173117

  2. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  3. Evaluation of oral care to prevent oral mucositis in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with everolimus (Oral Care-BC): randomized controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Naoki; Ota, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Naoki; Naito, Mariko; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Yamashita, Toshinari; Mukai, Hirofumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    This is a randomized, multi-center, open-label, phase III study to evaluate the efficacy of professional oral care in preventing oral mucositis induced by everolimus in postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients will be randomized into professional oral care and control groups (1:1 ratio). All patients will receive everolimus with exemestane and will continue everolimus until disease progression. In the professional oral care group, patients will receive teeth surface cleaning, scaling and tongue cleaning before starting everolimus, and will continue to receive professional oral care weekly from oral surgeons throughout the 8 week treatment. In the control group, patients will brush their own teeth and gargle with 0.9% sodium chloride solution or water. The primary endpoint is the incidence of all grades of oral mucositis. Target accrual is 200 patients with a two-sided type I error rate of 5% and 80% power to detect 25% risk reduction. PMID:27365521

  4. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  5. Lifestyle in Iranian Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Robabeh; Janbabai, Ghasem; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the most commonly diagnosed cancers is breast cancer that leads to mortality and morbidity among Iranian women. Behavioural risk factors, such as common lifestyle patterns are often associated with risk of breast cancer incidence. Aim This study aimed to investigate lifestyle of breast cancer patients admitted to Cancer Research Center of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using convenient sampling method. Sample size consisted of 150 cancer patients, and data collection tool included a researcher-made questionnaire on dimensions of lifestyle containing four dimensions of self-care, exercise and physical activity, diet and coping with stress. Maximum score in different dimensions, based on 100% of marks earned, was evaluated in three categories of undesirable, relatively desirable and desirable. Data were analysed with SPSS-19 software using descriptive statistics (relative and absolute frequencies, mean and standard deviation). Results In total of 150 women, the mean age of patients was 51.9 ± 1.04 (27-78). The majority of participants were married, housewives, with high school education. Among the four parts of healthy lifestyle, desirable level of physical activity and exercise had the least participants, and in the dimensions of physical activity and exercise, the lowest level related to walking, followed by daily exercise. Most of the participants had undesirable level of self-care and lowest frequency related to mammography after 40-year-old, followed by annual check-up and Pap-smear. With regard to nutrition, most of them were at desirable level. Conclusion The results indicated undesirable levels in two lifestyle dimensions (self-care and physical activity and exercise) in the majority of participants for a year before contracting breast cancer. Primary prevention programs should be implemented with a comprehensive approach, thus, effective strategies are

  6. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  7. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  8. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  9. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  10. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  11. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  12. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Lipofilling in breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Visnu; Rietjens, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Recently, lipofilling is being performed either as a part of oncoplastic technique or alone by itself for correction of defects and asymmetry after oncologic breast cancer surgery. Its efficacy, safety and technical procedures are varying among institutions and individual surgeon’s experiences. We provide a literature review and view point focus on this novel technique which emphasize on the application on breast cancer reconstruction. PMID:25083450

  14. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  15. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  16. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  17. Patterns of Care in the Administration of Neo-adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer. A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Vugts, Guusje; Maaskant-Braat, Adriana J G; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Roumen, Rudi M H; Luiten, Ernest J T; Voogd, Adri C

    2016-05-01

    Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is used to facilitate radical surgery for initially irresectable or locally advanced breast cancer. The indication for NAC has been extended to clinically node negative (cN0) patients in whom adjuvant systemic therapy is foreseen. A population-based study was conducted to evaluate the increasing use of NAC, breast conserving surgery (BCS) after NAC and timing of the sentinel node biopsy (SNB). All female breast cancer patients, treated in 10 hospitals in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry area in the Netherlands between January 2003 and June 2012 were included (N = 18,427). In total, 1,402 patients (7.6%) received NAC. The administration increased from 2.5% in 2003 to 13.0% in 2011 (p < 0.001). Use of NAC increased from 0.5% to 2.3% for cT1 tumors, from 2.8% to 27.0% for cT2, from 30.6% to 70.9% for cT3, and from 40.5% to 58.1% for cT4 tumors (p < 0.001). In cN0 patients, use of NAC increased from 1.0% to 4.4% and in clinically node positive patients from 12.0% to 57.5% (p < 0.001). Downsizing of the tumor and BCS are achieved increasingly. In 2011, in three hospitals NAC was administered in <10% of patients, in five hospitals in 10-15% and in two hospitals the proportion of patients receiving NAC was >20% (p < 0.001). Of the 1,402 patients with NAC, 495 patients underwent SNB, 91.5% of whom prior to NAC. In the Netherlands up to one in eight patients receive NAC. The administration of NAC and the percentage of BCS increased over the past decade, especially in cT2 tumors. Considerable hospital variation in the administration of NAC exists. PMID:26945566

  18. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    PubMed Central

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  19. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  20. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  1. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women’s health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program’s acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p<0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  2. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  3. Improving the management of people with a family history of breast cancer in primary care: before and after study of audit-based education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In England, guidance from National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) states women with a family history of breast cancer presenting to primary care should be reassured or referred. We reviewed the evidence for interventions that might be applied in primary care and conducted an audit of whether low risk women are correctly advised and flagged. Methods We conducted a literature review to identify modifiable risk factors. We extracted routinely collected data from the computerised medical record systems of 6 general practices (population approximately 30,000); of the variables identified in the guidance. We implemented a quality improvement (QI) intervention called audit-based education (ABE) comparing participant practices with guidelines and each other before and after; we report odds ratios (OR) of any change in data recording. Results The review revealed evidence for advising on: diet, weight control, physical exercise, and alcohol. The proportion of patients with recordings of family history of: disease, neoplasms, and breast cancer were: 39.3%, 5.1% and 1.3% respectively. There was no significant change in the recording of family history of disease or cancer; OR 1.02 (95% CI 0.98-1.06); and 1.08 (95% CI 0.99-1.17) respectively. Recording of alcohol consumption and smoking both increased significantly; OR 1.36 (95% CI 1.30-1.43); and 1.42 (95% CI 1.27-1.60) respectively. Recording lifestyle advice fell; OR 0.84 (95% CI 0.81-0.88). Conclusions The study informs about current data recording and willingness to engage in ABE. Recording of risk factors improved after the intervention. Further QI is needed to achieve adherence to current guidance. PMID:23879178

  4. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  5. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  6. Adjuvant systemic therapy in older women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Julieta; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is an increasing clinical problem. In addition, ~60% of deaths from breast cancer occur in women aged 65 years and older. Despite this, older women with breast cancer have been underrepresented in clinical trials, and this has led to less than optimal evidence to guide their therapy. The management of elderly women with early breast cancer is a complex process that requires careful evaluation of life expectancy, comorbidities, patient values, and risks and benefits of available treatment options. This review will focus on current adjuvant systemic therapy options for older women with breast cancer, discuss the principles in the decision-making process, and define the role of endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted agents. PMID:27524919

  7. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  8. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Open Portals For Patients and Survivors For ...

  9. A model to optimize public health care and downstage breast cancer in limited-resource populations in southern Brazil. (Porto Alegre Breast Health Intervention Cohort)

    PubMed Central

    Caleffi, Maira; Ribeiro, Rodrigo A; Filho, Dakir L Duarte; Ashton-Prolla, Patrícia; Bedin, Ademar J; Skonieski, Giovana P; Zignani, Juliana M; Giacomazzi, Juliana; Franco, Luciane R; Graudenz, Márcia; Pohlmann, Paula; Fernandes, Jefferson G; Kivitz, Philip; Weber, Bernardete

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is a major public health problem, with rising incidence in many regions of the globe. Although mortality has recently dropped in developed countries, death rates are still increasing in some developing countries, as seen in Brazil. Among the reasons for this phenomenon are the lack of structured screening programs, a long waiting period between diagnosis and treatment, and lack of access to health services for a large proportion of the Brazilian population. Methods and design Since 2004, an intervention study in a cohort of women in Southern Brazil, denominated Porto Alegre Breast Health Intervention Cohort, is being conducted in order to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a model for BC early detection and treatment. In this study, over 4,000 women from underserved communities aged 40 to 69 years are being screened annually with mammography and clinical breast examination performed by a multidisciplinary team, which also involves nutritional counseling and genetic cancer risk assessment. Risk factors for BC development are also being evaluated. Active search of participants by lay community health workers is one of the major features of our program. The accrual of new participants was concluded in 2006 and the study will last for 10 years. The main goal of the study is to demonstrate significant downstaging of BC in an underserved population through proper screening, attaining a higher rate of early-stage BC diagnoses than usually seen in women diagnosed in the Brazilian Public Health System. Preliminary results show a very high BC incidence in this population (117 cases per 100,000 women per year), despite a low prevalence of classical risk factors. Discussion This study will allow us to test a model of BC early diagnosis and treatment and evaluate its cost-effectiveness in a developing country where the mortality associated with this disease is very high. Also, it might contribute to the evaluation of risk factors in a

  10. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  11. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. PMID:26834104

  12. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  13. Breast cancer screening interventions for Arabic women: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Hwang, Jasmine

    2015-06-01

    Similar to other Middle Eastern countries, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Qatar with increasing incidence and mortality rates. High mortality rates of breast cancer in the Middle Eastern countries are primarily due to delayed diagnosis of the disease. Thus screening and early detection of breast cancer are important in reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. With the aim of updating knowledge on existing interventions and developing effective intervention programs to promote breast cancer screening in Arabic populations in Qatar, this review addresses the question: What interventions are effective in increasing breast cancer knowledge and breast cancer screening rates in Arabic populations in Arabic countries and North America? Systematic literature review was performed to answer the proposed question. As the result of the search, six research studies were identified and appraised. From the findings, we infer several insights: (a) a language-appropriate and culturally sensitive educational program is the most important component of a successful intervention regardless of the study setting, (b) multi-level interventions that target both women, men, health care professionals, and/or larger health care system are more likely to be successful than single educational interventions or public awareness campaigns, and (c) more vigorous, personal and cognitive interventions that address psychosocial factors are likely to be more effective than less personal and informative interventions. This review has important implications for health care providers, intervention planners, and researchers. PMID:23975014

  14. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  15. Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  16. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Lipid biology of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

  18. Medical Prevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, Johannes; Dieterich, Max; Gerber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Western Europe and North America. Effective strategies of medical prevention could reduce the burden of breast cancer mortality. The best evidence for a risk reduction exists for hormonal agents such as tamoxifen and raloxifene (22–72%) or aromatase inhibitors (50–65%). However, the severity of side effects and the lack of evidence for an improved survival compromise the risk/benefit balance. In this review the results of chemoprevention studies, including new treatment approaches, are summarized with critical discussion of their use in clinical practice. PMID:25759621

  19. Management of older women with early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Punglia, Rinaa S; Hughes, Kevin S; Muss, Hyman B

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease of aging. The average age at diagnosis is 61, and the majority of deaths occur after age 65. Caring for older women with breast cancer is a major challenge, as many have coexisting illness that can preclude optimal breast cancer treatment and which frequently have greater effect than the breast cancer itself. Older patients with cancer should be screened or have a brief geriatric assessment to detect potentially remediable problems not usually assessed by oncologists (e.g., self-care, falls, social support, nutrition). Older women with early-stage breast cancer should be treated initially with surgery unless they have an exceedingly short life expectancy. Primary endocrine therapy should be considered for patients who have hormone receptor-positive tumors and a very short life expectancy, an acute illness that delays surgery, or tumors that need to be downstaged to be resectable. Sentinel node biopsy should be considered for patients in whom it might affect treatment decisions. Breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery may be omitted for selected older women, especially for those with hormone receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer that are compliant with adjuvant endocrine therapy. The majority of older women with stage I and II breast cancer have hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative tumors, and endocrine therapy provides them with optimal systemic treatment. If these patients have life expectancies exceeding at least 5 years, they should be considered for genetic assays to determine the potential value of chemotherapy. Partnering care with geriatricians or primary care physicians trained in geriatrics should be considered for all vulnerable and frail older patients. PMID:25993142

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  3. Inflammatory breast cancer: unique biological and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A

    2015-11-01

    Through the concerted efforts of many patients, health-care providers, legislators, and other supporters, the past decade has seen the development of the first clinics dedicated to the care of patients with inflammatory breast cancer in the USA and other countries. Together with social networking, advocacy, and education, a few specialised centres have had substantial increases in patient numbers (in some cases ten times higher), which has further expanded the community of science and advocacy and increased the understanding of the disease process. Although inflammatory breast cancer is considered rare, constituting only 2-4% of breast cancer cases, poor prognosis means that patients with the disease account for roughly 10% of breast cancer mortality annually in the USA. I propose that the unique presentation of inflammatory breast cancer might require specific, identifiable changes in the breast parenchyma that occur before the tumour-initiating event. This would make the breast tissue itself a tumour-promoting medium that should be treated as a component of the pathology in multidisciplinary treatment and should be further studied for complementary targets to inhibit the pathobiology that is specific to inflammatory breast cancer. PMID:26545845

  4. Breast cancer prevention and control programs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dahlui, Maznah; Ramli, Sofea; Bulgiba, Awang M

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Malaysian females. The National Cancer Registry in 2003 and 2006 reported that the age standardized incidence of breast cancer was 46.2 and 39.3 per 100,000 populations, respectively. With the cumulative risk at 5.0; a woman in Malaysia had a 1 in 20 chance of developing breast cancer in her lifetime. The incidence of cancer in general, and for breast cancer specifically was highest in the Chinese, followed by Indians and Malays. Most of the patients with breast cancers presented at late stages (stage I: 15.45%, stage II: 46.9%, stage III: 22.2% and stage IV: 15.5%). The Healthy Lifestyles Campaign which started in the early nineties had created awareness on breast cancer and after a decade the effort was enhanced with the Breast Health Awareness program to promote breast self examination (BSE) to all women, to perform annual clinical breast examination (CBE) on women above 40 and mammogram on women above 50. The National Health Morbidity Survey in 2006 showed that the prevalence rate of 70.35% by any of three methods of breast screening; 57.1% by BSE, 51.8% by CBE and 7.6% by mammogram. The current screening policy for breast cancer focuses on CBE whereby all women at the age of 20 years and above must undergo breast examination by trained health care providers every 3 years for age between 20-39 years, and annually for age 40 and above. Several breast cancer preventive programs had been developed by various ministries in Malaysia; among which are the RM50 subsidy for mammogram by the Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development and the SIPPS program (a call-recall system for women to do PAP smear and CBE) by the Ministry of Health. Measures to increase uptake of breast cancer screening and factors as to why women with breast cancer present late should be studied to assist in more development of policy on the prevention of breast cancer in Malaysia. PMID:22126511

  5. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  6. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... States Preventive Services Task Force updated recommendations on breast cancer screening, suggesting that women ages 50 to 74 ...

  7. Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  8. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  9. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  10. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk On This Page Is there a relationship between pregnancy and breast cancer risk? Are any pregnancy-related factors associated with ...

  11. Breast Cancer: Match of Her Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer The Match of Her Life Past Issues / Spring - ... Martina Navratilova stays strong in her battle against breast cancer and her work to help Americans live healthier, ...

  12. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Breast Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New ...

  13. Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159781.html Why Breast Cancer Survivors Should Exercise Moderate physical activity can ease ... Excessive stress can lead to memory problems among breast cancer survivors, but exercise can help, according to new ...

  14. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... the Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In ...

  15. Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159762.html Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs Adaptive study design allows researchers to match ... provide a fighting chance for women with advanced breast cancer. The drugs, neratinib and veliparib, both appear effective ...

  16. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  17. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  18. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  19. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  20. Alcohol and risk of breast cancer in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Jeannette M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Livaudais, Jennifer; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Romieu, Isabelle; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the relationship between alcohol intake and breast cancer risk among Mexican women. This association may be modified by folate and Vitamin B12. METHODS A population-based case control study conducted in Mexico recruited 1000 incident breast cancer cases aged 35–69 and 1074 controls matched on age, region, and health care system. In-person interviews were conducted to assess breast cancer risk factors and recent diet using a food frequency questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Over one-half (57%) of cases and less than one-half of controls (45%) reported any lifetime alcohol consumption. Compared with never drinkers, women reporting ever drinking (Adjusted OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.99–1.58) had a greater odds of breast cancer. There was evidence for interaction in the association between ever consuming any alcohol and breast cancer by folate (p for interaction=0.04) suggesting women with lower folate intake had a higher odds of breast cancer (Adjusted OR=1.99, 95% CI= 1.26–3.16) compared to women with higher folate intake (OR=1.12, 95% CI = 0.69–1.83). CONCLUSIONS Our findings support emerging evidence that any alcohol intake increases risk of breast cancer. Insufficient intake of folate may further elevate risk for developing breast cancer among women who consume alcohol. PMID:20155314

  1. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science.

    PubMed

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C; Neuman, Heather B

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women's health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  2. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    PubMed Central

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  3. Breaking the silence: breast cancer knowledge and beliefs among Somali Muslim women in Seattle, Washington.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Samia; Cañas, Jordan; Hohl, Sarah D; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Thompson, Beti

    2015-01-01

    We elicited the perspectives of Somali women in Seattle, Washington, about breast cancer. We conducted a focus group of 14 Somali immigrant women at a community center in Seattle, Washington. Participants reported barriers to seeking cancer screening, including fear of pain, difficulty with transport, and lack of knowledge. Participants explained that Somali women tended not to discuss breast cancer or breast cancer screening, and said religion played a central role in their care and treatment decisions and coping mechanisms. If such barriers are addressed, fewer women may present with late-stage breast cancer, resulting in greater chances for long-term breast cancer survival. PMID:24351062

  4. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  5. Ownership of Uncertainty: Health Care Professionals counselling and treating women from hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families who receive an inconclusive BRCA1/2 genetic test result

    PubMed Central

    Kenen, Regina; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Lynch, Elly; Eeles, Rosalind

    2011-01-01

    AIM To understand more fully how health care professionals deal with the uncertainty intrinsic in counselling and treating women from hereditary breast/ovarian cancer(HBOC) families who receive inconclusive BRCA1/2 genetic test results (genetic tests which do not find a mutation to account for the family history). METHODS We conducted a small, qualitative, exploratory study using open -ended semi structured interviews of 12 geneticists, genetic counsellor/nurses, oncologists, gynaecologists and breast surgeons at a major UK cancer centre. We asked questions about; how these professionals dealt with the large amount of uncertainty raised by an inconclusive result, communicated the uncertainty involved and their feelings about presenting medical management options based on information fraught with uncertainty, the role of the media, differences in perspectives by specialty and personal feelings about the uncertainty. RESULTS Based on themes generated by the data, we proposed the concept “Ownership of Uncertainty” (sole, shared, diffused, normalised, transferred) to explain how the professionals in this study dealt with this high degree of uncertainty. A shared ownership of uncertainty was the dominant model during the presentation of information given by the professionals as part of their consultation with their patients. However, the final decision for management was left primarily to the woman seeking advice; even though several of the professionals reported feeling uneasy about this. CONCLUSION The concept “Ownership of Uncertainty helps advance the understanding of how health care professionals deal with the uncertainty intrinsic to an inconclusive BRCA1/2 genetic test result within the current social context. PMID:21254913

  6. Individual, Area, and Provider Characteristics Associated With Care Received for Stages I to III Breast Cancer in a Multistate Region of Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Camacho, Fabian; Mackley, Heath B.; Kern, Teresa; Yao, Nengliang; Matthews, Stephen A.; Fleming, Steven; Lipscomb, Joseph; Liao, Jason; Hwang, Wenke; Anderson, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We describe individual, area, and provider characteristics associated with care patterns for early-stage breast cancer in Appalachian counties of Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Methods: Cases of stages I to III breast cancer from 2006 to 2008 were linked to Medicare claims occurring within 1 year of diagnosis. Rates of guideline-concordant endocrine therapy (n = 1,429), chemotherapy (n = 1,480), and radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery were studied; RT was studied in women age ≥ 70 years with stage I estrogen receptor (ER) –positive/progesterone receptor (PR) –positive cancer, for whom RT was optional (n = 1,108), and in all others, for whom RT was guideline concordant (n = 1,422). Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed. Independent variables included age, race, county-level economic status, state, surgeon graduation year and volume, comorbidity, diagnosis year, Medicaid/Medicare dual status, histology, tumor size, tumor sequence, positive lymph nodes, ER/PR status, stage, trastuzumab use, and surgery type. Results: Population mean age was 74 years; 97% were white. For endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and RT, guideline concordance was 76%, 48%, and 83%, respectively. Where it was optional, 77% received RT. Guideline-concordant endocrine therapy was lower in North Carolina versus Pennsylvania (odds ratio [OR], 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.88) and higher if surgeon graduated between 1984 and 1988 versus ≥ 1989 (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.34). Guideline-concordant chemotherapy varied significantly by state, county-level economic status, and surgeon volume. In guideline-concordant RT, lower surgeon volume (v highest) predicted RT use (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.36). In optional RT, North Carolina residence (v Pennsylvania; OR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.48) and counties with higher economic status (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.94) predicated RT omission. Conclusion: Notable variation in care by geographic

  7. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  8. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  9. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-20

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Educating women about breast cancer. An intervention for women with a family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Ellen; Carroll, June C.; Heisey, Ruth E.; Goel, Vivek; Meschino, Wendy S.; Lickley, H. Lavina A.; Doan, Brian D.; Chart, Pamela L.; Orr, Vanessa; Lothian, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an "information aid" for women with a family history of breast cancer. DESIGN: Before-after descriptive study. SETTING: Family practices in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 405 randomly selected Ontario physician members of the College of Family Physician's of Canada's National Research System, 97 agreed to participate and to recruit three consecutive female patients with any family history of breast cancer. INTERVENTIONS: Patients completed a baseline questionnaire and, after reviewing the information aid, a satisfaction questionnaire. Four weeks later, they completed a third questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient satisfaction, knowledge, worries related to breast cancer, risk perception, and attitudes toward screening. RESULTS: Of 203 patients recruited, 160 (79%) completed all three questionnaires. The information aid was rated excellent or very good by 91% of the women; 99% would recommend it to other women. Knowledge improved significantly; worry about breast cancer did not increase. CONCLUSION: The information aid is a useful resource for women and primary care physicians and could facilitate appropriate risk assessment and management of women with a family history of breast cancer. PMID:12602843

  15. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  16. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  17. [Cancer in ectopic breast tissue].

    PubMed

    Røikjer, Johan; Lindmark, Ida; Knudsen, Thor

    2015-06-15

    Two different forms of ectopic breast tissue exist in human beings: supernumerary and aberrant. Both forms are usually seen alongside the milk lines, which extend from the upper limbs to the inguinal region where they give rise to mammary glands, areolas and nipples. Although ectopic- and orthotopic breast tissue are placed in different areas of the body, they still share the same ability to undergo pathological degeneration. The focus of this case report is to shed light on this unusual form of breast cancer, and raise the level of awareness in cases with lumps located in the milk lines. PMID:26101129

  18. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  20. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  1. Denosumab in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan C; van der Padt, Annemieke; Sleijfer, Stefan; Jager, Agnes

    2013-10-01

    The bone is the most common site to which breast cancer metastasises. Recently, denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) has been developed as a new targeted bone therapy. In a large randomized phase III study with a head-to-head comparison of denosumab to zoledronic acid in patients with bone metastases of breast cancer, denosumab significantly delayed the time to first skeletal related event. In the adjuvant setting denosumab significantly increased bone mineral density compared to placebo in a phase III study in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors. Preclinical data suggest an effect of denosumab on tumour growth and even on carcinogenesis. This review describes the current indications for denosumab in the various settings of breast cancer treatment, with special attention for efficacy, short and long term toxicity and other relevant issues for clinical practice. Furthermore possible and necessary future research questions are proposed. PMID:23545361

  2. Spontaneous regression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lewison, E F

    1976-11-01

    The dramatic but rare regression of a verified case of breast cancer in the absence of adequate, accepted, or conventional treatment has been observed and documented by clinicians over the course of many years. In my practice limited to diseases of the breast, over the past 25 years I have observed 12 patients with a unique and unusual clinical course valid enough to be regarded as spontaneous regression of breast cancer. These 12 patients, with clinically confirmed breast cancer, had temporary arrest or partial remission of their disease in the absence of complete or adequate treatment. In most of these cases, spontaneous regression could not be equated ultimately with permanent cure. Three of these case histories are summarized, and patient characteristics of pertinent clinical interest in the remaining case histories are presented and discussed. Despite widespread doubt and skepticism, there is ample clinical evidence to confirm the fact that spontaneous regression of breast cancer is a rare phenomenon but is real and does occur. PMID:799758

  3. Towards an optimal multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer treatment for older women.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Nemica; Menjak, Ines; Trudeau, Maureen; Mehta, Rajin; Wright, Frances; Leahey, Angela; Ellis, Janet; Gallagher, Damian; Moore, Jennifer; Bristow, Bonnie; Kay, Noreen; Szumacher, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer presents specifc concerns that are unique to the needs of older female patients. While treatment of early breast cancer does not vary greatly with age, the optimal management of older women with breast cancer often requires complex interdisciplinary supportive care due to multiple comorbidities. This article reviews optimal approaches to breast cancer in women 65 years and older from an interdisciplinary perspective. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE, choosing articles concentrated on the management of older breast cancer patients from the point of view of several disciplines, including geriatrics, radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, psychooncology, palliative care, nursing, and social work. This patient population requires interprofessional collaboration from the time of diagnosis, throughout treatment and into the recovery period. Thus, we recommend an interdisciplinary program dedicated to the treat ment of older women with breast cancer to optimize their cancer care. PMID:26897863

  4. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  5. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  6. Breast cancer. Selected legal issues.

    PubMed

    Wynstra, N A

    1994-07-01

    Several legal and ethical issues may arise during the course of screening for and diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Among the most active legal areas are reimbursement for therapies deemed experimental by certain insurance companies, such as high dose chemotherapy/autologous bone marrow transplantation (HDCT/ABMT) and off-label drug use; these reimbursement issues are discussed. Legal issues in mammography screening and insurance coverage and legal issues relative to informed consent in breast cancer treatment also are discussed. PMID:8004625

  7. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  9. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  10. PCNA immunostaining in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cummings, M C; Furnival, C M; Parsons, P G; Townsend, E

    1993-08-01

    Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has been shown to be of prognostic value in patients with certain types of cancer. The aim of this study was to determine if the abundance of PCNA is inversely correlated with survival of patients with breast cancer. Paraffin blocks were available from 68 patients, all of whom had been followed clinically for at least 5 years. Sections from 20 patients showed no reactivity to PCNA and were excluded from the study because it was not possible to distinguish between true negatives and false negatives (those due to poor fixation of the original specimens). The PCNA index (the number of stained cancer cells as a percentage of the total number of cancer cells present) was calculated for the remaining 48 patients. Results were analysed by Wilcoxon's rank sum test (two tailed) and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was no statistical difference between the PCNA indices of those patients dead from their disease within 5 years of diagnosis compared with those alive and without signs of breast cancer at 5 years. There was also no correlation between PCNA index and size of the cancer, involvement of axillary lymph nodes, time to recurrence or time to death. There was, however, a significant correlation between PCNA index and histological grade (P = 0.029). It appears that PCNA staining of stored paraffin sections is of little prognostic value in patients with breast cancer. PMID:8101708

  11. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Print-Friendly Page April 2016 The Impact of Breast Cancer Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the ...

  12. Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990

    MedlinePlus

    ... News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: October ... report from the American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States ...

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

  14. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  15. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  16. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Multiple sclerosis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, P W; Mulla, Z D; Nesic, O

    2015-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC) share common features; most notably, both are more frequent in women than in men. In addition to the involvement of sex hormones, a number of genetic and pharmacological studies support a possible relationship between these two diseases. However, there are no conclusive epidemiological findings related to MS and BC worldwide, and there are no recent data for the US population. We conducted a case-control study using a hospital inpatient discharge dataset (21,536 cases and two control series totaling 59,581 controls) from the Texas Health Care Information Collection. We assessed occurrence of MS in BC cases and in two control series: diabetes mellitus type II, and open wounds. After controlling for age, race-ethnicity, and health insurance status, a statistically-significant protective association was detected: BC cases were 45% less likely than diabetic controls to have MS (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.37-0.81), and 63% less likely than open wound controls to have MS (OR=0.37, 95% CI=0.21-0.66). Our study presented here is the only current assessment of the association between MS and BC in the USA and suggests a protective effect of MS on BC in the hospitalized population. PMID:26130448

  18. Radiotherapy Issues in Elderly Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older ‘low-risk’ patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of ‘low risk’ are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for ‘high-risk’ patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1–3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational. PMID:24715826

  19. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast…

  1. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  2. Designing a multifaceted survivorship care plan to meet the information and communication needs of breast cancer patients and their family physicians: results of a qualitative pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Following the completion of treatment and as they enter the follow-up phase, breast cancer patients (BCPs) often recount feeling ‘lost in transition’, and are left with many questions concerning how their ongoing care and monitoring for recurrence will be managed. Family physicians (FPs) also frequently report feeling ill-equipped to provide follow-up care to BCPs. In this three-phase qualitative pilot study we designed, implemented and evaluated a multi-faceted survivorship care plan (SCP) to address the information needs of BCPs at our facility and of their FPs. Methods In Phase 1 focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 35 participants from three stakeholder groups (BCPs, FPs and oncology specialist health care providers (OHCPs)), to identify specific information needs. An SCP was then designed based on these findings, consisting of both web-based and paper-based tools (Phase 2). For Phase 3, both sets of tools were subsequently evaluated via focus groups and interviews with 26 participants. Interviews and focus groups were audio taped, transcribed and content analysed for emergent themes and patterns. Results In Phase 1 patients commented that web-based, paper-based and human resources components were desirable in any SCP. Patients did not focus exclusively on the post-treatment period, but instead spoke of evolving needs throughout their cancer journey. FPs indicated that any tools to support them must distill important information in a user-friendly format. In Phase 2, a pilot SCP was subsequently designed, consisting of both web-based and paper-based materials tailored specifically to the needs of BCPs as well as FPs. During Phase 3 (evaluation) BCPs indicated that the SCP was effective at addressing many of their needs, and offered suggestions for future improvements. Both patients and FPs found the pilot SCP to be an improvement from the previous standard of care. Patients perceived the quality of the BCP-FP relationship as

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Survey to Assess Survivor Knowledge Change after Survivorship Care Plans: WiSDOM-B (Wisconsin Survey of cancer DiagnOsis and Management in Breast cancer)

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Froeschner, Jamie L.; Jones, Nathan; Donohue, Sarah; Wiegmann, Douglas; Sesto, Mary E.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The oncology community has increased efforts to inform survivors about long-term risks and planned follow-up after cancer treatment. Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) have been recommended since 2005, yet the benefits of implementation are only now being assessed. SCPs are hypothesized to enhance patient knowledge. The WiSDOM-B was developed to measure changes in breast cancer survivor knowledge pre and post delivery of an SCP. Methods The Wisconsin Survey of DiagnOsis and Management in Breast cancer (WiSDOM-B) was developed with input from oncologists (medical, radiation, and surgical), patient advocates, cancer survivors, and survey design experts. An initial 9 patients evaluated survey content, and modifications were made to enhance clarity. Subsequently, 38 patients were enrolled in a randomized pilot trial assessing SCP impact on knowledge of diagnosis, treatment, late effects and followup (WiSDOM-B) and satisfaction with knowledge (existing survey). Results The WiSDOM-B was developed using feedback from multiple stakeholders. Baseline knowledge was poor and remained stable in the control arm. There was a suggestion of increased survivor knowledge following receipt of SCPs in the intervention arm (68.4% vs. 74.4%). Change was not statistically significant compared with the control arm. Despite knowledge deficits, baseline satisfaction with knowledge was high for both groups, with 100% of patients being satisfied/very satisfied with information provided. Satisfaction did not change significantly following SCP receipt. Conclusion The WiSDOM-B assesses survivor knowledge of cancer diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and side effects. It will be a useful tool for future studies assessing the impact of care plans on survivor knowledge. PMID:24343267

  4. Breast cancer research in Asia: adopt or adapt Western knowledge?

    PubMed

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Yip, Cheng-Har; Hartman, Mikael; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Devi, Beena C R; Peeters, Petra H M; Taib, Nur Aishah; van Gils, Carla H; Verkooijen, Helena M

    2013-02-01

    The incidence and mortality of breast cancer continues to rise rapidly in Asian countries. However, most of our current knowledge on breast cancer has been generated in Western populations. As the socio-economic profile, life style and culture of Asian and Western women are substantially different, and genetic backgrounds vary to some extent, we need to answer the question on whether to 'adopt' or 'adapt' Western knowledge before applying it in the Asian setting. It is generally accepted that breast cancer risk factors, which have mainly been studied in Western populations are similar worldwide. However, the presence of gene-environment or gene-gene interactions may alter their importance as causal factors across populations. Diagnostic and prognostic study findings, including breast cancer prediction rules, are increasingly shown to be 'setting specific' and must therefore be validated in Asian women before implementing them in clinical care in Asia. Interventional research findings from Caucasian patients may not be applicable in patients in Asia due to differences in tumour biology/profiles, metabolism of drugs and also health beliefs which can influence treatment acceptance and adherence. While breast cancer research in Asia is warranted in all domains of medical research, it is felt that for Asian breast cancer patients, needs are highest for diagnostic and prognostic studies. International clinical trials meanwhile need to include breast cancer patients from various Asian settings to provide an insight into the effectiveness of new treatment modalities in this part of the world. PMID:23040889

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  6. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  7. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  8. Bridging Health Care and the Workplace: Formulation of a Return-to-Work Intervention for Breast Cancer Patients Using an Intervention Mapping Approach.

    PubMed

    Désiron, Huguette A M; Crutzen, Rik; Godderis, Lode; Van Hoof, Elke; de Rijk, Angelique

    2016-09-01

    Purpose An increasing number of breast cancer (BC) survivors of working age require return to work (RTW) support. Objective of this paper is to describe the development of a RTW intervention to be embedded in the care process bridging the gap between hospital and workplace. Method The Intervention Mapping (IM) approach was used and combined formative research results regarding RTW in BC patients with published insights on occupational therapy (OT) and RTW. Four development steps were taken, starting from needs assessment to the development of intervention components and materials. Results A five-phased RTW intervention guided by a hospital-based occupational therapist is proposed: (1) assessing the worker, the usual work and contextual factors which impacts on (re-)employment; (2) exploration of match/differences between the worker and the usual work; (3) establishing long term goals, broken down into short term goals; (4) setting up tailored actions by carefully implementing results of preceding phases; (5) step by step, the program as described in phase 4 will be executed. The occupational therapist monitors, measures and reviews goals and program-steps in the intervention to secure the tailor-made approach of each program-step of the intervention. Conclusion The use of IM resulted in a RTW oriented OT intervention. This unique intervention succeeds in matching individual BC patient needs, the input of stakeholders at the hospital and the workplace. PMID:26728492

  9. Religious beliefs and delay in breast cancer diagnosis for self-detected breast changes in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Gullatte, Mary Magee; Hardin, Pamela; Kinney, Anita; Powe, Barbara; Mooney, Kathi

    2009-07-01

    African-American women have a one-third higher death rate from breast cancer. Delay in breast cancer detection is a significant factor in being diagnosed at a later stage. The objective of this research was to examine the relationship between religious beliefs and delay in diagnosis of breast cancer and breast cancer stage for self-detected breast symptoms. Participants ranged in age from 30 to 84 years, with a median age of 54 years. This was a descriptive, correlational study, which utilized an open-ended questionnaire. Statistically significant association was found between Time to Seek Medical Care and Stage of Breast Cancer at p = 0.001, with 67% of the participants (n = 87) presenting with > Stage I breast cancer, and with the mean time to seek medical care at 5.4 months. A statistically significant association was also found related to "did you tell anyone about the breast change"? (i. e., Yes, No, or Only Talked to God). Delay in time to seek medical care was significantly associated with only talking to God about the breast change at (p = 0.02). Telling someone about their breast symptom was also statistically significant at p = 0.01 for reducing delay. PMID:19691181

  10. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  11. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
. PMID:27105188

  12. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shikha; Puri, Tarun; Julka, Pramod K

    2015-03-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter. PMID:25455282

  13. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  14. Breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Crivellari, Diana; Aapro, Matti; Leonard, Robert; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Brain, Etienne; Goldhirsch, Aron; Veronesi, Andrea; Muss, Hyman

    2007-05-10

    Screening and adjuvant postoperative therapies have increased survival among women with breast cancer. These tools are seldom applied in elderly patients, although the usually reported incidence of breast cancer is close to 50% in women 65 years or older, reaching 47% after 70 years in the updated Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Elderly breast cancer patients, even if in good medical health, were frequently excluded from adjuvant clinical trials. Women age 70 years who are fit actually have a median life expectancy of 15.5 years, ie, half of them will live much longer and will remain exposed for enough time to the potentially preventable risks of a relapse and specific death. In the last few years, a new concern about this issue has developed. Treatment now faces two major end points, as in younger women: to improve disease-free survival in the early stages, and to palliate symptoms in advanced disease. However, in both settings, the absolute benefit of treatment is critical because protecting quality of life and all its related aspects (especially functional status and independence), is crucial in older persons who have more limited life expectancy. Furthermore, the new hormonal compounds (aromatase inhibitors) and chemotherapeutic drugs (capecitabine, liposomal doxorubicin), are potentially less toxic than and equally as effective as older more established therapies. These new treatments bring new challenges including higher cost, and defining their benefit in elderly breast cancer must include an analysis of the cost/benefit ratio. These issues emphasize the urgent need to develop and support clinical trials for this older population of breast cancer patients both in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, a move that will take us from a prejudiced, age-based medicine to an evidence-based medicine. PMID:17488987

  15. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, P.A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; Papadimitriou, K.; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W.

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs and breast cancer” and “benchmarking and breast cancer care”, and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  16. Awareness and practice of breast self examination among malaysian women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Siew Yim; Chew, S L

    2011-01-01

    Breast self-examination (BSE) is a self-generated, non-invasive and non-irradiative method of breast cancer detection. This paper documents Malaysian women's awareness and practice of regular BSE as a potent breast cancer detection tool. A pre-test post-test questionnaire survey on women diagnosed with breast cancer (n=66) was conducted. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square tests were performed to correlate demographic variables, knowledge and regular practice of BSE. Findings showed that 80% of the breast cancer survivors self-detected the breast lumps, despite a high 85% of these women reporting they were never taught about BSE. More than 70% of the women maintained that lack of knowledge/skill on the proper practice of BSE was the key barrier to a more regular BSE practice. After an educational intervention on BSE and breast awareness, we found an increase report from 17% (at pre-test) to 67% (at post-test) of self reported monthly BSE practices. Provision of self-management education incorporating BSE, a readily available cheap method, should be introduced at primary care and breast clinics. This strategy promotes women's self-efficacy which contributes towards cancer control agenda in less resource available countries around Asia Pacific. Longer follow up may be crucial to examine the adherence to positive BSE behaviour. PMID:21517257

  17. Positive changes after breast cancer: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud; Taleghani, Fariba; Loripoor, Marzeyeh; Yousefy, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic events such as breast cancer along with negative effects on patients also have positive effects. These cases have been studied less in Iran. Therefore, this study was conducted with the aim of explanation of positive changes after breast cancer by using a qualitative approach. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in 2012 in one of the specialized centers for cancer affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. In this study, it was interviewed with 19 women with breast cancer about positive changes after cancer by using individual, open and deep methods. The interviews were analyzed with conventional content analysis method. Results: The titles of the three major categories were included as behavioral changes to maintain and promote health (acquisition of health information and adopting promoting health behaviors), spiritual development (attention to the God and sense of meaning in life, revising the values and priorities, strengthening moral and behavioral traits) and personal growth and flourish (feeling empowerment, confidence and efforts to achieve the goals and desires). These three categories have led to emerge themes in this study as the “Awakening after cancer.” Conclusions: The results of this study indicated positive changes after breast cancer. Considering such changes while providing care and consulting to patients with breast cancer in addition to facilitate and accelerate positive changes will be prompted to provide care and proper and influential consulting to promote patient health. PMID:26430682

  18. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Lacey R; Wilkinson, Deborah

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  20. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  1. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells become cancerous because of changes (mutations) in DNA. Some DNA mutations are inherited. This means the mutations are ... cancers that run in some families. But most DNA changes related to breast cancer are acquired in ...

  2. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer.org Handling treatment The goal of any breast cancer treatment is to get rid of the cancer and offer the best possible chance of survival. But even the best treatments have side effects. ...

  3. Breast Cancer in Transgender Veterans: A Ten-Case Series.

    PubMed

    Brown, George R

    2015-03-01

    All known cases of breast cancer in patients with a diagnosis consistent with transgender identification were identified in the Veterans Health Administration (1996-2013). Ten cases were confirmed: seven birth sex females and three birth sex males. Of the three birth sex males, two identified as gender dysphoric male-to-female and one identified as transgender with transvestic fetishism. The birth sex males all presented with late-stage disease that proved fatal, whereas most of the birth sex female transgender veterans presented with earlier stage disease that could be treated. These cases support the importance of screening for breast cancer using standard guidelines in birth sex males and females. Family history of breast cancer should be obtained from transgender people as part of routine care. This report expands the known cases of breast cancer in transgender persons from 5 to 12 (female-to-male) and from 10 to 13 (male-to-female). PMID:26790021

  4. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agnese, Doreen M.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2016-01-01

    As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. This review was written from the perspective of a surgeon with additional training in cancer genetics in an effort to provide a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important. PMID:26858951

  5. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research. PMID:21044008

  7. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Practices That Reduce the Latina Survival Disparity After Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, J. Emilio; Ang, Alfonzo; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Latina breast cancer patients are 20 percent more likely to die within 5 years after diagnosis compared with white women, even though they have a lower incidence of breast cancer, lower general mortality rates, and some better health behaviors. Existing data only examine disparities in the utilization of breast cancer care; this research expands the study question to which utilization factors drive the shorter survival in Latina women compared with white women. Methods This longitudinal linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study examined early stage breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2000 and followed for 5–11 years after diagnosis (N=44,999). Modifiable utilization factors included consistent visits to primary care providers and to specialists after diagnosis, consistent post-diagnosis mammograms, and receipt of initial care consistent with current standards of care. Results Of the four utilization factors potentially driving this disparity, a lack of consistent post-diagnosis mammograms was the strongest driver of the Latina breast cancer survival disparity. Consistent mammograms attenuated the hazard of death from 23% [hazard ratio, HR, (95% confidence interval, 95%CI)=1.23 (1.1,1.4)] to a nonsignificant 12% [HR (95%CI)=1.12 (0.7,1.3)] and reduced the excess hazard of death in Latina women by 55%. Effect modification identified that visits to primary care providers have a greater protective impact on the survival of Latina compared to white women [HR (95%CI)=0.9 (0.9,0.9)]. Conclusions We provide evidence that undetected new or recurrent breast cancers due to less consistent post-diagnosis mammograms contribute substantially to the long-observed Latina survival disadvantage. Interventions involving primary care providers may be especially beneficial to this population. PMID:24106867

  9. Evolution of Imaging in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Crowley, James; Hagan, Catherine; Atkinson, Lisa L

    2016-06-01

    The following topics are discussed in this article. A historical review of the evolution of breast cancer imaging from thermography through digital breast tomosynthesis, molecular breast imaging, and advanced breast magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of multiple clinical trials, their strengths, and weaknesses. Historical perspective on the Mammography Quality Standards Act and its relationship with development and implementation of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). PMID:27029017

  10. Breast Cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mungrue, K.; Chase, H.; Gordon, J.; Knowles, D.; Lockhart, K.; Miller, N.; Morley, T.; Sealey, L.; Turner, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women in the Bahamas, which consists of many islands. This is the first attempt to identify which island has the highest occurrence of breast cancer. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to describe the sociodemographical and spatial features of breast cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011. METHODS A review of the medical records of all women with a confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer during the period January 1, 2009–December 31, 2011, was undertaken. Data were first obtained from the National Oncology Board of the Bahamas and validated by a review of the medical records. The patient address was geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS 10.0 Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) to satellite images obtained from The Nature Conservancy in the Bahamas. RESULTS We recruited 270 patients who satisfied the entry criteria. The cumulative incidences of breast cancer for the years 2009–2011 were 51.4, 45.4, and 51.4, respectively. Breast cancer occurred most often in women of African origin with a mean age at diagnosis of 56.6 ± 13.8 years. Ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type observed with most cancers occurring in Grade II or higher and presenting as late stage (≥ Stage II). Surgery was the preferred method of treatment with modified radical mastectomy being the procedure of choice. Spatial distribution of cases across the Bahamas revealed one cluster, which is present on the island of New Providence. Further analysis of New Providence showed a consistently skewed kernel density in the central and eastern regions, compared with a scattered distribution in the southern and western regions. CONCLUSION The island of New Providence had the highest occurrence of breast cancer among all the islands of the Bahamas. The increasing incidence of breast cancer in young women is likely to impose a significant burden on the future of Bahamian health care. PMID:27127408

  11. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  12. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  13. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  14. Noncoding RNAs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Xipeng; Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhou, Qun

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian transcriptome has recently been revealed to encompass a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), the best studied of the short noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), have been extensively characterized with regard to their biogenesis, function and importance in tumorigenesis. Another class of sncRNAs called piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) has also gained attention recently in cancer research owing to their critical role in stem cell regulation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) of >200 nucleotides in length have recently emerged as key regulators of developmental processes, including mammary gland development. lncRNA dysregulation has also been implicated in the development of various cancers, including breast cancer. In this review, we describe and discuss the roles of sncRNAs (including miRNAs and piRNAs) and lncRNAs in the initiation and progression of breast tumorigenesis, with a focus on outlining the molecular mechanisms of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor ncRNAs. Moreover, the current and potential future applications of ncRNAs to clinical breast cancer research are also discussed, with an emphasis on ncRNA-based diagnosis, prognosis and future therapeutics. PMID:26685283

  15. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  16. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment fact sheet ePublications Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet Print this fact sheet Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet (PDF, 943 KB) Related information ...

  17. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... be treated successfully. Differences affecting early detection of breast cancers in men and women There are many similarities ...

  18. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

  19. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  20. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  1. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Merckel, Laura G.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Koehler, Max O.; Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den; Deckers, Roel; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Binkert, Christoph A.; Moonen, Chrit T.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  2. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  3. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  4. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  5. Diet and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  6. “Voices of Fear and Safety” Women’s ambivalence towards breast cancer and breast health: a qualitative study from Jordan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among Jordanian women. Breast malignancies are detected at late stages as a result of deferred breast health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore Jordanian women’s views and perceptions about breast cancer and breast health. Methods We performed an explorative qualitative study with purposive sampling. Ten focus groups were conducted consisting of 64 women (aged 20 to 65 years) with no previous history and no symptoms of breast cancer from four governorates in Jordan. The transcribed data was analysed using latent content analysis. Results Three themes were constructed from the group discussions: a) Ambivalence in prioritizing own health; b) Feeling fear of breast cancer; and c) Feeling safe from breast cancer. The first theme was seen in women’s prioritizing children and family needs and in their experiencing family and social support towards seeking breast health care. The second theme was building on women’s perception of breast cancer as an incurable disease associated with suffering and death, their fear of the risk of diminished femininity, husband’s rejection and social stigmatization, adding to their apprehensions about breast health examinations. The third theme emerged from the women’s perceiving themselves as not being in the risk zone for breast cancer and in their accepting breast cancer as a test from God. In contrast, women also experienced comfort in acquiring breast health knowledge that soothed their fears and motivated them to seek early detection examinations. Conclusions Women’s ambivalence in prioritizing their own health and feelings of fear and safety could be better addressed by designing breast health interventions that emphasize the good prognosis for breast cancer when detected early, involve breast cancer survivors in breast health awareness campaigns and catalyse family support to encourage women to seek breast health care. PMID:22834874

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer in men? What are the key statistics about breast cancer in men? The American Cancer ... 30 years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  8. Highlights from the Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference, Glasgow, 19–21 March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Munzone, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9), one of the largest breast cancer conferences in the world, was held in Glasgow in March 2014, and brought together the voices of doctors, researchers, nurses, and patients. All the major breast cancer advocacy groups and institutions were united in one forum (Europa Donna, the EORTC Breast Cancer group, and EUSOMA). The Scientific Programme for EBCC-9 highlighted a holistic picture of breast cancer, including research, prevention, treatment, advocacy, and care. Participants were able to discover the most up-to-date developments and findings within the field for implementation into daily practice. Improvements in treatment, as well as enhanced access to care, underlie the sustained decreases in breast cancer mortality seen in 30 European countries from 1989 to 2010. PMID:24834121

  9. Skp2 is over-expressed in breast cancer and promotes breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Cao, Lulu; Sun, Zijia; Xu, Jing; Tang, Lin; Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-18

    The F box protein Skp2 is oncogenic. Skp2 and Skp2B, an isoform of Skp2 are overexpressed in breast cancer. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which Skp2B promotes the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Here, we determined the expression and clinical outcomes of Skp2 in breast cancer samples and cell lines using breast cancer database, and investigated the role of Skp2 and Skp2B in breast cancer cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We obtained Skp2 is significantly overexpressed in breast cancer samples and cell lines, and high Skp2 expression positively correlated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. Both Skp2 and Skp2B could promote breast cancer cell proliferation, inhibit cell apoptosis, change the cell cycle distribution and induce the increased S phase cells and therefore induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. Moreover, the 2 isoforms could both suppress PIG3 expression via independent pathways in the breast cancer cells. Skp2 suppressed p53 and inhibited PIG3-induced apoptosis, while Skp2B attenuated the function of PIG3 by inhibiting PHB. Our results indicate that Skp2 and Skp2B induce breast cancer cell development and progression, making Skp2 and Skp2B potential molecular targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27111245

  10. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Kaufman, Bella; Meirow, Dror

    2008-10-01

    The frequency of pregnancy-associated breast cancer, a rare but serious occurrence, may increase in light of the secular trends for lower parity in general and for older age at first full-term delivery in particular Data on PABC in individuals who are at high risk for breast cancer are limited. A computerized search of Pubmed showed that the reported incidence of PABC is 1:3000 pregnancies; it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and its prognosis is inferior compared to non-PABC Carriers of mutations in the genes BRCA1/2 may present a specific high risk group for PABC especially at younger ages. Women treated with fertility treatment drugs may be at a higher risk for PABC as well. PMID:19009954

  11. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Factors affecting receipt of chemotherapy in women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Libby; Coalson, Jenna; Mowat, Fionna; O’Malley, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To review literature describing factors associated with receipt of chemotherapy for breast cancer, to better understand what factors are most relevant to women’s health and whether health disparities are apparent, and to assess how these factors might affect observational studies and outcomes research. Patterns of care for metastatic breast cancer, for which no standard-of-care exists, were of particular interest. Methods: Relevant studies written in English, Italian, French, or Spanish, published in 2000 or later, were identified through MEDLINE and reviewed. Review articles and clinical trials were excluded; all observational studies and surveys were considered. Articles were reviewed for any discussion of patient characteristics, hospital/physician/insurance characteristics, psychosocial characteristics, and clinical characteristics affecting receipt of chemotherapy by breast cancer patients. Results: In general, factors associated with increased likelihood of receiving chemotherapy included younger age, being Caucasian, having good general health and few co-morbidities, having more severe clinical disease, having responded well to previous treatment, and having breast cancer that is estrogen- or progesterone-receptor-negative. Many of the clinical factors found to increase the likelihood of receiving chemotherapy were consistent with current oncology guidelines. Of the relevant 19 studies identified, only six (32%) reported data specific to metastatic cancer; most studies aggregated women with stage I–IV for purposes of analysis. Conclusion: Studies of patterns of care in breast cancer treatment can help identify challenges in health care provided to particular subgroups of women and can aid researchers in designing studies that account for such factors in clinical and outcomes research. Although scarce, studies evaluating only women with metastatic breast cancer indicate that factors affecting decisions related to receipt of chemotherapy are similar

  14. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  15. [Study of diagnostic features, health care quality and surgical treatment among women living in the LHAs of Novara and Verbano Cusio Ossola hospitalized for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Padoan, Marina; Ferrante, Daniela; Pretti, Giorgio; Magnani, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    This study included 304 women, 128 Screen Detected (SD) e 176 non Screen Detected (NSD), aged 50-69, living in the ex-local health authorities (LHAs) 13 and 14, hospitalized for breast cancer or related chemotherapy or radiation treatments in 2003-2004. Some variables were detected from medical records in order to evaluate the local screening program. The results confirm that a prevention activity allows a rapid identification of cancer and less invasive surgery procedures. PMID:26057175

  16. Using hair to screen for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Kearsley, John; Irving, Tom; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Cookson, David

    1999-03-01

    We have studied hair using fibre X-ray diffraction studies with synchrotron radiation and find that hair from breast-cancer patients has a different intermolecular structure to hair from healthy subjects. These changes are seen in all samples of scalp and pubic hair taken from women diagnosed with breast cancer. All the hair samples from women who tested positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, which is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, also show these changes. Because our results are so consistent, we propose that such hair analyses may be used as a simple, non-invasive screening method for breast cancer.

  17. [Systemic therapy of breast cancer: practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsolt; Boér, Katalin; Dank, Magdolna; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Judit; Kövér, Erika; Pajkos, Gábor; Pikó, Béla; Rubovszky, Gábor; Eckhardt, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the practice guideline of systemic treatment of breast cancer and recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference. It reflects the recent international guidelines (ESMO, NCCN, ABC2, St Gallen's) irrespectively of the current financial opportunities. Here we follow the early - locally advanced - locally relapsed - metastatic breast cancer line for didactic considerations and we discuss the different subgroups of breast cancer based on hormone receptor and HER2 receptor status. Diagnosis and treatment options of rare clinical entities are summarised at the end of the paper. PMID:27579723

  18. Breast cancer and the consumption of coffee.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L; Miller, D R; Helmrich, S P; Kaufman, D W; Schottenfeld, D; Stolley, P D; Shapiro, S

    1985-09-01

    The hypothesis has been raised that coffee consumption may increase the incidence of breast cancer, based on the report that fibrocystic breast disease, a risk factor for breast cancer, regresses after abstention from coffee and other methylxanthines. The relation between recent coffee consumption and the risk of breast cancer was evaluated in a case-control study, based on interviews conducted 1975-1982 at several mainly eastern US teaching and community hospitals. The responses of 2,651 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were compared with those of 1,501 controls with nonmalignant conditions and 385 controls with cancers at other sites. The relative risk estimates for levels of coffee drinking up to seven or more cups daily, relative to none, approximated 1.0 with narrow 95% confidence intervals. After allowance for confounding, the relative risk estimate for drinking at least five cups a day was 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.6) using the noncancer controls and 1.1 (0.7-1.6) using the cancer controls. Coffee consumption was not associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women with a history of fibrocystic breast disease, nor were tea or decaffeinated coffee associated with an increase in the risk of breast cancer. The results suggest that the recent consumption of coffee does not influence the incidence of breast cancer. PMID:4025289

  19. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials. PMID:25324576

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  3. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  4. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-04-15

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend  = 0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  5. Treatment patterns, clinical outcomes and health care costs associated with her2-positive breast cancer with central nervous system metastases: a French multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The population of patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer (BC) who develop central nervous system (CNS) metastases is growing. Treatment strategies in this population are highly diverse. The objective of the study was to assess health care costs for the management of HER2 positive BC with CNS metastases. Methods This multicentre, retrospective, observational study was conducted on HER2-positive BC patients diagnosed with CNS metastases between 2006 and 2008. Data were extracted from patient medical records to estimate health care resource use. A partitioned estimator was used to adjust censoring costs by use of the Kaplan-Meier survival estimate. Results 218 patients were included and costs were estimated for 200 patients. The median time to detection of CNS metastases was 37.6 months. The first metastatic event involved the CNS in 39 patients, and this was the unique first metastatic site in 31 of these patients. Two years following diagnosis of CNS metastases, 70.3% of patients had died. The mean per capita cost of HER2-positive BC with CNS metastases in the first year following diagnosis was €35,735 [95% CI: 31,716-39,898]. The proportion of costs attributed to expensive drugs and those arising from hospitalisation were in the same range. Conclusion A range of individualised disease management strategies are used in HER2-positive BC patients with CNS metastases and the treatments used in the first months following diagnosis are expensive. The understanding of cost drivers may help optimise healthcare expenditure and inform the development of appropriate prevention policies. PMID:24176086

  6. Breast Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa: Opportunities for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Awuah, Baffour; Yarney, Joel; Wiafe, Seth; Wood, Shannon; Ansong, Daniel; Nyarko, Kofi; Wiafe-Addai, Beatrice; Clegg-Lamptey, Joe Nat

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although breast cancer is a growing health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, reasons for its increased occurrence remain unclear. Methods We reviewed published literature to determine the magnitude of the increase in breast cancer, associated risk factors (including for breast cancer subtypes), and ways to reduce incidence and mortality. Results Some of the increased breast cancer occurrence likely reflects that women are living longer and adopting lifestyles that favor higher incidence rates. However, a greater proportion of breast cancers occur among premenopausal women as compared to elsewhere, which may reflect unique risk factors. Breast cancers diagnosed among African women reportedly include a disproportionate number of poor prognosis tumors, including hormone receptor negative, triple negative and core basal phenotype tumors. However, it is unclear how lack of standardized methods for tissue collection, fixation and classification contribute to these rates. Given appropriate classifications, it will be of interest to compare rates with other populations and to identify risk factors that relate to specific tumor subtypes. This includes not only risk factors that have been recognized in other populations but some that may play unique roles among African women, such as genetic factors, microbiomata, xenoestrogens, hair relaxers and skin lighteners. Conclusions With limited opportunities for effective treatment, a focus is needed on identifying etiologic factors that may be amenable to intervention. It will also be essential to understand reasons why women delay seeking care after the onset of symptoms and for there to be educational campaigns about the importance of early detection. PMID:24604092

  7. [THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON BREAST CANCER].

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shelly Tartakover; Shochet, Gali Epstein; Drucker, Liat; Lishner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cancer and pregnancy coincide in about one in 1,000 pregnancies. One of the most common malignancies associated with pregnancy is breast cancer. Women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with metastatic disease and estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors than do non-pregnant women. Controversies exist regarding the effect of pregnancy on breast cancer prognosis. Some researchers suggest that pregnancy does not affect breast cancer prognosis, whereas others claim the opposite. Although PABC is usually discovered in an advanced stage, breast cancer metastasis on the placenta is a rare event. During cancer progression, the surrounding microenvironment co-evolves into an activated state through continuous communication with the malignant cells, thereby promoting tumor growth. The effect of pregnancy and placental environment on breast cancer biology is the issue of this review. Placental and cancer cells implantation processes share similar molecular pathways. This suggests that placental factors may affect breast cancer cells biology. Previously, we analyzed the effect of first trimester human placenta on breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells were co-cultured with placental explants during their implantation on matrigel substrate. We found that the placenta reduced ER expression on the cancer cells and induced their migration and invasion abilities. As a result of it, breast cancer cells migrated away from the placental implantation sites. Hormonal pathways were involved in these phenomena. These results may explain the high incidence of metastases during pregnancy in on the one hand and the rarity of metastases on the placenta on the other hand. PMID:26480621

  8. Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159652.html Gene Tied to Breast Cancer Raises Uterine Cancer Risk Too Women with BRCA1 may want to ... increased risk for a deadly form of uterine cancer, a new study finds. The BRCA1 gene mutation ...

  9. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  10. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  11. The Impact of the Natural, Social, Built, and Policy Environments on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The global burden of breast cancer in women is substantial and increasing. Efforts to address breast cancer have focused on primary prevention, reduction of modifiable risk factors, early detection, timely referral for appropriate treatment, and survivorship. Environmental and lifestyle factors that increase breast cancer risk include ionizing radiation, exogenous hormones, certain female reproductive factors, alcohol and other dietary factors, obesity, and physical inactivity. A variety of chemical exposures are purported to be associated with breast cancer. Methods In this article, we summarize the influence of the natural, social, built, and policy environments on breast cancer incidence and cancer recurrence in women based upon bibliographic searches and relevant search terms. Results Despite a lack of conclusive evidence from epidemiologic studies, exposures to chemicals with estrogenic or other properties relevant to sex steroid activity could influence breast cancer risk if the exposures occur at critical life stages or in combination with exposure to other similar chemicals. Results from several studies support an association between shift work and disruption of the circadian rhythm with breast cancer risk. The social environment likely influences breast cancer risk through several mechanisms including social norms pertaining to breast feeding, age at first live birth, parity, use of oral contraceptives and replacement estrogens, diet, and consumption of alcohol. Social norms also influence body weight, obesity, and physical activity, which have an effect on risk of breast cancer incidence and recurrence. Obesity, which is influenced by the social, built, and policy environments, is a risk factor for the development of postmenopausal breast cancer and certain other cancer types. Conclusions The natural, social, built, and policy environments affect breast cancer incidence and survival. Effective health care policies can encourage the provision of

  12. The stress of war and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Korda-Vidić, Vesna; Vasilj, Ivan; Babić, Dragan

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 94.000 persons were killed or disappeared and about 1.8 million people were forced to flee from their homes during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from April 1992 to December 1995. The Dayton Peace Agreement, signed on November 21, 1995, ended the war. Life and health conditions of the population in B&H characterized with severe disorders caused by severe war and post-war traumatic events. The aim of this work is to establish the connection between breast cancer in women and stress caused by traumatic experiences during the war in B&H. We performed this study of pairs at the Clinic for Oncology, University Clinical Hospital Mostar, from November 2008 to March 2009. Two hundred women from Herzegovina region participated in this research. The study group consisted of 100 women with diagnosed breast cancer. The control group consisted of 100 women without breast cancer diagnosis, of the same age and living in the same area. We have found that women with breast cancer had statistically considerably more war traumatic experiences and thus more stress than the women in control group (p=0.000). The following conclusions are also noteworthy: 39% of women in the study group were under the ages of 50, when diagnosed breast cancer. Only one woman got psychosocially care within breast cancer treatment. High middle age of physiological loss of period (≥50), longer fertile period, as well as the smoking habit are breast cancer risk factors statistically more present. Women with breast cancer have experienced more stress due to significantly more war traumatic experiences, so that war-related stress considered a risk factor. PMID:26657984

  13. Breast cancer and racial disparity between Caucasian and African American women, part 1 (BRCA-1).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Khurram; Latif, Naeem; Zaiden, Robert; Jasani, Nick; Rana, Fauzia

    2013-08-01

    Breast cancer is a commonly diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among American women today. Despite the lower incidence of breast cancer among African American women, they are more likely to die from the disease each year than their white counterparts. We present a retrospective cohort study of the tumor registry data from electronic medical records of patients diagnosed with breast cancer at the University of Florida Health, Jacksonville from 2000 to 2005. A total of 907 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer; 445 patients with invasive breast cancer had complete medical records and were selected for this review. Much like previously published research, we found that African American patients presented with a more advanced stage and aggressive subtype of breast cancer than white patients, and were less likely to have health insurance. However, we have yet to determine if universal health care insurance can lead to improved health care access, better breast cancer awareness, and an enhanced attitude toward breast cancer screenings. Such factors would ultimately lead to an earlier diagnosis and better outcomes in both African American and white patients. We plan to investigate this critical issue in a follow-up study (BRCA-2; Breast Cancer and Racial Disparity Between Caucasian and African American Women, Part 2), which will begin a few years after the complete implementation of the universal health care law enacted by President Obama in 2010. The higher frequency of aggressive tumor subtypes in African American women warrants more attention. We suggest further research to determine whether decreasing the initial age for screening or increasing the frequency of mammograms in African American women would improve breast cancer outcomes. This study underscores the importance of identifying and preventing obstacles in routine breast cancer screening, as well as increasing breast cancer awareness. PMID:24518421

  14. Current Usage of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Management of Breast Cancer: A Practitioner's Perspective.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Luke; Cochrane, Suzanne; Zhu, Xiaoshu

    2016-09-01

    Introduction This qualitative study seeks to explore the role within the context of Australian breast cancer oncology treatments that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners play in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods Semistructured interviews were used on 2 groups: the first group was TCM practitioners who were recognized experts in breast cancer, and the second group consisted of TCM practitioners who treated breast cancer as part of their practice but were not recognized experts. Data analysis was achieved through grounded theory with open coding. Results The main themes reported on here are the following: the role of TCM in the biomedical management of breast cancer, TCM strategies for the management of breast cancer, and the perceived holistic approach of the TCM practitioner and the importance of a TCM diagnosis in the role of breast cancer care. Discussion The role of TCM in biomedical breast cancer management is a supportive one; however, this role is difficult as there is a lack of understanding of TCM by biomedical practitioners. The viewpoints of practitioners differed on key strategies of TCM: diagnosis, and treatment protocols. Patients sought the holistic approach of TCM practitioners as they felt it addressed all aspects of their health and not just the symptoms relating to breast cancer. Conclusion The lack of an integrated medicine approach in relation to TCM makes it difficult to demonstrate the value of the contribution TCM can make to biomedicine in the field of breast care oncology. Effectiveness studies are needed that can accurately represent TCM in this field. PMID:26420777

  15. Women with Breast Cancer Micrometastases in Their Sentinel Lymph Nodes May Not Need Axillary Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report ... Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Breast Cancer Research Breast Cancer Patient Breast Cancer Treatment Male Breast ...

  16. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  17. Perceptions about breast cancer among African American women: do selected educational materials challenge them?

    PubMed

    Powe, Barbara D; Daniels, Elvan C; Finnie, Ramona; Thompson, Angela

    2005-02-01

    Despite the availability of factual information about breast cancer, there continues to be an abundance of misperceptions about the disease. This study, guided by the Patient/Provider/System Model for cancer screening, describes perceptions about breast cancer among African American women (N = 179) at primary care centers. Data were collected using the Breast Cancer Perceptions and Knowledge Survey and a demographic questionnaire. Breast cancer pamphlets available at the centers were evaluated (readability, extent they challenged misperceptions). The average age of the women was 34 years with an average educational level of 12 years. A number of misperceptions were prevalent. The majority viewed breast self-examination as a form of early detection and some viewed pain as an indicator of cancer. Pamphlets did not explicitly challenge the misperceptions and the SMOG reading level was high. Intervention studies are needed to identify the effective methods to challenge and correct misperceptions about breast cancer for these women. PMID:15653249

  18. Male breast cancer: is the scenario changing

    PubMed Central

    Contractor, Kaiyumars B; Kaur, Kanchan; Rodrigues, Gabriel S; Kulkarni, Dhananjay M; Singhal, Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Background The overall incidence of male breast cancer is around 1% of all breast cancers and is on the rise. In this review we aim to present various aspects of male breast cancer with particular emphasis on incidence, risk factors, patho-physiology, treatment, prognostic factors, and outcome. Methods Information on all aspects of male breast cancer was gathered from available relevant literature on male breast cancer from the MEDLINE database over the past 32 years from 1975 to 2007. Various reported studies were scrutinized for emerging evidence. Incidence data were also obtained from the IARC, Cancer Mondial database. Conclusion There is a scenario of rising incidence, particularly in urban US, Canada and UK. Even though more data on risk factors is emerging about this disease, more multi-institutional efforts to pool data with large randomized trials to show treatment and survival benefits are needed to support the existing vast emerging knowledge about the disease. PMID:18558006

  19. Overcoming radiation resistance in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A; Debeb, Bisrat G; Xu, Wei; Buchholz, Thomas A

    2010-06-01

    The clinical-pathological features of inflammatory breast cancer include enrichment of factors that have been previously associated with radioresistant disease, including negative hormone receptor status and a phenotype enriched for relatively radioresistant breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The risks and benefits of accelerated postmastectomy radiation treatment regimens in the multimodality management of inflammatory breast cancer were reviewed at the first International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The biological basis for radiation resistance and strategies to radiosensitize these tumors were also presented. The prevalent basal phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer makes it an ideal clinical model to examine stem cell hypotheses, which the authors believe can help guide future trials to continue making incremental progress against this aggressive disease. PMID:20503417

  20. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  1. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  2. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, Rebecca M

    2012-07-26

    . Currently, there is fierce debate surrounding the age at which breast cancer screening should begin, and once begun, how often it should occur. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40. On the other hand, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine so early. Rather, the Task Force recommends biennial mammography screening for women aged 50 to 74 years. The ten-year discrepancy in the onset of screening results from recent data suggesting that the frequent use of X-ray radiation during screenings could potentially increase the likelihood of developing cancer. This danger is increased by the low sensitivity and accuracy of mammograms, which sometimes require multiple screenings to yield results. Furthermore, mammograms are often not only inaccurate, but average appalling misdiagnoses rates: about 80% false positives and 15% false negatives. These misdiagnoses lead to unwarranted biopsies at an estimated health care cost of $2 billion per year, while at the same time, resulting in excessive cases of undetected cancer. As such, the National Cancer Institute recommends more studies on the advantages of types and frequency of screenings, as well as alternative screening options. The UST technology developed at LANL could be an alternative option to greatly improve the specificity and sensitivity of breast cancer screening without using ionizing radiation. LANL is developing high-resolution ultrasound tomography algorithms and a clinical ultrasound tomography scanner to conduct patient studies at the UNM Hospital. During UST scanning, the patient lies face-down while her breast, immersed in a tank of warm water, is scanned by phased-transducer arrays. UST uses recorded ultrasound signals to reconstruct a high-resolution three-dimensional image of the breast, showing the spatial distribution of mechanical properties within the breast. Breast cancers are detected by higher values of mechanical properties compared to

  3. Mammographic breast density: effect on imaging and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Renee W; Helvie, Mark A

    2010-10-01

    Mammographic breast density has been studied for more than 30 years. Greater breast density not only is related to decreased sensitivity of mammograms because of a masking effect but also is a major independent risk factor for breast cancer. This article defines breast density and reviews literature on quantification of mammographic density that is key to future clinical and research protocols. Important influences on breast density are addressed, including age, menopausal status, exogenous hormones, and genetics of density. Young women with dense breasts benefit from digital mammographic technique. The potential use of supplemental MRI and ultrasound screening techniques in high-risk women and women with dense breasts is explored, as are potential risk reduction strategies. PMID:20971840

  4. 21st century paradigm of tissue banking: the Clinical Breast Care Project.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Craig D

    2010-07-01

    The Clinical Breast Care Project (CBCP) is a congressionally mandated program that began in the year 2000. The military-civilian collaboration was founded on five pillars: (1) center of excellence in clinical care, (2) risk reduction for women at risk for developing breast cancer, (3) tissue banking to develop and maintain the world's finest repository of human biospecimens of breast diseases, (4) targeted research into the molecular signatures of breast diseases and cancer, and (5) biomedical informatics core to support the data warehouse needs of the project. Now in its eighth year of operation, these efforts have resulted in more than 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications and dozens of collaborations with world leaders in cancer research. In this short time, CBCP has created what is believed to be the world's largest breast tissue biorepository. PMID:23634480

  5. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  7. Breast cancer and sexuality: multi-modal treatment options.

    PubMed

    Krychman, Michael L; Katz, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The sexual consequences of breast cancer and its treatments are well known and previously reviewed. Alterations in body image, with or without breast reconstruction, changes in sexual self-esteem and self-efficacy, vulvovaginal atrophy as a result of chemotherapy and/or adjuvant hormone therapy, and loss of libido secondary to dyspareunia and body image issues are common in survivors of breast cancer. Medications that are prescribed for long-term use including those in the class of aromatase inhibitors can have far-reaching implications on quality of life by contributing to vulvar and vaginal atrophic changes. While this is an important issue, there are few widely accepted treatments that have been evaluated for efficacy and safety for these sexual challenges in the breast cancer population. However, progress is being made in finding new and innovative solutions for many of the sexual problems faced by breast cancer survivors and their partners. Many institutions are now compelled to address survivorship concerns and addressing sexuality and intimacy are paramount issues in survivorship care. In this article, we present the evidence for the multimodal approach to the management of sexuality concerns in the breast cancer survivor. Pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and psychosocial interventions will be reviewed. PMID:22151953

  8. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  9. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  11. Breast Cancer in the Personal Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Decewicz, David J.; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a complex etiology that develops from different cellular lineages, progresses along multiple molecular pathways, and demonstrates wide variability in response to treatment. The “standard of care” approach to breast cancer treatment in which all patients receive similar interventions is rapidly being replaced by personalized medicine, based on molecular characteristics of individual patients. Both inherited and somatic genomic variation is providing useful information for customizing treatment regimens for breast cancer to maximize efficacy and minimize adverse side effects. In this article, we review (1) hereditary breast cancer and current use of inherited susceptibility genes in patient management; (2) the potential of newly-identified breast cancer-susceptibility variants for improving risk assessment; (3) advantages and disadvantages of direct-to-consumer testing; (4) molecular characterization of sporadic breast cancer through immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling and opportunities for personalized prognostics; and (5) pharmacogenomic influences on the effectiveness of current breast cancer treatments. Molecular genomics has the potential to revolutionize clinical practice and improve the lives of women with breast cancer. PMID:21037853

  12. THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

  13. Findings from Focus Groups Indicating what Chinese American immigrant women think about breast cancer and breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Lin, Frances; Menon, Usha; Nail, Lillian; Lutz, Kristin F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore beliefs of Chinese American, immigrant women related to breast cancer and mammography. Design Qualitative description with semi-structured focus groups. Setting Metropolitan Portland, Oregon. Participants Thirty eight foreign-born Chinese women, age 40 and older, in five focus groups. Methods Focus group discussions in Chinese were audio taped, transcribed, and translated into English. Using a process of directed content analysis, group transcripts were coded for themes based on the discussion guide. Results Three main themes emerged from the analysis: knowledge and beliefs; support, communication, and educational needs; and access to care. Subthemes included beliefs such as barriers and facilitators to screening and perceptions about personal breast cancer risk. Several women were profoundly affected by the negative breast cancer-related experiences of relatives and friends. Some common myths remain about causes and treatment of breast cancer. Conclusions Although Chinese American immigrant women share beliefs with other minority women in the United States, some culturally-related barriers such as alienation due to cultural reasons for not sharing diagnosis with anyone and beliefs about the efficacy of Eastern versus Western medicine may affect adherence to screening and treatment. Facilitators included being told to get the test and getting screened for the sake of the family, while erroneous information about the cause of breast cancer such as diet and stress remained. Primary care providers such as advanced practice nurses should take into account culturally driven motivations and barriers to mammography adherence among Chinese American immigrant women. Provider-client interactions should involve more discussion about women’s breast cancer risks and screening harms and benefits. Such awareness could open a dialogue around breast cancer that is culturally sensitive and non-threatening to the patient. Information may need to be tailored to

  14. Depression in older breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women .The 5-year survival rate for this tumour is nowadays 85%, and the 61% of these women are still alive at 15 years. When depression symptoms are present as a consequence of breast cancer treatments, they may interfere negatively with patients’ quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of breast cancer treatment on the quality of life and the impact of depression on the health-related life. Methods We enrolled 173 women aged 65-75 years with early stage breast cancer diagnosed over the last 10 years, initially recruited to participate in a study examining heath-related quality of life in the first 5 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Participants were divided into four groups: 1) 46 breast cancer survivors (aged 65-70); 2) 62 women diagnosed with breast cancer (aged 65-69); 3) 32 women with recurrent breast cancer after 10 years (aged 66-75); 4) 30 women in good health status (aged 60-70). The Geriatric Depression Scale was used as a routine part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Collection of data for the application of instruments, such as sociodemographic variables (age, educational level, social state) and clinical date (stage and time of the disease and treatment), was carried out by trained researcher assistants. Results Our results demonstrated the correlation between depression and previous cancer experiences. In fact, in patients with cancer experience, the grade of depression was significantly higher compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the patients with recurrent breast cancer were severely depressed compared to other groups. Conclusions A high percentage of participants were identified as having emotional and/or well being problems. Further investigations on the cause of depression problems cancer-related are needed. PMID:23173836

  15. Exploring Iranian Women's Perceptions regarding Control and Prevention of Breast Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eileen; Escandon, Socorro; Lamyian, Minoor; Ahmadi, Fazlolah; Setoode, Sam Mohammad; Golkho, Shokoofe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian women's perceptions, behaviors, and beliefs related to breast cancer screening, breast cancer, and follow up care. A qualitative descriptive inquiry with both individual and focus group interviews was conducted in Tehran with 31 Farsi-speaking women, age 35 to 65 years of age. A constant comparison…

  16. Risks of online advertisement of direct-to-consumer thermography for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Kimberly M; Liang, Bryan A

    2011-12-01

    Direct-to-consumer online advertising for thermography as a sole agent with which to diagnose breast cancer is misleading and exploits women who are seeking preventive health care for breast cancer. Regulatory action should be taken against companies who continue to mislead the public to ensure patient safety and evidence-based public health information. PMID:22216479

  17. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  18. Breast thermography. A prognostic indicator for breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Isard, H J; Sweitzer, C J; Edelstein, G R

    1988-08-01

    A prognostic classification for thermographic staging of breast cancer has been applied to a cohort of 70 patients from 5040 screenees enrolled in the Albert Einstein Medical Center (AEMC) Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP). A diagnosis of breast cancer was established in each case before December 31, 1980. None of the patients have been lost to follow-up which extended from a minimum of 6 to a maximum of 13 years. Survival rates for those with favorable, equivocal, and poor thermographic factors are compared with each other and with results in accordance with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. As of December 31, 1986, there have been 22 (31.4%) deaths, all attributed to breast cancer. The thermographic scoring system clearly shows shorter survival for patients with poor thermographic prognostic factors, 30% surviving at 5 years and only 20% at 10 years compared with overall survival of 80% at 5 years and 70% at 10 years. PMID:3390789

  19. Are disparities of waiting times for breast cancer care related to socio-economic factors? A regional population-based study (France).

    PubMed

    Ayrault-Piault, Stéphanie; Grosclaude, Pascale; Daubisse-Marliac, Laetitia; Pascal, Jean; Leux, Christophe; Fournier, Evelyne; Tagri, Anne-Delphine; Métais, Magali; Lombrail, Pierre; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Molinié, Florence

    2016-11-01

    The increasing number of breast cancer cases may induce longer waiting times (WT), which can be a source of anxiety for patients and may play a role in survival. The aim of this study was to examine the factors, in particular socio-economic factors, related to treatment delays. Using French Cancer Registry databases and self-administered questionnaires, we included 1,152 women with invasive non-metastatic breast cancer diagnosed in 2007. Poisson regression analysis was used to identify WTs' influencing factors. For 973 women who had a malignant tissue sampling, the median of overall WT between the first imaging procedure and the first treatment was 44 days (9 days for pathological diagnostic WT and 31 days for treatment WT). The medical factors mostly explained inequalities in WTs. Socio-economic and behavioral factors had a limited impact on WTs except for social support which appeared to be a key point. Better identifying the factors associated with increase in WTs will make it possible to develop further interventional or prospective studies to confirm their causal role in delay and at last reduce disparities in breast cancer management. PMID:27405647

  20. Promoting Physician Preventive Practices: Needs Assessment for CME in Breast Cancer Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Dorothy S.; Burg, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    Needs assessment for a continuing medical education (CME) intervention directed at increasing breast cancer screening of women over 50 included a survey of target primary care physicians (n=323) to explore areas of interest for CME in breast care detection and to establish baseline screening practices. A survey of 1,440 women in the target age…

  1. Metastatic male ductal breast cancer mimicking obstructing primary colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  2. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  3. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  4. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A A; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  5. Breast cancer detection using time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Hossein

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer among women. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have certain limitations in detecting breast cancer, especially during its early stage of development. A number of studies have shown that microwave breast cancer detection has potential to become a successful clinical complement to the conventional X-ray mammography. Microwave breast imaging is performed by illuminating the breast tissues with an electromagnetic waveform and recording its reflections (backscatters) emanating from variations in the normal breast tissues and tumour cells, if present, using an antenna array. These backscatters, referred to as the overall (tumour and clutter) response, are processed to estimate the tumour response, which is applied as input to array imaging algorithms used to estimate the location of the tumour. Due to changes in the breast profile over time, the commonly utilized background subtraction procedures used to estimate the target (tumour) response in array processing are impractical for breast cancer detection. The thesis proposes a new tumour estimation algorithm based on a combination of the data adaptive filter with the envelope detection filter (DAF/EDF), which collectively do not require a training step. After establishing the superiority of the DAF/EDF based approach, the thesis shows that the time reversal (TR) array imaging algorithms outperform their conventional conterparts in detecting and localizing tumour cells in breast tissues at SNRs ranging from 15 to 30dB.

  6. Implementing personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Implementing personalized cancer care requires a sound understanding of cancer genomics, familiarity with the analytical methods used to study cancer, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of targeted drugs, and ways to assimilate and understand complex data sets. Perhaps the greatest challenge is obtaining the drugs predicted to be beneficial based on the genomic profile of a patient's tumour. A potential solution is creation of a national facilitated access programme and registry for off-label use of targeted anti-cancer drugs. Within such a programme, patients could receive the targeted agent matched to the genomic profile of their tumour. Physicians would receive guidance in interpretation of complex genomic tests and access to drugs. Pharmaceutical companies, payers and regulators would receive data on off-label drug and test use and clinical outcomes to inform their research and development plans and coverage decisions and to track real-world safety. Although recently launched prospective clinical trials will determine the true benefit of matching drugs to genomic alterations, the approach proposed here will facilitate delivery of personalized medicine services to participating patients while at the same time making observations that allow us to learn from each patient to inform clinical care and future research initiatives. PMID:24687035

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  9. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-28

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  10. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Estrogen sulfotransferases in breast and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2009-02-01

    Estrogen sulfotransferase is significantly more active in the normal breast cell (e.g., Human 7) than in the cancer cell (e.g., MCF-7). The data suggest that in breast cancer sulfoconjugated activity is carried out by another enzyme, the SULT1A, which acts at high concentration of the substrates. In breast cancer cells sulfotransferase (SULT) activity can be stimulated by various progestins: medrogestone, promegestone, and nomegestrol acetate, as well as by tibolone and its metabolites. SULT activities can also be controlled by other substances including phytoestrogens, celecoxib, flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, resveratrol), and isoflavones. SULT expression was localized in breast cancer cells, which can be stimulated by promegestone and correlated with the increase of the enzyme activity. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), which acts at nanomolar concentration of estradiol, can inactivate most of this hormone present in the normal breast; however, in the breast cancer cells, the sulfotransferase denoted as SULT1A1 is mainly present, and this acts at micromolar concentrations of E(2). A correlation was postulated among breast cancer cell proliferation, the effect of various progestins, and sulfotransferase stimulation. In conclusion, it is suggested that factors involved in the stimulation of the estrogen sulfotransferases could provide new possibilities for the treatment of patients with hormone-dependent breast and endometrial cancers. PMID:19250196

  13. Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Nattinger, Ann B; Mitchell, Julie L

    2016-06-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of breast cancer screening and prevention, focusing on risk assessment, screening, prevention, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:27270661

  14. Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation: new standard in early breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Su; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Noorie; Lee, Sea-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) has been proved effective and safe and even better for late or acute radiation toxicity for early breast cancer. Moreover, it improves patient convenience, quality of life and is expected to be advantageous in the medical care system by reducing overall cost. In this review, we examined key randomized trials of HF-WBI, focusing on adequate patient selection as suggested by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) guideline and the radiobiologic aspects of HF-WBI in relation to its adoption into clinical settings. Further investigation to identify the current practice pattern or cost effectiveness is warranted under the national health insurance service system in Korea. PMID:27306774

  15. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  16. African American women and breast cancer: notes from a study of narrative.

    PubMed

    Moore, R J

    2001-02-01

    Survival after breast cancer and after all cancers is significantly worse for African American women than for others. Although many reasons have been proposed, no studies have explored the reception of messages about breast cancer by African American survivors of this disease, and how public images and discourses about breast cancer affects both their perceived risk for this disease and their experiences of illness. Narrative accounts of their lived experiences with breast cancer were collected from 23 African American survivors of breast cancer. Three themes have emerged: (a) Breast cancer is perceived to be a white woman's disease; (b) cancer is caused by experiences of repeated traumatic heartbreak; and finally, (c) there is a perceived lack of social support and understanding for the unique life experiences of the African American survivor of breast cancer. Nurses are on the front line of patient care. In the context of the managed care environment, they spend more time with patients than other health care providers and are soundboards for many patient concerns. As such, they can use the information provided in this study to inform high-risk women, current patients, partners, and other individuals in the medical community of how African American women might inaccurately access their personal risks for breast cancer, despite the public emphasis on this disease. Through the use of culturally sensitive pamphlets, nurses and other medical practitioners can also open discussions with underserved and minority patients as a means of realistically addressing some of these women's fears about breast cancer. These fears are barriers to effective cancer prevention because these individuals may consciously or unconsciously link a diagnosis of breast cancer, or even behaviors related to cancer prevention, to a potential death sentence. PMID:11219421

  17. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  18. Innovative computer-based learning for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Karen Louise

    Discussions with student nurses when they have been on placement on the breast cancer surgery ward highlighted their lack of knowledge about breast cancer surgery. This lack of knowledge by student nurses necessitated the development of a computer-based learning tool. A distance-learning tool was found to be an effective way of providing education, due to lack of facilities and workload on the ward. The student nurses using this tool will have better understanding of the treatments their patients are undergoing, leading to improved patient care. PMID:17353818

  19. Inflammatory breast cancer clusters: A hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Paul H; Hashmi, Salman; Minaei, Ashley A; Veneroso, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Cancer clusters have long been a focus of interest because of the possibility of identifying etiologic agents. Only on rare occasions, however, have such cluster investigations been successful. One major difficulty in cluster investigations, particularly in the area of breast cancer, is the long latent period. There have been a number of publications providing a discouraging picture regarding cancer cluster investigations. The possibility of learning from a cluster investigation, however, is greatly increased if the cancer involved is relatively rare and if it has a short latent period. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) fits these criteria and is worth pursuing because of the strong evidence that environmental factors play a major role. In this report we describe our experience with several clusters and the lessons learned which are now being utilized to improve investigation of future IBC clusters. The first IBC cluster that we evaluated was in 2000, when we were asked to investigate an apparent cluster of IBC in Castro Valley, California where three women in an office setting of 24 people were diagnosed with IBC in a ten month period from May 1999 to March 2000. Our investigation of this striking cluster did not yield a specific trigger for this cluster but it did indicate that the women involved all had at least two IBC risk factors that may well have made them susceptible to getting IBC. We are now investigating another apparent cluster in Texas and are aware of several others requiring careful consideration. We see a need for a consistent protocol for the evaluation of IBC clusters focusing on the laboratory investigation of environmental triggers, primarily infectious agents and chemical carcinogens. PMID:25114867

  20. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity