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Sample records for breast cancer histological

  1. Rare Breast Cancer Subtypes: Histological, Molecular, and Clinical Peculiarities

    PubMed Central

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Orvieto, Enrico; Dominici, Massimo; Conte, PierFranco

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer encompasses a collection of different diseases characterized by different biological and pathological features, clinical presentation, response to treatments, clinical behavior, and outcome. On the basis of cell morphology, growth, and architecture patterns, breast cancer can be classified in up to 21 distinct histological types. Breast cancer special types, including the classic lobular invasive carcinoma, represent 25% of all breast cancers. The histological diversity of breast carcinomas has relevant prognostic implications. Indeed, the rare breast cancer group includes subtypes with very different prognoses, ranging from the tubular carcinoma, associated with an indolent clinical course, to metaplastic cancer, whose outcome is generally unfavorable. New approaches based on gene expression profiling allow the identification of molecularly defined breast cancer classes, with distinct biological features and clinical behavior. In clinical practice, immunohistochemical classification based on the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 is applied as a surrogate of the intrinsic molecular subtypes. However, the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes were almost completely limited to the study of ductal invasive breast cancer. Moreover, some good-prognosis triple-negative histotypes, on the basis of gene expression profiling, can be classified among the poor-prognosis group. Therefore, histopathological classification remains a crucial component of breast cancer diagnosis. Special histologies can be very rare, and the majority of information on outcome and treatments derives from small series and case reports. As a consequence, clear recommendations about clinical management are still lacking. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about rare breast cancer histologies. PMID:24969162

  2. Rare breast cancer subtypes: histological, molecular, and clinical peculiarities.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Orvieto, Enrico; Dominici, Massimo; Conte, PierFranco; Guarneri, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer encompasses a collection of different diseases characterized by different biological and pathological features, clinical presentation, response to treatments, clinical behavior, and outcome. On the basis of cell morphology, growth, and architecture patterns, breast cancer can be classified in up to 21 distinct histological types. Breast cancer special types, including the classic lobular invasive carcinoma, represent 25% of all breast cancers. The histological diversity of breast carcinomas has relevant prognostic implications. Indeed, the rare breast cancer group includes subtypes with very different prognoses, ranging from the tubular carcinoma, associated with an indolent clinical course, to metaplastic cancer, whose outcome is generally unfavorable. New approaches based on gene expression profiling allow the identification of molecularly defined breast cancer classes, with distinct biological features and clinical behavior. In clinical practice, immunohistochemical classification based on the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 is applied as a surrogate of the intrinsic molecular subtypes. However, the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes were almost completely limited to the study of ductal invasive breast cancer. Moreover, some good-prognosis triple-negative histotypes, on the basis of gene expression profiling, can be classified among the poor-prognosis group. Therefore, histopathological classification remains a crucial component of breast cancer diagnosis. Special histologies can be very rare, and the majority of information on outcome and treatments derives from small series and case reports. As a consequence, clear recommendations about clinical management are still lacking. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about rare breast cancer histologies. PMID:24969162

  3. Inflammatory Breast Cancer: A Distinct Clinicopathological Entity Transcending Histological Distinction

    PubMed Central

    Raghav, K.; French, J. T.; Ueno, N. T.; Lei, X.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Reuben, J. M.; Valero, V.; Ibrahim, N. K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although well recognized in breast oncology literature, histologic subtypes have not been previously described in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to describe lobular subtype in IBC and assess the impact of histology on patient outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 659 IBC patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center between January 1984 and December 2009. Patients with Invasive Lobular, Mixed Invasive Ductal and Lobular, or Invasive Ducal Carcinomas (ILC, MIC, IDC, respectively) comprise the subject of this report. Patient characteristics and survival estimates were compared by using chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank statistic. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to determine association of histology with outcomes after adjustment for other characteristics. Results A total of 30, 37, and 592 patients were seen to have invasive lobular, mixed, or ductal histology, respectively. Grade 3 tumors were more common in the ductal group (78%) than in the lobular (60%) or mixed (61%) group (P = 0.01). The 3-year overall survival rates were 68%, 64%, and 62% in the lobular, mixed, and ductal groups, respectively (P = 0.68). After adjustment, histology did not have a significant effect on death in the lobular group (HR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.261.94; P = 0.50) or mixed group (HR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.251.13; P = 0.10) compared with the ductal group. Conclusion In this cohort of IBC patients, lobular histology was seen in 4.5% cases. Histology does not appear to have a significant effect on survival outcomes in IBC patients, unlike in patients with non-inflammatory breast cancer (n-IBC), indicating the distinct biological behavior of the IBC phenotype. PMID:26752563

  4. Risk factors for uncommon histologic subtypes of breast cancer using centralized pathology review in the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Work, Meghan E; Andrulis, Irene L; John, Esther M; Hopper, John L; Liao, Yuyan; Zhang, Fang Fang; Knight, Julia A; West, Dee W; Milne, Roger L; Giles, Graham G; Longacre, Teri A; O'Malley, Frances; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Southey, Melissa C; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Terry, Mary Beth

    2012-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies of histologic types of breast cancer including mucinous, medullary, and tubular carcinomas have primarily relied on International Classification of Diseases-Oncology (ICD-O) codes assigned by local pathologists to define histology. Using data from the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR), we compared histologic agreement between centralized BCFR pathology review and ICD-O codes available from local tumor registries among 3,260 breast cancer cases. Agreement was low to moderate for less common histologies; for example, only 55 and 26 % of cases classified as mucinous and medullary, respectively, by centralized review were similarly classified using ICD-O coding. We then evaluated risk factors for each histologic subtype by comparing each histologic case group defined by centralized review with a common set of 2,997 population-based controls using polytomous logistic regression. Parity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.4, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI): 0.2-0.9, for parous vs. nulliparous], age at menarche (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI: 0.3-0.9, for age ≥13 vs. ≤11), and use of oral contraceptives (OCs) (OR = 0.5, 95 % CI: 0.2-0.8, OC use >5 years vs. never) were associated with mucinous carcinoma (N = 92 cases). Body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI: 1.0-1.1, per unit of BMI) and high parity (OR = 2.6, 95 % CI: 1.1-6.0 for ≥3 live births vs. nulliparous) were associated with medullary carcinoma (N = 90 cases). We did not find any associations between breast cancer risk factors and tubular carcinoma (N = 86 cases). Relative risk estimates from analyses using ICD-O classifications of histology, rather than centralized review, resulted in attenuated, and/or more imprecise, associations. These findings suggest risk factor heterogeneity across breast cancer tumor histologies, and demonstrate the value of centralized pathology review for classifying rarer tumor types. PMID:22527103

  5. Reproductive factors and histologic subtype in relation to mortality after a breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Warren Andersen, S; Newcomb, P A; Hampton, J M; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Egan, K M; Trentham-Dietz, A

    2011-12-01

    Evidence suggests that certain reproductive factors are more strongly associated with the incidence of lobular than of ductal breast cancer. The mechanisms influencing breast cancer incidence histology may also affect survival. Women with invasive breast cancer (N = 22,302) diagnosed during 1986-2005 were enrolled in a series of population-based studies in three US states. Participants completed telephone interviews regarding reproductive exposures and other breast cancer risk factors. Histologic subtype was obtained from state cancer registries. Vital status and cause of death were determined through December 2006 using the National Death Index. Women were followed for 9.8 years on average with 3,050 breast cancer deaths documented. Adjusted hazard rate ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models for breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Parity was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (P (Trend) = 0.002). Associations were similar though attenuated for all-cause mortality. In women diagnosed with ductal breast cancer, a 15% reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality was observed in women with five or more children when compared to those with no children (HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.73-1.00). A similar inverse though non-significant association was observed in women with lobular subtype (HR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.43-1.14). The trend did not extend to mixed ductal-lobular breast cancer. Age at first birth had no consistent relationship with breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality. We found increasing parity reduced mortality in ductal and lobular breast cancer. The number of full-term births, rather than age at first birth, has an effect on both breast cancer-specific and overall mortality. PMID:21769659

  6. Gene expression abnormalities in histologically normal breast epithelium from patients with luminal type of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zubor, Pavol; Hatok, Jozef; Moricova, Petra; Kajo, Karol; Kapustova, Ivana; Mendelova, Andrea; Racay, Peter; Danko, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The gene expression profile of breast cancer has been described as a great breakthrough on the way to comprehend differences in cancer origin, behavior and therapy. However, gene expression profile in histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) which could harbor genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue to develop malignancy was minor scope for scientists in the past. Thus, we aimed to analyze gene expressions in HNEpi and breast cancer tissue (BCTis) in order to establish its value as potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. We evaluated a panel of disease-specific genes in luminal type (A/B) of breast cancer and tumor surrounding HNEpi by qRT-PCR Array in 32 microdissected samples. There was 20.2 and 2.4% deregulation rate in genes with at least 2-fold or 5-fold over-expression between luminal (A/B) type breast carcinomas and tumor surrounding HNEpi, respectively. The high-grade luminal carcinomas showed higher number of deregulated genes compared to low-grade cases (50.6 vs. 23.8% with at least 2-fold deregulation rate). The main overexpressed genes in HNEpi were KLK5, SCGB1D2, GSN, EGFR and NGFR. The significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BAG1, C3, CCNA2, CD44, FGF1, FOSL1, ID2, IL6R, NGFB, NGFR, PAPPA, PLAU, SERPINB5, THBS1 and TP53 gene (p < 0.05) and BCL2L2, CTSB, ITGB4, JUN, KIT, KLF5, SCGB1D2, SCGB2A1, SERPINE1 (p < 0.01), and EGFR, GABRP, GSN, MAP2K7 and THBS2 (p < 0.001), and GSN, KLK5 (p < 0.0001). The ontological gene analyses revealed high deregulations in gene group directly associated with breast cancer prognosis and origin. PMID:25407308

  7. Histologic review of breast cancer cases in survivors of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuoka, S.; Asano, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Tokunaga, M.; Sakamoto, G.; Hartmann, W.H.; Hutter, R.V.; Land, C.E.; Henson, D.E.

    1984-09-01

    A panel of Japanese and American pathologists reviewed existing histologic material used to study breast cancer risk among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a population in which incidence studies have found a strong relationship between breast cancer risk and radiation dose. The primary charge to the panel was to define a body of confirmed cases in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation that would require little or no review for inclusion in future studies of breast cancer incidence. Broad agreement on histologic type was reached for 298 of 300 confirmed cases. The distribution of histologic types was, overall, similar to that seen in other studies of breast cancer in Japanese women, and did not appear to depend on dose; thus radiation-induced breast cancer appeared to be no different histologically from other breast cancer. Also, no evidence was found of variation in histologic type by city, age at exposure, age at diagnosis, or calendar time.

  8. Refinement of breast cancer classification by molecular characterization of histological special types.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, B; Horlings, H M; Kreike, B; Hayes, M M; Hauptmann, M; Wessels, L F A; de Jong, D; Van de Vijver, M J; Van't Veer, L J; Peterse, J L

    2008-10-01

    Most invasive breast cancers are classified as invasive ductal carcinoma not otherwise specified (IDC NOS), whereas about 25% are defined as histological 'special types'. These special-type breast cancers are categorized into at least 17 discrete pathological entities; however, whether these also constitute discrete molecular entities remains to be determined. Current therapy decision-making is increasingly governed by the molecular classification of breast cancer (luminal, basal-like, HER2+). The molecular classification is derived from mainly IDC NOS and it is unknown whether this classification applies to all histological subtypes. We aimed to refine the breast cancer classification systems by analysing a series of 11 histological special types [invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), tubular, mucinous A, mucinous B, neuroendocrine, apocrine, IDC with osteoclastic giant cells, micropapillary, adenoid cystic, metaplastic, and medullary carcinoma] using immunohistochemistry and genome-wide gene expression profiling. Hierarchical clustering analysis confirmed that some histological special types constitute discrete entities, such as micropapillary carcinoma, but also revealed that others, including tubular and lobular carcinoma, are very similar at the transcriptome level. When classified by expression profiling, IDC NOS and ILC contain all molecular breast cancer types (ie luminal, basal-like, HER2+), whereas histological special-type cancers, apart from apocrine carcinoma, are homogeneous and only belong to one molecular subtype. Our analysis also revealed that some special types associated with a good prognosis, such as medullary and adenoid cystic carcinomas, display a poor prognosis basal-like transcriptome, providing strong circumstantial evidence that basal-like cancers constitute a heterogeneous group. Taken together, our results imply that the correct classification of breast cancers of special histological type will allow a more accurate prognostication of breast cancer patients and facilitate the identification of optimal therapeutic strategies. PMID:18720457

  9. Histological grade and other prognostic factors in relation to survival of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, L. S.; Edwards, D. N.; McConnell, E. M.; Downham, D. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Records of 3085 patients registered with breast cancer at the Mersey Regional Cancer Registry have been analysed to evaluate the relative importance of possible prognostic factors. In a subgroup of 1759 patients, clinical stage and histological grade are shown to be strongly related to survival after treatment. In addition histological grade is related to the distribution of times to death after treatment. The results of this and 3 other studies have implications for the design and analysis of clinical trials in the primary treatment of breast cancer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:454563

  10. Whole exome sequencing of rare aggressive breast cancer histologies.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Smutná, Veronika; Scott, Véronique; Yin, Guangliang; Xu, Ran; Vielh, Philippe; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Vicier, Cécile; Laporte, Melanie; Drusch, Francoise; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco; Delaloge, Suzette; Lacroix, Ludovic; Fromigué, Olivia; André, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Celine

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about mutational landscape of rare breast cancer (BC) subtypes. The aim of the study was to apply next generation sequencing to three different subtypes of rare BCs in order to identify new genes related to cancer progression. We performed whole exome and targeted sequencing of 29 micropapillary, 23 metaplastic, and 27 pleomorphic lobular BCs. Micropapillary BCs exhibit a profile comparable to common BCs: PIK3CA, TP53, GATA3, and MAP2K4 were the most frequently mutated genes. Metaplastic BCs presented a high frequency of TP53 (78 %) and PIK3CA (48 %) mutations and were recurrently mutated on KDM6A (13 %), a gene involved in histone demethylation. Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma exhibited high mutation rate of PIK3CA (30 %), TP53 (22 %), and CDH1 (41 %) and also presented mutations in PYGM, a gene involved in glycogen metabolism, in 8 out of 27 samples (30 %). Further analyses of publicly available datasets showed that PYGM is dramatically underexpressed in common cancers as compared to normal tissues and that low expression in tumors is correlated with poor relapse-free survival. Immunohistochemical staining on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues available in our cohort of patients confirmed higher PYGM expression in normal breast tissue compared to equivalent tumoral zone. Next generation sequencing methods applied on rare cancer subtypes can serve as a useful tool in order to uncover new potential therapeutic targets. Sequencing of pleomorphic lobular carcinoma identified a high rate of alterations in PYGM. These findings emphasize the role of glycogen metabolism in cancer progression. PMID:26907767

  11. Characteristics of the Japanese histological classification for breast cancer: correlations with imaging and cytology.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shin-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tsuchiya, Kyoko; Ohashi, Ryuji

    2013-08-20

    The Japanese histological classification of breast cancer is a unique classification that was published as the 2nd edition of the General Rules for Clinical and Pathological Recording of Breast Cancer in 1971. According to this classification, breast cancers are divided into three subgroups: noninvasive, invasive, and Paget's disease. Invasive carcinomas are further divided into two groups: invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) and special types. IDCs are the most common types, representing 70-80 % of all breast cancers, and most of them correspond to invasive carcinoma-not special type-according to the latest WHO classification (4th edition). In particular, IDCs are subdivided into three subgroups as follows: (1) papillotubular carcinoma, which is characterized by the projection of papillae into spaces, and includes cribriform and comedo patterns; (2) solid-tubular carcinoma, which is a solid cluster of cancer cells with expansive growths that form relatively sharp borders; and (3) scirrhous carcinoma, which grows in a scirrhous manner characterized by cancer nests or cells accompanied by marked fibrosis. The concept of subclassification originated in Japan. The Japanese histological classification has taken on important roles since its publication, in particular for comparisons between histology and imaging or cytology. PMID:23959775

  12. Gene expression profiles of estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers are detectable in histologically normal breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kelly; Ge, Xijin; de las Morenas, Antonio; Tripathi, Anusri; Rosenberg, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we found that gene expression in histologically normal breast epithelium (NlEpi) from women at high breast cancer risk can resemble gene expression in NlEpi from cancer-containing breasts. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene expression characteristic of a cancer subtype might be seen in NlEpi of breasts containing that subtype. Experimental Design We examined gene expression in 46 cases of microdissected NlEpi from untreated women undergoing breast cancer surgery. From 30 age-matched cases (15 estrogen receptor (ER)+, 15 ER-) we used Affymetryix U133A arrays. From 16 independent cases (9 ER+, 7 ER-), we validated selected genes using qPCR. We then compared gene expression between NlEpi and invasive breast cancer using 4 publicly available datasets. Results We identified 198 genes that are differentially expressed between NlEpi from breasts with ER+ (NlEpiER+) compared to ER- cancers (NlEpiER-). These include genes characteristic of ER+ and ER- cancers (e.g., ESR1, GATA3, and CX3CL1, FABP7). QPCR validated the microarray results in both the 30 original cases and the 16 independent cases. Gene expression in NlEpiER+ and NlEpiER- resembled gene expression in ER+ and ER- cancers, respectively: 25-53% of the genes or probes examined in 4 external datasets overlapped between NlEpi and the corresponding cancer subtype. Conclusions Gene expression differs in NlEpi of breasts containing ER+ compared to ER- breast cancers. These differences echo differences in ER+ and ER- invasive cancers. NlEpi gene expression may help elucidate subtype-specific risk signatures, identify early genomic events in cancer development and locate targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:21059815

  13. Breast Cancer Classification From Histological Images with Multiple Features and Random Subspace Classifier Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yungang; Zhang, Bailing; Lu, Wenjin

    2011-06-01

    Histological image is important for diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we present a novel automatic breaset cancer classification scheme based on histological images. The image features are extracted using the Curvelet Transform, statistics of Gray Level Co-occurence Matrix (GLCM) and Completed Local Binary Patterns (CLBP), respectively. The three different features are combined together and used for classification. A classifier ensemble approach, called Random Subspace Ensemble (RSE), are used to select and aggregate a set of base neural network classifiers for classification. The proposed multiple features and random subspace ensemble offer the classification rate 95.22% on a publically available breast cancer image dataset, which compares favorably with the previously published result 93.4%.

  14. High histologic grade and increased relative content of tryptophan in breast cancer using ratios from fingerprint fluorescence spectral peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Histologic grade is a very important, but underappreciated, parameter of breast cancer aggressiveness. Despite its importance, it has historically not been included as one of the criteria for staging of this cancer. In this study, spectral fluorescence profiles from patients with breast carcinoma were acquired. Ratios of emission peaks at 340 over 440,460 nm from biomolecules in malignant and normal samples were calculated. Cancerous over normal ratios (double ratio (DR) method) were evaluated with respect to tumor characteristics. Increased tryptophan content in breast cancer tissues correlates strongly with high grade, but not with lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor or Her-2-Neu receptor status.

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  16. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histology images with deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cireşan, Dan C; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We use deep max-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mitosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained to classify each pixel in the images, using as context a patch centered on the pixel. Simple postprocessing is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming other contestants by a significant margin. PMID:24579167

  17. A new histological therapeutic classification system to predict eradicated and residual lymph nodes in breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Morohashi, Satoko; Yoshizawa, Tadashi; Seino, Hiroko; Hirai, Hideaki; Haga, Toshihiro; Ota, Rie; Wu, Yunyan; Yoshida, Eri; Hakamada, Kenichi; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The indication for neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has recently broadened to include its use in the treatment of initial stage breast cancer. Axillary lymph node metastasis after NAC in breast cancer is a poor prognostic factor. Thus, the prediction of lymph node metastasis is important to estimate the prognosis of breast cancer patients after NAC. Therefore, we focused on residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors after NAC and examined the correlation between the patterns and lymph node metastasis. In this study, we examined 50 breast cancer specimens and associated dissected lymph nodes after NAC. We divided 40 cases into an eradicated lymph node group and a residual lymph node group to analyze residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors. Residual carcinoma patterns were classified according to the cell density of carcinoma cells: dense, focal/nested and sporadic/in-situ. There were significant differences in residual carcinoma patterns (P<0.01) among the three pattern groups. There was a high incidence of dense patterns in the residual lymph node group and a high incidence of sporadic/in-situ patterns in the eradicated lymph node group. Analysis of residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors and clinicopathological factors demonstrated that there were significant differences in tumor reduced ratio on CT (P<0.001), primary tumor area before NAC (P<0.01), primary tumor area after NAC (P<0.00001), intrinsic subtype (P<0.01), Ki-67 labeling index (P<0.01), histological grade (P<0.05) and mitotic count (P<0.01) between the dense and non-dense groups. Therefore, our results suggest that the residual carcinoma pattern is useful for predicting eradicated or residual lymph nodes and the malignant potential in breast cancer after NAC. PMID:26935647

  18. A new histological therapeutic classification system to predict eradicated and residual lymph nodes in breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    MOROHASHI, SATOKO; YOSHIZAWA, TADASHI; SEINO, HIROKO; HIRAI, HIDEAKI; HAGA, TOSHIHIRO; OTA, RIE; WU, YUNYAN; YOSHIDA, ERI; HAKAMADA, KENICHI; KIJIMA, HIROSHI

    2016-01-01

    The indication for neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has recently broadened to include its use in the treatment of initial stage breast cancer. Axillary lymph node metastasis after NAC in breast cancer is a poor prognostic factor. Thus, the prediction of lymph node metastasis is important to estimate the prognosis of breast cancer patients after NAC. Therefore, we focused on residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors after NAC and examined the correlation between the patterns and lymph node metastasis. In this study, we examined 50 breast cancer specimens and associated dissected lymph nodes after NAC. We divided 40 cases into an eradicated lymph node group and a residual lymph node group to analyze residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors. Residual carcinoma patterns were classified according to the cell density of carcinoma cells: dense, focal/nested and sporadic/in-situ. There were significant differences in residual carcinoma patterns (P<0.01) among the three pattern groups. There was a high incidence of dense patterns in the residual lymph node group and a high incidence of sporadic/in-situ patterns in the eradicated lymph node group. Analysis of residual carcinoma patterns of primary breast tumors and clinicopathological factors demonstrated that there were significant differences in tumor reduced ratio on CT (P<0.001), primary tumor area before NAC (P<0.01), primary tumor area after NAC (P<0.00001), intrinsic subtype (P<0.01), Ki-67 labeling index (P<0.01), histological grade (P<0.05) and mitotic count (P<0.01) between the dense and non-dense groups. Therefore, our results suggest that the residual carcinoma pattern is useful for predicting eradicated or residual lymph nodes and the malignant potential in breast cancer after NAC. PMID:26935647

  19. Automatic glandular and tubule region segmentation in histological grading of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Barnes, Michael; Srinivas, Chukka; Chefd'hotel, Christophe

    2015-03-01

    In the popular Nottingham histologic score system for breast cancer grading, the pathologist analyzes the H and E tissue slides and assigns a score, in the range of 1-3, for tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism and mitotic activity in the tumor regions. The scores from these three factors are added to give a final score, ranging from 3-9 to grade the cancer. Tubule score (TS), which reflects tubular formation, is a value in 1-3 given by manually estimating the percentage of glandular regions in the tumor that form tubules. In this paper, given an H and E tissue image representing a tumor region, we propose an automated algorithm to detect glandular regions and detect the presence of tubules in these regions. The algorithm first detects all nuclei and lumen candidates in the input image, followed by identifying tumor nuclei from the detected nuclei and identifying true lumina from the lumen candidates using a random forest classifier. Finally, it forms the glandular regions by grouping the closely located tumor nuclei and lumina using a graph-cut-based method. The glandular regions containing true lumina are considered as the ones that form tubules (tubule regions). To evaluate the proposed method, we calculate the tubule percentage (TP), i.e., the ratio of the tubule area to the total glandular area for 353 H and E images of the three TSs, and plot the distribution of these TP values. This plot shows the clear separation among these three scores, suggesting that the proposed algorithm is useful in distinguishing images of these TSs.

  20. Histologic Grade and Decrease in Tumor Dimensions Affect Axillary Lymph Node Status after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hee; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Ji Young; Han, Sehwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purposes our study was to find out any histologic factors associated with negative conversion of axillary lymph node (ALN) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). We also evaluated the association between the decrease in size of primary breast tumor and negative conversion of ALN. Methods From January 2012 to November 2014, we included 133 breast cancer patients who underwent NAC and who had ALN metastases which were confirmed on fine-needle aspiration or core needle biopsy at initial diagnosis. All 133 patients underwent initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the time of diagnosis and preoperative MRI after completion of NAC. We measured the longest dimension of primary breast cancer on MRI. Results Of 133 patients, 39 patients (29%) showed negative conversion of ALN and of these 39 patients, 25 patients (64%) showed pathologic complete remission of primary breast. On univariate analysis, mean percent decrease in longest dimension, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status and histologic grade were significantly associated with the ALN status after NAC (p<0.001, p=0.001, p< 0.001, p=0.001, p=0.002, respectively). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, percent decrease in longest dimension (odds ratio, 1.026; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.044) and histologic grade (odds ratio, 3.964; 95% CI, 1.151-13.657) were identified as being independently associated with the ALN status after NAC. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.835 with the best cutoff value of 80% decrease in longest dimension. Combination of high histologic grade and more than 80% decrease in longest dimension showed 64% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Conclusion High histologic grade and more than 80% decrease in primary tumor dimension were associated with negative conversion of ALN after NAC. PMID:26770247

  1. Prognostic Value of Tumor-Associated Macrophages According to Histologic Locations and Hormone Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Jae Moon; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Il; Seo, An Na; Park, So Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor progression by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. However, in breast cancer, the clinical relevance of the TAM infiltration according to distinct histologic locations (intratumoral vs. stromal) and hormone receptor status is unclear. We investigated the significance of the levels of TAM infiltration in distinct histologic locations in invasive breast cancer. We also examined the relationship of the TAM levels with the clinicopathologic features of tumors, expression of EMT markers, and clinical outcomes. Finally, we analyzed the prognostic value of TAM levels according to hormone receptor status. High levels of infiltration of intratumoral, stromal and total TAMs were associated with high histologic grade, p53 overexpression, high Ki-67 proliferation index and negative hormone receptor status. Infiltration of TAMs was also correlated with overexpression of vimentin, smooth muscle actin and alteration of β-catenin. Overall, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAMs was associated with poor disease-free survival, and was found to be an independent prognostic factor. In subgroup analyses by hormone receptor status, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAM was an independent prognostic factor in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup, but not in the hormone-receptor negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that intratumoral TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in breast cancer, especially in the hormone receptor-positive group, and the level of TAM infiltration may be used as a prognostic factor and even a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25884955

  2. [Comparison of clinical data, ultrasonography, mamography and histological findings obtained by ex tempore biopsy for breast cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Stojacić-Djenić, S; Kerkez, M; Jović, D; Maksimović, Z; Jeftović, I; Milić, Z; Perisić, M; Jurisić, V

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is really one from tumor with highest mortality in this country as well as in the word. For early detection of the loco-regional breast cancer and disease confirmation, many diagnostic procedures were recommended with aims to help in decision for surgery treatment. This comparative study reported data by clinical analyses, ultra-sonography, mammography and histological findings obtained after ex tempore biopsy, in 59 women with breast cancer aged from 16 to 69. The highest incidence of cancer was obtained in women over 61 years of age, although high rate of breast cancer was found in aging between 21 to 50 years. The fibroadenoma were founded in 40.68%, while malignant carcinoma ductale in 13.55% of all cases. Correlation between applied analyses for fibroadenoma was found in 86.05% cases, while in malignant lesions this percentage was highest (93.33%). Apart of these methods applied for early diagnosis in general hospital and obtained statistical significance in diagnosis, new techniques based on molecular level (hormone receptor status) must be used. PMID:19245139

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  5. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  7. Use of different postmenopausal hormone therapies and risk of histology- and hormone receptor-defined invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Agnès; Fabre, Alban; Mesrine, Sylvie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Berrino, Franco; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We previously found that the risk of invasive breast cancer varied according to the progestagen component of combined postmenopausal hormone therapy (CHT): progesterone, dydrogesterone, or other progestagens. We conducted the present study to assess how these CHTs were associated with histology- and hormone receptor-defined breast cancer. Patients and Methods We used data from the French E3N cohort study, with 80,391 postmenopausal women followed for a mean duration of 8.1 years; 2,265 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers were identified through biennial self-administered questionnaires completed from 1990 to 2002. The relative risks (RRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Compared with postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) never-use, ever-use of estrogen+progesterone was not significantly associated with the risk of any breast cancer subtype, but increasing duration of estrogen+progesterone was associated with increasing risks of lobular (P=.06) and estrogen receptor–positive/progesterone receptor–negative (ER+/PR−; P=.02). Estrogen+dydrogesterone was associated with a significant increase in risk of lobular carcinoma (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.6). Estrogen+other progestagens was associated with significant increases in risk of ductal and lobular carcinomas (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 1.8; and 2.0; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.7, respectively), of ER+/PR+ and ER+/PR− carcinomas (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 2.1; and 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9 to 3.5, respectively), but not of ER−/PR+ or ER−/PR− carcinomas (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5 to 2.1; and 1.4; 95% CI, 0.9 to 2.0, respectively). Conclusion The increase in risk of breast cancer observed with the use of CHTs other than estrogen+progesterone and estrogen+dydrogesterone seems to apply preferentially to ER+ carcinomas, especially those ER+/PR−, and to affect both ductal and lobular carcinomas. PMID:18323549

  8. MRI Kinetics With Volumetric Analysis in Correlation With Hormonal Receptor Subtypes and Histologic Grade of Invasive Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lester Chee Hao; Gombos, Eva C.; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess whether computer-assisted detection–processed MRI kinetics data can provide further information on the biologic aggressiveness of breast tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS We identified 194 newly diagnosed invasive breast cancers presenting as masses on contrast-enhanced MRI by a HIPAA-compliant pathology database search. Computer-assisted detection–derived data for the mean and median peak signal intensity percentage increase, most suspicious kinetic curve patterns, and volumetric analysis of the different kinetic patterns by mean percentage tumor volume were compared against the different hormonal receptor (estrogen-receptor [ER], progesterone-receptor [PR], ERRB2 (HER2/neu), and triple-receptor expressivity) and histologic grade subgroups, which were used as indicators of tumor aggressiveness. RESULTS The means and medians of the peak signal intensity percentage increase were higher in ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative (all p ≤ 0.001), and grade 3 tumors (p = 0.011). Volumetric analysis showed higher mean percentage volume of rapid initial enhancement in biologically more aggressive ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative tumors compared with ER-positive (64% vs 53.6%, p = 0.013), PR-positive (65.4% vs 52.5%, p = 0.001), and nontriple-negative tumors (65.3% vs 54.6%, p = 0.028), respectively. A higher mean percentage volume of rapid washout component was seen in ERRB2-positive tumors compared with ERRB2-negative tumors (27.5% vs 17.9%, p = 0.020). CONCLUSION Peak signal intensity percentage increase and volume analysis of the different kinetic patterns of breast tumors showed correlation with hormonal receptor and histologic grade indicators of cancer aggressiveness. Computer-assisted detection–derived MRI kinetics data have the potential to further characterize the aggressiveness of an invasive cancer. PMID:25714321

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... puckering or dimpling An unusual increase in the size of one breast One breast unusually lower than the other Other Organizations American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Network Susan G. Komen for ...

  10. Are columnar cell lesions the earliest histologically detectable non-obligate precursor of breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Turashvili, Gulisa; Hayes, Malcolm; Gilks, Blake; Watson, Peter; Aparicio, Samuel

    2008-06-01

    Columnar cell lesions (CCLs) are one of the most common abnormalities in the adult female human breast, characterized by the presence of columnar-shaped epithelial cells lining enlarged terminal-duct lobular units. CCLs are being seen increasingly in core biopsies taken for the non-palpable calcifications. The increased incidence may reflect improved delineation and recognition of CCLs by pathologists or a true increase in incidence related to biological and/or environmental factors. Columnar cell-like lesions have been described under a variety of names such as blunt duct adenosis, flat epithelial atypia, and ductal intraepithelial neoplasia type DIN1a. The current histologic classification used by some pathologists divides them into simple columnar cell change and columnar cell hyperplasia, both of which can occur with or without atypia. Columnar cells lack mature luminal or basal/myoepithelial phenotype markers, but they are usually positive for estrogen receptor-alpha. The cellular origin of CCLs and their possible relationship to either expansion or metaplasia of a preexisting normal cell phenotype remains unclear. CCLs are frequently associated with lobular and ductal in situ tumors and invasive lobular and tubular carcinomas. The relationship and natural history of CCLs to invasive ductal carcinoma is enigmatic, but they may prove of clinical relevance when detected by screening mammography. PMID:18437416

  11. Quantitative thresholds for mitotic counts in histologic grading: confirmation in nonfrozen samples of invasive ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kronqvist, P; Kuopio, T; Collan, Y

    2000-04-01

    Increasing evidence in the medical literature suggests that freezing a sample before fixation causes changes in the histologically observed mitotic activity. In a recent study we determined quantitative thresholds for mitotic counts in invasive ductal breast cancer in both nonfrozen and frozen formalin-fixed specimens. Survival- and recurrence-based analyses of this study material indicated grading thresholds of 17 and 32 mitoses/mm(2) for standardized mitotic index (SMI) and 13 and 35 mitoses/10 high-power fields for mitotic activity index (MAI). The purpose of the present study is to confirm and adjust the introduced thresholds in only nonfrozen formalin-fixed samples. The SMI and MAI in 202 cases of nonfrozen formalin-fixed samples were analyzed to determine optimal cutpoints for prognostication of invasive breast cancer on the basis of mitotic activity. The SMI thresholds were identical in both the present nonfrozen specimens and the previous combined specimens. The optimal MAI thresholds in the nonfrozen material changed to 11 and 37 mitoses/10 high-power field. The confirmation and adjustment of the mitotic thresholds improved the prognostic significance of the method in the nonfrozen material, which will contribute to the clinical applicability of a morphometric grading system. PMID:10760318

  12. Sexuality After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment Emotional aspects of breast cancer Body image after breast cancer treatment Sexuality after breast cancer ... treatment for breast cancer stops working Previous Topic Body image after breast cancer treatment Next Topic Pregnancy after ...

  13. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... that obese women produce more estrogen. This may fuel the development of breast cancer. Radiation . If you ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ...

  14. HER 2 immunohistochemistry for breast cancer cell blocks can be used in the same way as that used for histological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Nami; Satou, Masakazu; Kojima, Kenta; Tanaka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing of samples from recurrent or metastatic breast cancer is recommended by the 2013 update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines. Although cytological analysis can be applied to several types of metastatic lesions, the practical method for HER2 testing of cytological specimens is yet to be resolved. We conducted immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for HER2 in breast cancer cell blocks (CBs) and compared the results with those from the corresponding histological specimens. In cases of discrepancy between the two types of specimen, the bright‐field HER2 dual in situ hybridization (DISH) assay was performed. Methods CBs were prepared from 54 surgically excised breast cancers. The cells were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and embedded in paraffin. A Ventana BenchMark ULTRA (Roche Diagnostics) with anti‐HER‐2/neu (4B5) rabbit monoclonal primary antibody and INFORM HER2/neu Dual ISH DNA Probe Cocktail was used for the assays. Results Successful results were obtained in 52 of 54 CBs. Forty cases showed agreement between CBs and the histological specimens. No discrepancy was observed between the two types of specimens in cases where HER2 expression was positive. IHC results of CB in 12 discrepant cases were HER2 intermediate or negative. The DISH results of 11 of these cases were negative. Conclusion IHC staining of HER2 for breast cancer CBs can be used in the same way as that used for histological specimens, although the number of equivocal cases in CBs is greater than that in histological specimens. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:274–279. © 2016 The Authors Diagnostic Cytopathology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800514

  15. Gene expression profiling of histologically normal breast tissue in females with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2‑positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zubor, Pavol; Hatok, Jozef; Moricova, Petra; Kapustova, Ivana; Kajo, Karol; Mendelova, Andrea; Sivonova, Monika Kmetova; Danko, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Gene expression profile‑based taxonomy of breast cancer (BC) has been described as a significant breakthrough in comprehending the differences in the origin and behavior of cancer to allow individually tailored therapeutic approaches. In line with this, we hypothesized that the gene expression profile of histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) could harbor certain genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue cells to develop human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑positive BC. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess gene expression in normal and BC tissue (BCTis) from patients with BC in order to establish its value as a potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. An array study evaluating a panel of 84 pathway‑ and disease‑specific genes in HER2‑positive BC and tumor‑adjacent HNEpi was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 12 patients using microdissected samples from frozen tissue. Common prognostic and predictive parameters of BC were assessed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In the BCTis and HNEpi samples of 12 HER2‑positive subjects with BC, the expression of 2,016 genes was assessed. A total of 39.3% of genes were deregulated at a minimal two‑fold deregulation rate and 10.7% at a five‑fold deregulation rate in samples of HNEpi or BCTis. Significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BCL2L2, CD44, CTSD, EGFR, ERBB2, ITGA6, NGFB, RPL27, SCBG2A1 and SCGB1D2 genes (P<0.05), as well as GSN, KIT, KLK5, SERPINB5 and STC2 genes (P<0.01). Insignificant differences (P<0.07) were observed for CCNA1, CLU, DLC1, GABRP and IL6 genes. The ontological gene analyses revealed that the majority of the deregulated genes in the HNEpi samples were part of the functional gene group directly associated with BC origin and prognosis. Functional analysis showed that the most frequent gene deregulations occurred in genes associated with apoptosis and cell cycle regulation in BCTis samples, and with angiogenesis, regulation of the cell cycle and transcriptional activity in HNEpi samples. The molecular profiling of HNEpi breast tissue revealed gene expression abnormalities that may represent potential markers of increased risk for HER2‑positive malignant transformation of breast tissue, and may be able to be employed as predictors of prognosis. PMID:25373323

  16. [Histological diagnosis, DNA-content and chromatin pattern of breast cancer cases with positive and negative 17-beta-oestradiol receptor binding (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sachs, H; Winzer, J

    1976-12-10

    The DNA-concent of cell nuclei of 45 breast cancer cases of various histological structure has been determined cytophotometrically. With the exception of two gallert carcinomas no DNA-histogram of peridiploid range was found. The average DNA-content was 2--3 times higher as in the control tissue. The standard deviation of undifferentiated solid mammary tumors was the highest measured in this series. 24 of 45 cases had a negative oestrogen receptor binding. This was true in 60% of the undiffierentiated solid breast cancer cases, in 69% of the adenomatous and in 89 respectively 67% of the ones of special histological structure. The heterochromatin content of nuclei was lowest in the group of differentiated mammary cancer (50--60%). In the group of undifferentiated tumors it was 60--70%. So much for now is known about the mechanism of cellular action of 17-beta-oestradiol and the function of eu- and heterochromatin of cell nuclei it is discussed that positive or negative oestrogen hormone receptor binding in mammary tumor cells is probably a biochemical parameter of cytological desintegration. From this point of view these hormon receptors could be of the same value as the index of Barr bodies in breast cancer cells with respect of selection of cases for hormonal therapy. But this has to be analyzed in further studies extensively. PMID:1036881

  17. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer ... common types of breast cancer surgery. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) This type of surgery removes only a ...

  18. Atypical breasts cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lucie; Ng, Cho Ee; Fasih, Tarannum

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With increasing incidence of breast cancers there are now a larger number of cases diagnosed with rare malignancies. These can be diagnostic dilemmas and management strategy can be different by various breast multi-disciplinary teams (MDT). We aim to discuss the evidence-based approach for management of these atypical breast cancers which were identified in patients from a single breast screening unit. Method Patient with unusual breast malignancies (all types except invasive ductal and lobular) treated under the care of a single surgeon were identified during the breast multi-disciplinary discussion from 2011 to 2015. The histology and management of these cases were reviewed and literature search of electronic databases via PubMed and the search engines Google/Google Scholar was performed. Emphasis on keywords based on the histology type was used to limit search. Search was focused on the diagnosis, management and prognosis of these unusual breast cancers. Conclusion This series aims to focus on the evidence-based management of these rare breast malignancies; the diagnosis of which is crucial as it affects the overall treatment and prognosis. PMID:26812668

  19. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  20. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  2. High GINS2 transcript level predicts poor prognosis and correlates with high histological grade and endocrine therapy resistance through mammary cancer stem cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Yinghui; Yang, Xiangmin; Tang, Juan; Wei, Ding; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Zhu, Ping

    2014-11-01

    GINS2, a subunit of the GINS complex, is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma and metastatic breast tumor; however, its prognostic power and possible molecular mechanisms in breast cancer (BC) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the function of GINS2 in BC. The association between GINS2 transcript level and the clinical outcome of BC patients were estimated using Kaplan-Meier plots, multivariate cox regression analysis, forest plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed to explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of the GINS2 transcript. High GINS2 transcript level was correlated with poor relapse free survival (log-rank P ≤ 0.001 in six cohorts; forest plot: total n = 1,420, total RR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.45-2.03; multivariate cox regression analysis: n = 906, HR 2.36, 95% CI 1.88-2.97), and distant metastasis free survival (log-rank P < 0.01 in 3 cohorts; forest plot: total n = 691, total RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.36-2.67; multivariate cox regression analysis: n = 442, HR 2.43, 95% CI 1.70-3.47). BC patients with higher GINS2 transcript levels showed poorer tamoxifen efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. GINS2 expression was significantly downregulated under mutated p53-depleted condition in MDA-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells, upregulated in mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs) (P = 0.003), and correlated with upregulated genes in mammary stem cells (GSEA: P < 0.01). Our study, for the first time, demonstrates that GINS2 is an independent prognostic marker and is associated with lung metastasis, histological grade, and endocrine therapy resistance in BC patients, which may attribute to mutant p53 and MaCSCs. PMID:25348432

  3. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K. Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M.; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1–14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  4. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars A; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P

    2015-10-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1-14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  5. Secondary cancer rates following breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wesley, David

    2007-01-01

    Life table analysis and other mortality methods apply well to end points other than mortality. This paper demonstrates the application of mortality experience methodology to the recurrence of breast cancer and/or new primaries in women previously diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Specific recurrence rates are broken out by duration as well as attributes available at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis: stage, histology, age band, and year of diagnosis. Use of attained age is demonstrated to control for the effect of aging over long durations. Breast cancer recurrence is shown to drop to a relatively low rate compared with the rate of new primary occurrence. PMID:17941334

  6. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index tumours supporting the importance of contralateral breast cancer screening at the time of primary diagnosis and during follow-up. BBC occurs more frequently in old age group and majority of these tumours are estrogen dependent. There is good pathological concordance between the index tumour and the contralateral breast cancer. PMID:26500995

  7. Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  8. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  9. Discordance of Intraoperative Frozen Section Analysis with Definitive Histology of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer Surgery: Complementary Axillary Lymph Node Dissection is Irrelevant for Subsequent Systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, D.; Gobardhan, P. D.; Madsen, E. V. E.; Albregts, M.; van Gorp, J.; de Hooge, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background In breast cancer surgery, intraoperative frozen section (FS) analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) enables axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) during the same operative procedure. In case of discordance between a negative FS analysis and definitive histology, an ALND as a second operation is advocated since additional lymph node metastases may be present. The clinical implications of the subsequent ALND in these patients were evaluated. Materials and Methods Between November 2000 and May 2008, 879 consecutive breast cancer patients underwent surgery including sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) with intraoperative FS analysis of 2 central cuts from axillary SLNs. Following fixation and serial sectioning, SLNs were further examined postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical techniques. For patients with a discordant FS examination, the effect of the pathology findings of the subsequent ALND specimen on subsequent nonsurgical therapy were evaluated. Results FS analysis detected axillary metastases in the SLN(s) in 200 patients (23%), while the definitive pathology examination detected metastases in SLNs in another 151 patients (17%). A complementary ALND was performed in 108 of the 151 patients with discordant FS. Additional tumor positive axillary lymph nodes were found in 17 patients (16%), leading to upstaging in 7 (6%). Subsequent nonsurgical treatment was adjusted in 4 patients (4%): all 4 had more extensive locoregional radiotherapy; no patient received additional hormonal and/or chemotherapy. Conclusion Discordance between intraoperative FS analysis and definitive histology of SLNs is common. In this selection of patients, a substantial proportion had additional lymph node metastases, but postsurgical treatment was rarely adjusted based on the findings of the complementary ALND. PMID:20422461

  10. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  11. [Breast cancer imaging].

    PubMed

    Canale, Sandra; Balleyguier, Corinne; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of breast cancer is multimodal. Mammography uses X-rays, the development of digital mammography has improved its quality and enabled implementations of new technologies such astomosynthesis (3D mammography) or contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Ultrasound is added to mammography when there is need to improve detection in high-density breast, to characterize an image, or guide apuncture or biopsy. Breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality. It detects a possible tumor angiogenesis by highlighting an early and intense contrast uptake. This method has an excellent negative predictive value, but its lack of specificity (false positives) can be problematic, thus it has to be prescribed according to published standards. An imaging breast screening report must be concluded by the BI-RADS lexicon classification of the ACR and recommendations about monitoring or histological verification. PMID:24579332

  12. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  13. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of breast cancer, have had breast biopsies in the past, or take hormones. False-negative results . These are tests that come back normal even though there ... have breast cancer and delay treatment. Exposure to radiation is ...

  14. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Breast Cancer - Stages up Breast Cancer - About Clinical Trials › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Breast Cancer ...

  15. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  16. Normal and pathological breast, the histological basis.

    PubMed

    Guinebretière, J M; Menet, E; Tardivon, A; Cherel, P; Vanel, D

    2005-04-01

    Breast tissue is heterogeneous, associating connective and glandular structures, which grow and change cyclically under hormonal regulation. Hormones are also thought to be the main determinant of the major benign and malignant pathologies encountered in the breast. Benign lesions are more frequent and fibrocystic changes are by far the most common among them. They usually associate different entities, (adenosis, fibrosis, cysts and hyperplasia) but vary in intensity and extension. Thus, their clinical and radiographic presentation is extremely different from one patient to another. Adenofibroma is the most frequent tumour. It also undergoes modifications according to hormonal conditions. About 90% of malignant tumours are primary carcinoma. The incidence of intra-ductal carcinoma has risen dramatically since the development of screening because of its ability to induce calcification. Two mechanisms could be involved in the formation of calcification: one active (tumour cell secretion of vesicles), the other passive (necrotic cell fragments are released). Invasive carcinoma comprises numerous histological types. Stromal reactions essentially determines their shape: a fibrous reaction commonly found in ductal carcinoma creates a stellate lesion while other stroma, inflammatory (medullary carcinoma), vascular (papillary carcinoma) or mucinous determine nodular lesions whose borders push the surrounding tissue. The histological features which give rise to the radiographic pattern will be emphasised. PMID:15797289

  17. Differences in fluorescence profiles from breast cancer tissues due to changes in relative tryptophan content via energy transfer: tryptophan content correlates with histologic grade and tumor size but not with lymph node metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-12-01

    The correlation between histologic grade, an increasingly important measure of prognosis for patients with breast cancer, and tryptophan levels from tissues of 15 breast carcinoma patients was investigated. Changes in the relative content of key native organic biomolecule tryptophan were seen from the fluorescence spectra of cancerous and paired normal tissues with excitation wavelengths of 280 and 300 nm. Due to a large spectral overlap and matching excitation-emission spectra, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan-donor to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides-acceptor was noted. We used the ratios of fluorescence intensities at their spectral emission peaks, or spectral fingerprint peaks, at 340, 440, and 460 nm. Higher ratios correlated strongly with high histologic grade, while lower-grade tumors had low ratios. Large tumor size also correlated with high ratios, while the number of lymph node metastases, a major factor in staging, was not correlated with tryptophan levels. High histologic grade correlates strongly with increased content of tryptophan in breast cancer tissues and suggests that measurement of tryptophan content may be useful as a part of the evaluation of these patients.

  18. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the male breast: A rare histology of an uncommon disease.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rituraj; Kumar, Pavnesh; Sharma, D N; Haresh, K P; Gupta, Subhash; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Bhankar, Himani

    2016-03-01

    Male breast carcinoma is a rare malignancy comprising less than 1% of all breast cancers. It is a serious disease with most patients presenting in advanced stages. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common histology while lobular carcinoma represents less than 1% of all these tumors. We report a case of locally advanced lobular carcinoma of breast in a 60year old male. PMID:26530727

  19. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Physical exam Mammogram Breast MRI Breast Ultrasound Breast Biopsy, either ultrasound or stereotactic Chest x-ray CT ... Turner RM. Staging the axilla in women with breast cancer: the utility or ... needle biopsy. Cancer Biol Med . 2014 June;11(2):69- ...

  20. Breast Cancer: Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  1. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  2. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  3. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  4. Mucoid breast carcinomas: histology and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, I. S.; Millis, R. R.; Smith, P.; Ellul, J. P.; Lampejo, O.

    1997-01-01

    In a series of 73 patients with mucoid breast carcinomas treated at Guy's Hospital between 1973 and 1989, 24 (33%) patients had pure mucoid lesions and 49 (67%) had mixed mucoid carcinomas. The patients with pure mucoid cancers had significantly smaller tumours and, among those in whom an axillary dissection was performed, mixed mucoid cancers were more likely to be associated with axillary nodal metastases (46% vs 14%). After long-term follow-up of 64 patients, both relapse-free and overall survival were significantly better for those with pure mucoid carcinomas, for whom the 10-year actuarial overall survival was 100%. The overall proportion of the tumour that was mucoid was also positively associated with a more favourable prognosis in patients with mixed tumours. With such a good prognosis, patients with pure mucoid carcinomas may not require systemic adjuvant therapy after adequate primary treatment. PMID:9083343

  5. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

  6. Clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leis, H P

    1975-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in women, and 6% will develop it during their normal life expectancy. There is a group who have a high risk of developing breast cancer. The recent improvement in cure rates seems to be jue chiefly to earlier diagnosis rather than to improved methods of therapy. The physician, by careful periodic breast examinations and by the judicious use of diagnostic aids such as mammography and thermography, especially in the high risk group, has a golden opportunity to pick up cancer in a localized stage where the prognosis for cure with appropriate therapy is excellent. A tentative diagnosis of breast cancer (Table XI) can be made with a fair degree of accuracy by taking a careful history, utilizing and combining available statistics about the frequency, median age, characteristic symptom complexes of the common breast lesions and factors related to a high mammary carcinoma risk, and by a systematic and thorough breast examination supplemented with diagnostic aids when appropriate. However, biopsy and histologic examination is mandatory in all patients with a) true, three dimentional, dominant lumps even if diagnostic aids are negative except for cysts which can be safely aspirated under controlled conditions; b) suspicious lesions found by diagnostic aids even though there are no clinical findings; c) serous, serosanguineous, bloody, or watery nipple discharge; and d) other signs of cancer, i.e. eczema of the nipple, axillary adenopathy, etc., in order to determine with absolute accuracy whether the lesion is benign or malignant. PMID:168376

  7. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  8. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  9. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  10. Breast cancer statistics, 2013.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Ma, Jiemin; Bryan, Leah; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,620 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2013. One in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates increased slightly among African American women; decreased among Hispanic women; and were stable among whites, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives from 2006 to 2010. Historically, white women have had the highest breast cancer incidence rates among women aged 40 years and older; however, incidence rates are converging among white and African American women, particularly among women aged 50 years to 59 years. Incidence rates increased for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers in the youngest white women, Hispanic women aged 60 years to 69 years, and all but the oldest African American women. In contrast, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers declined among most age and racial/ethnic groups. These divergent trends may reflect etiologic heterogeneity and the differing effects of some factors, such as obesity and parity, on risk by tumor subtype. Since 1990, breast cancer death rates have dropped by 34% and this decrease was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. Nevertheless, survival disparities persist by race/ethnicity, with African American women having the poorest breast cancer survival of any racial/ethnic group. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. PMID:24114568

  11. Annotating breast cancer microarray samples using ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; Li, Xin; Yoon, Victoria; Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    As the most common cancer among women, breast cancer results from the accumulation of mutations in essential genes. Recent advance in high-throughput gene expression microarray technology has inspired researchers to use the technology to assist breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment prediction. However, the high dimensionality of microarray experiments and public access of data from many experiments have caused inconsistencies which initiated the development of controlled terminologies and ontologies for annotating microarray experiments, such as the standard microarray Gene Expression Data (MGED) ontology (MO). In this paper, we developed BCM-CO, an ontology tailored specifically for indexing clinical annotations of breast cancer microarray samples from the NCI Thesaurus. Our research showed that the coverage of NCI Thesaurus is very limited with respect to i) terms used by researchers to describe breast cancer histology (covering 22 out of 48 histology terms); ii) breast cancer cell lines (covering one out of 12 cell lines); and iii) classes corresponding to the breast cancer grading and staging. By incorporating a wider range of those terms into BCM-CO, we were able to indexed breast cancer microarray samples from GEO using BCM-CO and MGED ontology and developed a prototype system with web interface that allows the retrieval of microarray data based on the ontology annotations. PMID:18999108

  12. Mucocele-like lesions of the breast: a clinical outcome and histologic analysis of 102 cases.

    PubMed

    Meares, Annie L; Frank, Ryan D; Degnim, Amy C; Vierkant, Robert A; Frost, Marlene H; Hartmann, Lynn C; Winham, Stacey J; Visscher, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Mucocele-like lesions (MLLs) of the breast are characterized by cystic architecture with stromal mucin and frequent atypia, but it is unknown whether they convey long-term breast cancer risk. We evaluated 102 MLLs that were derived from a single-institution benign breast disease cohort of 13412 women who underwent biopsy from 1967 to 2001. MLLs were histologically characterized by type of lining epithelium, architecture of the lesion, associated atypical hyperplasia (AH), and incidence of breast cancer (14.8-year median follow-up). A relatively large proportion of MLLs (42%) were diagnosed in women older than 55 years. AH was significantly more frequent in MLL patient compared to the cohort overall (27% versus 5%; P < .001). Breast cancer has developed in 13 patients with MLL. This frequency is only slightly higher than population expected rates overall (standardized incidence ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.91) and not significantly different from women in the cohort with (nonatypical) proliferative breast lesions. Younger women (<45) with MLL had a nonsignificant increase in risk of cancer compared to the general population (standardized incidence ratio, 5.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-13.23). We conclude that MLL is an uncommon breast lesion that is often associated with coexisting AH. However, in women older than 45 years, MLLs do not convey additional risk of breast cancer beyond that associated with the presence of proliferative disease. PMID:26826407

  13. Breast Cancer -- Inflammatory

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer - Inflammatory ... with Side Effects Follow-up Care and Monitoring ...

  14. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  16. Life after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Kirsty; Brennan, Meagan; French, James; Houssami, Nehmat; Boyages, John

    2006-04-01

    This thirteenth article in our series on breast disease explores the many concerns that patients face after completion of their breast cancer treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is an ordeal for women on a number of levels. Similarly, there are often a multitude of issues and concerns raised after the completion of treatment. Having an awareness of these medical and survivorship issues allows the general practitioner to provide important support to both the patient and her family. PMID:16642238

  17. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  18. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  19. Cathepsin D in breast secretions from women with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, L. M.; Ferrando, A. A.; Diez-Itza, I.; Vizoso, F.; Ruibal, A.; López-Otin, C.

    1993-01-01

    A proteinase accumulated in breast secretions from women with breast cancer has been characterised. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of breast secretions by pepstatin A showed that the main enzyme involved was an aspartyl proteinase. Determination of its cleavage specificity by SDS-PAGE and amino acid sequence analysis revealed that it was identical to that of cathepsin D, an aspartyl proteinase suggested to be involved in breast cancer development. The identity between both proteins was further confirmed by immunological analysis with monoclonal antibodies against cathepsin D. Quantification of cathepsin D in nipple fluids from 41 women with benign or malignant breast diseases and from 19 control women without breast pathology revealed the presence of variable amounts of this proteinase. The average concentration of cathepsin D in breast secretions from cancer-bearing breasts was 7.2 +/- 2.2 fmol micrograms of protein, which was significantly higher than those of nipple fluids from control women (2.9 +/- 0.6 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.04) or from patients with benign breast diseases (2.1 +/- 0.3 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.004). Though the number of cancer patients studied was small (n = 21), no correlations were found with cytosolic concentrations of cathepsin D or oestrogen receptors, neither with other parameters such as tumour size, histological grade, axillary node involvement or menopausal status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8494701

  20. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castrellon, Aurelio B; Glück, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of malignancy-related death in women in the USA, regardless of advances in novel therapeutic agents. High priority should be given to research aimed at the study of pharmacological and natural compounds that could potentially prevent the development of breast cancer in susceptible patients. Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce the incidence of estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer in women with a high risk of developing this condition by nearly 50%, and studies in osteoporosis have revealed a similar protective effect of raloxifene in postmenopausal women. The aromatase inhibitors are superior to tamoxifen in reducing the recurrence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women; large clinical trials are currently evaluating the chemopreventive effect of these agents. The list of agents with the potential for chemoprevention in breast cancer is extensive and continues to expand. There is an immense need to develop drugs that will decrease the incidence of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in women at high risk of developing the disease. Herein, we review the most important chemopreventive agents in breast cancer and clinical trials that have evaluated their efficacy. PMID:18366291

  1. Breast cancer and obesity.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, M; Giammanco, M

    2001-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence links breast cancer, a typical endocrine-related tumor, with western lifestyle, in particular eating habits. Yet, it's necessary to distinguish premenopausal from postmenopausal breast cancer. Visceral obesity and body weight gain are considered responsible for the increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. In fact, the mammary gland is sensitive to the level of circulating estrogens, visceral obesity is usually associated with higher levels of free steroid hormones, and the adipose tissue performs important endocrine function (clearance and aromatisation of androgens, regulation of free testoterone/DHEAS molar ratio). Before menopause, ovarian polycystosis is often seen with android obesity, and breast cancer risk could arise; however, as visceral obesity is generally less frequent, genetic factors are more important than nutritional ones. Furthermore, variations have been recorded in the secretion of insulin and insulin-like growth factors, involved in the genesis of the breast cancer. High body weight and male fat distribution negatively influence prognosis of breast cancer, too; this association is linked with the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in tumoral cells. Links between diet quality and breast cancer risk are shown: increased use of saturated fats and animal proteins, and a consequently decreased use of vegetables, legumes and fruit, constituting the so-called Mediterranean diet, are considered responsible for the increased risk of breast cancer. Lower fat and alcohol ingestion, the use of dietary fibre and a higher use of complex carbohydrates could reduce breast cancer risk. Finally, starting from the results of our previous animal researches, we suggest using a tryptophan devoid diet for a few days for premenopausal women with male obesity and alterations to the menstrual cycle. PMID:11449184

  2. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  3. The histological diagnosis of metastases to the breast from extramammary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew H S

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to review histological and immunohistochemical features that are useful in the diagnosis of metastases to the breast. Histological features were compared between non‐haematological metastases to the breast and 100 consecutive core biopsy specimens of primary invasive carcinomas of the breast. 18 non‐haematological metastases to the breast were diagnosed over a 10‐year period (0.3% of malignant mammary tumours). Elastosis and carcinoma in situ were seen only in primary mammary cancers. Two‐thirds of tumours had features raising the possibility of metastasis, such as clear cell carcinoma suggestive of renal origin and small cell carcinoma suggestive of pulmonary origin. The features observed in haematological metastases are also described. Immunohistochemical panels to distinguish mammary carcinoma (oestrogen receptor, gross cystic fluid protein‐15) from common metastases to the breast, including carcinoma of the lung (thyroid transcription factor‐1), malignant melanoma (S100, HMB45, melan‐A) and ovarian serous papillary carcinoma (Wilms' tumour 1), are discussed. The pathologist has a key role in considering the diagnosis of metastasis to the breast if the histological features are unusual for a primary mammary tumour. The clinical history is vital in some cases. Immunohistochemistry plays a useful supplementary role. PMID:18042689

  4. Epigenomics and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

  5. Progesterone and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lange, Carol A; Yee, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone is an ovarian steroid hormone that is essential for normal breast development during puberty and in preparation for lactation and breastfeeding. The actions of progesterone are primarily mediated by its high-affinity receptors, which include the classical progesterone receptor (PR)-A and -B isoforms, located in diverse tissues, including the brain, where progesterone controls reproductive behavior, and the breast and reproductive organs. Progestins are frequently prescribed for contraception or during postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, in which progestins are combined with estrogen as a means to block estrogen-induced endometrial growth. The role of estrogen as a potent breast mitogen is undisputed, and inhibitors of the estrogen receptor and estrogen-producing enzymes (aromatases) are effective first-line cancer therapies. However, PR action in breast cancer is grossly understudied and remains controversial. Herein, we review existing evidence and discuss the challenges to defining a role for progesterone in breast cancer. PMID:19072517

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Smoking and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Peggy

    2013-03-01

    The potential role of smoking in breast cancer risk has been the subject of over 100 publications, numerous scientific reviews, and animated debate. Tobacco exposure is a well-established cause of lung cancer, and is thought to account for nearly one third of all cancer deaths. Tobacco smoke contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are known to be mammary carcinogens. Although not initially thought to be a tobacco-related cancer, over the last several decades evidence has been accumulating on the role of both active smoking and secondhand smoking in the etiology of breast cancer. The human health evidence has been systematically evaluated not only by several independent researchers but also by several expert agency panels including those of the U.S. Surgeon General, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and a coalition of Canadian health agencies. Although the assessments have varied with time and across reviewers, the most recent weight of the evidence has suggested a potentially casual role for active smoking and breast cancer, particularly for long-term heavy smoking and smoking initiation at an early age. The role of secondhand smoking and breast cancer is less clear, although there has been some suggestion for an increased risk for premenopausal breast cancer. Recent studies evaluating the possible modifying role of polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of tobacco products, particularly NAT2, have contributed another dimension to these assessments, although to date that evidence remains equivocal. PMID:23179580

  8. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  9. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not a complete listing of breast cancer materials or information. The information contained herein is not ... quality or non-infringement of any of the materials, products or information provided by the organizations referenced ...

  10. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... men are hormone receptor- positive, hormone therapy (with tamoxifen) is often used depending on the stage. Chemotherapy may be given before tamoxifen. For men with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer, ...

  11. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22:9-23. [PubMed Abstract] Bertucci F, Ueno NT, Finetti P, et al. Gene expression profiles of ... Abstract] Fouad TM, Kogawa T, Reuben JM, Ueno NT. The role of inflammation in inflammatory breast cancer. ...

  12. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST SIGN UP Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Menu News & Opinion Blog Programs & Events About Us I Am... Facebook Twitter More Breast Cancer Helpline Donate Search form Search ...

  13. [Screening for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hessler, C

    1988-01-01

    On the "why", "whom" and "how" of breast screening for carcinoma, the following answers can be provided: Why? As there is no primary prevention, secondary prevention by early diagnosis is the only way to reduce breast cancer mortality. On the other hand, breast cancers discovered by screening can be conservatively treated more often than when they become symptomatic; this is especially important in young patients. For whom? Every woman over the age of 35-40 should be accepted for breast cancer screening. In countries such as Switzerland it is unthinkable to impose screening or even to send personal invitations for screening to the population. Only repeated information through newspapers, TV and conferences will induce women to come for screening. The costs would be paid for by the patient, as medical insurances do not cover this type of preventive medicine. How? Only screening through mammography with or without breast palpation, performed by paramedical personnel, can be considered, because of the cost. It should be done outside the senologic consultation setup for symptomatic patients where a doctor is in charge of the clinical consultation. As Doctor Van der Linde said at the end of his talk at the last Convention of the Swiss Senology Society in Lausanne, pilot projects for breast screening in Switzerland should be started. The Swiss Cancer Society has lately created a commission for early detection of breast cancer to study ways of launching a project. PMID:3165216

  14. Potential clinical relevance of uPA and PAI-1 levels in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up.

    PubMed

    Buta, Marko; Džodić, Radan; Đurišić, Igor; Marković, Ivan; Vujasinović, Tijana; Markićević, Milan; Nikolić-Vukosavljević, Dragica

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) prognostic value in postmenopausal, node-negative breast cancer patients bearing tumors with estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) expression, treated with locoregional therapy alone, within an early follow-up. We focused our analysis on tumors of histological grade II in order to improve its prognostic value and, consequently, to improve a decision-making process. The cytosol extracts of 73 tumor samples were used for assessing several biomarkers. ER and PR levels were measured by classical biochemical method. Cathepsin D was assayed by a radiometric immunoassay while both uPA and PAI-1 level determinations were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. HER-2 gene amplification was determined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) in primary tumor tissue. Patients bearing tumors smaller than or equal to 2 cm (pT1) or those with low PAI-1 levels (PAI-1 < 6.35 pg/mg) showed favorable outcome compared to patients bearing tumors greater than 2 cm (pT2,3) or those with high PAI-1 levels, respectively. Analyses of 4 phenotypes, defined by tumor size and PAI-1 status, revealed that patients bearing either pT1 tumors, irrespective of PAI-1 levels, or pT2,3 tumors with low PAI-1 levels, had similar disease-free interval probabilities and showed favorable outcome compared to those bearing pT2,3 tumors with high PAI-1 levels. Our findings suggest that tumor size and PAI-1, used in combination as phenotypes are not only prognostic but might also be predictive in node-negative, postmenopausal breast cancer patients bearing histological grade II tumors with ER/PR expression, during an early follow-up period. PMID:25994573

  15. Heritable breast cancer in twins

    PubMed Central

    Mack, T M; Hamilton, A S; Press, M F; Diep, A; Rappaport, E B

    2002-01-01

    Known major mutations such as BRCA1/2 and TP53 only cause a small proportion of heritable breast cancers. Co-dominant genes of lower penetrance that regulate hormones have been thought responsible for most others. Incident breast cancer cases in the identical (monozygotic) twins of representative cases reflect the entire range of pertinent alleles, whether acting singly or in combination. Having reported the rate in twins and other relatives of cases to be high and nearly constant over age, we now examine the descriptive and histological characteristics of the concordant and discordant breast cancers occurring in 2310 affected pairs of monozygotic and fraternal (dizygotic) twins in relation to conventional expectations and hypotheses. Like other first-degree relatives, dizygotic co-twins of breast cancer cases are at higher than usual risk (standardised incidence ratio (SIR)=1.7, CI=1.1–2.6), but the additional cases among monozygotic co-twins of cases are much more numerous, both before and after menopause (SIR=4.4, CI=3.6–5.6), than the 100% genetic identity would predict. Monozygotic co-twin diagnoses following early proband cancers also occur more rapidly than expected (within 5 years, SIR=20.0, CI=7.5–53.3). Cases in concordant pairs represent heritable disease and are significantly more likely to be oestrogen receptor-positive than those of comparable age from discordant pairs. The increase in risk to the monozygotic co-twins of cases cannot be attributed to the common environment, to factors that cumulate with age, or to any aggregate of single autosomal dominant mutations. The genotype more plausibly consists of multiple co-existing susceptibility alleles acting through heightened susceptibility to hormones and/or defective tumour suppression. The resultant class of disease accounts for a larger proportion of all breast cancers than previously thought, with a rather high overall penetrance. Some of the biological characteristics differ from those of breast cancer generally. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 294–300. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600429 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177798

  16. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  17. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  18. Triple-negative breast cancer: clinicopathological characteristics and relationship with basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thike, Aye Aye; Cheok, Poh Yian; Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Tan, Benita; Tan, Patrick; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer, defined as that with negative expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and cerbB2, accounted for 11% of invasive breast cancers in our study, drawn from an original cohort of 7048 women diagnosed with breast cancer from the files of the Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, over 14 years. Women with triple-negative breast cancer were generally postmenopausal, with adverse pathological characteristics of high histological grade and frequent nodal metastases. Using a set of 61 invasive breast cancers earlier profiled into molecular subtypes with expression arrays, we defined specificity and sensitivity values for different immunohistochemical panels of basal keratins (CK5/6, CK14, CK17, 34 beta E12), CD117, EGFR, p63 and SMA in defining basal-like breast cancer. Subsequent application of a tri-panel of CK14, EGFR and 34 beta E12 (specificity 100% and sensitivity 78%) to our group of 653 triple-negative breast cancers delineated 84% to be basal-like. Immunohistochemical expression of individual biological markers correlated with unfavorable pathological parameters. We conclude that triple-negative breast cancers in an Asian population harbor adverse pathobiological features, and an immunohistochemical surrogate panel can be reliably used to define basal-like cancers among them. PMID:19855377

  19. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  20. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Palo, G; Costa, A; Formelli, F; Del Vecchio, M; Marubini, E; Veronesi, U

    1993-01-01

    Chemoprevention of cancer is a new branch of the medical science and represents a topic of increasing concern in public health. Over the last decade chemoprevention has been extensively studied from many points of view, and topics in the field of chemoprevention have expanded considerably. Breast cancer, the most common malignant neoplasm in women, is one of the areas of clinical interest for chemoprevention. In this paper the authors synthesized the "status of art" in chemoprevention of breast cancer with retinoids and antiestrogens. PMID:8193278

  1. Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David; Di Carlo, Philip A; Khouri, Nagi F

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening has become a controversial topic. Understanding the points of contention requires an appreciation of the conceptual framework underpinning cancer screening in general, knowledge of the strengths and limitations of available screening modalities, and familiarity with published clinical trial data. This review is data intense with the intention of presenting enough information to permit the reader to enter into the discussion with an ample knowledge base. The focus throughout is striking a balance between the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. PMID:26315519

  2. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  6. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  7. Nonfamilial breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ringnr, Markus; Staaf, Johan; Jnsson, Gran

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, our knowledge in somatic genetic events related to breast cancer has increased -enormously. Through usage of various genome-wide molecular approaches, it has become increasingly clear that breast cancer is a vastly heterogeneous disease. Microarray-based gene expression profiling has divided breast cancer into five distinct intrinsic subtypes termed basal-like, HER2-enriched, normal-like, luminal A, and luminal B. Importantly, these subtypes are closely correlated to clinical variables as well as different outcomes, with luminal A tumors as the good prognostic group. Initial studies using genome-wide DNA copy number data broadly partitioned breast cancers into three types, complex, amplifier, and simple, and moreover associated distinct copy number changes with the intrinsic subtypes defined by gene expression profiles. More recently, this genomic classification was refined into six genomic subtypes demonstrating strong resemblance to the intrinsic gene expression classification. Additionally, inherited BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated tumors were significantly correlated to specific subtypes. In this chapter, we will review the current status regarding genomic subtypes of nonfamilial breast cancer. PMID:23412797

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of ... and/or a medical oncologist. Types of breast surgery Most men with breast cancer have some type ...

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in breast cancer: the road to personalized medicine?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    More women die from breast cancer across the world today than from any other type of malignancy. The clinical course of breast cancer varies tremendously between patients. While some of this variability is explained by traditional clinico-pathological factors (including patient age, tumor stage, histological grade and estrogen receptor status), molecular profiling studies have defined breast cancer subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes. This mini-review considers recent studies which have used genomics technologies in an attempt to identify new biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response. These studies highlight the genetic heterogeneity that exists within breast cancers in space and time. PMID:23800221

  10. Correlation of E-cadherin expression with differentiation grade and histological type in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, C.; Palacios, J.; Suarez, A.; Pizarro, A.; Navarro, P.; Quintanilla, M.; Cano, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a correlation has been suggested between a loss of E-cadherin (E-CD) and increased invasiveness of neoplastic cells. In this study, E-CD expression in breast cancer was investigated using an affinity-purified antibody (ECCD-2) in an immunoenzymatic (avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase) test. Intensity and extension of E-CD immunoreactivity were evaluated in 61 breast carcinomas and correlated with their histological type and grade, nodal involvement, and hormonal receptor status. Histological types were infiltrating ductal carcinoma of no special type (n = 54) and infiltrating lobular carcinoma (n = 7). All infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type except two grade 3 carcinomas showed positive immunoreactivity that was variable among different cases. Grade 1 breast carcinomas (n = 10) showed greater immunoreactivity than grade 2 (n = 25) and grade 3 (n = 19) carcinomas. E-CD immunoreactivity correlated positively with the degree of tubular formation and inversely with the mitoses number. None of the infiltrating lobular carcinomas expressed E-CD in their infiltrating cells, whereas they showed only weak immunostains in areas of atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ. These results indicate that E-CD expression correlates with histological type and grade in breast carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7682767

  11. Clinical implications of ?-catenin protein expression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziyi; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Jianxin; Niu, Jianing; Ma, Zhenhai; Zhao, Haidong; Liu, Caigang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and significance of ?-catenin in the diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. Overall, 241 patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer who had undergone radical surgery were enrolled in this study. ?-catenin protein expression in breast cancer samples was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. ?-catenin was expressed in Nuclei/Plasma of the samples from 41 patients. ?-catenin protein expression correlated with the histological grade of the tumor (P<0.05) and Ki-67 labeling (P<0.01). Survival analysis showed that ?-catenin expression negatively correlated with breast cancer-specific survival. Our results showed prominent expression of ?-catenin in breast cancer and strongly implicate the ?-catenin in tumor promotion. PMID:26823833

  12. [Basal-like breast cancer: a review].

    PubMed

    Treilleux, Isabelle; Morellon-Mialhe, Blandine

    2009-06-01

    Breast cancers of basal phenotype have been identified by molecular profiling and are associated with a poor prognosis. This review describes the morphological characteristics of these tumors and focuses on their profiling using immunohistochemistry: absence of detectable hormone receptors and HER2, expression of basal cytokeratins (CK5/6, CK14), myoepithelial markers (p63, smooth muscle actin) and HER1. This phenotype may be encountered in all histological types of breast cancer and is further divided into three subtypes according to prognosis and protein profiling. Pure basal and basal/myoepithelial subtypes have a poor prognosis in contrast to the myoepithelial subtype. PMID:19619822

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Relationship between reflection spectra of breast adipose tissue with histologic grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón; Vázquez Y Montiel, Sergio; Reigosa, Aldo

    2011-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy allows the characterization, recognition and differentiation of subcutaneous tissues healthy and no-healthy, to facilitate the diagnosis or early detection for breast cancer are studied white adipose tissue by the subcutaneous region with the help of the diffuse reflection spectroscopy in the visible areas (400 to 700 nm) of electromagnetic spectrum for them using a spectrometer portable of integrating sphere, Hunter lab Model Mini-Scan. The problem to be solved for cancer detection by optical techniques is to find the solution to the inverse problem of scattering of radiation in tissue where it is necessary to solve the equation of energy transfer. us through the trigonometric interpolation and by the data adjustment by least squares using Fourier series expansion to parameterize the spectral response curves of each sample of breast adipose tissue then correlated with histological grades established by the optical biopsy for each one of the samples, allowing use this technique to the study of anomalies in White Adipose Tissue Breast, changes are evident in the spectral response for Breast Adipose Tissue carcinogens with respect to healthy tissues and for the different histological grades.

  15. [Breast cancer update].

    PubMed

    Armuss, A

    2014-06-01

    Breast Cancer, with a life-time prevalence of about 10-12%, is the most common cancer in women. In 2013, the actress Angelina Jolie, by announcing she had a double mastectomy, increased the awareness of a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and the treatment available to reduce the inherited risks. In Germany, each year about 25 out of 100,000 women (age-standardized according to European Standard) die of the disease. The number of newly diagnosed cases is about 72,000 per year. In comparison, many other countries record higher levels. Investing in the development of new therapies has therefore been key for many years. Prevention programs, such as the mammography screening are publicly touted, in both cases with the aim to reduce breast cancer mortality. To accurately assess the risk in underwriting, it is important to know about the risk factors for the development of breast cancer, as well as the latest advances in prevention, therapy and their prognostic classification. The following article provides an overview. PMID:25000626

  16. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  17. Cytology of mucinous carcinoma of breast: a report of 28 cases with histological correlation.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, G; Swain, M; Chew, M T; Yip, C H; Moosa, F

    2000-12-01

    Pure mucinous carcinoma (MC) of the breast is a relatively uncommon variant of breast carcinoma with distinctive histological and cytological features. In this study we have analysed fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytological material from 28 cases of MC of breast and correlated the cytomorphological features with histopathology. The 28 patients consisted of 27 females and one male patient. 14 patients were Chinese, 10 were Indian and four were Malay. Their ages ranged from 38 to 90 with a mean at 52 years. The left breast was involved in 17 and the right in 11 cases. The duration of the lump varied from two weeks to 10 years. The cytological picture was characterized by abundant extracellular mucin giving a "sea of mucin" or "whirlpools of mucin" effect, in which were seen floating clusters of tumour cells with relatively bland cytological features. Myxo-vascular fragments were seen in 12 cases. Dissociated tumour cells showed a plasmacytoid appearance with eccentric nuclei. In four cases, the mucin was scanty in amount and the cellularity was high while in two cases, the cellularity was very low. Psammoma bodies were seen in cytological smears in one case. Histological study of excision or mastectomy specimens confirmed all 28 cases to be pure MC. Knowledge of the distinctive cytomorphological appearance of MC would enable correct identification of these lesions as malignant and prompt treatment that could further enhance the survival of these prognostically good breast cancers. PMID:16329537

  18. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  19. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Risk factors for male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, K; Bross, D S; Kessler, I I

    1985-02-01

    To investigate risk factors in male breast cancer, a case-control study of 52 histologically diagnosed cases and 52 controls--matched for age, race, marital status, and hospital--was conducted in 5 U.S. metropolitan areas. Cases were significantly more likely to be Jewish than were the controls, supporting earlier suggestions of an increased risk in Jewish males. A significant association of male breast cancer with mumps infections at age 20 years or older, along with the possible association with antecedent testicular injury and the excess frequency of mumps orchitis among cases, suggests that testicular factors may be important in the development of breast cancer among males. An increased frequency of breast cancer among persons who have worked in blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling mills is of interest because of the possible testicular effect of high environmental temperatures. The observed association between breast cancer and a prior history of swollen breast is difficult to interpret because of potential recall bias, and a possible relationship with military service needs further confirmation. PMID:3856050

  1. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  2. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  3. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically inactive sulfates. The action of progestins in breast cancer is very controversial; some studies indicate an increase in breast cancer incidence, others show no difference and still others a significant decrease. Progestin action can also be a function of combination with other molecules (e.g. estrogens). In order to clarify and better understand the response of progestins in breast cancer (incidence, mortality), as well as in hormone replacement therapy or endocrine dysfunction, new clinical trials are needed studying other progestins as a function of the dose and period of treatment. PMID:17943537

  4. Diversity of Breast Carcinoma: Histological Subtypes and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Makki, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Mammary carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor in women, and it is the leading cause of mortality, with an incidence of >1,000,000 cases occurring worldwide annually. It is one of the most common human neoplasms, accounting for approximately one-quarter of all cancers in females worldwide and 27% of cancers in developed countries with a Western lifestyle. They exhibit a wide scope of morphological features, different immunohistochemical profiles, and unique histopathological subtypes that have specific clinical course and outcome. Breast cancers can be classified into distinct subgroups based on similarities in the gene expression profiles and molecular classification. PMID:26740749

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  6. Spectral histology of breast tissue using mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounder, F. Nell; Bhargava, Rohit

    2009-02-01

    Histopathologic recognition is the gold standard in breast cancer diagnoses and is a primary determinant tool for cancer research. Unfortunately, the manual nature of histopathologic recognition leads to low throughput analysis, delays in decision-making and errors. Here, we present an automated means to accurate histologic recognition using mid-infrared molecular spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is combined with statistical pattern recognition and high throughput sampling to provide automated tissue segmentation into constituent cell types. The method does not need dyes or probes and dispenses with human input. Results demonstrate that the technique is capable of accurate histologic segmentation that can potentially become competitive with that attained by conventional immunohistochemical analyses.

  7. Breast stromal fibroblasts from histologically normal surgical margins are pro-carcinogenic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rakan, Maha A; Colak, Dilek; Hendrayani, Siti-Faujiah; Al-Bakheet, Albandary; Al-Mohanna, Falah H; Kaya, Namik; Al-Malik, Osama; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that normal breast stromal fibroblasts (NBFs) suppress tumour growth, while cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumourigenesis through functional interactions with tumour cells. Little is known about the biology and the carcinogenic potential of stromal fibroblasts present in histologically normal surgical margins (TCFs). Therefore, we first undertook gene expression analysis on five CAF/TCF pairs from breast cancer patients and three NBF samples (derived from mammoplasties). This comparative analysis revealed variation in gene expression between these three categories of cells, with a TCF-specific gene expression profile. This variability was higher in TCFs than in their paired CAFs and also NBFs. Cytokine arrays show that TCFs have a specific secretory cytokine profile. In addition, stromal fibroblasts from surgical margins expressed high levels of α-SMA and SDF-1 and exhibited higher migratory/invasiveness abilities. Indirect co-culture showed that TCF cells enhance the proliferation of non-cancerous mammary epithelial cells and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells. Moreover, TCF and CAF cells increased the level of PCNA, MMP-2 and the phosphorylated/activated form of Akt in normal breast luminal fibroblasts in a paracrine manner. Furthermore, TCFs were able to promote the formation and growth of humanized orthotopic breast tumours in nude mice. Interestingly, these TCF phenotypes and the extent of their effects were intermediate between those of NBFs and CAFs. Together, these results indicate that stromal fibroblasts located in non-cancerous tissues exhibit a tumour-promoting phenotype, indicating that their presence post-surgery may play important roles in cancer recurrence. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:24009142

  8. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery for breast cancer Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Mastectomy Lymph node surgery for breast cancer Radiation therapy ... is delivered. But breast biopsy procedures and even mastectomy and lymph node removal can be done safely ...

  9. Reproduction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, Stefanos; Iatrakis, George; Navrozoglou, Iordanis

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women of developed countries, and as a result of new developments in breast cancer treatment, more women are cured after being diagnosed with this disease. It is important that fertility preservation strategies are addressed before chemotherapy, because chemotherapy may induce premature ovarian failure (depending on the woman's age, the drugs used, the dosage and duration of treatment). Among possible solutions are embryos or oocytes cryopreservation, ovarian tissue cryopreservation-freezing with a subsequent orthotopic and heterotopic autotransplantation, whole ovary cryopreservation, ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which inhibit ovarian follicular depletion induced by chemotherapeutic agents and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) after ovulation induction with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen. PMID:20170848

  10. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  11. [Proteoglycans and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Delehedde, M; Deudon, E; Boilly, B; Hondermarck, H

    1997-04-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are complex sulphated macromolecules composed of linear polysaccharide chains of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) covalently attached to a core protein. These GAG chains contain sulphate groups at various positions, giving them a high density of negative charges, and allowing them to interact with extracellular matrix molecules, including various growth factors. In the developing mammary gland, sulphated proteoglycans participate in morphogenesis and interact with extracellular matrix components in order to constitute a functional matrix. In breast pathogenesis, qualitative or quantitative changes in PG may have important consequences on cell proliferation and/or differentiation. Thus, several studies showed large variations in the nature and distribution of PG/GAG in breast cancer. Accumulation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans was described in the stromal compartment of mammary biopsy sections, and content in heparan sulfate proteoglycans, which were more specifically distributed in the epithelial compartment, increased with the level of malignancy and invasiveness of breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, heparan sulfate proteoglycans seem to be involved in control of the growth-promoting activity of numerous growth factors such as fibroblast growth factors also named Heparin-Binding Growth Factors (HBGF). The implication of PG in growth factor activity suggest that PG may have prognostic value in breast cancer. In future, structural studies into the specific HS-sequences involvement in growth factors binding could allow the development of new antiproliferative strategies. PMID:9296079

  12. Parametrization histological grade white adipose tissue of the breast by the cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Leslie A.; Narea, Freddy J.; Cedeño, Fernando; Muñoz, Aaron A.; Reigosa, Aldo; Bravo, Kelly

    2013-11-01

    The noninvasive optical techniques have attracted considerable interest in recent years, because these techniques provide lot of information on the structure and composition of biological tissues more quickly and painlessly, in this study classifies the degrees of histological differentiation of neoplastic tissue of the breast in white adipose tissue samples through numerical pametrización of the diffuse reflection spectra using the Fourier series approximation. The white adipose tissue is irradiated with the spectrophotometer MiniScan XEplus and it from a mastectomy of patients with aged 38 and 50 who have a cancer lesion in the breast. The samples were provided by the pathologist with theirs medical report, it which we indicate the histological grade of tumor. We performed a parameterization algorithm where the classification criterion is the modulus of the minimum difference between the numerical approximation coefficients ai and average numerical approximation coefficients obtained for each histological grade ¯ al. Is confirmed that the cubic spline interpolation this low-power computing lets classified into histological grades with 91% certainty the tissues under study from |ai - ¯ al|

  13. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 ... of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project P–1 Study. Journal of the National Cancer ...

  14. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:27066090

  15. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Hur, Min Hee; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-03-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:27066090

  16. Breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Bellet, M.; Alonso, C.; Ojeda, B.

    1995-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly has attracted considerable interest in recent years for three main reasons. Firstly, information concerning the profile (clinical and biological) of the disease in the geriatric population is scarce; secondly, the number of patients is increasing, and thirdly there are conflicting data regarding the actual effectiveness of the different treatments. The present review attempts to outline the specific characteristics of this malignancy in the elderly in terms of histological pattern, stage at diagnosis, and outcome. The feasibility of standard therapies (mastectomy/lumpectomy, axillary clearance, and radio-therapy) in the elderly is carefully analysed, and compared to the efficacy of less aggressive procedures. The use of tamoxifen as a primary treatment, instead of surgery, is critically reconsidered, as well as its use as an adjuvant therapy. Finally, the effectiveness of systemic therapy in advanced disease is also discussed. Images Figure PMID:7494769

  17. Who may benefit from preoperative breast MRI? A single-center analysis of 1102 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Debald, Manuel; Abramian, Alina; Nemes, Lisa; Dbler, Michael; Kaiser, Christina; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Leutner, Claudia; Hller, Tobias; Braun, Michael; Kuhl, Christiane; Kuhn, Walther; Schild, Hans H

    2015-10-01

    Several authors question the potential benefit of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) against the background of possible overdiagnosis, false-positive findings, and unnecessary resections in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. In order to reveal a better selection of patients who should undergo preoperative MRI after histological confirmed breast cancer, the present analysis was implemented. We aimed to evaluate the influence of preoperative breast MRI in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer to find subgroups of patients that are most likely to benefit from preoperative MRI by the detection of occult malignant foci. A total of 1102 consecutive patients who underwent treatment for primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent triple assessment by breast ultrasound, mammography, and bilateral breast MRI. MRI findings not seen on conventional imaging that suggested additional malignant disease was found in 344 cases (31.2 %). Histological confirmed malignant foci were found in 223 patients (20.2 %) within the index breast and in 28 patients (2.5 %) in the contralateral breast. The rate of false-negative biopsies was 31 (2.8 %) and 62 (5.6 %), respectively. Premenopausal women (p = 0.024), lobular invasive breast cancer (p = 0.02) as well as patients with high breast density [American College of Radiology (ACR) 3 + 4; p = 0.01] were significantly associated with additional malignant foci in the index breast. Multivariate analysis confirmed lobular histology (p = 0.041) as well as the co-factors "premenopausal stage" and "high breast density (ACR 3+4)" (p = 0.044) to be independently significant. Previous studies revealed that breast MRI is a reliable tool for predicting tumor extension as well as for the detection of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci in histological confirmed breast cancer. In the present study, we demonstrate that especially premenopausal patients with high breast density as well as patients with lobular histology seem to profit from preoperative MRI. PMID:26323190

  18. Breast and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E.; Couchman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression. Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression. PMID:22205677

  19. Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

  20. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... for breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Breast Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer ...

  2. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  3. Reproduction and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-12-01

    Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  4. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  5. Triple negative breast cancer: an Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Murtaza; Dasgupta, Subhrajit; Rangwala, Murtuza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in the world. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a recently identified biological variant with aggressive tumor behavior and poor prognosis. Data of hormonal status from the Indian population is scarce due to financial constraints in performing immunohistochemistry evaluation. The present study aims to prospectively analyze receptor status of all breast cancer patients and identify TNBC and compare their clinical profile and short term survival with other non-TNBC group. Materials and methods All cytologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of carcinoma breast were prospectively enrolled. In a longitudinal study at tertiary care hospital in central India based on the hormonal status, they were further divided into TNBC and other groups. Comparison of risk factors, clinical profile and short-term survival was carried out. Results A total 85 patients were enrolled and of them 37 (43.7%) were TNBC. On comparing risk factors ie, age, age at menarche, total reproductive age, age at first child birth, and menopausal status – no statistical significance was observed between the TNBC and non-TNBC groups. But on comparison of clinical profile TNBC tumors were significantly large with majority of patients presenting as locally advanced breast cancer (83%). No statistical difference was observed in axillary lymph node status between two groups. TNBC tumors were histologically more aggressive (grade 3) compared to other groups. No statistically significant difference was observed in short term overall survival but all three deaths were observed in the TNBC group only and two local recurrences after surgery were observed in the TNBC group. Conclusion TNBC forms a large proportion of carcinoma breast patients in a central Indian scenario and needs more research to identify appropriate treatment planning considering aggressive histology and advanced presentation. PMID:26316816

  6. FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mammography and Breast Cancer Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

  7. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  8. Breast cancer — one term, many entities?

    PubMed Central

    Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer, rather than constituting a monolithic entity, comprises heterogeneous tumors with different clinical characteristics, disease courses, and responses to specific treatments. Tumor-intrinsic features, including classical histological and immunopathological classifications as well as more recently described molecular subtypes, separate breast tumors into multiple groups. Tumor-extrinsic features, including microenvironmental configuration, also have prognostic significance and further expand the list of tumor-defining variables. A better understanding of the features underlying heterogeneity, as well as of the mechanisms and consequences of their interactions, is essential to improve targeting of existing therapies and to develop novel agents addressing specific combinations of features. PMID:21965335

  9. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  12. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  14. Understanding breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin L

    2010-01-01

    With mammography firmly established as an integral part of efforts to reduce breast cancer mortality, many believe it is time to concentrate on prevention. Part of the multifaceted approach to preventing and treating this disease is unraveling its molecular, genetic and physiological makeup. Another aspect is ensuring that women have the information they need to make informed decisions about screening and treatment. Studies also point to the influence of nutrition, exercise, medicines and a patient's adherence to screening on cancer risk and recovery. PMID:20445140

  15. Breast cancer risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Marzena; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  16. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  17. Epidemiology of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joli R; Moysich, Kirsten B; Swede, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is a rare disease, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Although the epidemiologic literature regarding female breast cancer is extensive, relatively little is known about the etiology of male breast cancer (MBC). This review is intended to summarize the existing body of evidence on genetic and epidemiologic risk factors for breast cancer in men. Overall, the epidemiology of MBC presents similarities with the epidemiology of female breast cancer. Major genetic factors associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for men include BRCA2 mutations, which are believed to account for the majority of inherited breast cancer in men, Klinefelter syndrome, and a positive family history. Suspected genetic factors include AR gene mutations, CYP17 polymorphism, Cowden syndrome, and CHEK2. Epidemiologic risk factors for MBC include disorders relating to hormonal imbalances, such as obesity, testicular disorders (e.g., cryptorchidism, mumps orchitis, and orchiectomy), and radiation exposure. Suspected epidemiologic risk factors include prostate cancer,prostate cancer treatment, gynecomastia, occupational exposures (e.g., electromagnetic fields, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high temperatures), dietary factors (e.g., meat intake and fruit and vegetable consumption), and alcohol intake. PMID:15668471

  18. Digital histologic analysis reveals morphometric patterns of age-related involution in breast epithelium and stroma.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Chollet-Hinton, Lynn; Kirk, Erin L; Midkiff, Bentley; Troester, Melissa A

    2016-02-01

    Complete age-related regression of mammary epithelium, often termed postmenopausal involution, is associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, most studies have qualitatively assessed involution. We quantitatively analyzed epithelium, stroma, and adipose tissue from histologically normal breast tissue of 454 patients in the Normal Breast Study. High-resolution digital images of normal breast hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were partitioned into epithelium, adipose tissue, and nonfatty stroma. Percentage area and nuclei per unit area (nuclear density) were calculated for each component. Quantitative data were evaluated in association with age using linear regression and cubic spline models. Stromal area decreased (P = 0.0002), and adipose tissue area increased (P < 0.0001), with an approximate 0.7% change in area for each component, until age 55 years when these area measures reached a steady state. Although epithelial area did not show linear changes with age, epithelial nuclear density decreased linearly beginning in the third decade of life. No significant age-related trends were observed for stromal or adipose nuclear density. Digital image analysis offers a high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring tissue morphometry and for objectively assessing age-related changes in adipose tissue, stroma, and epithelium. Epithelial nuclear density is a quantitative measure of age-related breast involution that begins to decline in the early premenopausal period. PMID:26772400

  19. Breast-feeding may reduce breast-cancer risk.

    PubMed

    1994-04-30

    A case control study of 6000 women with breast cancer and about 8000 women with cancer living in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin found that younger women who breast feed are at a 20% lower risk of developing breast cancer before menopause than those who have never breast fed or have breast fed only briefly. The younger a woman was when she first breast fed, the less likely she was to develop premenopausal breast cancer. The length of total time a woman breast fed in her life was inversely related to the risk of developing breast cancer before menopause. For example, if a woman breast feeds for 4-12 months, the risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal women is reduced 11% when compared to women who breast feed for less than 3 months and those who do not breast feed. The risk can be reduced by about 25%, if women breast feed for at least 2 years. Neither young age nor long duration of total time breast feeding appeared to influence the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause, however. One hypothesis is that breast feeding suppresses the production of ovarian hormones which may be associated with breast cancer. Since most breast cancer cases in the US are postmenopausal, the reduction in breast cancer cases would be rather small, however. Another study of about 90,000 US nurses found no relationship between breast feeding and breast cancer. The lack of a relationship may have been due to the fact that the nurses were much less likely to breast feed at a young age since they had a high educational level. Further, breast feeding practices have changed in the last 20-30 years from feeding every 4 hours to feeding on demand. In India most rural women breast feed, beginning when they are young. They even practice communal breast feeding, which allows women to work outside their homes. PMID:12179188

  20. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  1. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  2. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  3. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  4. Histological factors for accurately predicting first locoregional recurrence of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Motoki; Hojo, Takashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    The accurate assessment of the risk of first locoregional recurrence is very important for improving the survival of patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The present study investigated which histological factors (both well-known histological factors and factors that we have proposed) were the most capable of accurately predicting first locoregional recurrence among 1042 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma and various tumor statuses (overall, nodal status, Union Internationale Contre le Cancer pathological TNM stage, adjuvant therapy status, and adjuvant radiotherapy status) using multivariate analyses by the Cox proportional hazard regression model. The present study clearly demonstrated that the best factor for accurately predicting locoregional recurrence was grade 3 lymph vessel tumor embolus (>4 mitotic figures and >6 apoptotic figures in tumor embolus), followed by type 2 invasive ductal carcinoma (negative for fibrotic foci but positive for atypical tumor-stromal fibroblast), grade 2 lymph vessel tumor embolus (1-4 mitotic figures and >0 apoptotic figures in tumor embolus; >0 mitotic figures and 1-6 apoptotic figures in tumor embolus), primary invasive tumor cell-related factors (>19 mitotic figures, presence of tumor necrosis, presence of skin invasion) and >5 mitotic figures in metastatic carcinomas to the lymph node. Our proposed factors were superior to well-known histological factors of primary invasive tumors or clinicopathological factors for the accurate prediction of first locoregional recurrence in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:23758085

  5. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-17

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  7. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 877-465-6636 • Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization: www. y- me. org or call 1-800-221-2141 What you can do to prevent breast cancer and to see if you have it? Lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise and avoiding excess alcohol, ...

  8. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  9. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... had breast cancer in the past. Lactation (breast milk production) and breast-feeding should be stopped if ... methotrexate , may occur in high levels in breast milk and may harm the nursing baby. Women receiving ...

  10. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... had breast cancer in the past. Lactation (breast milk production) and breast-feeding should be stopped if ... methotrexate , may occur in high levels in breast milk and may harm the nursing baby. Women receiving ...

  11. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. Case presentation A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Discussion Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. PMID:26773878

  12. Breast cancer update.

    PubMed

    Kuter, I

    2000-01-01

    The large number of excellent presentations on breast cancer at this year's ASCO meeting reflects the enormous interest in clinical trials of this common disease. In the reports of adjuvant hormonal therapy, the most interesting included Abstract 273 by Boccardo et al., who reported that postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) cancers who had already completed three years of tamoxifen experienced better overall survival if treated with two years of subsequent aminoglutethimide (a first-generation aromatase inhibitor) rather than another two years of tamoxifen. This whets our appetite for studies currently under way to define the role of third-generation aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant setting. A report by FISHER: from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-23 study (Abstract 277) provided confirmation of what is rapidly becoming accepted, that the addition of tamoxifen to chemotherapy does not benefit breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes who have ER(-) cancers. In premenopausal women, another report of the benefit of hormonal therapy, this time by the French Adjuvant Study Group using complete hormonal blockade with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and tamoxifen (Abstract 279) showed that hormonal therapy can be at least as good as, if not better, than six cycles of 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 50 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2) in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival. Among the papers on adjuvant chemotherapy, a controversial paper from the German Adjuvant Breast Cancer Group reported that three cycles of CMF (a dose-intense regimen with all three drugs being given on days 1 and 8) were as good as six cycles (Abstract 283). Another report, from the International Breast Cancer Study Group, raised the controversial question of whether there really is much added benefit from the addition of chemotherapy to tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with negative lymph nodes if their tumors have ERs (Abstract 281). A second study (the first was the CALGB study reported at ASCO in 1998) showing a benefit to the addition of Taxol to an anthracycline-based adjuvant regimen, was reported from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (Abstract 285), giving further impetus to the inclusion of Taxol in standard adjuvant treatment. Finally, there were a number of interesting presentations on HER-2. Reported here are three of these, all addressing the effect of HER-2 overexpression on the response to hormonal therapy. Taken together, they uphold the emerging concern that women with ER(+) cancers may not benefit significantly from endocrine treatment if the tumors also overexpress HER-2. Observations such as these will afford us the ability to predict more accurately which women will benefit from specific treatments. PMID:10964995

  13. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  15. Breast Cancer and Sarcoidosis: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jacob; Carter III, Robert; Maoz, Daniel; Tobar, Ana; Sharon, Eran; Greif, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sarcoidosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, which can involve different organs and systems. Accordingly, sarcoidosis can mimic breast cancer, making the differential diagnosis very difficult. Case Report 5 patients with a diagnosis of both sarcoidosis and breast cancer followed by the Rabin Medical Center between January 1993 and June 2012 were enrolled in this study. Additionally, a comprehensive literature review which identified 104 patients diagnosed with breast cancer and sarcoidosis was carried out. In both populations reviewed, the average age at diagnosis of sarcoidosis and breast cancer was 57 years. Among the 66 patients with both sarcoidosis and breast cancer, sarcoidosis preceded breast cancer in 31 cases, followed it in 23 cases, and appeared concurrently in 10 cases. Conclusion Based on our clinical cases and literature review, a histological study is recommended over imaging if sarcoidosis or breast cancer may be present. Furthermore, breast cancer is rarely associated with sarcoidosis or sarcoidosis-like reaction. PMID:26195943

  16. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  18. New prognostic factors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adam Maciejczyk, Adam

    2013-01-01

    For many years, the age of the patient, the condition of axillar lymph nodes, the size of the tumour, histological traits (in particular histological grade of malignancy and invasion of lymphatic vessels), condition of hormonal receptors and HER2 represented principal factors used for the stratification of breast cancer patients for the purposes of evaluating the prognosis and determining the appropriate strategy of treatment. Although the variables are useful for the prognostic evaluation of individual groups of breast cancer patients, their role in determining the individual risk level of the patient and in the selection of supplementary treatment is quite restricted. This article shows the prognostic value of additional parameters, whose expression is associated with chemioresistance (MRP2, BCRP, YB1) or individual assessment of the dynamics of tumor progression (S100P, BUBR1). In addition, it describes the role of an online database of "The Kaplan-Meier plotter" which contains the assessment of the effects of expression of various genes on the clinical outcome of patients with breast cancer. PMID:23468257

  19. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around ... cancer causes Reducing breast cancer risk Managing DCIS New lab tests for breast cancer New imaging tests ...

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  1. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα) dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  2. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-02

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  6. Hereditary breast cancer: from molecular pathology to tailored therapies.

    PubMed

    Tan, D S P; Marchi, C; Reis-Filho, J S

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for up to 5-10% of all breast carcinomas. Recent studies have demonstrated that mutations in two high-penetrance genes, namely BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for about 16% of the familial risk of breast cancer. Even though subsequent studies have failed to find another high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene, several genes that confer a moderate to low risk of breast cancer development have been identified; moreover, hereditary breast cancer can be part of multiple cancer syndromes. In this review we will focus on the hereditary breast carcinomas caused by mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, Fanconi anaemia (FANC) genes, CHK2 and ATM tumour suppressor genes. We describe the hallmark histological features of these carcinomas compared with non-hereditary breast cancers and show how an accurate histopathological diagnosis may help improve the identification of patients to be screened for mutations. Finally, novel therapeutic approaches to treat patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ line mutations, including cross-linking agents and PARP inhibitors, are discussed. PMID:18682420

  7. Phenotype-genotype correlation in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2011-04-01

    Familial breast cancer accounts for a small but significant proportion of breast cancer cases worldwide. Identification of the candidate genes is always challenging specifically in patients with little or no family history. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team is required for the proper detection and further management of these patients. Pathologists have played a pivotal role in the cataloguing of genotypic-phenotypic correlations in families with hereditary cancer syndromes. These efforts have led to the identification of histological and phenotypic characteristics that can help predict the presence or absence of germline mutations of specific cancer predisposition genes. However, the panoply of cancer phenotypes associated with mutations of genes other than in BRCA1 is yet to be fully characterised; in fact, many cancer syndromes, germline mutations and gene sequence variants are under investigation for their possible morphological associations. Here we review the current understanding of phenotype-genotype correlation in familial breast cancer. PMID:21400086

  8. ATM and breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Rahman, N

    2006-09-25

    ATM was originally identified by positional cloning as the gene that underlies the autosomal recessive condition ataxia-telangiectasia. The encoded protein plays a central role in the complex processes that repair DNA double-strand breaks. Nearly 20 years ago, epidemiological surveys of relatives of ataxia-telangiectasia cases suggested that female relatives were at modestly increased risk of breast cancer. Subsequently, many studies have tried to clarify the role of ATM in breast cancer susceptibility, but have produced inconclusive and/or inconsistent results. Recently, large epidemiological and molecular studies have finally provided conclusive evidence that ATM mutations that cause ataxia-telangiectasia are breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:16998505

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  11. Leptomeningeal metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Brian J; Kesari, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer may be characterized as either parenchymal brain metastasis (BM) or leptomeningeal (LM) metastasis. BM are much more common (about 80% of all CNS metastases), and have been more extensively studied than LM. CNS metastasis in breast cancer has been associated with reduced overall survival, with the shortest survival generally observed in cases of LM. Here, we review the epidemiology, prognostic factors, diagnostic tools, currently available treatments, and potential future therapies for LM from breast cancer. PMID:23593536

  12. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  13. Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

  14. Correlation between PET/CT results and histological and immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinomas*

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Lima, Eduardo Nóbrega Pereira; Chojniak, Rubens; Marques, Elvira Ferreira; de Souza, Juliana Alves; Graziano, Luciana; Andrade, Wesley Pereira; Osório, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno de Toledo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To correlate the results of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) performed with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts with histological/immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, where patients with biopsy-confirmed breast carcinomas were studied. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in prone position, with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts. PET/CT findings were compared with histological and immunohistochemical data. Results The authors identified 59 malignant breast lesions in 50 patients. The maximum diameter of the lesions ranged from 6 to 80 mm (mean: 32.2 mm). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type (n = 47; 79.7%). At PET/CT, 53 (89.8%) of the lesions demonstrated anomalous concentrations of 18F-FDG, with maximum SUV ranging from 0.8 to 23.1 (mean: 5.5). A statistically significant association was observed between higher values of maximum SUV and histological type, histological grade, molecular subtype, tumor diameter, mitotic index and Ki-67 expression. Conclusion PET/CT performed with specific protocol for assessment of breasts has demonstrated good sensitivity and was associated with relevant histological/immunohistochemical factors related to aggressiveness and prognosis of breast carcinomas. PMID:25741051

  15. [Patient education and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Arfé, Emmanuelle; Bombail, Marie

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic education program set up at the Institut Universitaire du Cancer (University Cancer Institute) in Toulouse accompanies the treatment pathway of breast cancer patients. It includes nine collective workshops. From work organization to application, professionals and patients are closely involved. PMID:26455624

  16. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  17. SUMOylation proteins in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Alshareeda, Alaa T; Negm, Ola H; Green, Andrew R; Nolan, Christopher; Tighe, Paddy; Albarakati, Nada; Sultana, Rebeka; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Ellis, Ian O; Rakha, Emad A

    2014-04-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier proteins (or SUMO) modify the function of protein substrates involved in various cellular processes including DNA damage response (DDR). It is becoming apparent that dysregulated SUMO contribute to carcinogenesis by affecting post-transcriptional modification of key proteins. It is hypothesised that SUMO contributes to the aggressive nature of breast cancer particularly those associated with features similar to breast carcinoma arising in patients with BRCA1 germline mutations. This study aims to assess the clinical and biological significance of three members of SUMO in a well-characterised annotated series of BC with emphasis on DDR. The study cohort comprised primary operable invasive BC including tumours from patients with known BRCA1 germline mutations. SUMO proteins PIAS1, PIAS4 and UBC9 were assessed using immunohistochemistry utilising tissue microarray technology. Additionally, their expression was assessed using reverse phase protein microarray utilising different cell lines. PIAS1 and UBC9 showed cytoplasmic and/or nuclear expression while PIAS4 was detected only in the nuclei. There was a correlation between subcellular localisation and expression of the nuclear transport protein KPNA2. Tumours showing positive nuclear/negative cytoplasmic expression of SUMO featured good prognostic characteristics including lower histologic grade and had a good outcome. Strong correlation with DDR-related proteins including BRCA1, Rad51, ATM, CHK1, DNA-PK and KU70/KU80 was observed. Correlation with ER and BRCA1 was confirmed using RPPA on cell lines. SUMO proteins seem to play important role in BC. Not only expression but also subcellular location is associated with BC phenotype. PMID:24584753

  18. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  19. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  20. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  1. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

  2. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  3. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  4. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  5. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... proven. Studies look at things like smoking, diet, chemicals, and types of birth control pills. Talk to your provider if you are interested in joining a clinical trial for breast cancer prevention.

  6. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

  7. Genotype/Phenotype correlations in patients with hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wittersheim, Maike; Büttner, Reinhard; Markiefka, Birgid

    2015-02-01

    Of all breast cancer cases, 5-10% can be attributed to germline mutations, and the high-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for about 25-28% of these cases. For the remainder, several genes of moderate and low penetrance have been discovered. Histopathologic characteristics have been studied in small cohorts, but for most of the known non-BRCA1/2-associated hereditary breast cancers, the histologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes are not yet identified. Particularly BRCA1 tumors are associated with a distinct morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics that differ from sporadic breast cancer of age-matched controls. The recognition of features characteristic of these mutations can be helpful to identify patients likely to carry a germline mutation and to assess which gene should be screened for first, in families with a high occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:25960721

  8. Genotype/Phenotype Correlations in Patients with Hereditary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittersheim, Maike; Bttner, Reinhard; Markiefka, Birgid

    2015-01-01

    Summary Of all breast cancer cases, 510% can be attributed to germline mutations, and the high-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for about 2528% of these cases. For the remainder, several genes of moderate and low penetrance have been discovered. Histopathologic characteristics have been studied in small cohorts, but for most of the known non-BRCA1/2-associated hereditary breast cancers, the histologic and immunohistochemical phenotypes are not yet identified. Particularly BRCA1 tumors are associated with a distinct morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics that differ from sporadic breast cancer of age-matched controls. The recognition of features characteristic of these mutations can be helpful to identify patients likely to carry a germline mutation and to assess which gene should be screened for first, in families with a high occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:25960721

  9. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  10. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  11. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26285906

  12. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  13. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  14. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Clinical and genetic counselling implications of breast cancer pathology

    PubMed Central

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all breast cancers are due to one of the high-risk breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or possibly to a third or fourth moderate- to high-risk gene(s). A further proportion of cases arise in the presence of a less striking family history, with later average age at onset and lower penetrance: familial breast cancer. Bilaterality is a recognized feature of hereditary breast cancer. Cancers often present at an early age, with the contralateral risk high within 10 years. Proof that bilateral malignancies are separate primaries can be difficult histologically, however, especially within 3 years. The recent finding of specific pathological features related to BRCA1 and, to a lesser extent, BRCA2 mutations means that, in addition to bilaterality and family history, a pathological element can be entered into the risk calculation for the presence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. This will facilitate the targeting of mutation testing to families in which a positive result is most likely, and may subsequently influence the clinical management of these families. PMID:11250683

  15. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  16. 'Omic approaches to preventing or managing metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of metastasis-prone breast cancers and characterization of residual metastatic cancers are important in efforts to improve management of breast cancer. Applications of genome-scale molecular analysis technologies are making these complementary approaches possible by revealing molecular features uniquely associated with metastatic disease. Assays that reveal these molecular features will facilitate development of anatomic, histological and blood-based strategies that may enable detection prior to metastatic spread. Knowledge of these features also will guide development of therapeutic strategies that can be applied when metastatic disease burden is low, thereby increasing the probability of a curative response. PMID:22216753

  17. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  18. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  19. The risk of contralateral breast cancer in daughters of women with and without breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Narod, S A; Kharazmi, E; Fallah, M; Sundquist, K; Hemminki, K

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to estimate the 15-year and lifetime risks of contralateral breast cancer in breast cancer patients according to the age of diagnosis of the first cancer and the history of breast cancer in the mother. The risks of contralateral breast cancer were estimated for all 78,775 breast cancer patients in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database (age at diagnosis of first breast cancer <70 years). The risk of experiencing a contralateral breast cancer within 15 years of diagnosis was 8.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.1-8.7%] for women with an unaffected mother, was 12% (95%CI: 11-13%) for a woman with a mother with unilateral breast cancer and was 13% (95%CI: 9.5-17%) for women with a mother with bilateral breast cancer. In early-onset diagnosed women (<50 years) with an unaffected mother, the risk of contralateral breast cancer until age 80 was 23% (95%CI: 20-26%) and for late-onset (50-69 years) diagnosed women it was 17% (95%CI: 14-21%). In a woman with a mother with an early-onset unilateral breast cancer, risk of contralateral breast cancer by age 80 was 35% (95%CI: 25-46%). Women with a mother with early-onset bilateral breast cancer had 31% (95%CI: 12-67%) lifetime risk of contralateral breast cancer. The risk of contralateral breast cancer is higher for daughters of breast cancer patients than for daughters of women without breast cancer. Maternal cancer history and age at onset of first breast cancer in women should be taken into account when counseling breast cancer patients about their risk of contralateral breast cancer. PMID:25920602

  20. Luminal breast cancer: from biology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2013-09-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive--or luminal--tumours represent around two-thirds of all breast cancers. Luminal breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising different histologies, gene-expression profiles and mutational patterns, with very varied clinical courses and responses to systemic treatment. Despite adjuvant endocrine therapy and chemotherapy treatment for patients at high risk of relapse, both early and late relapses still occur, a fact that highlights the unmet medical needs of these patients. Ongoing research aims to identify those patients who can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy and who will benefit from extended adjuvant hormone therapy. This research also aims to explore the role of adjuvant bisphosphonates, to interrogate new agents for targeting minimal residual disease, and to address endocrine resistance. Data from next-generation sequencing studies have given us new insight into the biology of luminal breast cancer and, together with advances in preclinical models and the availability of newer targeted agents, have led to the testing of rationally chosen combination treatments in clinical trials. However, a major challenge will be to make sense of the large amount of patient genomic data that is becoming increasingly available. This analysis will be critical to our understanding how intertumour and intratumour heterogeneity can influence treatment response and resistance. PMID:23881035

  1. Genomic profiling of breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent advances in the application of advanced genomic technologies towards the identification of biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. Recent findings Advances in high-throughput genomic profiling such as massively parallel sequencing have enabled researchers to catalogue the spectrum of somatic alterations in breast cancers. These tools also hold promise for precision medicine through accurate patient prognostication, stratification, and the dynamic monitoring of treatment response. For example, recent efforts have defined robust molecular subgroups of breast cancer and novel subtype-specific oncogenes. In addition, previously unappreciated activating mutations in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have been reported, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. Genomic profiling of cell-free tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells has been used to monitor disease burden and the emergence of resistance, and such ‘liquid biopsy’ approaches may facilitate the early, noninvasive detection of aggressive disease. Finally, single-cell genomics is coming of age and will contribute to an understanding of breast cancer evolutionary dynamics. Summary Here, we highlight recent studies that employ high-throughput genomic technologies in an effort to elucidate breast cancer biology, discover new therapeutic targets, improve prognostication and stratification, and discuss the implications for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25502431

  2. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  3. Breast cancer and fertility preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

  4. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Medical Prevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, Johannes; Dieterich, Max; Gerber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Western Europe and North America. Effective strategies of medical prevention could reduce the burden of breast cancer mortality. The best evidence for a risk reduction exists for hormonal agents such as tamoxifen and raloxifene (22–72%) or aromatase inhibitors (50–65%). However, the severity of side effects and the lack of evidence for an improved survival compromise the risk/benefit balance. In this review the results of chemoprevention studies, including new treatment approaches, are summarized with critical discussion of their use in clinical practice. PMID:25759621

  6. Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Kinome profiling reveals breast cancer heterogeneity and identifies targeted therapeutic opportunities for triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Mariska; Shi, Wei; Simpson, Peter T.; Song, Sarah; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Saunus, Jodi M.; Smart, Chanel E.; Mariasegaram, Mythily; Wiegmans, Adrian P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lakhani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of breast cancer heterogeneity at the protein level is limited despite proteins being the ultimate effectors of cellular functions. We investigated the heterogeneity of breast cancer (41 primary tumors and 15 breast cancer cell lines) at the protein and phosphoprotein levels to identify activated oncogenic pathways and developing targeted therapeutic strategies. Heterogeneity was observed not only across histological subtypes, but also within subtypes. Tumors of the Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype distributed across four different clusters where one cluster (cluster ii) showed high deregulation of many proteins and phosphoproteins. The majority of TNBC cell lines, particularly mesenchymal lines, resembled the cluster ii TNBC tumors. Indeed, TNBC cell lines were more sensitive than non-TNBC cell lines when treated with targeted inhibitors selected based on upregulated pathways in cluster ii. In line with the enrichment of the upregulated pathways with onco-clients of Hsp90, we found synergy in combining Hsp90 inhibitors with several kinase inhibitors, particularly Erk5 inhibitors. The combination of Erk5 and Hsp90 inhibitors was effective in vitro and in vivo against TNBC leading to upregulation of pro-apoptotic effectors. Our studies contribute to proteomic profiling and improve our understanding of TNBC heterogeneity to provide therapeutic opportunities for this disease. PMID:24762669

  8. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Histologic characterization of DCE-MRI breast tumors with dimensional data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varini, Claudio; Degenhard, Andreas; Nattkemper, Tim W.

    2006-03-01

    The assessment of similarities of breast tumors in DCE-MRI is an important step to improving diagnostic accuracy. A comparison of a breast lesion with different histologic types of tumors can in addition provide further clinical information on the nature of the lesion itself. We present an approach to the visual comparison of different histologic types of breast tumor utilizing Locally Linear Embedding (LLE), an algorithm for dimensional data reduction.The experimental dataset contains the time-series of seven benign and seven malignant breast tumors of various histologic types that were manually labeled by an expert physician from a sequence of DCE-MRI volumes. The adopted DCE-MRI protocol involves six consecutive images of the female breast, yielding to a six-dimensional time-series of MR intensity values for each voxel. The set of all time-series from the 14 tumors constitutes a six-dimensional signal space where similar time-series exhibit locality. This high-dimensional dataset is projected into two dimensions by LLE while preserving the local space topology. In this way similar time-series are mapped onto neighboring data points in the LLE projection. Its visualization with customized colors encoding the histologic information provides a convenient interface for interactive comparison of various breast tumors belonging to different histologic families.

  12. Breast cancer multifocality, disease extent, and survival.

    PubMed

    Tot, Tibor; Gere, Mária; Pekár, Gyula; Tarján, Miklós; Hofmeyer, Syster; Hellberg, Dan; Lindquist, David; Chen, Tony Hsiu-His; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Tabár, László

    2011-11-01

    The prognostic information implied in subgross morphologic parameters such as lesion distribution (unifocal, multifocal, or diffuse) and disease extent in breast cancer has remained largely unexplored in the literature. We aimed to test whether these parameters influence survival in breast carcinoma. The parameters were assessed in a series of 574 cases, all documented in large-format histology sections. We used Cox proportional hazards regression accompanied by Kaplan-Meyer survival curves, with P < .05 regarded as significant. The invasive component was unifocal in 62% (311/499), multifocal in 24% (122/499), and diffuse in 5% (26/499) of the cases. Combining the in situ and invasive tumor components resulted in 48% (274/574) unifocal, 25% (141/574) multifocal, and 20% (117/574) diffuse tumors. Sixty percent (347/574) of the tumors were categorized as having limited extent (occupying an area <40 mm in largest dimension) and 29% (164/574) as extensive. Highly significant (P < .0001) differences were observed in 10-year disease-specific cumulative survival among the cases with unifocal, multifocal, and diffuse invasive (89.6%, 76.0%, and 63.6%, respectively) and combined (92.3%, 82.3%, and 75.7%, respectively) lesion distribution. Patients with extensive tumors exhibited a significantly lower cumulative survival (P < .0001) compared with those with limited extent (91.6% and 75.5%) and a statistically significantly 1.89-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.07-3.37; P = .03) risk for breast cancer death after controlling for tumor attributes, type of surgery, and adjuvant therapy. The hazard ratio for breast cancer death for mutifocal and/or diffuse tumors versus unifocal ones was 1.96 (95%; 1.11-3.48; P = .02) after controlling for the same factors. Lesion distribution and disease extent represent important independent survival-related prognostic parameters in breast carcinoma. PMID:21663941

  13. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  14. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  15. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  16. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic signatures of breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Stecklein, Shane R; Jensen, Roy A; Pal, Arindam

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease at both the histological and molecular levels. The current model of breast tumorigenesis suggests that the normal mammary stem cell and the various progenitors that arise thereof can be transformed and generate lineage-restricted tumor phenotypes. This model is supported by observations that the different subtypes of breast cancer share transcriptional signatures intrinsic to normal components of the mammary epithelium. Studies have since elaborated these molecular signatures to include recurrent genetic abnormalities, patterns of DNA methylation and dysregulation of microRNAs. Here we aim to review the current state of knowledge concerning the cellular etiology of breast cancer subtypes and the genetic, transcriptional and epigenetic aberrations associated with each subtype. PMID:22201926

  18. Evolving Evidence of the Efficacy and Safety of nab-Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Cancers with Squamous Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Herbert H.; Chan, Alvita C.Y.; Wong, Ashley C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Taxanes, such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, are well-established cytotoxic chemotherapeutics used in the treatment of a variety of cancers, including those of squamous histology. In their formulation, both agents require solvents, which have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions, peripheral neuropathy, hepatic toxicities, and impaired drug delivery. nab-Paclitaxel is a novel, albumin-bound form of paclitaxel with improved tolerability, bioavailability, and efficacy compared with solvent-based paclitaxel. Currently, nab-paclitaxel is approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer, locally advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and metastatic pancreatic cancer. Clinical studies suggest that nab-paclitaxel may be particularly effective in cancers with squamous histology, including NSCLC. This article reviews the emerging evidence supporting nab-paclitaxel as an effective agent in the treatment of malignancies of squamous histology. PMID:26918039

  19. Racial differences in breast cancer screening, knowledge and compliance.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Dawne M.; Miller, Jane E.; Davis, Diane M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. Although the incidence of breast cancer is 13% higher in white women, mortality in black women is 28% higher, due to histological and socioeconomic factors. Existing research regarding racial differences in compliance with breast cancer screening recommendations has found conflicting results. METHODS: Data on more than 4,500 women were taken from the 1992 National Health Interview Survey, a nationally representative, population-based sample survey. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relative odds of knowledge of breast self-exam (BSE) and mammograms, and compliance with BSE, clinical breast exams (CBE), and mammograms. RESULTS: Black women were less likely than white women to be aware of and use breast cancer screening tests. However, among women who were aware of screening tests, compliance was higher among black women. Women with low educational attainment, low cancer knowledge, and no usual source of care were less likely to be CBE or mammogram compliant. Socioeconomic differences were larger for the two clinical tests than for BSE. CONCLUSIONS: Programs should inform women about cancer screening tests and remove barriers that hinder women from receiving clinical screening exams. PMID:12934865

  20. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  1. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  2. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence. PMID:22852765

  3. Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval (CI), 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose.

  4. Breast Cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mungrue, K.; Chase, H.; Gordon, J.; Knowles, D.; Lockhart, K.; Miller, N.; Morley, T.; Sealey, L.; Turner, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women in the Bahamas, which consists of many islands. This is the first attempt to identify which island has the highest occurrence of breast cancer. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to describe the sociodemographical and spatial features of breast cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011. METHODS A review of the medical records of all women with a confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer during the period January 1, 2009–December 31, 2011, was undertaken. Data were first obtained from the National Oncology Board of the Bahamas and validated by a review of the medical records. The patient address was geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS 10.0 Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) to satellite images obtained from The Nature Conservancy in the Bahamas. RESULTS We recruited 270 patients who satisfied the entry criteria. The cumulative incidences of breast cancer for the years 2009–2011 were 51.4, 45.4, and 51.4, respectively. Breast cancer occurred most often in women of African origin with a mean age at diagnosis of 56.6 ± 13.8 years. Ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type observed with most cancers occurring in Grade II or higher and presenting as late stage (≥ Stage II). Surgery was the preferred method of treatment with modified radical mastectomy being the procedure of choice. Spatial distribution of cases across the Bahamas revealed one cluster, which is present on the island of New Providence. Further analysis of New Providence showed a consistently skewed kernel density in the central and eastern regions, compared with a scattered distribution in the southern and western regions. CONCLUSION The island of New Providence had the highest occurrence of breast cancer among all the islands of the Bahamas. The increasing incidence of breast cancer in young women is likely to impose a significant burden on the future of Bahamian health care. PMID:27127408

  5. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  6. Ten genes for inherited breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire

    2007-02-01

    Inherited breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in ten different genes in pathways critical to genomic integrity. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations confer very high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. p53 and PTEN mutations lead to very high breast cancer risks associated with rare cancer syndromes. Mutations in CHEK2, ATM, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1, and PALB2 are associated with doubling of breast cancer risks. In addition, biallelic mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and PALB2 cause Fanconi anemia. The convergence of these genes in a shared role reveals underlying biology of these illnesses and suggests still other breast cancer genes. PMID:17292821

  7. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  8. Trial of early detection of breast cancer: description of method.

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A large-scale trial has been started in the United Kingdom with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of different methods for the early detection of breast cancer. Two populations, each of 25,000 women aged 45-64 are invited for annual screening by mammography and/or clinical examination. Two further populations, one of 25,000 and one of 40,000 women in the same age range, are invited for education sessions in breast self-examination, and 4 control populations, totalling 120,000 women, are offered no additional services beyond conventional diagnostic facilities. All breast histology, both benign and malignant, in all women in the study is recorded, as are the findings, management and follow-up of all breast cancers. Changes in the populations, and deaths from all causes, are also recorded. This is essentially a non-randomized trial, though in one of the screening centres, where an education programme about breast cancer is provided for the whole population, only women registered with certain randomly selected general practices are invited to be screened. The principal means of evaluation will be the comparison of the mortality rates from breast cancer in each of the study populations. Costs, in terms of use of health resources, unnecessary surgery and radiation hazard, will be assessed. Additional aspects of the trial include studies of women's attitudes to early detection, and of the aetiology of breast cancer. PMID:7032568

  9. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  10. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-29

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. [Cancer in ectopic breast tissue].

    PubMed

    Røikjer, Johan; Lindmark, Ida; Knudsen, Thor

    2015-06-15

    Two different forms of ectopic breast tissue exist in human beings: supernumerary and aberrant. Both forms are usually seen alongside the milk lines, which extend from the upper limbs to the inguinal region where they give rise to mammary glands, areolas and nipples. Although ectopic- and orthotopic breast tissue are placed in different areas of the body, they still share the same ability to undergo pathological degeneration. The focus of this case report is to shed light on this unusual form of breast cancer, and raise the level of awareness in cases with lumps located in the milk lines. PMID:26101129

  14. DNA damage and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer D; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is intimately related to the accumulation of DNA damage, and repair failures (including mutation prone repair and hyperactive repair systems). This article relates current clinical categories for breast cancer and their common DNA damage repair defects. Information is included on the potential for accumulation of DNA damage in the breast tissue of a woman during her lifetime and the role of DNA damage in breast cancer development. We then cover endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, types of DNA damage repair and basic signal transduction pathways for three gene products involved in the DNA damage response system; namely BRCA1, BRIT1 and PARP-1. These genes are often considered tumor suppressors because of their roles in DNA damage response and some are under clinical investigation as likely sources for effective new drugs to treat breast cancers. Finally we discuss some of the problems of DNA damage repair systems in cancer and the conundrum of hyper-active repair systems which can introduce mutations and confer a survival advantage to certain types of cancer cells. PMID:21909479

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  16. Breast cancer in older women.

    PubMed

    Kimmick, G; Muss, H B

    1997-05-01

    More than 50% of breast cancers are diagnosed in women aged 65 years or older, a quickly growing segment of the population. Healthy older women should be offered state-of-the-art screening and treatment for breast cancer, including mammography, surgery, radiation therapy, and adjuvant therapy for early stage tumors. Clinical trials focusing on the role of adjuvant treatment in older women with breast cancer are of chief importance. The optimal treatment for older women with life-threatening, comorbid conditions may be primary treatment with tamoxifen or adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen alone after definitive surgery. Outside the clinical trials setting, metastatic disease should be treated similarly in all age groups. PMID:9115451

  17. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  18. Job Authority and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2014-01-01

    Using the 19572011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of womens job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which womens occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions. PMID:25506089

  19. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  20. Far Beyond the Usual Biomarkers in Breast Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    dos Anjos Pultz, Brunna; da Luz, Felipe Andrs Cordero; de Faria, Paulo Rogrio; Oliveira, Ana Paula Lima; de Arajo, Rogrio Agenor; Silva, Marcelo Jos Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Research investigating biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and the prediction of treatment responses in breast cancer is rapidly expanding. However, no validated biomarker currently exists for use in routine clinical practice, and breast cancer detection and management remains dependent on invasive procedures. Histological examination remains the standard for diagnosis, whereas immunohistochemical and genetic tests are utilized for treatment decisions and prognosis determinations. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive review of literature published in PubMed on breast cancer biomarkers between 2009 and 2013. The keywords that were used together were breast cancer, biomarkers, diagnosis, prognosis and drug response. The cited references of the manuscripts included in this review were also screened. We have comprehensively summarized the performance of several biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and predicted drug responses of breast cancer. Finally, we have identified 15 biomarkers that have demonstrated promise in initial studies and several miRNAs. At this point, such biomarkers must be rigorously validated in the clinical setting to be translated into clinically useful tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of drug responses of breast cancer. PMID:25057307

  1. Family history of breast cancer and all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Milne, Roger L.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Sangaramoorthy, Meera; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Goodwin, Pamela J.; OMalley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Friedlander, Michael L.; Giles, Graham G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; West, Dee W.; John, Esther M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although having a family history of breast cancer is a well established breast cancer risk factor, it is not known whether it influences mortality after breast cancer diagnosis. Methods Subjects were 4,153 women with first primary incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2000, and enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry through population-based sampling in Northern California, USA; Ontario, Canada; and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Cases were oversampled for younger age at diagnosis and/or family history of breast cancer. Carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 were excluded. Cases and their relatives completed structured questionnaires assessing breast cancer risk factors and family history of cancer. Cases were followed for a median of 6.5 years, during which 725 deaths occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate associations between family history of breast cancer at the time of diagnosis and risk of all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis, adjusting for established prognostic factors. Results The hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.84-1.15) for having at least one first- or second-degree relative with breast cancer, and 0.85 (95% CI=0.70-1.02) for having at least one first-degree relative with breast cancer, compared with having no such family history. Estimates did not vary appreciably when stratified by case or tumor characteristics. Conclusions Family history of breast cancer is not associated with all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis for women without a known germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Therefore, clinical management should not depend on family history of breast cancer. PMID:19034644

  2. Histologic type of lung cancer and asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, O; Garfinkel, L; Parks, V R; Conston, A S; Galdi, V A; Joubert, L

    1984-12-15

    The histologic types of lung cancer in 855 patients (747 men and 107 women) from three hospitals and one international study of insulation workers were evaluated. Of these, 196 cases had asbestos exposure. About one half of the cases were diagnosed from surgical slides and one half from autopsy slides. Squamous cell carcinoma constituted the largest percentage of tumor types and was found with the same frequency in exposed and nonexposed groups. Small cell carcinoma was found in 25% of the exposed and in 15% of the nonexposed patients. Upper lung sites were involved in about two thirds of the cases with asbestos exposure and lower lobes in the other one third. There was little difference in histologic type in cases regardless of whether upper or lower lobes were involved. Cigarette smokers who smoked until their cancer diagnosis showed no difference in histologic type by amount smoked, and slight but not statistically significant differences from ex-cigarette smokers. PMID:6093990

  3. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  4. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  5. Postpartum Remodeling, Lactation, and Breast Cancer Risk: Summary of a National Cancer Institute–Sponsored Workshop

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The pregnancy–lactation cycle (PLC) is a period in which the breast is transformed from a less-developed, nonfunctional organ into a mature, milk-producing gland that has evolved to meet the nutritional, developmental, and immune protection needs of the newborn. Cessation of lactation initiates a process whereby the breast reverts to a resting state until the next pregnancy. Changes during this period permanently alter the morphology and molecular characteristics of the breast (molecular histology) and produce important, yet poorly understood, effects on breast cancer risk. To provide a state-of-the-science summary of this topic, the National Cancer Institute invited a multidisciplinary group of experts to participate in a workshop in Rockville, Maryland, on March 2, 2012. Topics discussed included: 1) the epidemiology of the PLC in relation to breast cancer risk, 2) breast milk as a biospecimen for molecular epidemiological and translational research, and 3) use of animal models to gain mechanistic insights into the effects of the PLC on breast carcinogenesis. This report summarizes conclusions of the workshop, proposes avenues for future research on the PLC and its relationship with breast cancer risk, and identifies opportunities to translate this knowledge to improve breast cancer outcomes. PMID:23264680

  6. Gastric Mucinous Cancer Histology: Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Jian-Hui, Chen; Shi-Rong, Cai; Hui, Wu; Jian-bo, Xu; Kai-Ming, Wu; Si-le, Chen; He, Yu-Long

    2016-01-01

    MC tended toward worse tumor biological behavior and long-term survival outcome compared to WMDC. Moreover, MC also showed worse clinicopathological features and survival outcome in some selected patients. For these reasons, MC should be deemed as a special histological type of gastric cancer with worse clinicopathological features and survival outcome. PMID:26839544

  7. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Skeletal manifestations of treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  9. Correlation of Hormone Receptor Expression with Histologic Parameters in Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepti; Gupta, Veena; Marwah, Nisha; Gill, Meenu; Gupta, Sumiti; Gupta, Gopal; Jain, Promil; Sen, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Breast cancer is the commonest cancer of Indian women. Estrogen and Progesterone expression is seen in benign breast lesions and in breast carcinoma associated with good prognostic parameters and it correlates well with response to hormone therapy. Although a lot of studies have been conducted in the past on hormone receptor expression in breast cancer and few have correlated them with other prognostic parameters of breast cancer, the present study was intended to document the prevalence of hormone receptor positive breast carcinomas in our population; their importance in benign breast diseases; to document a reliable scoring system of hormone receptors expression by Quick scoring; to correlate them with most of the proven prognostic parameters of breast carcinoma. Methods: Tissue specimens from 25 patients with benign breast disease and 50 patients with breast carcinoma were assayed for estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors using Quick scoring. ER/PR expression in breast carcinomas was correlated with various prognostic parameters including patients’ age, menopausal status, tumor size, type, MBR grade, NPI, lymphatic vessel invasion, lymph node stage, lymphomononuclear invasion, elastosis and HER2/neu status. Result: Scoring of steroid receptors paralleled intensity of hyperplasia in benign breast diseases but in breast carcinoma, it was inversely correlated with grade of tumor, NPI, HER2/neu status, tumor necrosis, lymphomononuclear infiltrate and elastosis. We found no relationship with tumor size, lymph node status or age. Conclusion: Assessment of hormone receptors for clinical management of breast cancer patients is strongly advocated to provide prognostic information and best therapeutic options. PMID:26516322

  10. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Women Biopsied for Benign Breast Disease: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Jones, Joan G.; Olson, Neal; Negassa, Abdissa; Duggan, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mindy; Kandel, Rita A.; Glass, Andrew G.; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Women with a history of benign breast disease are at increased risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, few studies have examined whether established breast cancer risk factors other than histology are associated with an altered risk of breast cancer in women with benign breast disease. We used a nested case-control design within a large, multi-center cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease (BBD) to estimate odds ratios for breast cancer in association with exposure to a range of personal and lifestyle factors. Methods Cases were women biopsied for BBD who subsequently developed breast cancer; controls were individually matched to cases on center and age at diagnosis and were women biopsied for BBD who did not develop breast cancer in the same follow-up interval as that for the cases. After excluding women with prevalent breast cancer, 1357 records (661 case records and 696 records) were available for analysis. We used conditional logistic regression to obtain crude and multivariable-adjusted estimates of the association between specific factors and risk of breast cancer. Results In multivariable analyses age at first live birth, number of pregnancies, and postmenopausal status were inversely associated with risk of breast cancer. The odds ratio for women with age at first birth <25 years and >3 pregnancies, relative to nulliparous women, was 0.49, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.79, and that for postmenopausal women relative to premenopausal women was 0.60, 95% 0.37-0.99. Conclusions Further study of personal factors influencing the risk of breast cancer in women with BBD may help to identify subgroups of the population at increased risk of invasive disease. PMID:20079704

  11. Genetic testing by cancer site: breast.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Chittenden, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Women in the United States have a 12% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Although only about 5% to 10% of all cases of breast cancer are attributable to a highly penetrant cancer predisposition gene, individuals who carry a mutation in one of these genes have a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer, as well as other cancers, over their lifetime compared with the general population. The ability to distinguish those individuals at high risk allows health care providers to intervene with appropriate counseling and education, surveillance, and prevention-with the overall goal of improved survival for these individuals. This article focuses on the identification of patients at high risk for breast cancer and provides an overview of the clinical features, cancer risks, causative genes, and medical management for the most clearly described hereditary breast cancer syndromes. Newer genes that have also been implicated in familial breast cancer are also briefly reviewed. PMID:22846731

  12. Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: ... American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States have dropped 34% since ...

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

  14. 19p13.1 is a triple-negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristen N; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christoph; Godwin, Andrew K; Weaver, Joellen; Pathak, Harsh B; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Mller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L; Bentez, Javier; Zamora, Mara Pilar; Prez, Jos Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Brge G; Flyger, Henrik; Gunel, Pascal; Truong, Thrse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marm, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dnnebier, Thomas; Rdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcom W; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Hooning, Maartje J; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylks, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Alns, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Brresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L; Pankratz, V S; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-04-01

    The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.15; P = 3.49 10(-5)] and triple-negative (ER-, PR-, and HER2-negative) breast cancer (rs8170: OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31; P = 2.22 10(-7)). However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when triple-negative cases were excluded (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.89-1.07; P = 0.62). In addition, a combined analysis of triple-negative cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC; N = 3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and triple-negative breast cancer risk (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.18-1.33; P = 3.31 10(-13)]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple-negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histologic subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple-negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

  15. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  16. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria. PMID:21067536

  17. MiRNA-101 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CX chemokine receptor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xiu-Li; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Whereas miR-101 is involved in the development and progression of breast cancer, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that miR-101 expression is inversely correlated with the clinical stage, lymph node metastasis and prognosis in breast cancers. Introduction of miR-101 inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of in vivo. CX chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) is a direct target of miR-101, positively correlating with the histological grade and the incidence of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. The effects of miR-101 were mimicked and counteracted by CXCR7 depletion and overexpression, respectively. STAT3 signaling downstream of CXCR7 is involved in miR-101 regulation of breast cancer cell behaviors. These findings have implications for the potential application of miR-101 in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26360780

  18. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    DO CANTO, LUISA MATOS; MARIAN, CATALIN; WILLEY, SHAWNA; SIDAWY, MARY; DA CUNHA, PATRICIA A.; RONE, JANICE D.; LI, XIN; GUSEV, YURIY; HADDAD, BASSEM R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer. PMID:26984519

  19. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Luisa Matos; Marian, Catalin; Willey, Shawna; Sidawy, Mary; Da Cunha, Patricia A; Rone, Janice D; Li, Xin; Gusev, Yuriy; Haddad, Bassem R

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer. PMID:26984519

  20. Testosterone and breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R; Dimitrakakis, C

    2015-11-01

    Testosterone (T) is the most abundant biologically active hormone in women. Androgen receptors (AR) are located throughout the body including the breast where T decreases tissue proliferation. However, T can be aromatized to estradiol (E2), which increases proliferation and hence, breast cancer (BCA) risk. Increased aromatase expression and an imbalance in the ratio of stimulatory estrogens to protective androgens impacts breast homeostasis. Recent clinical data supports a role for T in BCA prevention. Women with symptoms of hormone deficiency treated with pharmacological doses of T alone or in combination with anastrozole (A), delivered by subcutaneous implants, had a reduced incidence of BCA. In addition, T combined with A effectively treated symptoms of hormone deficiency in BCA survivors and was not associated with recurrent disease. Most notably, T+A implants placed in breast tissue surrounding malignant tumors significantly reduced BCA tumor size, further supporting T direct antiproliferative, protective and therapeutic effect. PMID:26160683

  1. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  2. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  3. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. [Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tassin, S; Bragard, I; Thommessen, M; Pitchot, W

    2011-01-01

    In occidental countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women. In the last 30 years, the therapeutical progresses have improved the prognosis and the survival rate. However, despite this hope of recovering, women continue to face the fear of death and vulnerability. Moreover, treatments can induce cognitive, emotional and behavioral reactions in patients but also in their relatives. Therefore, the treatments are associated with physical and psychosocial dysfunctioning influencing quality of life. PMID:21826969

  5. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Par(-4)oxysm in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion that leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

  7. Par(-4)oxysm in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M

    2013-07-01

    Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion, which leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

  8. Unusual Aggressive Breast Cancer: Metastatic Malignant Phyllodes Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-01-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor. PMID:23705037

  9. [Factors influencing on the prognosis in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, T; Horino, T; Ota, J

    1988-07-01

    TNM classification, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, histological type of primary tumor, ER status and biological tumor markers have been recognized as prognostic factors in breast cancer. The 673 breast cancer patients undergoing radical mastectomy at this department were analyzed for TNM classification influencing on the postoperative prognosis. Five-and ten- year survival rates were 93% and 89% in stage I, 83.9% and 75.5% in stage II, 67.3% and 60% in stage III. The most common histological type, namely, invasive ductal carcinoma, of primary breast cancer was classified into three types by Japan Mammary Cancer Society. The first type was papillotubular carcinoma, the second solid-tubular carcinoma, and the third scirrhous carcinoma. The prognosis of papillotubular carcinoma was best. Many investigators reported that the prognosis of ER positive breast cancer was good. But in the latest report, the opposite result is obtained. More study is necessary to evaluate the prognostic value of ER. The most common biological tumor markers were CEA, LDH and ALP. The CEA was the best prognosis-factor in biological tumor markers. PMID:2456037

  10. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  12. BRCA 1/2-Mutation Related and Sporadic Breast and Ovarian Cancers: More Alike than Different

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Melissa; Puhalla, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    No longer is histology solely predictive of cancer treatment and outcome. There is an increasing influence of tumor genomic characteristics on therapeutic options. Both breast and ovarian cancers are at higher risk of development in patients with BRCA 1/2-germline mutations. Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have shown a number of genomic similarities between triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) and ovarian cancers. Recently, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising activity in hereditary BRCA 1/2-mutated and sporadic breast and ovarian cancers. In this review, we will summarize the current literature regarding the genomic and phenotypic similarities between BRCA 1/2-mutation related cancers, sporadic TNBCs, and sporadic ovarian cancers. We will also review Phase I, II, and III data using PARP inhibitors for these malignancies and compare and contrast the results with respect to histology. PMID:24579064

  13. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  14. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer (Arabic) سرطان الثدي - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Breast Cancer Karcinom dojke - Bosanski (Bosnian) ...

  15. Studies of breast cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen. Immunomedics Breast Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D M; Wegener, W

    1997-01-01

    Multiple imaging methods are currently used to detect the presence, location, and extent of breast cancer, either at initial presentation or during follow-up. Even at initial diagnosis, more specific methods are needed to complement the high sensitivity of mammography in the detection and diagnosis of mammary carcinoma. Therefore, the current study evaluates the potential use of a new monoclonal antibody-based imaging agent, arcitumomab (CEA-Scan), which comprises an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment labeled directly with technetium-99m, in the detection of primary, recurrent, or metastatic mammary cancer. A prospective, non-randomized, open-label, multicenter trial was conducted in 123 women 100 with primary breast cancer confirmed by histology or cytology, and 23 with a prior history and who were under evaluation for possible recurrence or metastasis. A 1-mg dose of arcitumomab labeled with 20-25 mCi Tc-99m was injected i.v., and planar images were acquired at 5-8 hr, as well as single-photon emission computed tomography. Additional planar scanning was performed optionally at 18-24 hr. The imaging studies were interpreted as positive if there was abnormal focal activity, and were correlated, wherever possible, with histopathology or conventional imaging tests. In 78 evaluable patients with primary breast carcinoma arcitumomab showed an imaging sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 88%, respectively, even detecting lesions < 1 cm in 61% of the cases. Among 58 patients evaluable for axillary node involvement, 30 were positive by histopathology, of which arcitumomab was correct in 19 with cancer (63% sensitivity) and in 25 of 28 without cancer (89% specificity). Among 88 primary operable patients, arcitumomab showed additional sites of focal uptake outside of the breasts and axillae in 10, or 11%. In a total of 19 breast cancer patients with known or suspected recurrence or metastatic disease, 13, or 68%, showed one or more focal sites of uptake, involving the typical sites of spread of mammary cancer. No significant adverse effects or induction of human antimouse antibodies were observed in these patients. Arcitumomab immunoscintigraphy is a simple, same-day, and safe new imaging modality for the detection of sites of breast cancer, including lesions < 1 cm, with a reasonably high rate of sensitivity and specificity. It may be used to complement mammography in the differentiation of malignant from benign disease. PMID:9227788

  16. Breast cancer with inguinal node recurrence.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shikha; Puri, Tarun; Julka, Pramod K

    2015-03-01

    Surgery and irradiation for breast cancer may interfere with conventional pathways of spread, leading to bizarre patterns of dissemination through lymphatics or through hematogenous route. Lymphoscintigraphic studies may help identify nodal involvement. Other possible reasons could be occurrence of primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue retained in the vulva following involution of milk line. We describe a case of triple negative breast cancer, who developed contralateral breast cancer during treatment. Three years later, she developed isolated inguinal nodal metastases, which responded to local radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the patient relapsed after 2 years and could not be salvaged thereafter. PMID:25455282

  17. Male Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Comparison With Female Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, William F.; Jatoi, Ismail; Tse, Julia; Rosenberg, Philip S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Because of its rarity, male breast cancer is often compared with female breast cancer. Patients and Methods To compare and contrast male and female breast cancers, we obtained case and population data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for breast cancers diagnosed from 1973 through 2005. Standard descriptive epidemiology was supplemented with age-period-cohort models and breast cancer survival analyses. Results Of all breast cancers, men with breast cancer make up less than 1%. Male compared with female breast cancers occurred later in life with higher stage, lower grade, and more estrogen receptorpositive tumors. Recent breast cancer incidence and mortality rates declined over time for men and women, but these trends were greater for women than for men. Comparing patients diagnosed from 1996 through 2005 versus 1976 through 1985, and adjusting for age, stage, and grade, cause-specific hazard rates for breast cancer death declined by 28% among men (P = .03) and by 42% among women (P ? 0). Conclusion There were three intriguing results. Age-specific incidence patterns showed that the biology of male breast cancer resembled that of late-onset female breast cancer. Similar breast cancer incidence trends among men and women suggested that there are common breast cancer risk factors that affect both sexes, especially estrogen receptorpositive breast cancer. Finally, breast cancer mortality and survival rates have improved significantly over time for both male and female breast cancer, but progress for men has lagged behind that for women. PMID:19996029

  18. Cancer risk after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Randimbison, L; Te, V-C; Vecchia, C La

    2006-01-01

    Among women with breast cancer, we compared the relative and absolute rates of subsequent cancers in 1541 women treated with radiotherapy (RT) to 4570 women not so treated (NRT), using all registered in the Swiss Vaud Cancer Registry in the period between 1978 and 1998, and followed up to December 2002. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were based on age- and calendar year-specific incidence rates in the Vaud general population. There were 11 lung cancers in RT (SIR=1.40; 95% CI: 0.70–2.51) and 17 in NRT women (SIR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.44–1.22), 72 contralateral breast cancers in RT (SIR=1.85; 95% CI: 1.45–2.33) and 150 in NRT women (SIR=1.38; 95% CI: 1.16–1.61), and 90 other neoplasms in RT (SIR=1.37; 95% CI: 1.10–1.68) and 224 in NRT women (SIR=1.05; 95% CI: 0.91–1.19). Overall, there were 173 second neoplasms in RT women (SIR=1.54, 95% CI: 1.32–1.78) and 391 among NRT women (SIR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.02–1.25). The estimates were significantly heterogeneous. After 15 years, 20% of RT cases vs 16% of NRT cases had developed a second neoplasm. The appreciable excess risk of subsequent neoplasms after RT for breast cancer must be weighed against the approximately 5% reduction of breast cancer mortality at 15 years after RT. PMID:16804519

  19. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  20. Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Petra; Savage, Michelle I.; Brown, Powel H.

    2013-01-01

    With a better understanding of the etiology of breast cancer, molecularly targeted drugs have been developed and are being testing for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Targeted drugs that inhibit the estrogen receptor (ER) or estrogen-activated pathways include the selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and lasofoxifene) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer and promising results of AIs in breast cancer trials, suggest that AIs might be even more effective in the prevention of ER-positive breast cancer. However, these agents only prevent ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, current research is focused on identifying preventive therapies for other forms of breast cancer such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, breast cancer that does express ER, progesterone receptor, or HER2). HER2-positive breast cancers are currently treated with anti-HER2 therapies including trastuzumab and lapatinib, and preclinical and clinical studies are now being conducted to test these drugs for the prevention of HER2-positive breast cancers. Several promising agents currently being tested in cancer prevention trials for the prevention of TNBC include poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, vitamin D, and rexinoids, both of which activate nuclear hormone receptors (the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors). This review discusses currently used breast cancer preventive drugs, and describes the progress of research striving to identify and develop more effective preventive agents for all forms of breast cancer. PMID:24069582

  1. Asian ethnicity and breast cancer subtypes: a study from the California Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Telli, Melinda L; Chang, Ellen T; Kurian, Allison W; Keegan, Theresa H M; McClure, Laura A; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Ford, James M; Gomez, Scarlett L

    2011-06-01

    The distribution of breast cancer molecular subtypes has been shown to vary by race/ethnicity, highlighting the importance of host factors in breast tumor biology. We undertook the current analysis to determine population-based distributions of breast cancer subtypes among six ethnic Asian groups in California. We defined immunohistochemical (IHC) surrogates for each breast cancer subtype among Chinese, Japanese, Filipina, Korean, Vietnamese, and South Asian patients diagnosed with incident, primary, invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2007 in the California Cancer Registry as: hormone receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2- [estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and/or progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-)], triple-negative (ER-, PR-, and HER2-), and HER2-positive (ER±, PR±, and HER2+). We calculated frequencies of breast cancer subtypes among Asian ethnic groups and evaluated their associations with clinical and demographic factors. Complete IHC data were available for 8,140 Asian women. Compared to non-Hispanic White women, Korean [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], Filipina (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.5), Vietnamese (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6), and Chinese (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.3) women had a significantly increased risk of being diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer subtypes after adjusting for age, stage, grade, socioeconomic status, histology, diagnosis year, nativity, and hospital ownership status. We report a significant ethnic disparity in HER2-positive breast cancer in a large population-based cohort enriched for Asian-Americans. Given the poor prognosis and high treatment costs of HER2-positive breast cancer, our results have implications for healthcare resource utilization, cancer biology, and clinical care. PMID:20957431

  2. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Site Map Privacy Accessibility Terms of Use State Fundraising Notices Site Comments Better Business Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © 2016 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified ...

  3. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells become cancerous because of changes (mutations) in DNA. Some DNA mutations are inherited. This means the mutations are ... cancers that run in some families. But most DNA changes related to breast cancer are acquired in ...

  4. Prognostic Typing in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hartveit, F.

    1971-01-01

    Infiltrating breast carcinomas in which recurrence takes place 10 years or more after operation are reported to contain tumour cells of characteristic morphology. The cytological features of these tumour cells form the basis of the system of classification described here. Three cytological types are recognized, prognosis being best in type III. Typing is carried out on specimens stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The results of typing were reproducible in over 90% of cases and independent of the histology of the lesion. Correlation to survival time was shown in a total of 222 cases. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4107964

  5. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-27

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  6. Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Binukumar, Bhaskarapillai; Mathew, Aleyamma

    2005-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and its subtypes and their effect on the development of breast cancer. Methods A Pubmed search for literature on the consumption of dietary fat and risk of breast cancer published from January 1990 through December 2003 was carried out. Results Increased consumption of total fat and saturated fat were found to be positively associated with the development of breast cancer. Even though an equivocal association was observed for the consumption of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the risk of breast cancer, there exists an inverse association in the case of oleic acid, the most abundant MUFA. A moderate inverse association between consumption of n-3 fatty acids and breast cancer risk and a moderate positive association between n-6 fatty acids and breast cancer risk were observed. Conclusion Even though all epidemiological studies do not provide a strong positive association between the consumption of certain types of dietary fat and breast cancer risk, at least a moderate association does seem to exist and this has a number of implications in view of the fact that breast cancer is an increasing public health concern. PMID:16022739

  7. Radiation Dose and Breast Cancer Risk in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Peter D.; Robison, Leslie L.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Whitton, John A.; Diller, Lisa; Kenney, Lisa; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meadows, Anna T.; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the risk of breast cancer in relation to radiation dose and chemotherapy among survivors of childhood cancer. Methods We conducted a case-control study of breast cancer in a cohort of 6,647 women who were 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and who were treated during 1970 through 1986. One hundred twenty patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer were identified and were individually matched to four selected controls on age at initial cancer and time since initial cancer. Medical physicists estimated radiation dose to the breast tumor site and ovaries on the basis of medical records. Results The odds ratio for breast cancer increased linearly with radiation dose, and it reached 11-fold for local breast doses of approximately 40 Gy relative to no radiation (P for trend < .0001). Risk associated with breast irradiation was sharply reduced among women who received 5 Gy or more to the ovaries (P = .002). The excess odds ratio per Gy was 0.36 for those who received ovarian doses less than 5 Gy and was 0.06 for those who received higher doses. Radiation-related risk did not vary significantly by age at exposure. Borderline significantly elevated risks were seen for doxorubicin, dactinomycin, dacarbazine, and carmustine. Conclusion Results confirm the radiation sensitivity of the breast in girls age 10 to 20 years but do not demonstrate a strong effect of age at exposure within this range. Irradiation of the ovaries at doses greater than 5 Gy seems to lessen the carcinogenic effects of breast irradiation, most likely by reducing exposure of radiation-damaged breast cells to stimulating effects of ovarian hormones. PMID:19620485

  8. Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Alphandéry, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

  9. Ovarian granulosa cell tumor and increased risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Anne; Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C

    2013-12-01

    Granulosa cell tumor of the ovary (GCT) is a rare neoplasm. The tumor often secretes estrogens and then presents at an earlier stage due to hormone-related symptoms. GCT women are at increased risk of endometrial carcinoma, but there is only limited information about GCTs and potential association to other hormone-related neoplasms such as breast cancer. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study on 163 women with GCT. Medical records and histological sections were reviewed and a search in the pathology registry performed. Eight [95% confidence interval (CI); 3.4-15.8] GCT women were diagnosed with a breast neoplasm; one with Paget's disease of the nipple and seven with breast carcinoma. Based on calculations using incidence rates on breast cancer among Danish women, we would have expected 2.5 cases of breast cancer. The odds ratio was 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6-6.6), suggesting an increased risk of breast cancer in GCT women. PMID:24283356

  10. Overactive Thyroid Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... women with the opposite problem -- a condition called hypothyroidism, where abnormally low levels of thyroid hormones are ... federal policy. More Health News on: Breast Cancer Hypothyroidism Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast ...

  11. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... samples from lumps or other abnormalities in the breast that are detected by physical examination or on mammograms or other imaging scans. Because approximately 80 percent of all breast abnormalities turn out not to be cancer, this ...

  12. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. Estrogen metabolites and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Santen, Richard J; Yue, Wei; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies link several factors related to estrogen production in women to an increased risk of breast cancer. These include early menarche, late menopause, obesity, use of post-menopausal hormone therapy, and plasma estradiol levels. Two possible mechanisms have been proposed to explain the increased risk: (1) estrogen receptor (ER) mediated stimulation of breast cell proliferation with a concomitant enhanced rate of mutations and (2) metabolism of estradiol to genotoxic metabolites with a resulting increase in DNA mutations. The metabolism of estradiol can cause DNA damage in two ways: (a) formation of estradiol-adenine - guanine adducts which are released from the DNA backbone leaving depurinated sites which undergo error prone DNA repair and mutations and (b) generation of oxygen free radicals resulting from redox cycling of 4-OH estradiol to the 3-4 estradiol quinone and back conversion to 4-OH estradiol. If one or both pathways are operative, sufficient numbers of mutations accumulate over a long period of time to induce neoplastic transformation. Our studies are based on the hypothesis that both receptor-mediated and genotoxic pathways contribute to breast cancer. We initially demonstrated that MCF-7 breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue in aromatase transfected mice contain the enzymes necessary to convert estradiol to the estradiol DNA adducts. We then utilized a highly reductionist model to separately analyze the effect of estrogen receptor alpha (ER) on tumor formation and the effects of estrogen depletion by castration in ER knock out/Wnt-1 (ERKO/Wnt) transgenic animals to assess the effects of estradiol in the absence of an ER. Estradiol was added back in castrate ERKO/Wnt animals to determine if Koch's postulates could be fulfilled to increase the incidence of cancer with administration of exogenous estradiol. Finally, we assessed the effects of an aromatase inhibitor on tumor incidence in non-castrate, ERKO/Wnt animals. The studies demonstrated the conversion of estradiol to genotoxic metabolites in breast tissue. In addition, knockout of ERα caused a reduction in incidence of tumor formation and a delay in the occurrence of those that formed. Oophorectomy further reduced the incidence of tumors and delayed their onset whereas estradiol add-back returned the incidence rate to that observed before oophorectomy. The aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, delayed the onset of tumor formation. Taken together, these data support a role for estradiol metabolism as one of the components in the development of experimental breast cancer. PMID:25168343

  14. Histopathological Features of Non-Neoplastic Breast Parenchyma Do Not Predict BRCA Mutation Status of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Qiu, Hongming; Liu, Diane; Shen, Yu; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Arun, Banu K; Sahin, Aysegul A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several studies have evaluated histologic features of non-neoplastic breast parenchyma in patients with BRCA1/2 mutations, but the results are conflicting. The limited data suggest a much higher prevalence of high-risk precursor lesions in BRCA carriers. Therefore, we designed this study to compare the clinicopathological characteristics of peritumoral benign breast tissue in patients with and without deleterious BRCA mutations. METHODS Women with breast cancer (BC) who were referred for genetic counseling and underwent BRCA genetic testing in 2010 and 2011 were included in the study. RESULTS Of the six benign histological features analyzed in this study, only stromal fibrosis grade 2/3 was found to be statistically different, with more BRCA noncarriers having stromal fibrosis grade 2/3 than BRCA1/2 carriers (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION There is no significant association between mutation risk and the presence of benign histologic features of peritumoral breast parenchyma. PMID:26327783

  15. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalache, A; McPherson, K; Barltrop, K; Vessey, M P

    1983-10-01

    An attempt is made to summarize the results of recently conducted epidemiological studies relating to the possible adverse effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on breast cancer. Evaluation of the safety of OCs is difficult. An important reason is that since preparations were introduced to the American market in 1959 the formulation of pills and the dosage of constituents have both changed markedly. A number of other considerations to be born in mind when evaluating the relevant literature were identified by a recent World Health Organization (WHO) Scientific Group. These include the following: there is usually a considerable latent period between 1st exposure to a carcinogen and the development of overt malignancy; and it is possible that exposure to contraceptive steroids may be particularly important at certain critical periods during reproductive life. After age, the most important risk factors during early life are a young age at menarche and a late age at 1st full term birth. There factors appear to operate independently and so the longer the period between menarche and 1st full term birth, the higher is the risk of breast cancer. A girl whose menarche occurs before age 12 is approximately twice as likely to develop breast cancer later in life as a girl whose menarche occurs after age 14. Similarly, a woman whose first full term birth occurs after age 35 is about 3 times more likely to develop breast cancer than a woman who gives birth before age 20. Nulliparous women have an intermediate risk. Other known risk factors include a family history of breast cancer, a past history of benign breast disease, and increased body weight. Possibly the most serious problem from an epidemiological perspective is the interrelationship between calendar time, age, and OC exposure. OC seems to be clearly associated with a decreased risk of benign breast disease of sufficient severity to require biopsy and the evidence is that the reduction in risk increases with duration of use. The epidemiological evidence available regarding OCs and breast cancer is reassuring. Data have been obtained from case control studies and cohort studies. A table summarizes the main features of 12 case control studies. Results of both groups of studies are reassuring in relation to breast cancer, yet there is usually a long period between exposure to a carcinogen and the development of overt malignancy and OCs have been in widespread use for only a relatively short time. Women who have never used OCs seem to present with more clinically advanced tumors than women who have used them. The differences in staging are reflected in patterns of survival. The difference may be due to a greater awareness of breast disease in OC users, but it could represent a beneficial biological effect of OCs. PMID:6640197

  16. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Endometrial cancer survival after breast cancer in relation to tamoxifen treatment: Pooled results from three countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tamoxifen is an effective treatment for breast cancer but an undesirable side-effect is an increased risk of endometrial cancer, particularly rare tumor types associated with poor prognosis. We investigated whether tamoxifen therapy increases mortality among breast cancer patients subsequently diagnosed with endometrial cancer. Methods We pooled case-patient data from the three largest case-control studies of tamoxifen in relation to endometrial cancer after breast cancer (1,875 patients: Netherlands, 765; United Kingdom, 786; United States, 324) and collected follow-up information on vital status. Breast cancers were diagnosed in 1972 to 2005 with endometrial cancers diagnosed in 1978 to 2006. We used Cox proportional hazards survival analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 1,104 deaths occurred during, on average, 5.8 years following endometrial cancer (32% attributed to breast cancer, 25% to endometrial cancer). Mortality from endometrial cancer increased significantly with unfavorable non-endometrioid morphologies (P < 0.0001), International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics staging system for gynecological malignancy (FIGO) stage (P < 0.0001) and age (P < 0.0001). No overall association was observed between tamoxifen treatment and endometrial cancer mortality (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: (0.89 to 1.55)). Tamoxifen use for at least five years was associated with increased endometrial cancer mortality (HR = 1.59 (1.13 to 2.25)). This association appeared to be due primarily to the excess of unfavorable histologies and advanced stage in women using tamoxifen for five or more years since the association with mortality was no longer significant after adjustment for morphological type and FIGO stage (HR = 1.37 (0.97 to 1.93)). Those patients with endometrioid tumors, who stopped tamoxifen use at least five years before their endometrial cancer diagnosis, had a greater mortality risk from endometrial cancer than endometrioid patients with no tamoxifen exposure (HR = 2.11 (1.13 to 3.94)). The explanation for this latter observation is not apparent. Conclusions Patients with endometrial cancer after breast cancer who received tamoxifen treatment for five years for breast cancer have greater endometrial cancer mortality risk than those who did not receive tamoxifen. This can be attributed to non-endometrioid histological subtypes with poorer prognosis among long term tamoxifen users. PMID:22691381

  18. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism reveals marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction. She exhibits a total lack of development of spoken language, with no attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture. During the visit, she occupies herself with repetitive motor mannerisms. Susan believes that Amy struggles with overstimulation from tactile input. Therefore, she is combative with health-care providers and intolerant of invasive devices. Susan has an intimate understanding of Amy's ability to communicate her needs and wants through nonverbal changes. RECURRENCE Approximately 2 months ago, Amy began favoring her right arm and appeared to be in pain when participating in various activities. Susan became aware of Amy's pain issues by noticing that her posture was slightly altered and she was carrying herself differently. Further investigation with a CT scan showed concern for local disease recurrence involving the axillary lymph nodes. No distant metastases were seen. The standard of care for this diagnosis is surgical resection and consideration of radiation therapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (NCCN, 2012). Susan does not want Amy to undergo further surgery and believes radiation would be too difficult to maneuver. The next best option would be a medical approach with chemotherapy as the main modality. DIFFICULT DECISIONS If treatment is pursued, the advanced practitioner will need to perform regular examinations and prescribe and monitor chemotherapy. The delivery of therapy, requiring frequent blood draws and IV access, will be a challenge for the health-care staff. The APN is apprehensive about the ability to accomplish these tasks safely given Amy's limited capacity to participate. The APN is also concerned with how treatment will affect Amy's life. The APN may have her own individual conflict of morals to contend with, given the limited understanding of the patient vs. nontreatment of a potentially curative malignancy. Chemotherapy is not an easy task for any patient to undertake, especially for a patient with challenges such as Amy has. Although Susan can give legal consent for her sister, Amy is unable to participate in this decision-making. Susan strongly believes that Amy's quality of life is much more important than the quantity. Withholding treatment may shorten the natural course of Amy's life, yet administering chemotherapy will alter the quality of life that she now enjoys without her understanding or consent. Should Amy receive chemotherapy or should Susan refuse treatment on her behalf? PMID:25031990

  19. Evolution of Imaging in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Evelyn M; Crowley, James; Hagan, Catherine; Atkinson, Lisa L

    2016-06-01

    The following topics are discussed in this article. A historical review of the evolution of breast cancer imaging from thermography through digital breast tomosynthesis, molecular breast imaging, and advanced breast magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of multiple clinical trials, their strengths, and weaknesses. Historical perspective on the Mammography Quality Standards Act and its relationship with development and implementation of the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). PMID:27029017

  20. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established fertility preservation strategy, providing a 25-35% chance of pregnancy. In addition, oocyte freezing can be considered as an alternative in patients who are single and in those who do not wish a sperm donor. Although ovarian tissue harvesting appears to be safe, experience regarding ovarian transplantation is still limited due to low utilization, so the true value of this procedure remains to be determined. Nevertheless, in clinical situations in which chemotherapy needs to be started in young patients facing premature ovarian failure, ovarian tissue preservation seems to be a promising option for restoring fertility, especially in conjunction with other options like immature oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation of oocytes, oocyte vitrification, or embryo cryopreservation. It seems that in vitro maturation is a useful strategy because it improves oocyte or cryopreservation outcome in breast cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation. PMID:24315568

  1. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  2. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  4. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  5. Diet and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  6. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  7. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  8. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer in men? What are the key statistics about breast cancer in men? The American Cancer ... 30 years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  10. The epidemiology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Gammon, M D

    1991-01-01

    Table 5 presents risk factors for breast cancer generally regarded as established, together with their approximate relative risks. With the exception of age, country of birth, and a history of breast cancer in both a mother and a sister, all of the relative risks reported to date are of a relatively modest magnitude. Thus, new risk factors need to be identified and knowledge of existing risk factors refined. Factors for which the evidence of an etiologic role has mounted over the past several years, but which are not yet considered to be established, include the protective effects of parity and lactation in certain age groups and the increased risks associated with alcohol consumption and with DES exposure during pregnancy. In addition, physical activity has emerged as a factor worthy of further study. Some evidence suggests that use of oral contraceptives for several years at an early age modestly increases the risk for breast cancer diagnosed before age 35 and perhaps age 45. Use of estrogen-replacement therapy for 20 years or more has been found by a few studies to increase the risk for breast cancer in the postmenopausal years; further studies of very long-term users are needed. Also, other risks and benefits of these hormones need to be taken into account when women decide whether to use them. Surprisingly elusive has been the etiologic role of endogenous hormones, especially in view of the large number of studies that have been concerned with them. A better understanding of the role of endogenous hormones should help explain the mechanisms of action of known and suspected risk factors. Areas of high priority for further research thus include establishing with more certainty whether the risk for breast cancer is increased in any subgroups of women who use oral contraceptives and estrogen-replacement therapy and determining the etiologic roles of specific endogenous hormones. The possible risks associated with alcohol consumption and lack of physical activity need to be studied more thoroughly, and ideas about new potential risk factors are needed. Although epidemiologic studies will continue to be concerned with diet, enthusiasm for its etiologic role in women has been considerably dampened by the lack of association in many of the studies reported to date. The studies in women exposed to radiation, DES, and oral contraceptives suggest that the timing of some exposures may be critical, since the effects of these agents may mostly be limited to specific time periods of rapid breast development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1902137

  11. [Breast-specific gamma imaging in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    van Loevezijn, Ariane A; van Breda Vriesman, Adriaan C; Neijenhuis, Peter A; Pereira Arias-Bouda, Lenka M

    2016-01-01

    Breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) is a new technique in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of breast cancer. After intravenous injection of the radioactive substance 99mTc-sestamibi the breasts are imaged with a gamma camera. The radionuclide assimilates into intracellular mitochondria, which are present in greater numbers in breast cancer cells than in normal cells. This causes a relatively high uptake of the radionuclide in tumours. Along with mammography and ultrasound, MRI is the current gold standard in breast imaging diagnostics. However, MRI is a complex and expensive procedure and has low specificity leading to high false-positive rates. BSGI has equally high sensitivity but is more specific, cheaper and much simpler to interpret. BSGI could replace MRI as a complementary technique to show, exclude or indicate the extent of breast cancer. PMID:26786798

  12. Skp2 is over-expressed in breast cancer and promotes breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Cao, Lulu; Sun, Zijia; Xu, Jing; Tang, Lin; Chen, Weiwei; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-18

    The F box protein Skp2 is oncogenic. Skp2 and Skp2B, an isoform of Skp2 are overexpressed in breast cancer. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which Skp2B promotes the occurrence and development of breast cancer. Here, we determined the expression and clinical outcomes of Skp2 in breast cancer samples and cell lines using breast cancer database, and investigated the role of Skp2 and Skp2B in breast cancer cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We obtained Skp2 is significantly overexpressed in breast cancer samples and cell lines, and high Skp2 expression positively correlated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. Both Skp2 and Skp2B could promote breast cancer cell proliferation, inhibit cell apoptosis, change the cell cycle distribution and induce the increased S phase cells and therefore induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. Moreover, the 2 isoforms could both suppress PIG3 expression via independent pathways in the breast cancer cells. Skp2 suppressed p53 and inhibited PIG3-induced apoptosis, while Skp2B attenuated the function of PIG3 by inhibiting PHB. Our results indicate that Skp2 and Skp2B induce breast cancer cell development and progression, making Skp2 and Skp2B potential molecular targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27111245

  13. Multidisciplinary care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulvat, Melissa C; Hansen, Nora M; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients with breast cancer has become increasingly complex with advancements in diagnostic modalities, surgical approaches, and adjuvant treatments. A multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care is essential to the successful integration of available therapies. This article addresses the key components of multidisciplinary breast cancer care, with a special emphasis on new and emerging approaches over the past 10 years in the fields of diagnostics, surgery, radiation, medical oncology, and plastic surgery. PMID:19186235

  14. The breast cancer epidemic: 10 facts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A Patrick; Zainer, Christine M; Kubat, Christopher Kevin; Mullen, Nancy K; Windisch, Amberly K

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer, affecting one in eight American women, is a modern epidemic. The increasing frequency of breast cancer is widely recognized. However, the wealth of compelling epidemiological data on its prevention is generally not available, and as a consequence, is largely unknown to the public. The purpose of this report is to review the epidemiological evidence of preventable causes of breast cancer. [Table: see text]. PMID:25249706

  15. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  16. Targeted therapies for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michaela J.; Baselga, Jos

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the description of well-defined molecular subtypes of breast cancer, together with the identification of the driving genetic alterations and signaling pathways, has led to the clinical development of a number of successful molecular targeted agents. This is best exemplified in the subset of HER2-amplified breast cancers, in which an increasing number of active agents are changing the natural history of this aggressive disease. Other targets are under exploration, and the clinical development of these agents will require a change from the current large, randomized trials in unselected patient populations to smaller trials in groups with a molecularly defined tumor type. In addition, combinatorial approaches that act on the secondary mutations and/or compensatory pathways in resistant tumors may markedly improve on the effects of targeted agents used alone. PMID:21965336

  17. Pathology of breast cancer in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis. [X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretsky, P.M.; Woodard, E.; Bonfiglio, T.A.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Morse, I.P.

    1980-11-15

    The gross and microscopic pathology of breast cancers in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis was compared to the breast cancers found in the sisters of the irradiated women. In considering the lesions in the two populations, the size, location, histologic type, histologic grade, inflammatory response, lymphatic and blood vascular invasion, nipple involvement, axillary lymph node metastases, and menopausal status at the time of diagnosis were statistically indistinguishable. The only parameter that was different in the two populations was the desmoplastic response to the malignant lesion. The control population had more marked fibrosis within the cancers compared with the irradiated women.

  18. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (p<0.05) and the redox ratio Fp/(NADH+Fp) was about 27% higher in the cancerous tissues than in the normal ones (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the redox state could differentiate between cancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  19. Does diet affect breast cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michelle D; Willett, Walter C

    2004-01-01

    The role of specific dietary factors in breast cancer causation is not completely resolved. Results from prospective studies do not support the concept that fat intake in middle life has a major relation to breast cancer risk. However, weight gain in middle life contributes substantially to breast cancer risk. Alcohol is the best established dietary risk factor, probably by increasing endogenous estrogen levels. Hypotheses relating diet during youth to risk decades later will be difficult to test. Nevertheless, available evidence is strong that breast cancer risk can be reduced by avoiding weight gain during adult years, and by limiting alcohol consumption. PMID:15217490

  20. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Habibullah; Allerton, Rozenn; Pettit, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer in men is rare, but its incidence is increasing, in keeping with the aging population. The majority of breast cancers in men are estrogen receptor positive. There is a paucity of clinical trials to inform practice, and much has been extrapolated from breast cancer in women. Hormone therapy represents the mainstay of adjuvant and palliative therapy but may have contraindications or poor tolerability. We review the evidence for choice of hormone therapy in both the adjuvant and palliative setting in breast cancer in men. PMID:26165199

  1. [Male Breast Cancer: What is Different?].

    PubMed

    Niederberger, Philipp; Bucher, Susanne; Aebi, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease. Symptoms and signs resemble breast cancer in women: A palpable mass, enlarged lymph nodes or skin changes (ulceration, secretion, peau d'orange) mandate mammography, ultrasound to assess the regional lymph nodes. The definitive diagnosis is made by biopsy. Men with breast cancer are treated along the same principles as women: resection followed by systemic and radiation therapy. Tamoxifen, not aromatase inhibitors, is the adjuvant therapy of choice for estrogen receptor positive tumors. Therapy of men with metastatic breast cancer follows the same principles as therapy of women. PMID:26837323

  2. Using hair to screen for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Kearsley, John; Irving, Tom; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Cookson, David

    1999-03-01

    We have studied hair using fibre X-ray diffraction studies with synchrotron radiation and find that hair from breast-cancer patients has a different intermolecular structure to hair from healthy subjects. These changes are seen in all samples of scalp and pubic hair taken from women diagnosed with breast cancer. All the hair samples from women who tested positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, which is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, also show these changes. Because our results are so consistent, we propose that such hair analyses may be used as a simple, non-invasive screening method for breast cancer.

  3. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  4. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  5. Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Aguilar, VM; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adanm; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Tovar-Rodriguez, JM

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, progressive, currently, are classified according to in pattern of gene expression luminal A, luminal B, basal and HER-2neu + and Triple-negative, 75% to 80% have receptors positive hormonal and 15% to 20% are positive for hER-2neu and 10% to 20% are triple negative, with hormone receptor negative and HER2-neu and their diagnostic is made by exclusion, the Metabolic Syndrome is related to a higher incidence of these cancers where the insulin-leptin axis-adiponectin are implicated in carcinogenesis. PMID:25083463

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  7. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers ... Gene Test Differentiates Cancer Types [nih.gov] National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) scientists have developed a new ...

  8. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  9. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A. Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-01-01

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of adolescent total red meat was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintiles, RR, 1.42; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend=0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent poultry intake was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.75; 95%CI, 0.59-0.96; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 16% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 24% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). Higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  10. Triple negative breast cancers: clinical and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S J; Provenzano, E; Caldas, C

    2009-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are defined by the absence of oestrogen, progesterone and HER2 expression. Most triple negative cancers display distinct clinical and pathological characteristics with a high proportion of these tumours occurring at a younger age of onset and in African-American women. Triple negative tumours typically demonstrate high histological grade and are the most common breast cancer subtype in BRCA1 carriers. In addition, many of the features of triple negative cancers are similar to those identified in the basal-like molecular subtype which has recently been characterised by gene expression profiling. Although the two groups overlap, they are not synonymous. Triple negative breast cancers are of pivotal clinical importance given the lack of therapeutic options. The prognostic significance of triple negative tumours remains unclear since the group is heterogeneous and worst prognosis seems to be mostly confined to those that express basal cytokeratins or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This review focuses on outlining the pathological, molecular, and clinical features of triple negative breast cancers, discusses its prognostic value and summarises current therapeutic approaches and future directions of research. PMID:19775602

  11. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  12. High levels of class III β-tubulin expression are associated with aggressive tumor features in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEBOK, PATRICK; ÖZTÜRK, MELIKE; HEILENKÖTTER, UWE; JAENICKE, FRITZ; MÜLLER, VOLKMAR; PALUCHOWSKI, PETER; GEIST, STEFAN; WILKE, CHRISTIAN; BURANDT, EICKE; LEBEAU, ANNETTE; WILCZAK, WALDEMAR; KRECH, TILL; SIMON, RONALD; SAUTER, GUIDO; QUAAS, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3), a factor that confers dynamic properties to microtubules, is a candidate biomarker for resistance to microtubule-targeting chemotherapeutics in breast and other types of solid cancer. Discrepant results from previous studies, with respect to the association of TUBB3 expression levels with breast cancer phenotype and patient prognosis, prompted the present study to investigate TUBB3 expression in a large cohort of breast cancer cases, with available clinical follow-up data. A preexisting breast cancer prognosis tissue microarray, containing a single 0.6 mm tissue core from each of 2,197 individual patients with breast cancer, was analyzed for TUBB3 expression by immunohistochemistry. The results of the present study revealed that TUBB3 expression was less frequent in lobular breast cancer cases (34%), compared with that of cancer cases of alternative histologies, including breast cancer of no special type (60%; P<0.0001). High TUBB3 positivity was associated with high tumor grade (P<0.0001), negativity for estrogen (P<0.0001) and progesterone receptors (P<0.004), as well as the presence of human epidermal growth factor 2 amplification (P<0.0001) and a triple-negative phenotype (P<0.0001). TUBB3 overexpression was additionally associated with reduced patient survival if all breast cancer cases of any histology were jointly analyzed (P=0.0088); however this link was not evident in the subset of breast cancer cases of no special type, or in a multivariate analysis including the established prognostic factors of tumor stage, grade and nodal stage. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TUBB3 overexpression was associated with adverse features of breast cancer, and that TUBB3 may possess a distinct role in lobular breast cancer cases, compared with alternative histological subtypes. The results of the present study do not support a clinically relevant role for TUBB3 as a prognostic marker in breast cancer. PMID:26998111

  13. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor expression in breast cancer tissue and mammographic density

    PubMed Central

    SUN, WOO-YOUNG; YUN, HYO-YOUNG; SONG, YOUNG-JIN; KIM, HEON; LEE, OK-JUN; NAM, SEOK-JIN; KOO, JA-SEUNG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression in breast cancer tissue and mammographic density and the clinical significance of IGF-1R overexpression. A total of 167 patients with primary invasive breast cancer were analyzed. Mammographic breast density and IGF-1R overexpression were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and analyzed by overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Increased breast tissue density was significantly associated with age, body mass index, menopausal status, histological grade and IGF-1R overexpression in the univariate analysis and with age (P=0.001), histological grade (P=0.045) and IGF-1R overexpression (P=0.021) in the multivariate analysis. IGF-1R overexpression was significantly associated with dense breast tissue in patients aged >40 years (P=0.002). IGF-1R overexpression in breast cancer in premenopausal women was associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) positivity (P=0.016) and worse DFS (P=0.0414). There was no significant difference in OS and DFS between dense and non-dense breast tissue. IGF-1R expression in breast cancer tissue was significantly associated with mammographic breast tissue density in patients aged >40 years. It appears that IGF-1R expression in breast cancer tissue plays an important role in breast cancer in patients with dense breast tissue. In premenopausal women, IGF-1R overexpression in breast cancer tissue was significantly associated with HER-2 positivity and poor DFS. PMID:26137269

  14. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  15. Statin Use and Breast Cancer Risk in the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Borgquist, Signe; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chen, Wendy Y; Garber, Judy E; Eliassen, A Heather; Ahern, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical studies support an anticancer effect of statin drugs, yet epidemiologic evidence remains inconsistent regarding their role in breast cancer primary prevention. Here, we report an updated analysis of the association between statin use and breast cancer incidence in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort. Postmenopausal NHS participants without a cancer history were followed from 2000 until 2012 (n = 79,518). Data on statin use were retrieved from biennial questionnaires. We fit Cox regression models to estimate associations between longitudinal statin use and breast cancer incidence. Over 823,086 person-years of follow-up, 3,055 cases of invasive breast cancer occurred. Compared with never users, both former and current statin users had similar rates of invasive breast cancer incidence [former users: HRadj, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82-1.1; current users: HRadj, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.92-1.3]. Associations did not differ by estrogen receptor (ER) status or histology (ductal vs. lobular carcinoma). Statin use was not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer, irrespective of histologic subtype and ER status. Statin drugs do not appear to modify processes involved in breast cancer initiation. PMID:26762806

  16. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  17. Unilateral multicentric cancer of the breast containing two different histopathological types: Case report.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Tadahiro; Sueishi, Katsuo; Mori, Emiko; Kohno, Mayuko; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takashi; Ezaki, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral multicentric cancer of the breast containing a tumor with a specific histopathological type is comparatively rare. We, herein, report a case of an unilateral multicentric cancer of the breast containing two separate tumors diagnosed as a papillo-tubular carcinoma and an invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the difference in histological type, these two tumors also had different patterns of expression of hormonal receptors reflecting the cellular aggressiveness. Therfore, these tumors may be formed through multicentric tumorigenesis. PMID:23255944

  18. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for breast cancer in men What happens after treatment for breast cancer in men? Once your treatment ends, you may ... and Staging Treating Breast Cancer In Men After Treatment What`s New in Breast Cancer In Men Research? Other Resources and References Cancer ...

  19. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  20. Imaging-Histological Discordance after Sonographically Guided Percutaneous Breast Core Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Soyder, Aykut; Taşkin, Füsun; Ozbas, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of imaging-histological discordance and to compare the frequency of carcinoma between discordant lesions at ultrasound (US)-guided core needle biopsy. Materials and Methods From November 2009 to June 2012, we performed US-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies on 989 breast lesions in 961 women. We reviewed 58 (5.8%) cases that had imaging-histological discordance after percutaneous breast biopsy and underwent subsequent excisional biopsy. The clinical, radiological, and histological findings were reviewed for those 58 cases. Results Among the 58 cases, subsequent excisions revealed 16 (27.5%) malignancies, which were categorized as 9 (15.5%) invasive ductal carcinomas, 4 (6.9%) malignant phyllodes tumors, and 3 (5.1%) ductal carcinomas in situ. Conclusion The malignancy rate of 27.5% suggests that surgical excision should be performed in those cases presenting with imaging-histological discordance after US-guided core biopsy. Careful correlation of clinical, radiological, and histological results as well as appropriate follow-up are essential. We have submitted a short version of this work as a poster presentation during the 2012 European Society of Surgery (ESS) Congress in Istanbul/Turkey. PMID:25960723

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of CXCR4 on Breast Cancer and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama Kishima, Marina; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Banin-Hirata, Bruna Karina; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; Brajo de Oliveira, Karen; Amarante, Marla Karine; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2015-01-01

    Many tumor cells express chemokines and chemokine receptors, and, for this reason, these molecules can affect the tumor progression. It is known that breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous neoplasia comprising distinct diseases, histological characteristics, and clinical outcomes. The most studied role for CXCL12 chemokine and its receptor CXCR4 in breast cancer pathogenesis is the metastasis event, although several reports have demonstrated its involvement in other processes, such as angiogenesis and tumor growth. It has been found that CXCR4 is required for breast cancer cell migration to other sites such as lung, bone, and lymph nodes, which express high levels of CXCL12 chemokine. Therefore, CXCR4 is being considered a prognostic marker in breast cancer. Within this context, this review summarizes established studies involving expression of CXCR4 on breast cancer, focusing on its clinical significance. PMID:26161302

  2. Progress in the Biological Understanding and Management of Breast Cancer-Associated Central Nervous System Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) is a devastating neurological complication of systemic cancer. Brain metastases from breast cancer have been documented to occur in approximately 10%–16% of cases over the natural course of the disease with leptomeningeal metastases occurring in approximately 2%–5% of cases of breast cancer. CNS metastases among women with breast cancer tend to occur among those who are younger, have larger tumors, and have a more aggressive histological subtype such as the triple negative and HER2-positive subtypes. Treatment of CNS metastases involves various combinations of whole brain radiation therapy, surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and chemotherapy. We will discuss the progress made in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer-associated CNS metastases and will delve into the biological underpinnings of CNS metastases including evaluating the role of breast tumor subtype on the incidence, natural history, prognostic outcome, and impact of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23740934

  3. Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

    2011-11-01

    Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

  4. A multi-center prospective cohort study of benign breast disease and risk of subsequent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Joan G.; Olson, Neal; Negassa, Abdissa; Duggan, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mindy; Kandel, Rita A.; Glass, Andrew G.; Rohan, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We used a nested case–control design within a large, multi-center cohort of women who underwent a biopsy for benign breast disease (BBD) to assess the association of broad histologic groupings and specific histologic entities with risk of breast cancer. Methods Cases were all women who had a biopsy for BBD and who subsequently developed breast cancer; controls were individually matched to cases and were women with a biopsy for BBD who did not develop breast cancer in the same follow-up interval as that for the cases. After exclusions, 1,239 records (615 cases and 624 controls) were available for analysis. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Relative to non-proliferative BBD/normal pathology, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for proliferative lesions without atypia was 1.45 (95% CI 1.10–1.90), and that for atypical hyperplasia was 5.27 (95% CI 2.29–12.15). The presence of multiple foci of columnar cell hyperplasia and of complex fibroadenoma without atypia was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of breast cancer, whereas sclerosing adenosis, radial scar, and papilloma showed no association with risk. Conclusion Our results indicate that, compared to women with normal pathology/non-proliferative disease, women with proliferative disease without atypia have a modestly increased risk of breast cancer, whereas women with atypical hyperplasia have a substantially increased risk. PMID:20084540

  5. Interleukin-8 in Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Milovanović, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemokine that has an autocrine and/or paracrine tumor-promoting role and significant potential as a prognostic and/or predictive cancer biomarker. In breast cancer, which is mostly determined by expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), IL-8 could play a specific role. IL-8 is highly expressed in ER− breast cancers, but it increases invasiveness and metastatic potential of both ER− and ER+ breast cancer cells. It is also highly expressed in HER2+ breast cancers. Because of the complex crosstalk between these receptors and IL-8, its role is mainly determined by delicate balance in their signaling pathways. Therefore, the main point of this review was to analyze the possible influence of IL-8 in breast cancer progression related to its interaction with ER and HER2 and the consequent therapeutic implications of these relations. PMID:23697558

  6. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer. PMID:26985847

  7. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  8. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... against subsequent chemical carcinogen-induced breast cancer in rats and mice. (1) Estrogen and progesterone combinations and ... pregnancy, is protective for carcinogen-induced cancer in rats. (1) Animal Model Gaps What are the mechanisms ...

  9. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  10. Male breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, IS

    2009-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

  11. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique. PMID:24598575

  12. Genotype in BRCA-associated Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Litton, Jennifer; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Ready, Kaylene; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lu, Karen H.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu K.

    2015-01-01

    Women with BRCA1 or 2 mutations are at high risk for breast cancer. For BRCA1, a trend of increasing risk has been associated with increasing downstream (3′) location for mutations compared to the upstream (5′) mutations in the gene. For BRCA2, an increased risk of breast cancer has been associated with mutations outside of the ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR). We sought to determine the mutation position in BRCA-associated breast cancers and whether or not there was a genotype-phenotype correlation. Breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations were identified by a search of a prospectively maintained data base. Mutation site, patient, and tumor characteristics were determined through retrospective review. One hundred and sixty-four patients with BRCA1-associated breast cancer and 109 patients with BRCA2-associated breast cancer were identified. Among patients with BRCA1-associated cancers, 86 (52%) had mutations in the 5′ half of the gene. Among patients with BRCA2-associated breast cancers, 40 (37%) had OCCR mutations. Although BRCA1-associated tumors were more likely to be ER/PR- than BRCA2-associated cancers (p < 0.0001), there was no difference in the tumor characteristics among BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated cancers based on mutation location. In this single-institution study, over half of BRCA1-associated and over a third of BRCA2-associated breast cancers were associated with putative lower risk mutations. Although we cannot exclude the possibility that mutations in these regions confer a lower relative risk for breast cancer, vigilance in cancer screening and prevention remains necessary. Further studies in genotype/phenotype correlation are needed to individualize prevention strategies. PMID:23231005

  13. Phospho-TCTP as a therapeutic target of dihydroartemisinin for aggressive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lucibello, Maria; Adanti, Sara; Antelmi, Ester; Dezi, Dario; Ciafr, Stefania; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Nicotera, Giuseppe; Sica, Lorenzo; De Braud, Filippo; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is associated with poorly differentiated aggressive tumors, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism(s) are still debated. Here, we show that in breast cancer cell lines TCTP is primarily localized in the nucleus, mostly in the phosphorylated form. The effects of Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an anti-malaria agent that binds TCTP, were tested on breast cancer cells. DHA decreases cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death by targeting the phosphorylated form of TCTP. Remarkably, DHA enhances the anti-tumor effects of Doxorubicin in triple negative breast cancer cells resulting in an increased level of apoptosis. DHA also synergizes with Trastuzumab, used to treat HER2/neu positive breast cancers, to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Finally, we present new clinical data that nuclear phospho-TCTP overexpression in primary breast cancer tissue is associated with high histological grade, increase expression of Ki-67 and with ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. Notably, phospho-TCTP expression levels increase in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors, suggesting a possible role of phospho-TCTP as a new prognostic marker. In conclusion, the anti-tumor effect of DHA in vitro with conventional chemotherapeutics suggests a novel therapeutic strategy and identifies phospho-TCTP as a new promising target for advanced breast cancer. PMID:25779659

  14. Phospho-TCTP as a therapeutic target of Dihydroartemisinin for aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lucibello, Maria; Adanti, Sara; Antelmi, Ester; Dezi, Dario; Ciafrè, Stefania; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Nicotera, Giuseppe; Sica, Lorenzo; De Braud, Filippo; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2015-03-10

    Upregulation of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is associated with poorly differentiated aggressive tumors, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanism(s) are still debated. Here, we show that in breast cancer cell lines TCTP is primarily localized in the nucleus, mostly in the phosphorylated form.The effects of Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an anti-malaria agent that binds TCTP, were tested on breast cancer cells. DHA decreases cell proliferation and induces apoptotic cell death by targeting the phosphorylated form of TCTP. Remarkably, DHA enhances the anti-tumor effects of Doxorubicin in triple negative breast cancer cells resulting in an increased level of apoptosis. DHA also synergizes with Trastuzumab, used to treat HER2/neu positive breast cancers, to induce apoptosis of tumor cells.Finally, we present new clinical data that nuclear phospho-TCTP overexpression in primary breast cancer tissue is associated with high histological grade, increase expression of Ki-67 and with ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. Notably, phospho-TCTP expression levels increase in trastuzumab-resistant breast tumors, suggesting a possible role of phospho-TCTP as a new prognostic marker.In conclusion, the anti-tumor effect of DHA in vitro with conventional chemotherapeutics suggests a novel therapeutic strategy and identifies phospho-TCTP as a new promising target for advanced breast cancer. PMID:25779659

  15. Mitochondria and Familial Predisposition to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome and functional alterations are related to various diseases including cancer. In all cases, the role of these organelles is associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism and control of tumor-induced oxidative stress. The present study examines the involvement of mitochondrial DNA in cancer and in particular in breast cancer. Furthermore, since mitochondrial DNA is maternally inherited, hereditary breast cancer has been focused on. PMID:24179442

  16. Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

    2014-05-01

    Background Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, α-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence.Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer.Results Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (P< .05) and decreased HER2 expression (P< .05) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 index; NS) among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients when compared with placebo. Uncontrolled and biomarker studies suggest beneficial effects on hot flashes, cell proliferation, atypical cytomorphology, and mammographic density, as well as possible anti-angiogenic activity at doses of 25 g ground flax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients.Conclusions Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast cancer. PMID:24013641

  17. Molecular homology and difference between spontaneous canine mammary cancer and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E.; Northrup, Nicole C.; Rodriguez, Carlos O.; O'Regan, Ruth M.; Dalton, Stephen; Zhao, Shaying

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring canine mammary cancer (MC) represents an excellent model of human breast cancer but is greatly understudied. To better utilize this valuable resource, we performed whole genome sequencing, whole exome sequencing, RNA-seq and/or high density arrays on 12 canine MC cases, including 7 simple carcinomas and four complex carcinomas. Canine simple carcinomas, which histologically match human breast carcinomas, harbor extensive genomic aberrations, many of which faithfully recapitulate key features of human breast cancer. Canine complex carcinomas, which are characterized by proliferation of both luminal and myoepithelial cells and are rare in human breast cancer, appear to lack genomic abnormalities. Instead, these tumors have about 35 chromatin-modification genes downregulated, and are abnormally enriched with active histone modification H4-acetylation while aberrantly depleted with repressive histone modification H3K9me3. Our findings indicate the likelihood that canine simple carcinomas arise from genomic aberrations whereas complex carcinomas originate from epigenomic alterations, reinforcing their unique value. Canine complex carcinomas offer an ideal system to study myoepithelial cells, the second major cell lineage of the mammary gland. Canine simple carcinomas, which faithfully represent human breast carcinomas at the molecular level, provide indispensable models for basic and translational breast cancer research. PMID:25082814

  18. Post-breast cancer lymphedema: part 2.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei R; Ridner, Sheila H; Armer, Jane

    2009-08-01

    As breast cancer survivors often say, lymphedema is more than just a swollen arm. A result of surgical or radiologic breast cancer treatment, it's an abnormal accumulation of lymph in the arm, shoulder, breast, or thoracic area that usually develops within three years of a breast cancer diagnosis but can occur much later. In Part 1 (July) the authors described the pathophysiology and diagnosis of lymphedema. In Part 2 they discuss current approaches to risk reduction, treatment and management of the condition, and implications for nurses. PMID:19641404

  19. Biological determinants of radiation-induced human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second in a three part series on the hypothetical risk from x-ray mammography. It will review those aspects of breast anatomy, histology, physiology, and pathology which are pertinent to radiation carcinogenesis. Radiation-induced breast cancers are histologically identical to the naturally occurring type in that they arise from the ductal epithelium and consist of a similar proportion of infiltrating and intraductal lesions. Possible explanations for the increased resistance to radiation effect in women over 30 years of age at time of exposure include regression of the glandular target tissue, hormonal changes, and parity. Examples of age-related sensitivity and hormonal dependence in other radiation-induced human and animal tumors will be discussed.

  20. Unique features of breast cancer in Asian women--breast cancer in Taiwan as an example.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2010-02-28

    Breast carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in women and is known to arise from a multifactorial process, the effect of reproductive risk factors strongly supporting a hormonal role in its etiology. Breast cancer in Asia is characterized by a lower incidence than in Western populations, but is still the leading type of cancer in Asian women, and a significant increasing tread indicates that it is an issue of particular public health importance. Asian breast cancer is characterized by early tumor onset, showing a relatively younger median age at diagnosis. Recently, scientists began to explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying breast cancer formation at the molecular level. Both a candidate-gene approach and genome-wide association studies have yielded crucial insights into breast cancer susceptibility genes initiating breast tumorigenesis. As expected, ethnic/racial variation in the genotypic frequency of these genes results in differences in breast cancer incidence in different populations. Furthermore, the question of how important these genes are in Asian breast cancer remains to be explored. It has been demonstrated that gene expression profiles and gene sets are prognostic and predictive for patients with breast cancer. Originally, due to its early onset, it was speculated that Asian breast cancer would have a higher frequency of the basal-like subtype of breast cancer, a molecular subtype characterized by poor differentiation, resulting in a relatively poor progression; however, recent findings do not support this speculation. The frequency of the luminal-A subtype of breast cancer, characterized by estrogen receptor expression, is similar to that in breast cancer in Caucasian, supporting the usefulness of hormone-based therapy in Asian breast cancer. PMID:20045728

  1. MicroRNAs in breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joy; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common type of cancers as well as a principal cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although research has provided a better understanding and diagnosis of breast cancer, studies in breast cancer therapeutics are still far from satisfactory. Recent research on microRNAs (miRNAs) has implicated these tiny regulatory molecules in progression of breast cancer with the possibility of exploiting them as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers. The loss of tumor suppressor miRNAs or overexpression of oncogenic miRNAs can lead to breast cancer tumorigenesis or metastasis. However, the next step - linking miRNAs to cancer therapeutics - is still under progression. The roles of miRNAs exhibit much potential in breast cancer therapy, but currently need to be further studied and evaluated in order to better understand how to apply laboratory results to clinical medicine. Here we provide an update on our current understanding of miRNAs as molecular targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of breast cancers. PMID:24479805

  2. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  3. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  4. DDT, endocrine disruption and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ana M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to endocrine disruptors is suspected to be one of the main factors responsible for the increased incidence of breast cancer in industrialized countries. New data published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism show that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane during fetal life is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. PMID:26239610

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  6. Breast cancer in the personal genomics era.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Decewicz, David J; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Darrell L

    2010-05-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a complex etiology that develops from different cellular lineages, progresses along multiple molecular pathways, and demonstrates wide variability in response to treatment. The "standard of care" approach to breast cancer treatment in which all patients receive similar interventions is rapidly being replaced by personalized medicine, based on molecular characteristics of individual patients. Both inherited and somatic genomic variation is providing useful information for customizing treatment regimens for breast cancer to maximize efficacy and minimize adverse side effects. In this article, we review (1) hereditary breast cancer and current use of inherited susceptibility genes in patient management; (2) the potential of newly-identified breast cancer-susceptibility variants for improving risk assessment; (3) advantages and disadvantages of direct-to-consumer testing; (4) molecular characterization of sporadic breast cancer through immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling and opportunities for personalized prognostics; and (5) pharmacogenomic influences on the effectiveness of current breast cancer treatments. Molecular genomics has the potential to revolutionize clinical practice and improve the lives of women with breast cancer. PMID:21037853

  7. THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

  8. Breast Cancer in the Personal Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Decewicz, David J.; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a complex etiology that develops from different cellular lineages, progresses along multiple molecular pathways, and demonstrates wide variability in response to treatment. The standard of care approach to breast cancer treatment in which all patients receive similar interventions is rapidly being replaced by personalized medicine, based on molecular characteristics of individual patients. Both inherited and somatic genomic variation is providing useful information for customizing treatment regimens for breast cancer to maximize efficacy and minimize adverse side effects. In this article, we review (1) hereditary breast cancer and current use of inherited susceptibility genes in patient management; (2) the potential of newly-identified breast cancer-susceptibility variants for improving risk assessment; (3) advantages and disadvantages of direct-to-consumer testing; (4) molecular characterization of sporadic breast cancer through immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling and opportunities for personalized prognostics; and (5) pharmacogenomic influences on the effectiveness of current breast cancer treatments. Molecular genomics has the potential to revolutionize clinical practice and improve the lives of women with breast cancer. PMID:21037853

  9. Differentiating lymphovascular invasion from retraction artifact on histological specimen of breast carcinoma and their implications on prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Patil, Ninad; Freedman, Gary Mitchel; Tuluc, Madalina

    2012-12-01

    On a pathological specimen of breast cancer cells, retraction artifact during histological processing mimics true lymphovascular invasion (LVI). The accurate determination of the presence or absence of LVI is a factor in determining risk of having a positive sentinel node, or having additional positive axillary nodes after a positive sentinel node biopsy in women with early-stage breast cancer. The determination of nodal risk influences the decision of the treating physicians as to whether a sentinel node biopsy or completion axillary dissection is necessary. On slide preparation, ideal factors favoring true LVI include: a definite endothelial lining, with endothelial nuclei that seem to protrude into the lymphatic space; invasion in one lymphatic vessel (LV) lumen with nearby cancer glands that have minimal or no retraction; a tumor embolus in a LV clear lumen with outside nearby tumor bulk; a tumor embolus that is different in shape than its surrounding clear LV space; and a positive stain for fibrin, CD31, or CD34 on tumor embolus periphery. PMID:23346180

  10. Differentiating Lymphovascular Invasion from Retraction Artifact on Histological Specimen of Breast Carcinoma and Their Implications on Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Patil, Ninad; Tuluc, Madalina

    2012-01-01

    On a pathological specimen of breast cancer cells, retraction artifact during histological processing mimics true lymphovascular invasion (LVI). The accurate determination of the presence or absence of LVI is a factor in determining risk of having a positive sentinel node, or having additional positive axillary nodes after a positive sentinel node biopsy in women with early-stage breast cancer. The determination of nodal risk influences the decision of the treating physicians as to whether a sentinel node biopsy or completion axillary dissection is necessary. On slide preparation, ideal factors favoring true LVI include: a definite endothelial lining, with endothelial nuclei that seem to protrude into the lymphatic space; invasion in one lymphatic vessel (LV) lumen with nearby cancer glands that have minimal or no retraction; a tumor embolus in a LV clear lumen with outside nearby tumor bulk; a tumor embolus that is different in shape than its surrounding clear LV space; and a positive stain for fibrin, CD31, or CD34 on tumor embolus periphery. PMID:23346180

  11. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-27

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  12. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  13. Breast thermography. A prognostic indicator for breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Isard, H J; Sweitzer, C J; Edelstein, G R

    1988-08-01

    A prognostic classification for thermographic staging of breast cancer has been applied to a cohort of 70 patients from 5040 screenees enrolled in the Albert Einstein Medical Center (AEMC) Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP). A diagnosis of breast cancer was established in each case before December 31, 1980. None of the patients have been lost to follow-up which extended from a minimum of 6 to a maximum of 13 years. Survival rates for those with favorable, equivocal, and poor thermographic factors are compared with each other and with results in accordance with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. As of December 31, 1986, there have been 22 (31.4%) deaths, all attributed to breast cancer. The thermographic scoring system clearly shows shorter survival for patients with poor thermographic prognostic factors, 30% surviving at 5 years and only 20% at 10 years compared with overall survival of 80% at 5 years and 70% at 10 years. PMID:3390789

  14. Metastatic male ductal breast cancer mimicking obstructing primary colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-03-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  15. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  16. PAQR3 expression is downregulated in human breast cancers and correlated with HER2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenghu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Weiwei; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Pan, Yi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    PAQR3 is a newly discovered tumor suppressor and its functional role in breast cancer has not been well characterized. We report here that PAQR3 is associated with the progression and survival of human patients with breast cancer, as well as cell proliferation and migration of human breast cancer cells. PAQR3 mRNA level was robustly downregulated in human breast cancer samples compared with their corresponding para-cancerous histological normal tissues (n = 82, P < 0.0001). The mRNA level of PAQR3 was negatively correlated with HER2 expression (P < 0.0001) and disease-free survival of the patients (P < 0.0001). PAQR3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration of breast cancer cells including MCF7, SKBR3, MDA-MD-231, MDA-MD-468 and MDA-MD-453 cells. Knockdown of PAQR3 in MDA-MD-231 cells elevated cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of HER2 by trastuzumab increased PAQR3 expression in SKBR3 cells. In conclusion, PAQR3 expression is frequently downregulated in human breast cancers inversely correlated with HER2 expression. PAQR3 is able to modulate the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that PAQR3 functions as a tumor suppressor in the development of human breast cancers. PMID:25900239

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. Ospemifene, vulvovaginal atrophy, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wurz, Gregory T; Soe, Lin H; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    The incidence and severity of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients has a significant impact on quality of life. While the etiology of VVA is primarily related to low estrogen levels seen in menopause, women with breast cancer have an added risk of VVA induced by a combination of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and menopause. Ospemifene is a new, non-hormonal selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) triphenylethylene derivative that is effective in treating VVA in postmenopausal women. Although other SERMs have antagonistic effects on the vagina, ospemifene exerts an estrogen-like effect on the vaginal epithelium. This review will focus on data demonstrating the antiestrogenic activity of ospemifene in several unique breast cancer animal models, and the implications for utilizing ospemifene in patients with breast cancer suffering from VVA. Additional research addressing the expanded use of ospemifene in breast cancer patients is also warranted. PMID:23332519

  19. Preventive treatments for breast cancer: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Alés-Martínez, J E; Ruiz, A; Chacón, J I; Lluch Hernández, A; Ramos, M; Córdoba, O; Aguirre, E; Barnadas, A; Jara, C; González, S; Plazaola, A; Florián, J; Andrés, R; Sánchez Rovira, P; Frau, A

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a burden for western societies, and an increasing one in emerging economies, because of its high incidence and enormous psychological, social, sanitary and economic costs. However, breast cancer is a preventable disease in a significant proportion. Recent developments in the armamentarium of effective drugs for breast cancer prevention (namely exemestane and anastrozole), the new recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to use preventative drugs in women at high risk as well as updated Guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Society of Clinical Oncology should give renewed momentum to the pharmacological prevention of breast cancer. In this article we review recent major developments in the field and examine their ongoing repercussion for breast cancer prevention. As a practical example, the potential impact of preventive measures in Spain is evaluated and a course of practical actions is delineated. PMID:25445174

  20. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  1. Breast Cancer Screening Barriers and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ana; Stuifbergen, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that early detection from breast cancer screening is an effective means to reduce overall mortality from breast cancer. Findings from multiple research studies suggest that women with chronic disabling conditions are less likely to participate in breast cancer screening due to the multiple barriers they face. Barriers include those related to finances, environment, physical limitations, health care providers’ attitudes and lack of knowledge, and psychosocial issues. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the existing evidence of the barriers to breast cancer screening experienced by women with physical disabilities. Rehabilitation nurses who work with women who have chronic disabling conditions can be instrumental in eliminating these barriers to breast cancer screening through their efforts to promote health which is consistent with the philosophy of maximizing the health potential and quality of life of these women whose needs are often overlooked. PMID:22434617

  2. Breast cancer detection using time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Hossein

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer among women. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have certain limitations in detecting breast cancer, especially during its early stage of development. A number of studies have shown that microwave breast cancer detection has potential to become a successful clinical complement to the conventional X-ray mammography. Microwave breast imaging is performed by illuminating the breast tissues with an electromagnetic waveform and recording its reflections (backscatters) emanating from variations in the normal breast tissues and tumour cells, if present, using an antenna array. These backscatters, referred to as the overall (tumour and clutter) response, are processed to estimate the tumour response, which is applied as input to array imaging algorithms used to estimate the location of the tumour. Due to changes in the breast profile over time, the commonly utilized background subtraction procedures used to estimate the target (tumour) response in array processing are impractical for breast cancer detection. The thesis proposes a new tumour estimation algorithm based on a combination of the data adaptive filter with the envelope detection filter (DAF/EDF), which collectively do not require a training step. After establishing the superiority of the DAF/EDF based approach, the thesis shows that the time reversal (TR) array imaging algorithms outperform their conventional conterparts in detecting and localizing tumour cells in breast tissues at SNRs ranging from 15 to 30dB.

  3. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk. PMID:24450034

  4. Cancer and fertility preservation: fertility preservation in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Maltaris, Theodoros; Weigel, Michael; Mueller, Andreas; Schmidt, Marcus; Seufert, Rudolf; Fischl, Franz; Koelbl, Heinz; Dittrich, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive chemotherapy has improved the life expectancy for reproductive-age women with breast cancer, but it often causes infertility or premature ovarian failure due to destruction of the ovarian reserve. Many questions concerning fertility preservation in breast cancer patients remain unanswered for example, whether fertility preservation methods interfere with chemotherapy, and whether subsequent pregnancy has negative effects on the prognosis. Fertility preservation is a critical factor in decision-making for younger breast cancer patients, however, and clinicians should address this. The present article reviews the incidence of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea, and discusses fertility-preservation options and the prognosis for patients who become pregnant after breast cancer. PMID:18492214

  5. Gene expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaklamani, Virginia G; Gradishar, William J

    2006-03-01

    We now recognize that all breast cancers are not the same. Different characteristics in gene expression profiles result in differential clinical behavior. With the use of gene microarrays, different subtypes of breast cancer have been characterized. The basal subtype is characterized by high expression of keratins 5 and 17, laminin, and fatty acid-binding protein 7. The ERBB2+ subtype is characterized by high expression of genes in the ERBB2 amplicon. The luminal A subtype is characterized by the highest expression of the ER alpha gene. The luminal B and C subtypes have a lower expression of the ER cluster. The importance of these different subtypes lies in the fact that they differ in clinical outcome, with the basal and ERBB2+ subtypes having the worse prognosis and the luminal A group having the best prognosis. Different strategies for evaluating tumors in a clinical setting have been developed. Two such strategies are the 21-gene assay (Oncotype DX; Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA), which is currently in commercial use in the United States, and the 70-gene assay, which has been developed by a group in the Netherlands. These assays have been shown to predict clinical outcome and response to therapy. However, to date these gene assays have not been studied in a prospective manner. Over the next year, prospective clinical trials will be initiated using these predictive tools in the treatment of breast cancer. In the near future, clinical decisions will most likely be dictated by the genetic characteristics of the tumor, with the clinical characteristics becoming less important. Tailoring our treatment based on individual tumor characteristics will help us develop better therapeutic strategies and save many patients from receiving unnecessary toxic therapy. PMID:16455023

  6. Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Lymphedema: What Every Woman With Breast Cancer Should Know ... for breast cancer may be at risk for lymphedema in the arm, breast, and chest. Here we ...

  7. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-28

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  8. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  9. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. DDT Exposure in Utero and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Krigbaum, Nickilou Y.; Yeh, Gregory; Park, June-Soo; Zimmermann, Lauren; Cirillo, Piera M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Currently no direct evidence links in utero dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure to human breast cancer. However, in utero exposure to another xenoestrogen, diethylstilbestrol, predicts an increased breast cancer risk. If this finding extends to DDT, it could have far-reaching consequences. Many women were heavily exposed in utero during widespread DDT use in the 1960s. They are now reaching the age of heightened breast cancer risk. DDT exposure persists and use continues in Africa and Asia without clear knowledge of the consequences for the next generation. Hypothesis: In utero exposure to DDT is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Design: This was a case-control study nested in a prospective 54-year follow-up of 9300 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort (n = 118 breast cancer cases, diagnosed by age 52 y and 354 controls matched on birth year). Setting and Participants: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members who received obstetric care in Alameda County, California, from 1959 to 1967, and their adult daughters participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure: Daughters' breast cancer diagnosed by age 52 years as of 2012 was measured. Results: Maternal o,p′-DDT predicted daughters' breast cancer (odds ratio fourth quartile vs first = 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5–9.0). Mothers' lipids, weight, race, age, and breast cancer history did not explain the findings. Conclusions: This prospective human study links measured DDT exposure in utero to risk of breast cancer. Experimental studies are essential to confirm results and discover causal mechanisms. Findings support classification of DDT as an endocrine disruptor, a predictor of breast cancer, and a marker of high risk. PMID:26079774

  11. Estrogen sulfotransferases in breast and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2009-02-01

    Estrogen sulfotransferase is significantly more active in the normal breast cell (e.g., Human 7) than in the cancer cell (e.g., MCF-7). The data suggest that in breast cancer sulfoconjugated activity is carried out by another enzyme, the SULT1A, which acts at high concentration of the substrates. In breast cancer cells sulfotransferase (SULT) activity can be stimulated by various progestins: medrogestone, promegestone, and nomegestrol acetate, as well as by tibolone and its metabolites. SULT activities can also be controlled by other substances including phytoestrogens, celecoxib, flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, resveratrol), and isoflavones. SULT expression was localized in breast cancer cells, which can be stimulated by promegestone and correlated with the increase of the enzyme activity. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), which acts at nanomolar concentration of estradiol, can inactivate most of this hormone present in the normal breast; however, in the breast cancer cells, the sulfotransferase denoted as SULT1A1 is mainly present, and this acts at micromolar concentrations of E(2). A correlation was postulated among breast cancer cell proliferation, the effect of various progestins, and sulfotransferase stimulation. In conclusion, it is suggested that factors involved in the stimulation of the estrogen sulfotransferases could provide new possibilities for the treatment of patients with hormone-dependent breast and endometrial cancers. PMID:19250196

  12. Thermoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer: comparison to histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Griep, S. K.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.; Hull, D.

    2014-03-01

    Ex vivo imaging of fresh prostate specimens was performed to test the hypothesis that the thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism generated with very high frequency electromagnetic (EM) irradiation is sensitive to prostate cancer. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after radical prostatectomy, performed as part of normal care. Irradiation pulsewidth was 700 ns and duty cycle was extremely low. Typical specific absorption rate (SAR) throughout the prostate was 70-90 kW/kg during pulsing, but time-averaged SAR was below 2 W/kg. TA pressure pulses generated by rapid heating due to EM energy deposition were detected using single element transducers. 15g/L glycine powder mixed into DI water served as acoustic couplant, which was chilled to prevent autolysis. Spatial encoding was performed by scanning in tomographic "step-and-shoot" mode, with 3 mm translation between slices and 1.8-degree rotation between tomographic views. Histology slides for 3 cases scanned with 2.25 MHz transducers were marked for comparison to TA reconstructions. These three cases showed little, moderate, and severe involvement in the histology levels surrounding the verumontanum. TA signal strength decreased with percent cancerous involvement. When VHF is used for tissue heating, the TA contrast mechanism is driven by ionic content and we observed suppressed TA signal from diseased prostate tissue in the peripheral zone. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity.

  13. The role of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer – immunohistochemical evaluation of oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in invasive breast cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Patera, Janusz; Sobol, Maria; Przybylski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study Expression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors is a very powerful and useful predictor. Because the response rate to hormonal treatment in breast cancer is associated with the presence of oestrogen and progesterone receptors, assessment of the receptor expression profile allows for prediction of breast cancer response to hormonal treatment. The aim of this study was to assess whether the expression of receptors for oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) in the tumour tissue of patients with invasive breast cancer correlated with tumour histological type, histological grade of malignancy, tumour size, and lymph node status. Material and methods Materials consisted of histological preparations derived from patients treated for invasive breast cancer. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Results Among 231 cases of breast cancer 18 invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC) and 213 invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC) were diagnosed. Taking the histological type of tumour into account, oestrogen receptor-positive reaction was observed in 74.2% of IDC and 77.8% of ILC, and the positive response to PR was observed in 67.1% of IDC and 61.1% of ILC. Considering the histological grade, ER- in the largest percentage (72%) was observed in second-grade (G2) invasive carcinomas. Similarly, PR expression (75%) was found in the largest percentage in second-grade (G2) carcinomas. Based on our own studies and data from literature, it appears that the ER (+) status is an indicator of good prognosis, because it points to a less aggressive cancer, in which overall survival and disease-free time is longer in comparison with ER (–) tumours. Conclusions Determination of ER status may, therefore, have significant clinical value and is widely used in routine pathological diagnostics. PMID:26557763

  14. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  15. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  16. Regional and racial disparities in breast cancer-specific mortality.

    PubMed

    Grann, Victor; Troxel, Andrea B; Zojwalla, Naseem; Hershman, Dawn; Glied, Sherry A; Jacobson, Judith S

    2006-01-01

    Where and how one lives is associated with cancer survival. This study was designed to assess geographical region of residence, race/ethnicity, and clinical and socioeconomic factors as predictors of survival in a population based cohort of women with breast cancer followed for up to 12 years. In a cohort of 218,879 breast cancer patients >20 years of age at diagnosis, registered in the database of the US National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1990 and 2001, we analyzed the association of breast cancer-specific survival with SEER region; age; stage; histology; hormone receptor status; race/ethnicity; and census data on educational attainment, income, employment, and insurance coverage. We compared Kaplan-Meier survival curves by region and race/ethnicity. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to assess the association of mortality with region, race/ethnicity, and the other variables. Women who lived in Detroit had significantly higher mortality than those living in most other SEER regions. In most regions, black women had the poorest survival. The association of mortality with race did not differ significantly across regions, but it was significantly stronger among women 50-64 years of age than among women 65 and older. The SEER data document the association of breast cancer mortality with region, race, and socioeconomic status. Black race was a strong predictor of mortality in each region even after controlling for socioeconomic factors. The diminishing effect of race with age, which may only partially be explained by insurance in those over 65, suggests a need for research on the role of other factors, such as comorbid conditions or access to care, in breast cancer mortality. PMID:16051406

  17. Breast Cancer After Chest Radiation Therapy for Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Malhotra, Jyoti; Friedman, Danielle Novetsky; Mubdi, Nidha Z.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Smith, Susan A.; Henderson, Tara O.; Boice, John D.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Diller, Lisa R.; Bhatia, Smita; Kenney, Lisa B.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Begg, Colin B.; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The risk of breast cancer is high in women treated for a childhood cancer with chest irradiation. We sought to examine variations in risk resulting from irradiation field and radiation dose. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 1,230 female childhood cancer survivors treated with chest irradiation who were participants in the CCSS (Childhood Cancer Survivor Study). Results Childhood cancer survivors treated with lower delivered doses of radiation (median, 14 Gy; range, 2 to 20 Gy) to a large volume (whole-lung field) had a high risk of breast cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 43.6; 95% CI, 27.2 to 70.3), as did survivors treated with high doses of delivered radiation (median, 40 Gy) to the mantle field (SIR, 24.2; 95% CI, 20.7 to 28.3). The cumulative incidence of breast cancer by age 50 years was 30% (95% CI, 25 to 34), with a 35% incidence among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (95% CI, 29 to 40). Breast cancer–specific mortality at 5 and 10 years was 12% (95% CI, 8 to 18) and 19% (95% CI, 13 to 25), respectively. Conclusion Among women treated for childhood cancer with chest radiation therapy, those treated with whole-lung irradiation have a greater risk of breast cancer than previously recognized, demonstrating the importance of radiation volume. Importantly, mortality associated with breast cancer after childhood cancer is substantial. PMID:24752044

  18. Nipple-areolar pigmentation: histology and potential for reconstitution in breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dean, Nicola; Haynes, Julie; Brennan, Jim; Neild, Tim; Goddard, Chris; Dearman, Bronwyn; Cooter, Rod

    2005-03-01

    The makeup of nipple-areolar skin, in terms of its melanin and melanocyte content has not previously been established. This histological information is required if pigmentation of the reconstructed nipple-areola is to be successful in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. We describe examination of 200 parallel sections of nipple-areolar skin of 20 women using histochemical (Masson-Fontana) and immunohistochemical (Mel-5) techniques, evaluated using quantitative image analysis. The amount of melanin present per length of basement membrane was 2.14 times higher in areolar skin than breast skin. The ratio of melanocytes to keratinocytes was 1:9.7 in areolar skin vs. 1:14.7 in breast skin. We also describe a cell culture and skin construct method using autologous human serum without toxic growth promoting additives, which could be used in the clinical setting of nipple-areolar reconstruction. PMID:15710115

  19. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  20. The history of breast cancer advocacy.

    PubMed

    Braun, Susan

    2003-01-01

    There have been four key steps in the advent of breast cancer advocacy: priming the market, engaging consumers, establishing political advocacy, and taking the advocacy mainstream. Breast cancer was surrounded by secrecy until the 1980s, when brave individuals such as former First Ladies Betty Ford and Nancy Reagan, and founder of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Nancy Brinker (Susan Komen's sister), began speaking publicly about the personal impact of the disease, which increased awareness of breast cancer and made it more acceptable to talk about it openly. At the same time, statistics about breast cancer were presented in new ways that the public could understand. Public health advocates played a key role in the second step, engaging consumers, when they established guidelines in the 1980s that encouraged women to perform breast self-examinations (BSEs) and have screening mammograms and clinical breast examinations (CBEs). Other events that helped engage consumers were increased media coverage of breast cancer issues, the founding of the Komen Race for the Cure in 1983, and the establishment of other programs that both educated the public and raised funds. Funds from these efforts enabled advocates to hold educational forums and produce educational materials in different media and tailored to different audiences and to become active in the funding of research. The third step, political action, became possible when breast cancer advocates joined together in the 1980s and 1990s to work toward legislative, regulatory, and funding changes, such as passage of the Mammography Quality Standards Act and increased funding for the National Cancer Institute. These efforts contributed to a more than quadrupling of federal funding for breast cancer research in the 1990s. Going mainstream, the final step in the advocacy process, entailed establishing a solid base of support to ensure that the message about breast cancer stays strong and fresh. This has been achieved by engaging the business, government, and scientific communities as partners in advocacy. PMID:12713506

  1. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Papa, V; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A; Giuffrida, D; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G B; Brand, R; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0.95 + 0.68, P less than 0.001) and in six normal specimens obtained from reduction mammoplasty (0.84 +/- 0.78, P less than 0.001). The insulin receptor content in breast cancer tissues was also higher than in any normal tissue investigated including liver (Pezzino, V., V. Papa, V. Trischitta, A. Brunetti, P.A. Goodman, M.K. Treutelaar, J.A. Williams, B.A. Maddux, R. Vigneri, and I.D. Goldfine, 1989. Am. J. Physiol. 257:E451-457). The insulin receptor in breast cancer retained its ability to both bind insulin and undergo insulin-induced tyrosine kinase activation. Immunostaining of the specimens revealed that the insulin receptor was present in malignant epithelial cells, but was not detected in stromal and inflammatory cells. Univariant analysis revealed that the insulin receptor content of the tumors correlated positively with tumor size (P = 0.014), histological grading (P = 0.030), and the estrogen receptor content (P = 0.035). There were no significant correlations between insulin receptor content and the age, body weight, menopausal status, and nodal involvement of the patients. These studies indicate, therefore, that the insulin receptor content is increased in breast cancers and raise the possibility that the insulin receptor may have a role in the biology of these tumors. Images PMID:2243127

  2. Breast Cancer Survivorship: Where Are We Today?

    PubMed

    Ganz, Patricia A; Goodwin, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and survivors with this diagnosis account for almost one fourth of the over 14 million cancer survivors in the US. After several decades of basic and clinical trials research, we have learned much about the heterogeneity of breast cancer and have evolved a complex and multidisciplinary treatment approach to the disease. Increasingly, we are paying attention to the long term and late effects of breast cancer treatment, and this is largely the subject of this volume. In this chapter, the authors introduce the topic of breast cancer survivorship and highlight the organization and content of this volume, briefly describing the contents of the subsequent chapters. PMID:26059925

  3. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the breast in a female adolescent. Case report with histologic and therapeutic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, R.; Bianchi, A.; Jakate, S.M.

    1988-06-15

    A 14-year-old girl developed a radiation-induced sarcoma of the left breast after successful combined surgical and radiation therapy of a left adrenal carcinoma when she was 9 months old. The breast lesion was histologically described as a stromal sarcoma with fibrosarcomatous and myxosarcomatous areas. The second primary lesion and local recurrence of this was treated with surgery. At each recurrence the tumor became more aggressive both clinically and histologically, and eventually proved fatal.

  4. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

  5. Main controversies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

  6. Par-4 prevents breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Nikhil; Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Rangnekar, Vivek M

    2013-01-01

    Therapy resistance and disease recurrence are two of the most challenging aspects in breast cancer treatment. A recent article in Cancer Cell makes a significant contribution toward a better understanding of this therapeutic problem by establishing downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the primary determinant of breast cancer recurrence. This viewpoint brings forth the importance of their findings and its implications on future research and therapy. PMID:24164776

  7. Par-4 prevents breast cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Therapy resistance and disease recurrence are two of the most challenging aspects in breast cancer treatment. A recent article in Cancer Cell makes a significant contribution toward a better understanding of this therapeutic problem by establishing downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the primary determinant of breast cancer recurrence. This viewpoint brings forth the importance of their findings and its implications on future research and therapy. PMID:24164776

  8. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanyuan; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and distant site metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. There is increasing evidence supporting the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cell progression, invasion, and metastasis. During the process of EMT, epithelial cancer cells acquire molecular alternations that facilitate the loss of epithelial features and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Such transformation promotes cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that EMT is associated with the increased enrichment of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and these CSCs display mesenchymal characteristics that are resistant to chemotherapy and target therapy. However, the clinical relevance of EMT in human cancer is still under debate. This review will provide an overview of current evidence of EMT from studies using clinical human breast cancer tissues and its associated challenges. PMID:26821054

  9. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957337

  10. Breast cancer epidemiology: summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L

    1993-01-01

    The most common cancer in US women and the 2nd leading cause of cancer death is breast cancer. Between 1980-1987 in the US. age-adjusted incidence rates of breast cancer rose rapidly. They are also rising rapidly in several Asian countries (e.g., in Japan) which have the lowest incidence rates. These rapid increases may mean that environmental factors are responsible. Incidence rates rise greatly with age until the late 40s. US women at highest risk of breast cancer are Jewish women, urban women, single women, and women living in the northern US. Women at lowest risk include Mormon and Seventh-Day Adventist women, Hispanic and Asian women, rural women, women living in the southern US, and married women. Factors that have a relative risk greater than 2 are mother and sister with history of breast cancer, especially if diagnoses at an early age; atypical epithelial cells in nipple aspirate fluid; nodular densities on the mammogram; history of cancer in 1 breast; mother or sister with history of breast cancer; biopsy-confirmed benign proliferative breast disease; hyperplastic epithelial cells without atypia in nipple aspirate fluid; and radiation to chest in moderate to high doses. Ovarian hormones appear to stimulate cell division in the breast, thus elevated levels may be risk factors. Exogenous hormones may also increase the risk. Women are exposed to these exogenous hormones through estrogen replacement therapy, progestin only pills, oral contraceptives, long-acting injectable contraceptives, and diethylstilbestrol. Postmenopausal obesity increases the risk while premenopausal obesity decreases the risk. A high fat diet in childhood and adolescence may increase the risk. Alcohol drinking may also increase the risk. Older, white, and nulliparous women are more likely to have estrogen receptor-positive cancers. Breast cancer in males tends to share the same risk factors as well as its own unique factors. Prevention of postmenopausal obesity is the only established primary prevention effort. Screening is the only secondary prevention means. PMID:8405209

  11. Psychooncologic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neises, Mechthild

    2008-01-01

    Summary Around one third of all patients reveal signs of stress disorder and adaptation difficulties following breast cancer or during the course of the illness, often manifested clinically as fear and depression. Supportive treatment should be made available to all patients in the form of psycho-educative group sessions introducing information and assistance to help overcome the illness. The indication for extensive treatment, e.g. psychotherapy, can be deduced from the somatopsychic disorders presented. Individual or group therapy will be offered to the patient corresponding to her diagnostics and motivation. The aim of therapy should be discussed openly with the patient, that is, an improvement in the quality of life and the possibility to overcome the situation. In general, the various intervention programmes have proved to be beneficial for patients with cancer. These include relaxation therapy and stress management as well as behavioural therapy and supportive psychotherapy. Patients have high expectations of the therapy offered and this should be taken into careful consideration by all physicians, psychologists and others responsible for administering treatment. The aim of this work is mainly to present the clinical experience gained in a breast centre. PMID:20824031

  12. Eribulin mesylate in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Helena; Morilla, Idoia; Urruticoechea, Ander

    2013-11-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic analog of halichondrin B (a polyether macrolide isolated from a marine sponge). It is a nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor with a novel mechanism of action. It is the first drug that has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival as a single agent compared with the physician's choice of currently available treatments in locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. It has shown a good manageable tolerability profile. This drug has been approved by the US FDA and by the EMA for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have received at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced/metastatic disease. Prior therapy should have included an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting unless patients were not suitable for these treatments. The aim of this article is to describe the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and the most relevant clinical trials in the development of this drug. PMID:24161305

  13. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns.

  14. Metachronous Double Primary Cancer after Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pattern of double primary cancer after treatment for breast cancer is important for patient survival. Materials and Methods We analyzed 108 cases of metachronous double primary cancer in breast cancer patients treated from 1999 to 2012. Results Metachronous double primary cancers occurred in 108 of 2,657 patients (4.1%) with breast cancer. The median time to the occurrence of second cancer after diagnosis of the first was 58.4±41.2 months (range, 6.9 to 180.2 months). The most common cancer was thyroid cancer, which occurred in 45 patients (41.7%). This was followed by gastric cancer in 16 patients (14.8%), endometrial cancer in 10 patients (9.3%), and cervical cancer in seven patients (6.5%). The relative risk showed a significant increase in endometrial (4.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 13.79), gastric (2.61; 95% CI, 1.68 to 4.06), and thyroid cancer (1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.79). At 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer, secondary cancer occurred in 48 patients (44.4%), with 50.0% of the endometrial, 56.3% of the stomach, and 37.8% of the thyroid cancer cases being diagnosed after 5 years. Median survival after diagnosis of the second cancer was 123.9±11.2 months. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the anatomic site. Conclusion The incidence of endometrial, stomach, and thyroid cancer increased significantly after treatment with primary breast cancer, and survival was dependent on early detection and the type of second primary cancer. A prolonged follow-up examination for metachronous double primary cancer is needed to provide early detection and improve survival time in patients with breast cancer. PMID:25544582

  15. Dietary fat in breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Nour; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V; Parekh, Niyati

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ≥200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, disease-specific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fat may exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality. PMID:23701588

  16. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  17. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  18. [Occurrence of squamous cell lung carcinoma in the irradiated field after radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamato, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Kazunori; Takeda, Mitunobu; Hashimoto, Yasuji; Tokuoka, Masayoshi; Ide, Yoshihito; Matsuyama, Jin; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Morimoto, Takashi; Fukushima, Yukio; Nomura, Takashi; Sasaki, Yo; Takeda, Masashi

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer reduces the incidence of disease recurrence and breast cancer mortality.However, it has also been associated with an increased risk of developing secondary cancers in exposed sites.Recently, we observed a 64-year-old woman who developed squamous cell lung carcinoma in the field irradiated with a total dose of 55 Gy after conservative breast surgery for left breast cancer 16 years previously.The patient underwent left upper lobectomy combined with chest wall resection.She had no recurrence of the breast cancer for 16 years.The secondary lung cancer tumor was of a different histological type than the primary breast cancer, and it appeared in the irradiated field.In conclusion, we regarded her lung cancer as a radiation-induced cancer, although it is difficult to clearly define radiation-induced cancer.In addition, the patient 's lung cancer may not only be a result of the late effect of irradiation, but might also be due to her smoking habit. PMID:25731415

  19. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Circulating testosterone and prostate-specific antigen in nipple aspirate fluid and tissue are associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Edward R; Tichansky, David S; Chervoneva, Inna; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary evidence has associated testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with breast cancer. Our objective was to determine whether a) testosterone levels in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF), serum, or breast tissue are associated with breast cancer; b) testosterone levels in serum are associated with levels in NAF; c) PSA in NAF, serum, or breast tissue is associated with breast cancer; and d) serum PSA is associated with NAF PSA levels. We obtained 342 NAF specimens from 171 women by means of a modified breast pump. Additionally, we collected 201 blood samples from 99 women and 51 tissue samples from 41 subjects who underwent surgical resection for suspected disease. Women currently using birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy were excluded from the study. Controlling for age and menopausal status, serum testosterone was significantly increased in women with breast cancer (p = 0.002). NAF and serum testosterone levels were not associated. Neither NAF nor tissue testosterone was associated with breast cancer. Controlling for menopausal status and age, NAF PSA was significantly decreased in women with breast cancer (p < 0.001). We did not find serum PSA to be associated with breast cancer, although we found an indication that, in postmenopausal women, its levels were lower in women with cancer. Serum PSA was associated with NAF PSA in postmenopausal women (p < 0.001). PSA levels in cancerous tissue were significantly lower than in benign breast specimens from subjects without cancer (p = 0.011), whereas levels of PSA in histologically benign specimens from subjects with cancer were intermediate. Our results suggest that serum testosterone is increased and NAF PSA is decreased in women with breast cancer, with PSA expression being higher in normal than in cancerous breast tissues. NAF and serum PSA levels in postmenopausal women are correlated, suggesting that as laboratory assessment of PSA becomes more sensitive, serum PSA may become useful in identifying women with breast cancer. PMID:11882474

  1. Cell Fate Decisions During Breast Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Kayla; Wronski, Ania; Skibinski, Adam; Phillips, Sarah; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of breast cancer, many genes become altered as cells evolve progressively from normal to a pre-malignant to a malignant state of growth. How mutations in genes lead to specific subtypes of human breast cancer is only partially understood. Here we review how initial genetic or epigenetic alterations within mammary epithelial cells (MECs) can alter cell fate decisions and put pre-malignant cells on a path towards cancer development with specific phenotypes. Understanding the early stages of breast cancer initiation and progression and how normal developmental processes are hijacked during transformation has significant implications for improving early detection and prevention of breast cancer. In addition, insights gleaned from this understanding may also be important for developing subtype-specific treatment options. PMID:27110512

  2. Expression of glycodelin in human breast and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, M; Halttunen, M; Koistinen, R; von Boguslawsky, K; von Smitten, K; Andersson, L C; Seppälä, M

    1999-12-10

    Glycodelin is a 28 kDa glycoprotein with structural homology to beta-lactoglobulins, particularly expressed in steroid-responsive tissues of the female reproductive tract. We previously found that transfection of glycodelin cDNA into MCF-7 breast cancer cells induces differentiation into organized acinar epithelium and up-regulation of epithelial markers. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry, Northern blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses to study glycodelin expression in normal and in malignant breast tissues. The results were compared with the expression of estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) and p53 tumor suppressor protein. Glycodelin was found in ductal and lobular epithelium of 6/6 normal breast tissues, 27/29 morphologically normal breast tissues from breast cancer patients, 6/6 benign lactating adenomas, 21/35 ductal carcinomas, 9/9 tubular carcinomas, 9/9 mucinous carcinomas, 3/3 mixed ductal/tubular carcinomas and 7/11 lobular carcinomas. In the latter, of particular interest was the presence of glycodelin in paranucleolar vacuoles of carcinoma cells. Northern blot analysis of fresh frozen tissues revealed the normal full length 0.9 kb mRNA of glycodelin in ductal breast carcinoma. Using RT-PCR analysis, glycodelin messenger ribonucleic acid was found in 13/13 ductal and in 3/3 tubular tumor tissues. We also detected a splicing variant lacking exon 4, which includes the nucleotide sequence encoding the potential N-glycosylation site at Asn-85. Our results demonstrate the synthesis of glycodelin in normal breast and breast cancer. In addition, we show that the paranuclear vacuole, characteristically present in lobular breast cancer cells, contains abundant amounts of glycodelin. PMID:10597188

  3. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ludman, Evette J.; Ichikawa, Laura E.; Simon, Gregory E.; Rohde, Paul; Arterburn, David; Operskalski, Belinda H.; Linde, Jennifer A.; Jeffery, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity and depression may each be associated with less cervical and breast cancer screening. Studies have examined obesity or depression alone, but not together, despite the established link between them. Purpose To disentangle the effects of depression and obesity on receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening. Methods A stratified sampling design was used to recruit women aged 40–65 years with information on BMI from an integrated health plan in Washington in 2003–2005. A telephone survey included the PHQ-9 for depression, weight, and height. Automated data assessed Paps for 3097 women over a 3-year period and screening mammograms over a 2-year period for 2163 women aged ≥51 years. Logistic regression models (conducted in 2008) examined the association between obesity and depression and receipt of screening tests. Results In univariate logistic regression models, women were less likely to receive a Pap if they were obese (OR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.41–0.69) or depressed (OR = 0.60, 95% CI= 0.42–0.87). Women were less likely to receive a screening mammogram if they were depressed (OR = 0.45, 95% CI= 0.30–0.67). In multivariable models, only obesity remained significantly associated with lower likelihood of Pap screening (OR =0.67, 95% CI= 0.0.49–0.93) and only depression remained significantly associated with less screening mammography (OR =0.49, 95% CI 0.31–0.76). Obesity and depression did not interact significantly in either model. Conclusions Obesity and depression appear to have specific effects on receipt of different cancer screening tests. PMID:20171532

  4. [Oncoplastic techniques for immediate reconstruction with nipple-areolar preservation following radical resection of a centrally located breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Flierl, D; Hanker, J P

    2001-07-01

    There are few breast-conserving therapies (BCT) for centrally located breast cancer. The present paper describes a BCT for breast cancers in such a location, which permits conservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), provided this has not been infiltrated. After histological detection of the breast cancer by punch biopsy, a central segmental mastectomy and an axillary dissection are performed. An immediate reconstruction of the subareolar defect is carried out by means of a local flap technique, thus conserving the NAC. PMID:11534300

  5. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  6. Breast cancer: agenda setting through activism.

    PubMed

    Brendtro, M J

    1998-01-01

    Breast cancer has long been one of the leading causes of death among women in the United States. The disease did not gain serious attention in the public policy arena, however, until the 1990s. Using Kingdon's agenda-setting model as a framework, this article describes how breast cancer moved to a place of prominence on the national health care agenda. The role of breast cancer activists in this effort is examined. Suggestions are then made concerning why and how advanced practice nurses might effectively influence the health policy agenda through political activism. PMID:9874938

  7. Older women, breast cancer, and social support

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Ellen G.; Aviv, Caryn; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Introduction One in ten women over the age of 65 will develop breast cancer. Despite this high incidence of breast cancer among older women, social support for them is often inadequate. This paper describes a qualitative study of the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on older women from racially/ethnically diverse populations and their subsequent need for social support. Methods Forty-seven older African American, Asian American, Caucasian and Latina women between the ages of 65 to 83 participated in a larger study examining the impact of breast cancer on women from racially/ethnically diverse populations and the meaning and nature of social support. The women completed an in-depth qualitative interview on the psychosocial impact of breast cancer and the meaning and nature of social support. Results and Conclusion The results indicate that there are variations in reactions to a breast cancer diagnosis among older women, and that these reactions impact their experiences with seeking social support at diagnosis and during treatment. Respondents were concerned about their aging bodies, potential dependency on others, and loss of autonomy. At the same time, the severity of cancer treatment and existing co-morbidities often meant they needed to learn to receive support, and to reach out if they had no support. The implications of these findings underscore the older cancer patient’s need to strengthen her supportive networks at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and post-treatment. PMID:20967554

  8. Autophagy and endocrine resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Katherine L; Shajahan, Ayesha N; Clarke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The American Cancer Society estimates that over 200,000 new breast cancer cases are diagnosed annually in the USA alone. Of these cases, the majority are invasive breast cancers and almost 70% are estrogen receptor-α positive. Therapies targeting the estrogen receptor-α are widely applied and include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor downregulator such as Fulvestrant (Faslodex; FAS, ICI 182,780), or one of the third-generation aromatase inhibitors including letrozole or anastrozole. While these treatments reduce breast cancer mortality, many estrogen receptor-α-positive tumors eventually recur, highlighting the clinical significance of endocrine therapy resistance. The signaling leading to endocrine therapy resistance is poorly understood; however, preclinical studies have established an important role for autophagy in the acquired resistance phenotype. Autophagy is a cellular degradation process initiated in response to stress or nutrient deprivation, which attempts to restore metabolic homeostasis through the catabolic lysis of aggregated proteins, unfolded/misfolded proteins or damaged subcellular organelles. The duality of autophagy, which can be either pro-survival or pro-death, is well known. However, in the context of endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer, the inhibition of autophagy can potentiate resensitization of previously antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells. In this article, we discuss the complex and occasionally contradictory roles of autophagy in cancer and in resistance to endocrine therapies in breast cancer. PMID:21916582

  9. Classification of lung cancer histology by gold nanoparticle sensors

    PubMed Central

    Barash, Orna; Peled, Nir; Tisch, Ulrike; Bunn, Paul A.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Haick, Hossam

    2016-01-01

    We propose a nanomedical device for the classification of lung cancer (LC) histology. The device profiles volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of (subtypes of) LC cells, using gold nanoparticle (GNP) sensors that are suitable for detecting LC-specific patterns of VOC profiles, as determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry analysis. Analyzing the GNP sensing signals by support vector machine allowed significant discrimination between (i) LC and healthy cells; (ii) small cell LC and nonsmall cell LC; and between (iii) two subtypes of nonsmall cell LC: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The discriminative power of the GNP sensors was then linked with the chemical nature and composition of the headspace VOCs of each LC state. These proof-of-concept findings could totally revolutionize LC screening and diagnosis, and might eventually allow early and differential diagnosis of LC subtypes with detectable or unreachable lung nodules. PMID:22033081

  10. Mouse models of breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fantozzi, Anna; Christofori, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic spread of cancer cells is the main cause of death of breast cancer patients, and elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process is a major focus in cancer research. The identification of appropriate therapeutic targets and proof-of-concept experimentation involves an increasing number of experimental mouse models, including spontaneous and chemically induced carcinogenesis, tumor transplantation, and transgenic and/or knockout mice. Here we give a progress report on how mouse models have contributed to our understanding of the molecular processes underlying breast cancer metastasis and on how such experimentation can open new avenues to the development of innovative cancer therapy. PMID:16887003

  11. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolou, Panagiotis; Toloudi, Maria; Papasotiriou, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed to determine genes that are expressed in breast cancer and breast CSCs and to investigate their correlation with stemness. RNA was extracted from established breast cancer cell lines and from CSCs derived from five different breast cancer patients. DNA microarray analysis was performed and any upregulated genes were also studied in other cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer. For genes that were expressed only in breast cancer, knockdown-based experiments were performed. Finally, the gene expression levels of stemness transcription factors were measured. The outcome of the analysis indicated a group of genes that were aberrantly expressed mainly in breast cancer cells with stemness properties. Knockdown experiments confirmed the impact of several of these on NANOG, OCT3/4, and SOX2 transcription factors. It seems that several genes that are not directly related with hormone metabolism and basic signal transduction pathways might have an important role in relapse and disease progression and, thus, can be targeted for new treatment approaches for breast cancer. PMID:26203276

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ejlertsen, Bent

    2016-05-01

    With long-term follow-up, the DBCG 77B trial demonstrates that oral single-agent cyclophosphamide significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and mortality as compared with no systemic therapy in pre-menopausal patients with high-risk early breast cancer. DBCG 77B is the only randomised trial assessing single-agent cyclophosphamide; and a second comparison suggests that its benefits are comparable to what may be achieved by classic CMF. The lack of benefits from adding methotrexate and fluorouracil to cyclophosphamide paved the way for combining cyclophosphamide with anthracyclines and later taxanes. DBCG 89D showed an incremental benefit in DFS and OS from substituting methotrexate with epirubicin. The advantage of anthracycline-containing three-drug combinations over CMF was confirmed by others and in the individual-patient EBCTCG meta-analysis, while standard AC or EC for four cycles not was superior to classic CMF. A further reduction in breast cancer mortality appeared in the EBCTCG meta-analysis from the addition of a taxane to a standard AC, while the substitution of cycles or drugs with a taxane was not associated with a reduction in mortality. No apparent benefit was observed in an early analysis of the DBCG 82C evaluating the addition of CMF to tamoxifen in post-menopausal high-risk breast cancer patients. Apart from menopausal status, the two trials had identical selection criteria, and the differences in outcome warranted a long-term follow-up of the 82C trial. After ten years of follow-up, CMF in the DBCG 82C was associated with a significant improvement in DFS; but even with 24 years of follow-up, mortality was not significantly improved. The diversity in outcome from the 77C and the 82B trials triggered further studies. The 77B trial used classic CMF with oral cyclophospamide, while a four-weekly intravenous CMF regimen was used in the 82B and C trials, and a three-weekly CMF regimen was used in the succeeding 89B and D trials. The outcome following these CMF regimens has not been compared within the context of a randomised trial. Shifting from the 77B's classic CMF regimen to the 82B four-weekly IV regimen or the 89B three-weekly IV regimen was associated with a 30% increased risk of a DFS event in a multivariate analysis of a population-based cohort study. Furthermore, the four-weekly regimen used in 82B was associated with a 40% increase in mortality. The strengths of the design include identical selection criteria, uniform and prospective registration of treatment, tumour and patient characteristics. Caution is still required due to the non-experimental design of the comparison. Another finding was a substantial difference in the risk of amenorrhoea; and while 15% of patients aged 40 or younger in 77B had regular menses throughout chemotherapy, the corresponding percentage was 37 in 82B and 47 in 89B. The DBCG in collaboration with a Swedish and a Dutch centre participating in the DBCG trial 89B compared CMF with ovarian ablation in premenopausal high-risk breast cancer patients with ER-positive tumours. No significant differences were found in DFS or OS in the preplanned analysis, suggesting that the benefits of CMF may, at least in part, be explained by ovarian suppression in premenopausal patients with ER-positive tumours. However, these results are not clinically useful by themselves as other chemotherapy regimens have been more efficacious, and knowledge is still lacking regarding the benefits from adding ovarian suppression to chemotherapy plus tamoxifen. The results from the DBCG 77B and 82C are in accordance with other large adjuvant trials and the EBCTCG meta-analyses. The benefits obtained with any individual anticancer drug are largely determined by the cancer (somatic) genome; and by being a molecular target of anthracyclines, TOP2A aberrations could obviously be associated with cancer drug benefits. In the DBCG 89D, a significant heterogeneity was observed between a beneficial effect on DFS and OS of epirubicin and the presence of TOP2A, but not the presence of HER2 aberrations. The results obtained in the 89D trial regarding TOP2A have been reproduced by others, but not consistently. However, a recent individual-patient pooled analysis of five adjuvant trials demonstrated that patients with either TOP2A or centromere 17 aberrations, but not with HER2 amplification, benefit from anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy. Anthracyclins have additional distinct biological mechanisms; and results from the DBCG 89D suggested that tumours with normal TOP2A were only non-responsive to anthracyclines if they were TIMP1 immunoreactive. The DBCG READ trial (N = 2,015) prospectively included patients without TOP2A-aberrated breast cancers, and its results are awaited for prospective confirmation of the results from the DBCG 89D and the individual-patient pooled analysis. Adjuvant chemotherapy substantially reduces the risk of recurrence and mortality of breast cancer, but is also associated with significant toxicity. However, according to a large cohort study from DBCG, chemotherapy can safely be withheld in one fourth of postmenopausal patients who will be without excess mortality following sufficient adjuvant endocrine therapy for ER positive breast cancer. A prognostic standard mortality rate index (PSI) was constructed using regression coefficients obtained in a multivariate fractional polynomials model, and most accurately identified those who could be spared chemotherapy. In addition to age, tumour size, nodal status, histological type and malignancy grade, the PSI also includes ER level addressed as a continuous variable in the MFP model. In the MFP model, absence of LVI was sufficient to counteract the impact of other risk factors, while that could not be achieved with a categorical multivariate model in a prior study. An evaluation of whether the addition of results from a molecular assay may improve the clinical utility of the PSI is on-going, but when used alone evidence from such assays has been insufficient. PMID:27127018

  13. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Print-Friendly Page April 2015 The Impact of Breast Cancer The National Cancer Institute reports that about 12. ...

  14. mTOR inhibition in management of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Shona

    2012-01-01

    The mTOR pathway is becoming increasingly important in several cancers including breast cancer. This review will focus on the role of its inhibition in the management of advanced breast cancer. PMID:22988350

  15. TOX3 Mutations in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James Owain; Chin, Suet-Feung; Wong-Taylor, Li-An; Leaford, Donna; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Caldas, Carlos; Maia, Ana-Teresa

    2013-01-01

    TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs) in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe) was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA). Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology. PMID:24069272

  16. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer. PMID:26218769

  17. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  18. Association between SIRT1 Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer in Egyptians

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Sherine M.; Shahin, Nancy N.; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is reported to cause the highest mortality among female cancer patients. Previous studies have explored the association of silent mating-type information regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) gene expression with prognosis in breast cancer. However, no studies exist, so far, on the role of SIRT1 gene polymorphism in breast cancer risk or prognosis. The present study aimed to assess the association between SIRT1 gene polymorphisms and breast cancer in Egyptians. Methods The study comprised 980 Egyptian females divided into a breast cancer group (541 patients) and a healthy control group (439 subjects). SIRT1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs3758391, rs3740051 and rs12778366 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Allelic and genotypic frequencies were determined in both groups and association with breast cancer and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. Results Breast cancer patients exhibited elevated serum SIRT1 levels which varied among different tumor grades. SIRT1 rs3758391 and rs12778366 TT genotypes were more frequent, exhibited higher SIRT1 levels than CC and CT genotypes and were associated with histologic grade and lymph node status. SIRT1 rs12778366 TT genotype also correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses. The T allele frequency for both SNPs was higher in breast cancer patients than in normal subjects. Combined GG and AG genotypes of rs3740051 were more frequent, showed higher serum SIRT1 levels than the AA genotype, and were associated with ER and PR expression. Furthermore, inheritance of the G allele was associated with breast cancer. Conclusions Our findings reveal that rs3758391 and rs12778366 polymorphisms of SIRT1 gene are associated with breast cancer risk and prognosis in the Egyptian population. PMID:26999517

  19. Breast cancer characteristics-comparison of preoperative and postoperative values.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, Dusan; Pecha, Vaclav; Skovajsova, Miroslava; Zahumensky, Jozef; Trnkova, Marketa; Petruzelka, Lubos; Halaska, Michael; Sottner, Oldrich; Otcenasek, Michal; Kolarova, Hana

    2013-07-01

    Breast cancer characteristics obtained at the time of diagnosis are important for setting the basic strategy of the treatment. Reliability of preoperative investigation differs for various features of the disease. The aim of this study was to ascertain the agreements and differences between preoperative and postoperative values. This retrospective study analyzed the results of 617 women with primary surgery of the breast and axilla. Cohen's kappa coefficient has been employed to measure the degree of agreement between preoperative and postoperative values. Substantial or "almost perfect" agreement has been documented for the histological type of the tumors, their histopathological grade, proliferation index Ki67, as well as for estrogen, progesterone, and HER-2/neu receptors. Substantial differences exist between preoperative and postoperative diagnoses of invasiveness of the tumor, determination of the size of the tumors, and the number of tumor foci. Preoperative imaging and clinical examination of lymph nodes exhibited unacceptably high false negative rates. Heterogeneity of breast cancer cell population, methodology of histology examinations, and insufficient imaging of lymph nodes are the major limitations precluding satisfactory accuracy of preoperative diagnosis. Preoperatively diagnosed in situ carcinomas, as well as multifocal lesions, were the most often sources of diagnostic failures. PMID:23726929

  20. African American breast cancer survivors participating in a breast cancer support group: Translating research into practice

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Anjanette A.; Gulbas, Lauren; Sanders-Thompson, Vetta; Shon, En-Jung; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an overall decline in mortality, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death among African American women. As such, clinicians should prepare to address the unique sociocultural and psychological concerns encountered by African American women breast cancer survivors. Objective To examine, using qualitative methods, the main coping facilitators used by African American women as they transition across the cancer continuum. The identification of these facilitators was then aligned with culturally sensitive interventions most useful with women coping with cancer, along the cancer continuum. Methods This was a secondary analysis of 20 video-taped stories of African American breast cancer survivors collected as a part of the Washington University Center for Excellence in Cancer Communications project. The interview began with a discussion of how the survivor first became aware she had breast cancer, followed by a series of open-ended probes used to explore the following themes: coping, relationships, health care system experiences, follow up care, and quality of life living with breast cancer. Results Survivors discussed their experiences and advice for targeting needs at each cancer stage, from screening to diagnosis, treatment, and then survivorship. Survivor narratives point to key evidence-based clinical intervention strategies at each stage of the cancer trajectory. Conclusion This study found that survivors see a cyclical cancer course, whereby African American breast cancer survivors serve an important role in the lives of unscreened women, newly diagnosed women, and women in treatment. PMID:24326669

  1. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... EM. Reproductive factors and breast cancer. Epidemiologic Reviews 1993; 15(1):36–47. [PubMed Abstract] Dickson RB, ... factors on cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer 1993; 53(2):215–219. [PubMed Abstract] Titus-Ernstoff ...

  2. Perceived Versus Objective Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Risk in Diverse Women

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Julia; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Jessica; Ozanne, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Prior research suggests that women do not accurately estimate their risk for breast cancer. Estimating and informing women of their risk is essential for tailoring appropriate screening and risk reduction strategies. Methods: Data were collected for BreastCARE, a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a PC-tablet based intervention providing multiethnic women and their primary care physicians with tailored information about breast cancer risk. We included women ages 4074 visiting general internal medicine primary care clinics at one academic practice and one safety net practice who spoke English, Spanish, or Cantonese, and had no personal history of breast cancer. We collected baseline information regarding risk perception and concern. Women were categorized as high risk (vs. average risk) if their family history met criteria for referral to genetic counseling or if they were in the top 5% of risk for their age based on the Gail or Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium Model (BCSC) breast cancer risk model. Results: Of 1,261 participants, 25% (N=314) were classified as high risk. More average risk than high risk women had correct risk perception (72% vs. 18%); 25% of both average and high risk women reported being very concerned about breast cancer. Average risk women with correct risk perception were less likely to be concerned about breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.20.4) while high risk women with correct risk perception were more likely to be concerned about breast cancer (OR=5.1; 95%CI=2.79.6). Conclusions: Many women did not accurately perceive their risk for breast cancer. Women with accurate risk perception had an appropriate level of concern about breast cancer. Improved methods of assessing and informing women of their breast cancer risk could motivate high risk women to apply appropriate prevention strategies and allay unnecessary concern among average risk women. PMID:24372085

  3. Computer-Aided Assessment of Tumor Grade for Breast Cancer in Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study involved developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for discriminating the grades of breast cancer tumors in ultrasound (US) images. Histological tumor grades of breast cancer lesions are standard prognostic indicators. Tumor grade information enables physicians to determine appropriate treatments for their patients. US imaging is a noninvasive approach to breast cancer examination. In this study, 148 3-dimensional US images of malignant breast tumors were obtained. Textural, morphological, ellipsoid fitting, and posterior acoustic features were quantified to characterize the tumor masses. A support vector machine was developed to classify breast tumor grades as either low or high. The proposed CAD system achieved an accuracy of 85.14% (126/148), a sensitivity of 79.31% (23/29), a specificity of 86.55% (103/119), and an AZ of 0.7940. PMID:25810750

  4. Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-09

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  5. The thyroid, iodine and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Peter P A

    2003-01-01

    A renewal of the search for a link between breast cancer and thyroid disease has once again demonstrated an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with breast cancer. This is the most recent of many studies showing an association between a variety of thyroid disorders and breast cancer. Such an association is not surprising as both diseases are female predominant with a similar postmenopausal peak incidence. The significance of the presence of thyroid autoantibodies, particularly thyroid peroxidase antibodies, in serum from patients with breast cancer is unknown, but it has been suggested that antibody positivity is associated with better prognosis. One area in which thyroid and breast functions overlap is in the uptake and utilization of dietary iodide. Experimental findings showing the ability of iodine or iodine-rich seaweed to inhibit breast tumour development is supported by the relatively low rate of breast cancer in Japanese women who consume a diet containing iodine-rich seaweed. However, there is as yet no direct evidence that iodine, iodinated compounds, or a combination of iodine and selenium is the antimammary carcinogenic element in the Japanese diet. It remains to be resolved whether the perceived breast cancer-thyroid disease relationship is thyroid or iodine related or, in the case of thyroid autoantibodies, is the consequence of an immune response to the carcinoma. Is this response breast specific and does it relate to iodine status? These and many other questions await resolution before a definitive role in the natural history of breast carcinoma can be assigned to the thyroid. PMID:12927031

  6. New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Etet, Paul Faustin Seke; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed. PMID:25516852

  7. Micropapillary lung cancer with breast metastasis simulating primary breast cancer due to architectural distortion on images.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyungran; Ro, Jae Yoon; Hong, Eun Kyung; Lee, Seeyeon

    2012-01-01

    A 47-year-old Korean woman with right middle lobe lung adenocarcinoma, malignant pleural effusion, and multiple lymph node and bone metastases, after three months of lung cancer diagnosis, presented with a palpable right breast mass. Images of the right breast demonstrated architectural distortion that strongly suggested primary breast cancer. Breast biopsy revealed metastatic lung cancer with a negative result for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and mammaglobin, and a positive result for thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). We present a case of breast metastasis from a case of lung cancer with an extensive micropapillary component, which was initially misinterpreted as a primary breast cancer due to unusual image findings with architectural distortion. PMID:22438695

  8. Inequalities in breast cancer care and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M.; Sainsbury, R.; Kerr, D.

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons across Europe suggest that survival from breast cancer is less good in the United Kingdom than in many countries. The care given in some UK breast cancer units is exemplary. However, it is difficult to escape the conclusion that a substantial number of women who present with breast cancer receive suboptimal care. Cancer registry-based studies have clearly demonstrated variations between surgeons and between hospitals in the management of early breast cancer. Although variations in surgical practice per se may have little impact on survival, there is evidence that differences in the use of systemic adjuvant therapy influence outcome. Five-year survival seems to be greater in women treated by surgeons seeing more than 30-50 new cases of breast cancer each year. This may be because such patients are more likely to be treated by a multidisciplinary team and to receive adjuvant therapy. Proposals that would increase the overall quality of breast cancer care and remove current inequalities must be carefully considered and should then be implemented. PMID:9303363

  9. Managing Breast Cancer in the Older Patient

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Tracey; Shinde, Arvind; Doan, Caroline; Katheria, Vani; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated with aging, with almost one-half of all new breast cancer cases diagnosed annually in the United States occurring in women age 65 and older. Recent data suggest that although breast cancer outcomes in younger women have shown substantial improvement as a result of advances in treatment and screening, the benefits in older women have been less pronounced. Although older adults have been under-represented on cancer clinical trials there is an emerging body of literature to help guide treatment decisions. For early stage breast cancer, the discussion regarding treatment options involves balancing the reduction in risk of recurrence gained by specific therapies with the potential for increased treatment-related toxicity potentially exacerbated by physiological decline or comorbidities that often co-exist in the older population. A key component of care of the older adult is the recognition that chronologic age alone cannot guide the management of an older individual with breast cancer; rather, treatment decisions must also take into account an individual’s functional status, estimated life expectancy, the risks and benefits of the therapy, potential barriers to treatment, and patient preference. This article reviews the available evidence for therapeutic management of early-stage breast cancer in older adults, and highlights data from geriatric oncology literature that provides a basis on which to facilitate evidence-based treatment. PMID:24472802

  10. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    PubMed Central

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. PMID:26229503

  11. Knowledge of Breast Cancer and Screening Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahabi, Mandana

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess young women's breast health knowledge and explore its relation to the use of screening mammography. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women aged 25-45 residing in Toronto, Canada, with no history of breast cancer and mammography received an information brochure and four questionnaires which assessed their knowledge of

  12. Knowledge of Breast Cancer and Screening Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahabi, Mandana

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess young women's breast health knowledge and explore its relation to the use of screening mammography. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women aged 25-45 residing in Toronto, Canada, with no history of breast cancer and mammography received an information brochure and four questionnaires which assessed their knowledge of…

  13. Biostereometric analysis for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Proietti-Orlandi, F; Varga, R S; Sheffer, D B; Price, T E; Loughry, C W

    1988-05-01

    A measurement technique has been developed for noninvasive breast cancer detection. The process involves the use of close-range stereophotogrammetry as a data acquisition device for the determination of breast surface concavities. We report the methodology used to detect these surface depressions, the rationale for the study, and our preliminary findings. PMID:3392975

  14. Squamoid features and expression of involucrin in primary breast carcinoma associated with high histological grade, tumour cell necrosis and recurrence sites.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, H.; Sakamaki, C.; Fukutomi, T.; Hirohashi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Although breast carcinomas are considered to originate from glandular epithelial cells, some exhibit 'squamoid features', comprising stratification with a gradient in the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio within individual cancer cell nests on microscopy. In parallel with a histological review of squamoid features, we immunohistochemically investigated the expression of involucrin, a marker of terminal squamous differentiation, in 223 breast carcinomas with one to three regional nodal metastases but no distant metastases and analysed their association with other clinicopathological parameters to explore their clinical and biological implications. Squamoid features and involucrin expression, detected in 22% and 27% of cases respectively, correlated with each other and were associated with high-grade atypia, a solid-nest pattern, cancer cell necrosis on histology and negative oestrogen receptor status. The incidence of regional recurrences was higher in patients with involucrin expression, whereas bone metastases were less frequent in groups with squamoid features or with diffuse (> or = 10%) involucrin expression. Both squamoid features and involucrin expression, which were considered to be derived either from differentiation into keratinocytes or from some kind of cellular degeneration caused by high turnover rate, are suggested to influence the biological behaviour of breast cancer cells in vivo, and they may be effective in predicting the most likely recurrence sites. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9166948

  15. Breast cancer and sexual function.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Erica N; Dizon, Don S

    2015-04-01

    As the most common malignancy affecting women within the United States, breast cancer can bring about multiple physical and psychological challenges. Among the greatest challenges are those associated with female sexual function. Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, surgeries and radiation can all have a large effect in altering a woman's sexual health and function. Sexual concerns result in significant emotional distress, including sadness/depression, issues related to personal appearance, stigma, and negative impacts on personal relationships. In this article, we discuss some of the specific challenges that present with each type of treatment and the socio-physical impact they have on survivorship. Among the most detrimental to sexual function, are the use of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Additionally, anatomical changes that transpire in patients who have undergone surgery or radiation therapy (RT), disrupt perceptions of body image. Here we will discuss and also review the contemporary literature to determine effective management and treatment of sexual dysfunction. PMID:26816822

  16. Breast cancer and sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Erica N.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common malignancy affecting women within the United States, breast cancer can bring about multiple physical and psychological challenges. Among the greatest challenges are those associated with female sexual function. Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, surgeries and radiation can all have a large effect in altering a woman’s sexual health and function. Sexual concerns result in significant emotional distress, including sadness/depression, issues related to personal appearance, stigma, and negative impacts on personal relationships. In this article, we discuss some of the specific challenges that present with each type of treatment and the socio-physical impact they have on survivorship. Among the most detrimental to sexual function, are the use of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Additionally, anatomical changes that transpire in patients who have undergone surgery or radiation therapy (RT), disrupt perceptions of body image. Here we will discuss and also review the contemporary literature to determine effective management and treatment of sexual dysfunction. PMID:26816822

  17. Cryotherapy in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy and Nail Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Who Are Receiving Paclitaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-26

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Pain; Peripheral Neuropathy; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  18. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Agnese, Doreen M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-01-01

    As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. This review was written from the perspective of a surgeon with additional training in cancer genetics in an effort to provide a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important. PMID:26858951

  19. Developing phytoestrogens for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mandy M; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Chemoprevention using phytoestrogens (PEs) for breast cancer may be a valid strategy. PEs are phytochemicals with estrogen-like structures and can be classified into four types: isoflavones, lignans, stilbenes and coumestans. They are widely distributed in diet and herbs and have shown anti-cancer activity via mechanisms including estrogen receptor modulation, aromatase inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Genistein, daidzein and resveratrol are some of the most studied PE examples. Quality control in product manufacturing and clinical study design is a critical issue in developing them as clinically effective chemopreventive agents for breast cancer. PMID:22583409

  20. Breast Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David A; Lee, Jean H; Eubank, William B

    2009-10-01

    Whereas (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/computed tomography has proven to be valuable for breast cancer diagnosis and response evaluation, it is likely that PET radiopharmaceuticals beyond FDG will contribute further to the understanding of breast cancer and thereby further direct breast cancer care. Increasingly specific and quantitative approaches will help direct treatment selection from an ever-expanding and increasing array of targeted breast cancer therapies. This article highlights 4 areas of ongoing research where preliminary patient results look promising: (1) tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, (2) drug delivery and transport, (3) tumor receptor imaging, and (4) early response evaluation. For each area, the biologic background is reviewed and early results are highlighted. PMID:27157306

  1. ALND for Women with Breast Cancer Micrometastases

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a randomized clinical trial that compared axillary lymph node dissection versus no axillary lymph node dissection in women with breast cancer and only micrometastases in their sentinel lymph nodes.

  2. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website.  Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  3. Breast cancer subtypes: morphologic and biologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Masood, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    Advances in basic science, technology and translational research have created a revolution in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. Researchers' discoveries of genes defining variability in response to therapy and heterogeneity in clinical presentations and tumor biology are the foundation of the path to personalized medicine. The success of personalized breast cancer care depends on access to pertinent clinical information and risk factors, optimal imaging findings, well-established morphologic features, and traditional and contemporary prognostic/predictive testing. The integration of these entities provides an opportunity to identify patients who can benefit from specific therapies, and demonstrates the link between breast cancer subtypes and their association with different tumor biology. It is critical to recognize specific types of breast cancer in individual patients and design optimal personalized therapy. This article will highlight the roles of morphologic features and established tumor biomarkers on patient outcome. PMID:26756229

  4. [New targeted therapies in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Coussy, F; Teixeira, L; Giacchetti, S; Cuvier, C; Hocini, H; Espié, M

    2014-11-01

    Trastuzumab improves care of patients with HER2+ breast cancer and allows a major gain in terms of survival. T-DM1 and pertuzumab are two new treatments, which give very encouraging results in metastatic breast cancer. Their place in neo-adjuvant and adjuvant setting still remains to be defined. Bevacizumab have its place in metastatic breast cancer. In adjuvant setting, results are disappointing and in neo-adjuvant setting, we need more studies on subgroups, which can benefit more. Development of the PARP inhibitors was slowed down by recent negative results in metastatic breast cancer but studies continue with more targeted patient's. Finally, everolimus, inhibitor of mTOR, allows to by pass the hormono-resistance in metastatic phase. Its toxicity must be taken into account in particular in adjuvant setting. PMID:25442825

  5. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerns, discuss them with your primary care physician, women’s health specialist, radiologist, physician’s assistant, or other healthcare professional. Resources CDC's Campaign: "Breast Cancer Screening: The Right to Know." CDC’s Disability and Health Information CDC's ...

  6. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , BS ; Kamaneh Montazeri , MD ; Sara Tolaney , ... in remission. Previous Section Next Section What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure or cardiomyopathy occurs when the ...

  7. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  8. Breast carcinoma developing in patients on hormone replacement therapy: a histological and immunohistological study.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, I F; Shembekar, M V; Shousha, S

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To study the histopathological features of breast carcinoma developing in postmenopausal patients on hormone replacement therapy (HRT). METHODS: The sample comprised 60 patients with invasive breast carcinoma including 31 who had received HRT at or shortly before presentation, and 29 who had not. Details concerning their tumour size, histological type and grade, lymph node status, and oestrogen and progesterone receptor status were compared. Immunoperoxidase staining for Bcl-2, p53, and E-cadherin was carried out on paraffin sections of all 60 patients. The results were then statistically analysed. RESULTS: Tumours detected in HRT patients were significantly smaller (mean 17 mm v 25 mm; p = 0.0156) and of a lower histological grade (p = 0.0414) than those detected in non-HRT patients. The incidence of invasive lobular carcinoma was slightly higher in HRT patients (19% v 14%). Immunohistologically, 87% of HRT tumours were Bcl-2 positive (compared with 79% in the control group), 29% were p53 positive (45% in the control), and 48% were E-cadherin positive (72% in the control group). Although the differences were not statistically significant there was a trend towards higher incidence of p53 negative and E-cadherin negative tumours in HRT patients. CONCLUSIONS: Breast carcinomas detected in patients on HRT have a significantly higher incidence of two favourable prognostic features (small size and a low histological grade). They also show a trend, statistically not significant, of being p53 negative and E-cadherin negative; this may be related to the slightly higher incidence of invasive lobular tumours in these patients. PMID:10070338

  9. Histology, composition, and quality traits of chicken Pectoralis major muscle affected by wooden breast abnormality.

    PubMed

    Soglia, F; Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Di Nunzio, M; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2016-03-01

    Only a few years ago, the poultry industry began to face a recent abnormality in breast meat, known as wooden breast, which frequently overlaps with white striping. This study aimed to assess the impact of wooden breast abnormality on quality traits of meat. For this purpose, 32 normal (NRM), 32 wooden (WB), and 32 wooden and white-striped (WB/WS) Pectoralis major muscles were selected from the same flock of heavy broilers (males, Ross 708, weighing around 3.7 kg) in the deboning area of a commercial processing plant at 3 h postmortem and used to assess histology, proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and collagen) and mineral composition (Mg, K, P, Na and Ca), sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein patterns, and technological traits of breast meat. Compared to the normal group, WB/WS fillets showed more severe histological lesions characterized by fiber degeneration, fibrosis, and lipidosis, coupled with a significantly harder texture. With regard to proximate and mineral composition, abnormal samples exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher moisture, fat, and collagen contents coupled with lower (P < 0.001) amounts of protein and ash. Furthermore, increased calcium (131 vs. 84 mg kg(-1); P < 0.05) and sodium (741 vs. 393 mg kg(-1); P < 0.001) levels were found in WB/WS meat samples. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a significantly lower amount of calcium-ATPase (SERCA, 114 kDa), responsible for the translocation of Ca ions across the membrane, in normal breasts compared to abnormal ones. As for meat quality traits, fillets affected by wooden abnormality exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher ultimate pH and lower water-holding/water-binding capacity. In particular, compared to normal, abnormal samples showed reduced marinade uptake coupled with increased drip loss and cooking losses as well. In conclusion, this study revealed that meat affected by wooden breast or both wooden breast and white striping abnormalities exhibit poorer nutritional value, harder texture, and impaired water-holding capacity. PMID:26706363

  10. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muoz, Elkin; Gonzlez, Naira; Muoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jess; Velasco, Juan A Garca

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer-free interval or mortality rates in these women. PMID:25729417

  11. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer-free interval or mortality rates in these women. PMID:25729417

  12. 19p13.1 is a triple negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M.; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R.; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christof; Godwin, Andrew K.; Weaver, JoEllen; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J.; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dünnebier, Thomas; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P.; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcom W.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L.; Pankratz, V.S.; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 – 1.15, p=3.49 × 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 – 1.31, p=2.22 × 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 – 1.33, p=3.31 × 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

  13. Vaginal Health During Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy J; Bober, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    There are increasing numbers of breast cancer survivors. Chemotherapy or endocrine therapy result in effects on vaginal health that may affect quality of life. These effects may impact sexual function, daily comfort, or the ability to perform a pelvic examination. Vulvovaginal atrophy, or genitourinary syndrome of menopause, may be treated with nonhormonal or hormonal measures. Breast cancer survivors who are menopausal and/or on endocrine therapy should be screened for issues with vaginal health and counseled about treatment options. PMID:27074843

  14. Hormone Therapy and Fatal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Sandra A.; Weber, Anita L.; Localio, A. Russell; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Ursin, Giske; Strom, Brian L.; Weiss, Linda K.; Burkman, Ronald T.; Bernstein, Leslie; Deapen, Dennis M.; Folger, Suzanne G.; Simon, Michael S.; Nadel, Marion R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Among unanswered questions is whether menopausal use of estrogen therapy (ET) or estrogen-plus-progestin therapy (CHT) increases risk of developing fatal breast cancer, i.e developing and dying of breast cancer. Using a population-based case-control design, we estimated incidence rate ratios of fatal breast cancer in postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) users compared to non-users by type, duration, and recency of HT use. Methods HT use prior to breast cancer diagnosis in 278 women who died of breast cancer within 6 years of diagnosis (cases) was compared with use in 2,224 controls never diagnosed with breast cancer using conditional logistic regression. Measures taken to address potential bias and confounding inherent in case-control studies included collecting and adjusting for detailed data on demographic and other factors potentially associated both with hormone therapy use and breast cancer. Results Fifty-six percent of cases and 68% of controls reported HT use. Among current 3+ year HT users, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for death were 0.83 (0.50, 1.38) and 0.69 (0.44, 1.09), respectively, for exclusive use of CHT or of ET, and were 0.94 (0.59, 1.48) and 0.70 (0.45, 1.07) for any use of CHT or of ET regardless of other hormone use. Conclusion Point estimates suggest no increased risk of fatal breast cancer with HT use, although 50% increases in risk in longer-term current CHT users cannot be ruled out. PMID:20336635

  15. Modern Breast Cancer Detection: A Technological Review

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Jagtap, Shami; Anjum, Waqas; Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Brooks, Ari D.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field. PMID:20069109

  16. Clinical Diagnosis and Management of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Elizabeth S; Clark, Amy S; Tchou, Julia; Zhang, Paul; Freedman, Gary M

    2016-02-01

    The diagnosis and management of breast cancer are undergoing a paradigm shift from a one-size-fits-all approach to an era of personalized medicine. Sophisticated diagnostics, including molecular imaging and genomic expression profiles, enable improved tumor characterization. These diagnostics, combined with newer surgical techniques and radiation therapies, result in a collaborative multidisciplinary approach to minimizing recurrence and reducing treatment-associated morbidity. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, including screening, staging, and multidisciplinary management. PMID:26834110

  17. Annular erythema as a sign of recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eugene; Kuper-Hommel, Marion; Rademaker, Marius

    2010-05-01

    Three women with known breast cancer presented with very similar annular erythemas of their chest walls. All women were in remission from their breast cancer for at least 6 months. Their breast cancers had initially responded well to multi-modality treatment with no clinical or radiologic evidence of recurrence, until the development of the annular erythema. In the first case, the annular erythema was treated unsuccessfully as a dermatitis and then as tinea corporis. In the second case, subacute cutaneous lupus was considered but lupus antibodies were negative. In the third case, the annular erythema was promptly recognized and biopsied. Histology in all three cases revealed identical findings of invasive ductal carcinoma involving the lymphatics of the skin. Immunohistochemical staining of the carcinoma was positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 but negative for oestrogen and progesterone receptors. Annular erythema can pose a wide differential but rarely has it been described as a sign of locally recurrent cancer. These cases highlight the importance of recognizing this entity in the oncologic patient, where prompt skin biopsies can confirm the diagnosis and allow early initiation of therapy. PMID:20546222

  18. Risk Factors of the Invasive Breast Cancer Locoregional Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liubota, R. V.; Zotov, A. S.; Vereshchako, R. I.; Liubota, I. I.; Zaychuk, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the research was to estimate the frequency of the locoregional breast cancer recurrence appearance, the recurrence-free period continuance, and the 3- and 5-year survival depending on the scope of the surgical intervention, menstrual profile, and histological and molecular-biologic characteristics of the primary tumor. Patients and Methods. Among 218 patients with a breast cancer, 99 patients had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 119 underwent radical mastectomy (RME); all patients had regional lymphatic nodes dissection. The size and the primary tumor differentiation degree, metastasis presence in the regional lymph nodes, ER expression, PR, and Her/2neu were assessed as the prognostics factors. Results. It was defined that the locoregional recurrence appearance frequency in patients with BCS turned out to be 13%, and in patients after RME it turned out to be 9%; the recurrence-free period continuance was 53 8 months and 56 10 months, respectively. Conclusions. The locoregional cancer recurrence frequency is higher in women with the menstrual function being preserved at the moment of the primary tumor detection than in postmenopausal patients and also in patients having the hyperexpression of the Her/2neu. The ipsilateral cancer recurrence decreases the 3-year survival by 7,1% and the 5-year one by 20,3%, respectively. PMID:26339643

  19. Breast cancer following polyacrylamide hydrogel injection for breast augmentation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GANG; WANG, YUJIA; HUANG, JIN-LONG

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) has been used for several years as an injectable implant for augmentation mammoplasty in China. Although patients who received PAAG injections experienced a number of complications, breast cancer following PAAG injection has been reported only in two cases. In this report, we present a case of breast cancer following PAAG injection for breast augmentation. Our study demonstrated that PAAG injection may increase the risk of breast cancer development. Early-stage breast cancer detection is difficult, since the breast is covered with the indurated injected gel. Thus, PAAG injection for augmentation mammoplasty may negatively affect breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:26998299

  20. Microwave Radiothermometry (9GHz) Applied To Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautherie, M.; Mamouni, A.; Samsel, M.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Leroy, Y.; Gros, Ch.

    1980-05-01

    Radiothermometric investigations have been carried out on breast cancer patients and on patients with tumors of various localizations and histologic types (liver,thyrold,...) (55 cases), by means of a high sensitivity hyperfrequency radiometer operating at 9GHz.The findings were analyzed as follow: (a) comparison between microwave thermal mapping and infrared thermography; (b) correlations with various morphologic and thermal parameters (depth and size oftumor thermal conductivity, vascularization and x-ray structures of tissues). Microwave radiometry seems to be able to provide significant information on meta-bolism and thermal conditions of subcutaneous tumor tissue, especially under those clinical situations where infrared thermography does not work.