These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno  

E-print Network

the stroma. #12;Common secondary sites of breast cancer metastasis: 1. Bone 2. Lungs 3. Liver 4. Brain cancer metastasis can cause an increase in either osteoclasts or osteoblasts. #12;Metastasis to the BrainHistology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000

Gleeson, Joseph G.

2

Rare breast cancer subtypes: histological, molecular, and clinical peculiarities.  

PubMed

Breast cancer encompasses a collection of different diseases characterized by different biological and pathological features, clinical presentation, response to treatments, clinical behavior, and outcome. On the basis of cell morphology, growth, and architecture patterns, breast cancer can be classified in up to 21 distinct histological types. Breast cancer special types, including the classic lobular invasive carcinoma, represent 25% of all breast cancers. The histological diversity of breast carcinomas has relevant prognostic implications. Indeed, the rare breast cancer group includes subtypes with very different prognoses, ranging from the tubular carcinoma, associated with an indolent clinical course, to metaplastic cancer, whose outcome is generally unfavorable. New approaches based on gene expression profiling allow the identification of molecularly defined breast cancer classes, with distinct biological features and clinical behavior. In clinical practice, immunohistochemical classification based on the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and Ki67 is applied as a surrogate of the intrinsic molecular subtypes. However, the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes were almost completely limited to the study of ductal invasive breast cancer. Moreover, some good-prognosis triple-negative histotypes, on the basis of gene expression profiling, can be classified among the poor-prognosis group. Therefore, histopathological classification remains a crucial component of breast cancer diagnosis. Special histologies can be very rare, and the majority of information on outcome and treatments derives from small series and case reports. As a consequence, clear recommendations about clinical management are still lacking. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about rare breast cancer histologies. PMID:24969162

Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Orvieto, Enrico; Dominici, Massimo; Conte, PierFranco; Guarneri, Valentina

2014-08-01

3

Management of Unusual Histological Types of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

There is increased understanding of the heterogeneity of breast tumors, with greater emphasis now being placed on histological and molecular profiles and, in particular, their implications for prognosis and therapy. This review addresses breast cancers of unusual histological subtype with an approximate incidence ?1%. Given the rarity of these tumors, the literature contains primarily case reports, small series, and population-based studies. Data are heterogeneous and almost entirely retrospective, frequently gathered over long time periods, in the context of changing pathological techniques and reporting. In addition, our understanding of the disease biology and therapeutic context has also evolved significantly over this time. There is often limited information about the specific therapies used and the rationale for choosing such an approach. Meaningful comparisons of treatment modalities are not feasible and it is not possible to define management guidelines. Instead, this review correlates the available information to give an impression of how each subgroup behaves—of the favored surgical technique, responses to therapy, and prognosis—as well as the emerging molecular data, highlighting new research areas for potential target in clinical trials. Each tumor subtype described represents a small but real cohort of patients with breast cancer, and although inferences may be made from this review, we are mindful of the paucity of data. The management of each patient must be considered in the context of their unique clinical presentation and correlated with the evidence-based principles that apply to more common breast cancer histologies. PMID:22826373

McArdle, Orla; O'Shea, Anne-Marie; Power, Colm P.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

2012-01-01

4

Menopausal hormone therapy and other breast cancer risk factors in relation to the risk of different histological subtypes of breast cancer: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancers of different histology have different clinical and prognostic features. There are also indications of differences in aetiology. We therefore evaluated the risk of the three most common histological subtypes in relation to menopausal hormone therapy and other breast cancer risk factors. METHODS: We used a population-based case-control study of breast cancer to evaluate menopausal hormone therapy and

Lena U Rosenberg; Cecilia Magnusson; Emma Lindström; Sara Wedrén; Per Hall; Paul W Dickman

2006-01-01

5

Metaplastic breast cancer: histologic characteristics, prognostic factors and systemic treatment strategies  

PubMed Central

Metaplastic breast cancer (MBC) is a rare subtype of invasive breast cancer that tends to have an aggressive clinical presentation as well as a variety of distinct histologic designations. Few systemic treatment options are available for MBC, as it has consistently shown a suboptimal response to standard chemotherapy regimens. These characteristics result in a worse overall prognosis for patients with MBC compared to those with standard invasive breast cancer. Due to its rarity, data focusing on MBC is limited. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, breast imaging findings, histologic and molecular characteristics of MBC as well as potential future research directions. PMID:24499560

2013-01-01

6

Histologic review of breast cancer cases in survivors of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A panel of Japanese and American pathologists reviewed existing histologic material used to study breast cancer risk among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a population in which incidence studies have found a strong relationship between breast cancer risk and radiation dose. The primary charge to the panel was to define a body of confirmed cases in the Life

Shoji Tokuoka; Masahide Asano; Tsutomu Yamamoto; Masayoshi Tokunaga; Goi Sakamoto; William H. Hartmann; Robert V. P. Hutter; Charles E. Land; Donald E. Henson

1984-01-01

7

Influence of breast cancer histology on the relationship between ultrasound and pathology tumor size measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Establishing an accurate primary invasive breast cancer size is crucial for patient management. Although ultrasonographic measurement is reported to correlate reliably with the gold standard pathology measurement, few authors have examined the influence of histologic subtype on ultrasound measurement. The common subtypes of invasive breast carcinoma, ductal and lobular, have different growth patterns, which may influence the ability of ultrasound

Bobbi Pritt; Takamaru Ashikaga; Robert G Oppenheimer; Donald L Weaver

2004-01-01

8

Impact of hormone replacement therapy on the histologic subtype of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increase in breast cancer risk, which correlates to\\u000a the duration of HRT use. We wanted to investigate a possible association between HRT use and the risk of a histologic subtype\\u000a of breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  From 1995 until 2004, 497 cases of primary ductal, lobular or ductulolobular breast cancer in postmenopausal

Rosanna A. Zanetti-Dällenbach; Elke M. Krause; Olav Lapaire; Uwe Gueth; Wolfgang Holzgreve; Edward Wight

2008-01-01

9

Correlation of Immunoglobulin G Expression and Histological Subtype and Stage in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Recently, growing evidence indicates that immunoglobulins (Igs) are not only produced by mature B lymphocytes or plasma cells, but also by various normal cells types at immune privileged sites and neoplasm, including breast cancer. However, the association of breast cancer derived IgG with genesis and development of the disease has not yet been established. Methods In this study we examined the expression of IgG in 186 breast cancers, 20 benign breast lesions and 30 normal breast tissues. Both immunohistochemistry with antibodies to Ig? (immunoglobulin G ? light chain) and Ig? (immunoglobulin G heavy chain) and in situ hybridization with an antisense probe to IgG1 heavy chain constant region gene were performed. Various clinicopathological features were also analyzed. Results We found that IgG is specifically expressed in human breast cancer cells. Both infiltrating ductal carcinoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma had significantly greater numbers of Ig? and Ig? positive cancer cells as compared with medullary carcinoma, carcinoma in situ, and benign lesions (all p<0.05). In addition, IgG expression was correlated with breast cancer histological subtypes (p<0.01) and AJCC stages (p<0.05), with more abundance of IgG expression in more malignant histological subtypes or in more advanced stage of the disease. Conclusions IgG expression in breast cancer cells is correlated with malignancy and AJCC stages of the cancers. This suggests that breast cancer derived IgG may be associated with genesis, development and prognosis of the cancer. PMID:23554916

Chen, Zhengshan; Yi, Weining; McNutt, Michael A.; Wang, Yun; Korteweg, Christine; Gu, Jiang

2013-01-01

10

Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histology Images with Deep Neural Networks  

E-print Network

Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histology Images with Deep Neural Networks Dan C. Cires is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming. Mitosis detection is very hard. In fact, mitosis is a complex process during which a cell nucleus

Schmidhuber, Juergen

11

Molecular profiling contributes more than routine histology and immonohistochemistry to breast cancer diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initial enthusiasm to explore gene expression profi ling and other high-throughput molecular methods as molecular diagnostic tools for breast cancer has given way to increasing skepticism. Several investigators suggested that these novel analytical methods may not have advanced diagnostic medicine beyond what optimally performed histology and immonohistochemistry (IHC) could deliver. Th ere is some truth in this criticism, particularly when

Christine Shiang; Lajos Pusztai

2010-01-01

12

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

13

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

Breast Cancer Introduction Cancer of the breast is the most common form of cancer that affects women but ... arm, as well as muscles involved in breathing. Breast Cancer Breast cancer may originate from either the glands ...

14

Breast cancer prognostic classification in the molecular era: the role of histological grade  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with varied morphological appearances, molecular features, behavior, and response to therapy. Current routine clinical management of breast cancer relies on the availability of robust clinical and pathological prognostic and predictive factors to support clinical and patient decision making in which potentially suitable treatment options are increasingly available. One of the best-established prognostic factors in

Emad A Rakha; Jorge S Reis-Filho; Frederick Baehner; David J Dabbs; Thomas Decker; Vincenzo Eusebi; Stephen B Fox; Shu Ichihara; Jocelyne Jacquemier; Sunil R Lakhani; José Palacios; Andrea L Richardson; Stuart J Schnitt; Fernando C Schmitt; Puay-Hoon Tan; Gary M Tse; Sunil Badve; Ian O Ellis

2010-01-01

15

Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in

Stéphanie Fabre-Lafay; Florence Monville; Sarah Garrido-Urbani; Carole Berruyer-Pouyet; Christophe Ginestier; Nicolas Reymond; Pascal Finetti; Richard Sauvan; José Adélaïde; Jeannine Geneix; Eric Lecocq; Cornel Popovici; Patrice Dubreuil; Patrice Viens; Anthony Gonçalves; Emmanuelle Charafe-Jauffret; Jocelyne Jacquemier; Daniel Birnbaum; Marc Lopez

2007-01-01

16

Mitosis detection in breast cancer histology images with deep neural networks.  

PubMed

We use deep max-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mitosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained to classify each pixel in the images, using as context a patch centered on the pixel. Simple postprocessing is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming other contestants by a significant margin. PMID:24579167

Cire?an, Dan C; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

2013-01-01

17

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

18

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ... liver, or elsewhere. Continue Why Do People Get Breast Cancer? Any woman can get breast cancer, but doctors ...

19

Use of Different Postmenopausal Hormone Therapies and Risk of Histology-and Hormone ReceptorDefined Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

­Defined Invasive Breast Cancer Agnès Fournier1 , Alban Fabre1 , Sylvie Mesrine1 , Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault1. Abstract Purpose We previously found that the risk of invasive breast cancer varied according- and hormone receptor- defined breast cancer. Patients and Methods We used data from the French E3N cohort

Boyer, Edmond

20

Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images An ICPR 2012 contest  

PubMed Central

Introduction: In the framework of the Cognitive Microscope (MICO) project, we have set up a contest about mitosis detection in images of H and E stained slides of breast cancer for the conference ICPR 2012. Mitotic count is an important parameter for the prognosis of breast cancer. However, mitosis detection in digital histopathology is a challenging problem that needs a deeper study. Indeed, mitosis detection is difficult because mitosis are small objects with a large variety of shapes, and they can thus be easily confused with some other objects or artefacts present in the image. We added a further dimension to the contest by using two different slide scanners having different resolutions and producing red-green-blue (RGB) images, and a multi-spectral microscope producing images in 10 different spectral bands and 17 layers Z-stack. 17 teams participated in the study and the best team achieved a recall rate of 0.7 and precision of 0.89. Context: Several studies on automatic tools to process digitized slides have been reported focusing mainly on nuclei or tubule detection. Mitosis detection is a challenging problem that has not yet been addressed well in the literature. Aims: Mitotic count is an important parameter in breast cancer grading as it gives an evaluation of the aggressiveness of the tumor. However, consistency, reproducibility and agreement on mitotic count for the same slide can vary largely among pathologists. An automatic tool for this task may help for reaching a better consistency, and at the same time reducing the burden of this demanding task for the pathologists. Subjects and Methods: Professor Fr?d?rique Capron team of the pathology department at Piti?-Salp?tri?re Hospital in Paris, France, has selected a set of five slides of breast cancer. The slides are stained with H and E. They have been scanned by three different equipments: Aperio ScanScope XT slide scanner, Hamamatsu NanoZoomer 2.0-HT slide scanner and 10 bands multispectral microscope. The data set is made up of 50 high power fields (HPF) coming from 5 different slides scanned at ×40 magnification. There are 10 HPFs/slide. The pathologist has annotated all the mitotic cells manually. A HPF has a size of 512 ?m × 512 ?m (that is an area of 0.262 mm 2 , which is a surface equivalent to that of a microscope field diameter of 0.58 mm. These 50 HPFs contain a total of 326 mitotic cells on images of both scanners, and 322 mitotic cells on the multispectral microscope. Results: Up to 129 teams have registered to the contest. However, only 17 teams submitted their detection of mitotic cells. The performance of the best team is very promising, with F-measure as high as 0.78. However, the database we provided is by far too small for a good assessment of reliability and robustness of the proposed algorithms. Conclusions: Mitotic count is an important criterion in the grading of many types of cancers, however, very little research has been made on automatic mitotic cell detection, mainly because of a lack of available data. A main objective of this contest was to propose a database of mitotic cells on digitized breast cancer histopathology slides to initiate works on automated mitotic cell detection. In the future, we would like to extend this database to have much more images from different patients and also for different types of cancers. In addition, mitotic cells should be annotated by several pathologists to reflect the partial agreement among them. PMID:23858383

Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel; Lomenie, Nicolas; Kulikova, Maria; Irshad, Humayun; Klossa, Jacques; Capron, Frederique; Genestie, Catherine; Le Naour, Gilles; Gurcan, Metin N.

2013-01-01

21

Sexuality After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer treatment Emotional aspects of breast cancer Body image after breast cancer treatment Sexuality after breast cancer ... treatment for breast cancer stops working Previous Topic Body image after breast cancer treatment Next Topic Pregnancy after ...

22

Are columnar cell lesions the earliest histologically detectable non-obligate precursor of breast cancer?  

PubMed

Columnar cell lesions (CCLs) are one of the most common abnormalities in the adult female human breast, characterized by the presence of columnar-shaped epithelial cells lining enlarged terminal-duct lobular units. CCLs are being seen increasingly in core biopsies taken for the non-palpable calcifications. The increased incidence may reflect improved delineation and recognition of CCLs by pathologists or a true increase in incidence related to biological and/or environmental factors. Columnar cell-like lesions have been described under a variety of names such as blunt duct adenosis, flat epithelial atypia, and ductal intraepithelial neoplasia type DIN1a. The current histologic classification used by some pathologists divides them into simple columnar cell change and columnar cell hyperplasia, both of which can occur with or without atypia. Columnar cells lack mature luminal or basal/myoepithelial phenotype markers, but they are usually positive for estrogen receptor-alpha. The cellular origin of CCLs and their possible relationship to either expansion or metaplasia of a preexisting normal cell phenotype remains unclear. CCLs are frequently associated with lobular and ductal in situ tumors and invasive lobular and tubular carcinomas. The relationship and natural history of CCLs to invasive ductal carcinoma is enigmatic, but they may prove of clinical relevance when detected by screening mammography. PMID:18437416

Turashvili, Gulisa; Hayes, Malcolm; Gilks, Blake; Watson, Peter; Aparicio, Samuel

2008-06-01

23

BREAST CANCER 4. BREAST CANCER  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER 29 4. BREAST CANCER 4.1. SUMMARY The average number of new cases diagnosed each year was 2,965 in women and 20 in men. Breast cancer was the most common cancer in women in Ireland breast cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 12 for women and 1 in 1,621 for men and was slightly higher

Paxton, Anthony T.

24

A comparison between flow cytometric assessment of S-phase fraction and Nottingham histologic grade as prognostic instruments in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flow cytometric DNA analysis with assessment of S-phase fraction and DNA ploidy was compared to Nottingham histologic grade. The study population consisted of 654 patients who presented between 1987 and 1996 with primary operable breast cancer and whose tumours had been analysed for S-phase fraction and DNA ploidy at the time of surgery. Grade, tumour size, node status, steroid receptor

Marie Sundquist; Sten Thorstenson; Lars Brudin; Olle Stål; Bo Nordenskjöld

2000-01-01

25

Breast Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer ...

26

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death from ...

27

Breast cancer molecular subtypes in oman: correlation with age, histology, and stage distribution - analysis of 542 cases.  

PubMed

Background: Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common malignancies and a foremost health issue throughout world. BC accounted for 23.1% of cancer cases diagnosed in Oman in 2009. BC is a heterogeneous disease, and immuno-histochemical (IHC) markers are used to further classify it into distinct subtypes, which are biologically discrete and display different behaviors. IHC testing of the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2); can sub-classify BC into 4 principal molecular subtypes. These subtypes are luminal A (ER+ and/or PR+, HER2-), luminal B (ER+ and/or PR+, HER2+), basal like (BCL - ER-, PR-, HER2-), and Her2/neu (ER-, PR-, HER2+). Previous studies have shown preliminary evidence and high probabilities of molecular differences across ethnic and geographic groups which may be responsible for disparities in presentation, biological behavior, treatment response and outcome. Patients and Methods: BC data from 2006-2010 at the National Oncology Center - The Royal Hospital, Oman were retrospectively retrieved from the electronic patient record system (Al-Shifa). Data were analyzed with respect to ER, PR, and Her-2 status and tumours were classified on molecular basis. Molecular subtypes were correlated with age, histology and treatment outcome. The results were compared with published regional and international data. Results: There were 542 cases of BC accessible for evaluation. Luminal A subtype was the most common and the BCL subtype was highest among Omani females. Age was a significant factor in basal-like (63.8% younger than 50 years vs. 36.2% older than 50 years) and Her2 +ve tumours (60.9% vs. 39.1%). High grade tumors were mostly observed (41%) in basal tumors and were lowest in luminal A (19%). A higher stage at presentation (Stage III and IV) was observed in Her2+ tumours (59%), and a higher (22.4%) mortality was detected in basal like/TN tumours. Conclusions: The molecular classification and sub-typing of BC have revealed ethnic and geographic variation. Luminal A subtype is the most common among Omani female breast cancers but it is less common than in Western females. BCL subtype is highest among Omani females compared with Western females. These differences may have diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic implications. Large scale and multi-centre studies may confirm these findings and can be translated and incorporated to pertinent management strategies. Key Words: Molecular subtypes, breast cancer, Oman, Royal Hospital. PMID:24610287

Mehdi, I; Monem, A A; Al Bahrani, B; Ramadhan, F A

2014-01-01

28

Breast cancer and primary systemic therapy. Results of the Consensus Meeting on the recommendations for pathological examination and histological report of breast cancer specimens in the Marche Region.  

PubMed

Primary systemic therapy (PST) adds some practical problems to the pathologic examination of neoplastic breast tissue obtained from patients before and after chemotherapy. Pathologists, oncologists, breast surgeons, radiotherapists and radiologists in the Marche Region held a Consensus Meeting in Ancona on May 13, 2010, in which 15 statements dealing with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were approved by all participants. The first two statements are related to the pre-PST phase and concern the technical procedures and the histological report of the core biopsy. The other statements deal with similar issues of the post-PST surgical specimen. PMID:22393685

Santinelli, A; De Nictolis, M; Mambelli, V; Ranaldi, R; Bearzi, I; Battellpi, N; Mariotti, C; Fabbietti, L; Baldassarre, S; Giuseppetti, G M; Fabris, G

2011-10-01

29

What Is Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts ... and our document Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

30

Types of Breast Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into several types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

31

Immunohistochemical Expression of Metallothionein in Invasive Breast Cancer in Relation to Proliferative Activity, Histology and Prognosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunohistochemically detected metallothionein expression [MT(+)] was shown to be related to aggressive behavior of the invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. In this study, MT expression was examined immunohistochemically in 92 cases of invasive breast carcinoma and compared with immunohistochemically demonstrated estrogen receptor (ER), c-erbB-2, Ki-67 status and clinocopathological characteristics. Of the 92 cases examined, 27.1% (25 cases) were MT(+),

Tetsunari Oyama; Hiroyuki Takei; Toshiaki Hikino; Yuichi Iino; Takashi Nakajima

1996-01-01

32

[Sebaceous breast carcinoma: report of a rare histological special subtype].  

PubMed

We report on a case of sebaceous carcinoma of the breast as a rare histological special subtype of breast cancer. Because these tumors are uncommon, differential diagnostic considerations and the exclusion of Muir-Torre syndrome are emphasized. Finally possible mechanisms of development and therapeutic strategies for this carcinoma are discussed. PMID:24414613

Wachter, D L; Rauh, C; Wenkel, E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Hartmann, A

2014-02-01

33

Breast Cancer: Treatment Options  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Download PDF Breast Cancer: Treatment Options This section has been reviewed and ... Cancer - About Clinical Trials › f t g e + Breast Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics ...

34

Evaluation of p53, HoxD10, and E-Cadherin Status in Breast Cancer and Correlation with Histological Grade and Other Prognostic Factors  

PubMed Central

Background. Study of tumor molecular characteristics is necessary to understand both the risk of breast cancer recurrence and the response to therapy. Aims. To evaluate p53, HoxD10, and E-cadherin status in breast cancer and to correlate with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Material and Methods. The study was conducted in 60 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma NOS with 20 cases belonging to each grade and evaluation of p53 was done by IHC and that of HoxD10 and E Cadherin status by PCR and correlation was done with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Result. p53 expression was seen in 71.67% (43/60) of the tumors. HoxD10 gene was downregulated in 46.67% (28/60) of the tumors. p53 overexpression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels showed statistically significant association higher histological grade of the tumor (P < 0.05). CDH1 gene mutation was seen in 60% (15/25) of the tumors. No significant association was found between p53 expression, HoxD10 gene, CDH1 gene mutation, and other prognostic factors. Conclusion. p53 over expression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels were found to be significantly associated with higher grade tumours. This suggests that p53 and HoxD10 gene play an important tumor suppressor role and the loss of which results in breast cancer progression. PMID:24634677

Sekar, Preethi; Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Nigam, Jitendra Singh; Sharma, Ankit; Soni, Priyanka Bhatia

2014-01-01

35

Evaluation of p53, HoxD10, and E-Cadherin Status in Breast Cancer and Correlation with Histological Grade and Other Prognostic Factors.  

PubMed

Background. Study of tumor molecular characteristics is necessary to understand both the risk of breast cancer recurrence and the response to therapy. Aims. To evaluate p53, HoxD10, and E-cadherin status in breast cancer and to correlate with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Material and Methods. The study was conducted in 60 cases of invasive ductal carcinoma NOS with 20 cases belonging to each grade and evaluation of p53 was done by IHC and that of HoxD10 and E Cadherin status by PCR and correlation was done with histological grade and other prognostic factors. Result. p53 expression was seen in 71.67% (43/60) of the tumors. HoxD10 gene was downregulated in 46.67% (28/60) of the tumors. p53 overexpression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels showed statistically significant association higher histological grade of the tumor (P < 0.05). CDH1 gene mutation was seen in 60% (15/25) of the tumors. No significant association was found between p53 expression, HoxD10 gene, CDH1 gene mutation, and other prognostic factors. Conclusion. p53 over expression and lower HoxD10 mRNA levels were found to be significantly associated with higher grade tumours. This suggests that p53 and HoxD10 gene play an important tumor suppressor role and the loss of which results in breast cancer progression. PMID:24634677

Sekar, Preethi; Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Nigam, Jitendra Singh; Sharma, Ankit; Soni, Priyanka Bhatia

2014-01-01

36

breast cancer  

E-print Network

Summary Among 288 breast cancer patients (118 with bilateral disease and 165 with diagnosis before 40 years of age), we identified 26 families with a history of breast cancer, including a minimum of three first- or second-degree relatives. Complete pedigrees with verified malignancy data from the Finnish cancer registry were constructed for 22 families. The median age at breast cancer diagnosis of the young probands (cancer at a younger age (median age 54 years) than the relatives of the older (bilateral) probands (median age 60 years). Standard life-table methods were used to compare the risk of breast cancer in the family members with that of the general population. Among the relatives of the young probands, the increased breast cancer risk occurred in the early post-menopausal period, whereas the risk estimate for the relatives of the bilateral probands closely followed that of the general population. In both groups, however, those family members reaching the age of 80 years had a cumulative probability of over 50 % of developing breast cancer. The standard life-table method proved useful when assessing the age-specific risk for familial breast cancer, taking into account numerous family members as well as their age at disease onset. This kind of analysis can be performed in populations for which reliable cancer registry data are available. It provides a useful tool for selecting individuals for imaging and mutation screening, counselling and experimental chemoprevention programmes.

unknown authors

37

Histological assessment of breast lesions identified exclusively by magnetic resonance.  

PubMed

Radiologic-pathologic correlation of lesions diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) is precluded by insufficient data on histological characteristics of lesions suspicious on MR but not visible on concurrent mammogram or ultrasound. The objective of this study was to describe histological features of breast lesions diagnosed exclusively by MR. The participants underwent MR-guided breast biopsy between 2007 and 2012 for a suspicious lesion not identified by mammography or ultrasound. Histology slides were interpreted retrospectively by a breast pathologist. Of 126 patients (126 lesions), 34 (27%) had new breast cancer, 51 (40.5%) previous breast cancer, and 41 (32.5%) dense breasts or a significant family history of breast cancer. MR identified 23 (18.3%) invasive cancers: 20 were Grade 1 and 17 were ductal. Of the 126 lesions, 16 (13%) were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), four were atypical ductal hyperplasia and atypical lobular hyperplasia (3%), and 68 (54%) were benign. Fifteen biopsies (12%) had no significant pathology. Five DCIS lesions were upgraded to T1 invasive cancers. Approximately 30 per cent of suspicious lesions detected exclusively by MR are invasive or in situ cancers that are predominantly low grade. Further studies are needed to determine if malignant lesions can be prospectively distinguished by MR characteristics. PMID:25264635

O'Connor, Victoria; Arena, Elizabeth; Albright, Joslyn; Brown, Nefertiti; O'Connor, Ryan; Chung, Maureen; DiNome, Maggie; Shamonki, Jaime

2014-10-01

38

Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

39

6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

40

Learning about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

41

Comparative Study of the One-step Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay and Conventional Histological Examination for the Detection of Breast Cancer Sentinel Lymph Node Metastases.  

PubMed

Intraoperative sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is widely used in patients with early-stage breast cancer and is conventionally performed using hematoxylin and eosin-based histological examination. The one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) assay is a molecular diagnostic tool and a semi-automated lymph node examination method. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of the OSNA assay and conventional histological examination with frozen sections (FSs) by using 111 SLN biopsy samples from 89 patients at the Tokai University Hospital. The SLN samples were split into 3 slices: the middle slice was used for FS histological examination and the other slices were used for the OSNA assay. The McNemar test was used to compare the differences in the sensitivity and specificity between the OSNA assay and FS histological examination. The sensitivity of the OSNA assay (97.1%) was less than that of FS histological examination (100%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.125). The specificity of both the methods was identical (96.9%). Despite previously published results suggesting that the OSNA assay is as reliable as histological examinations, our results indicate that this assay often fails to detect micrometastases or isolated tumor cells in SLNs. PMID:25248427

Terada, Mizuho; Niikura, Naoki; Tsuda, Banri; Masuda, Shinobu; Kumaki, Nobue; Tang, Xiaoyan; Okamura, Takuho; Saito, Yuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Yutaka

2014-01-01

42

Contralateral Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer survivors constitute about 25% of the growing population of cancer survivors in the US. Contralateral breast cancer is the most common second cancer in women with primary breast cancer. With increasing cure rates comes increasing concern

43

High GINS2 transcript level predicts poor prognosis and correlates with high histological grade and endocrine therapy resistance through mammary cancer stem cells in breast cancer patients.  

PubMed

GINS2, a subunit of the GINS complex, is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma and metastatic breast tumor; however, its prognostic power and possible molecular mechanisms in breast cancer (BC) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the function of GINS2 in BC. The association between GINS2 transcript level and the clinical outcome of BC patients were estimated using Kaplan-Meier plots, multivariate cox regression analysis, forest plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed to explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of the GINS2 transcript. High GINS2 transcript level was correlated with poor relapse free survival (log-rank P ? 0.001 in six cohorts; forest plot: total n = 1,420, total RR = 1.72, 95 % CI 1.45-2.03; multivariate cox regression analysis: n = 906, HR 2.36, 95 % CI 1.88-2.97), and distant metastasis free survival (log-rank P < 0.01 in 3 cohorts; forest plot: total n = 691, total RR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.36-2.67; multivariate cox regression analysis: n = 442, HR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.70-3.47). BC patients with higher GINS2 transcript levels showed poorer tamoxifen efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. GINS2 expression was significantly downregulated under mutated p53-depleted condition in MDA-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells, upregulated in mammary cancer stem cells (MaCSCs) (P = 0.003), and correlated with upregulated genes in mammary stem cells (GSEA: P < 0.01). Our study, for the first time, demonstrates that GINS2 is an independent prognostic marker and is associated with lung metastasis, histological grade, and endocrine therapy resistance in BC patients, which may attribute to mutant p53 and MaCSCs. PMID:25348432

Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Yinghui; Yang, Xiangmin; Tang, Juan; Wei, Ding; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Jian-Li; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Zhu, Ping

2014-11-01

44

Secondary cancer rates following breast cancer diagnosis.  

PubMed

Life table analysis and other mortality methods apply well to end points other than mortality. This paper demonstrates the application of mortality experience methodology to the recurrence of breast cancer and/or new primaries in women previously diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Specific recurrence rates are broken out by duration as well as attributes available at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis: stage, histology, age band, and year of diagnosis. Use of attained age is demonstrated to control for the effect of aging over long durations. Breast cancer recurrence is shown to drop to a relatively low rate compared with the rate of new primary occurrence. PMID:17941334

Wesley, David

2007-01-01

45

Breast Cancer -- Male  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

46

Male Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

47

Breast Cancer Trends  

MedlinePLUS

... How Is Breast Cancer Treated? Breast Cancer in Young Women Who Has a Higher Risk? What Can I ... Infographic Partners Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women Members Meetings March 27–28, 2014 January 9, ...

48

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female)  

E-print Network

--22000000 22 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female

Paxton, Anthony T.

49

Reliability of histological malignancy grade, ER and HER2 status on core needle biopsy vs surgical specimen in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Early determination of malignancy grade and biomarkers in primary breast cancer is important when planning the treatment with neoadjuvant therapy and breast-conserving surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of malignancy grade on core needle biopsies, and to compare the concordance of ER and HER2 status on core needle biopsies vs surgical specimens. Eighty-nine patients with invasive ductal or lobular carcinoma were included. Malignancy grade was upgraded by one degree in 23.0%. The mitotic count had most impact on the malignancy grade, and may be underestimated on core needle biopsies compared with surgical specimens. ER status was concordant in core needle biopsies and surgical specimens in 98.0%, but should be repeated when doubtfully negative. HER2 status was concordant in 84.0% prior to FISH-HER2. Including FISH-HER2 data, the core needle biopsies showed a final total concordance of 95.4%. In conclusion, ER and HER2 are useful markers in core needle biopsies, providing a reliable base for preoperative decisions in neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and may be omitted on surgical specimens with certain precautions and exceptions. Determination of malignancy grade should be repeated on surgical specimens, and one should be aware of underestimation on core needle biopsies. PMID:24372587

Munch-Petersen, Helga D; Rasmussen, Birgitte B; Balslev, Eva

2014-09-01

50

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense Melissa Etheridge promotes breast cancer awareness CSI Breast Cancer Blogroll Being Cancer Debbie's Cancer Women with Cancer Breast Cancer Resources Breast Cancer Alltop Breast Cancer Sisterhood Europa Donna

Espinosa, Horacio D.

51

Breast Cancer and Sexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women today. With early detection and advanced treatment options, survival rates are continuing to improve, but not without some long-term physical and emotional side effects. This article reviews the effects of breast cancer in general and breast cancer treatment specifically on sexuality in cancer survivors. How the cancer and its

Helene K. Henson

2002-01-01

52

Inflammatory Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and very aggressive disease in which cancer cells block lymph vessels ... difficult. Also, because inflammatory breast cancer is so aggressive, it can arise between scheduled screening mammograms and ...

53

Histologic evaluation of sentinel and non-sentinel axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer by multilevel sectioning and predictors of non-sentinel metastasis  

PubMed Central

Sentinel lymph node (SLN) provides accurate nodal staging for breast cancer. This technique has been introduced in Siriraj Hospital since 1998. The goal of this study is to assess its accuracy in predicting the state of the axilla, and compare the results of standard examination and multilevel sectioning. A retrospective analysis of 195 breast cancer patients who underwent both SLN biopsy (using dye alone as the lymphatic mapping) and axillary node dissection during 1998-2002 were analyzed. All slides including SLNs and the non-SLNs (NSLNs) were reviewed and multilevel study was performed on all SLNs and NSLNs [four levels of hematoxylin-eosin (HE) at 200 µm interval and keratin stains on the first and fourth levels]. Of 195 patients, 30% of cases were SLN-positive (32 NSLN-positive and 27 NSLN-negative). Additional study could detect positive axillary nodes 10.8% (4 SLN-positive and 5 NSLN-positive) more than standard HE stain. The false negative rate increased from 20.3% to 24.1%. The concordance between SLN and NSLN statuses was 89.7%. The sensitivity was 75.9%. By multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for axillary node metastasis were tumor size of more than 2.2 cm, histologic type of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), not otherwise specified (NOS) and lymphovascular invasion (LVI). By univariable analysis, the significant predictors of NSLN metastasis after positive-SLN were outer location of the tumor, LVI and perinodal extension. In conclusion, use of multilevel and immunohistochemistry increased detection of positive-SLNs. Caution should be kept in accepting SLN biopsy using peritumoral dye technique alone as the procedure for staging due to a high false-negative rate. The concordance rate of 89.7% confirmed the reliability of SLN. Outer location of tumor, LVI and perinodal extension is significant predictors of positive-NSLN after positive-SLN. PMID:25083488

Jeeravongpanich, Piyarat; Komoltri, Chulaluk; Ratanawichitrasin, Adune

2014-01-01

54

Breast Cancer Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Intergroup (TBCI) began its transition to the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee (BCSC) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Breast Cancer Symposium in September 2008 in Washington DC. The TBCI and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) came together along with the Correlative Science Committee chair of the TBCI to form the BCSC.

55

Breast Cancer and Bone Loss  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Share: Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

56

Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... Used in Breast Cancer Drugs Used to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

57

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... the risk of dying from breast cancer. Tissue sampling Breast tissue sampling is taking cells from breast tissue to check ... some studies. Scientists are studying whether breast tissue sampling can be used to find breast cancer at ...

58

Normal and pathological breast, the histological basis.  

PubMed

Breast tissue is heterogeneous, associating connective and glandular structures, which grow and change cyclically under hormonal regulation. Hormones are also thought to be the main determinant of the major benign and malignant pathologies encountered in the breast. Benign lesions are more frequent and fibrocystic changes are by far the most common among them. They usually associate different entities, (adenosis, fibrosis, cysts and hyperplasia) but vary in intensity and extension. Thus, their clinical and radiographic presentation is extremely different from one patient to another. Adenofibroma is the most frequent tumour. It also undergoes modifications according to hormonal conditions. About 90% of malignant tumours are primary carcinoma. The incidence of intra-ductal carcinoma has risen dramatically since the development of screening because of its ability to induce calcification. Two mechanisms could be involved in the formation of calcification: one active (tumour cell secretion of vesicles), the other passive (necrotic cell fragments are released). Invasive carcinoma comprises numerous histological types. Stromal reactions essentially determines their shape: a fibrous reaction commonly found in ductal carcinoma creates a stellate lesion while other stroma, inflammatory (medullary carcinoma), vascular (papillary carcinoma) or mucinous determine nodular lesions whose borders push the surrounding tissue. The histological features which give rise to the radiographic pattern will be emphasised. PMID:15797289

Guinebretière, J M; Menet, E; Tardivon, A; Cherel, P; Vanel, D

2005-04-01

59

Imaging inflammatory breast cancer.  

PubMed

Carcinomatous mastitis is a severe form of breast cancer and its diagnosis is essentially clinical and histological. The first examination to perform is still mammography, not only to provide evidence supporting this diagnosis but also to search for a primary intramammary lesion and assess local/regional spread. It is essential to study the contralateral breast for bilaterality. Ultrasound also provides evidence supporting inflammation, but appears to be better for detecting masses and analysing lymph node areas. The role of MRI is debatable, both from a diagnostic point of view and for monitoring during treatment, and should be reserved for selected cases. An optimal, initial radiological assessment will enable the patient to be monitored during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:22305593

Alunni, J-P

2012-02-01

60

Breast Cancer and Depression  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer and Depression HealthDay October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Depression Women's Health Transcript Depression is a disabling ...

61

Breast Cancer: Early Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

62

Living Beyond Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... more Upcoming Events #LBBCchat: Healthy Eating After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis 12/03/2014 Join us at 8 ... Read more Annual Update from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 12/19/2014 Learn about new research ...

63

Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

64

Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... risk Known factors that increase the risk of male breast cancer include: • Klinefelter’s syndrome (a genetic condition related to ... This will depend on the stage of their breast cancer. Since most male breast cancers are hormone receptorpositive, hormone therapy (with ...

65

Breast Cancer Rates by State  

MedlinePLUS

... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Share ... died from breast cancer each year. Incidence of Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

66

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives

unknown authors

67

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives ? Drinking alcohol ? Being physically inactive

unknown authors

68

Breast cancer screening.  

PubMed

Mammography remains the primary technique for breast cancer screening. Women with dense breast tissue may benefit from digital mammography and tomosynthesis, and women at high risk may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging. However, false-positive results are problematic. The North Carolina breast density law necessitates education about screening options for women with dense breasts. PMID:24663133

Freimanis, Rita I; Yacobozzi, Margaret

2014-01-01

69

Telomerase and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current therapies for breast cancer include treatments that are toxic and often result in drug resistance. Telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres), is activated in the vast majority of breast cancers (over 90% of breast carcinomas) but not in normal adjacent tissues. Telomerase is thus an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because

Brittney-Shea Herbert; Woodring E Wright; Jerry W Shay

2001-01-01

70

Breast Cancer in Three Dimensions: Revealing Telomere Dysfunction in Breast Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Forty three paraffin fixed tissue samples from anonymous hereditary and non-hereditary breast cancer cases were selected for the study. Five mum histological sections were prepared on microscopic slides for processing and analyses. All of the 43 tissue sa...

W. D. Foulkers, S. Mai

2005-01-01

71

Prolactin Concentrations in Patients with Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Basal prolactin levels were measured before operation in 113 patients undergoing surgery for a lump in the breast. Prolactin concentrations were not significantly higher in those patients with breast cancer than in those with benign lumps. Prolactin concentrations were, however, found to be higher in premenopausal women than in postmenopausal ones, regardless of tumour histology. PMID:4434088

Franks, S.; Ralphs, D. N. L.; Seagroatt, Valerie; Jacobs, H. S.

1974-01-01

72

Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Breast cancer On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed August 2007 What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a disease in which certain ...

73

Breast Cancer in Young Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Podcasts Health-e-Cards Web Badges Infographics Twitter Breast Cancer in Young Women Share Compartir Most breast cancers ... lower your risk. What Is CDC Doing about Breast Cancer in Young Women? CDC works with public, non- ...

74

Breast cancer in China.  

PubMed

The health burden of cancer is increasing in China, with more than 1·6 million people being diagnosed and 1·2 million people dying of the disease each year. As in most other countries, breast cancer is now the most common cancer in Chinese women; cases in China account for 12·2% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers and 9·6% of all deaths from breast cancer worldwide. China's proportional contribution to global rates is increasing rapidly because of the population's rising socioeconomic status and unique reproductive patterns. In this Review we present an overview of present control measures for breast cancer across China, and emphasise epidemiological and socioeconomic diversities and disparities in access to care for various subpopulations. We describe demographic differences between China and high-income countries, and also within geographical and socioeconomic regions of China. These disparities between China and high-income countries include younger age at onset of breast cancer; the unique one-child policy; lower rates of provision and uptake for screening for breast cancer; delays in diagnosis that result in more advanced stage of disease at presentation; inadequate resources; and a lack of awareness about breast cancer in the Chinese population. Finally, we recommend key measures that could contribute to improved health outcomes for patients with breast cancer in China. PMID:24872111

Fan, Lei; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Li, Jun-Jie; St Louis, Jessica; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Yu, Ke-Da; Chen, Wan-Qing; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Goss, Paul E

2014-06-01

75

TCGA Proteomics: Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

76

Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-03

77

[Risk of breast cancer].  

PubMed

The factors that influence the risk of breast cancer are vitally important when collecting information on woman particularly at risk from cancer for screening and for advisory care in breast clinics. On the basis of the experience gathered over the last 150 years (since Rigoni-Stern in 1842), these should be divided up into I. confirmed (carcinoma of the breast, mastopathy with cytological atypia, women whose mother and sisters already had breast cancer), II. probable (childlessness, late first birth, miscarriage, early menarche and late menopause, overweight, elevated socio-economic status), and III. improbable risk factors (paranchyma samples according to Wolfe, the contraceptive pill, nicotine, coffee, alcohol and drugs). PMID:2699136

Thür, L

1989-12-01

78

Breast Lumps: A 21-Year Single-Center Clinical and Histological Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the presentation and histological diagnosis of breast lumps of patients seen in Trans Ekulu Hospital Enugu Southeastern Nigeria from 1993 to 2013 in a period of 21 years. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study covering a period of 21 years. Case notes of patients containing clinical information and their histology reports were studied. Results: Only 38% of the patients came within 3 months of finding lumps in their breast. One hundred and thirty-seven patients (83%) had benign disease, i.e., fibroadenoma, mammary dysplasia, cysts, adenomas, tuberculosis, phyllodes tumor, mastitis, and lipoma. Only 16.9% i.e., 28 patients had breast cancer, out of which two females were in their 20s, and three were males. Conclusions: Benign breast diseases, i.e., fibroadenoma, fibroadenosis, cysts, adenomas, tuberculosis, phyllodes, mastitis, and lipoma are the commoner breast diseases in our locality. PMID:24665202

Njeze, Gabriel E

2014-01-01

79

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project Breast cancer is  

E-print Network

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project NEED Breast cancer is emerging as a uniquely on molecularly- driven research and to design models that adequately serve the study of breast cancer risk scientists and public health experts is dedicated to research on the primary prevention of breast cancer

Ginzel, Matthew

80

Grading Breast Cancer Tissues Using Molecular Portraits*  

PubMed Central

Tumor progression and prognosis in breast cancer patients are difficult to assess using current clinical and laboratory parameters, where a pathological grading is indicative of tumor aggressiveness. This grading is based on assessments of nuclear grade, tubule formation, and mitotic rate. We report here the first protein signatures associated with histological grades of breast cancer, determined using a novel affinity proteomics approach. We profiled 52 breast cancer tissue samples by combining nine antibodies and label-free LC-MS/MS, which generated detailed quantified proteomic maps representing 1,388 proteins. The results showed that we could define in-depth molecular portraits of histologically graded breast cancer tumors. Consequently, a 49-plex candidate tissue protein signature was defined that discriminated between histological grades 1, 2, and 3 of breast cancer tumors with high accuracy. Highly biologically relevant proteins were identified, and the differentially expressed proteins indicated further support for the current hypothesis regarding remodeling of the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. The protein signature was corroborated using meta-analysis of transcriptional profiling data from an independent patient cohort. In addition, the potential for using the markers to estimate the likelihood of long-term metastasis-free survival was also indicated. Taken together, these molecular portraits could pave the way for improved classification and prognostication of breast cancer. PMID:23982162

Olsson, Niclas; Carlsson, Petter; James, Peter; Hansson, Karin; Waldemarson, Sofia; Malmstrom, Per; Ferno, Marten; Ryden, Lisa; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.

2013-01-01

81

Cathepsin D in breast secretions from women with breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

A proteinase accumulated in breast secretions from women with breast cancer has been characterised. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of breast secretions by pepstatin A showed that the main enzyme involved was an aspartyl proteinase. Determination of its cleavage specificity by SDS-PAGE and amino acid sequence analysis revealed that it was identical to that of cathepsin D, an aspartyl proteinase suggested to be involved in breast cancer development. The identity between both proteins was further confirmed by immunological analysis with monoclonal antibodies against cathepsin D. Quantification of cathepsin D in nipple fluids from 41 women with benign or malignant breast diseases and from 19 control women without breast pathology revealed the presence of variable amounts of this proteinase. The average concentration of cathepsin D in breast secretions from cancer-bearing breasts was 7.2 +/- 2.2 fmol micrograms of protein, which was significantly higher than those of nipple fluids from control women (2.9 +/- 0.6 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.04) or from patients with benign breast diseases (2.1 +/- 0.3 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.004). Though the number of cancer patients studied was small (n = 21), no correlations were found with cytosolic concentrations of cathepsin D or oestrogen receptors, neither with other parameters such as tumour size, histological grade, axillary node involvement or menopausal status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8494701

Sánchez, L. M.; Ferrando, A. A.; Diez-Itza, I.; Vizoso, F.; Ruibal, A.; López-Otin, C.

1993-01-01

82

A case of metaplastic breast cancer in a man  

PubMed Central

Metaplastic breast cancers (MPBCs) represent <1% of breast cancers. Reports of MPBC in men are limited to case reports. We report a case of MPBC with pulmonary metastasis occurring in a 59-year-old man who initially presented with a presumed breast abscess. Histology from the breast lesion revealed a poorly differentiated carcinoma and a computed tomography scan showed an ulcerative right-sided breast mass and an area of scarring in the apex of the left lung. The breast lesion and the lung lesion were resected separately and the histology from the lung showed a poorly differentiated carcinoma with sarcomatous features in keeping with metastasis from a primary breast cancer. Our patient then proceeded to chemotherapy with FEC 100 regimen (5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide). MPBC is an aggressive breast cancer that has a propensity to metastasis to the lungs. Prognosis is poor. PMID:24964410

Barr, James Geoffrey; Jane Clayton, Elizabeth Sarah; Sotheran, Wendy

2013-01-01

83

Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer Or Other Cancers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-07-01

84

Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... for professional printing [PDF-1.1MB] Cancer Home Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Many things can increase the ...

85

Epigenomics and breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

Lo, Pang-Kuo

2009-01-01

86

Breast cancer and protein biomarkers  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

Gam, Lay-Harn

2012-01-01

87

Breast cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiographic imaging of the breast began in the early years of the twentieth century. Continuous advances in film quality, energy sources, targets, grids, and filters have all contributed to superior image resolution. Federal quality standards now regulate screening mammography, and mass screening for breast cancer has become widely accepted in the United States. Wider application of screening has resulted in

Kathleen M. Harris; Victor G. Vogel

1997-01-01

88

Breast and Gynecologic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials and the evaluation of new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and new technologies to identify premalignant

89

What Is Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

90

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women Key Points Based on current breast cancer incidence rates, experts estimate that ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

91

Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Chinese Women in Shanghai  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five hundred thirty-four histologically confirmed incident cases of breast cancer in Chinese women of Shanghai and an equal number of age and sex-matched population controls were interviewed as part of an epidemiológica! study of breast cancer risk factors. Early age at menarche was positively associated with breast cancer risk whereas early age at first full term pregnancy, high parity, and

Jian-Min Yuan; Mimi C. Vu; Ronald K. Ross; Yu-Tang Gao; Brian E. Henderson

1988-01-01

92

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

93

Your Body After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber Newlywed Sarah Lien didn’t ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

94

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

2000-01-01

95

Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2012-11-14

96

Cas Signaling in Breast Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Antiestrogens have proven to be effective in the treatment of hormone-responsive breast cancer. In metastatic breast cancer, antiestrogens lead to a response in nearly one half of patients. Resistance to antiestrogens, however, is a serious clinical probl...

K. Vuori

2007-01-01

97

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

98

Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

99

Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture HealthDay November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Acupuncture Breast Cancer Exercise and Physical Fitness Transcript Exercise therapy and ...

100

Combined magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and histology imaging strategy in a human breast tumor xenograft model  

PubMed Central

Applications of molecular imaging in cancer and other diseases frequently require combining in vivo imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance and optical imaging, with ex vivo optical, fluorescence, histology, and immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging, to investigate and relate molecular and biological processes to imaging parameters within the same region of interest. We have developed a multimodal image reconstruction and fusion framework that accurately combines in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), ex vivo brightfield and fluorescence microscopic imaging, and ex vivo histology imaging. Ex vivo brightfield microscopic imaging was used as an intermediate modality to facilitate the ultimate link between ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI/MRSI. Tissue sectioning necessary for optical and histology imaging required generation of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction module for 2D ex vivo optical and histology imaging data. We developed an external fiducial marker based 3D reconstruction method, which was able to fuse optical brightfield and fluorescence with histology imaging data. Registration of 3D tumor shape was pursued to combine in vivo MRI/MRSI and ex vivo optical brightfield and fluorescence imaging data. This registration strategy was applied to in vivo MRI/MRSI, ex vivo optical brightfield/fluorescence, as well as histology imaging data sets obtained from human breast tumor models. 3D human breast tumor data sets were successfully reconstructed and fused with this platform. PMID:22945331

Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Amstalden van Hove, Erika R.; Chughtai, Kamila; Raman, Venu; Winnard, Paul T.; Heeren, Ron; Artemov, Dmitri; Glunde, Kristine

2014-01-01

101

Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

102

Challenges to Developing Proteomic-Based Breast Cancer Diagnostics  

PubMed Central

Abstract Over the past decade, multiple genetic and histological approaches have accelerated development of new breast cancer diagnostics and treatment paradigms. Multiple distinct genetic subtypes of breast cancers have been defined, and this has progressively led toward more personalized medicine in regard to treatment options. There still remains a deficiency in the development of molecular diagnostic assays that can be used for breast cancer detection and pretherapy clinical decisions. In particular, the type of cancer-specific biomarker typified by a serum or tissue-derived protein. Progress in this regard has been minimal, especially in comparison to the rapid advancements in genetic and histological assays for breast cancers. In this review, some potential reasons for this large gap in developing protein biomarkers will be discussed, as well as new strategies for improving these approaches. Improvements in the study design of protein biomarker discovery strategies in relation to the genetic subtypes and histology of breast cancers is also emphasized. The current successes in use of genetic and histological assays for breast cancer diagnostics are summarized, and in that context, the current limitations of the types of breast cancer-related clinical samples available for protein biomarker assay development are discussed. Based on these limitations, research strategies emphasizing identification of glycoprotein biomarkers in blood and MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of tissues are described. PMID:21332380

Cazares, Lisa H.; Jones, E. Ellen; Fuller, Thomas W.; Semmes, O. John; Laronga, Christine

2011-01-01

103

Breast cancer in young women  

PubMed Central

Although uncommon, breast cancer in young women is worthy of special attention due to the unique and complex issues that are raised. This article reviews specific challenges associated with the care of younger breast cancer patients, which include fertility preservation, management of inherited breast cancer syndromes, maintenance of bone health, secondary prevention, and attention to psychosocial issues. PMID:21067532

2010-01-01

104

Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

RADIATION THERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER © ASTRO 2011 Printed on Recycled Paper CARING FOR YOURSELF NOTES/QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTOR Facts to Help Patients Make ... Oncology Group www.rtog.org HELPFUL WEBSITES ON BREAST CANCER Breast Cancer Network of Strength www.networkofstrength.org ...

105

Screening of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the randomized controlled trials carried out in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mammographic screening was demonstrated to\\u000a have an impact in decreasing mortality from breast cancer. The evaluation of mammographic service screening programmes implemented\\u000a in several Western European countries in the late 1980s and the 1990s demonstrated that these programmes may have an even\\u000a higher effect on breast

Per Skaane

106

CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... date with mammography screening. Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer 22M 22 million adults aged 50–75 need ... of people who get screened for colon or breast cancer is very different from state to state. The ...

107

Genetic factors and breast cancer laterality  

PubMed Central

Background Women are more likely to develop cancer in the left breast than the right. Such laterality may influence subsequent management, especially in elderly patients with heart disease who may require radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore possible factors for such cancer laterality. Methods In this work, clinical data for consecutive patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer were reviewed, with emphasis on clinical presentation and family history. Results Between 2005 and 2012, 687 patients with breast cancer were seen. Two women with incomplete data and eleven men were excluded. In total, 343 (50.9%) patients presented with left breast cancer, 311 (46.1%) with right breast cancer, and 20 (3.0%) with simultaneous bilateral malignancy. There were no significant differences between the three groups, especially in regards to clinical presentation and tumor characteristics. A total of 622 (92.3%) patients had unilateral primary, 20 (3.0%) had simultaneous bilateral, and 32 (4.7%) had metachronous primary breast cancer with subsequent contralateral breast cancer after 7.5–236 months. The worst 10-year survival was for bilateral simultaneous (18%) compared with unilateral (28%) and metachronous primaries (90%). There were no differences in survival in relation to breast cancer laterality, handedness, and presence or absence of a family history of cancer. There were significant similarities between patients and first-degree relatives in regards to breast cancer laterality, namely same breast (30/66, 45.5%), opposite breast (9/66, 13.6%), and bilateral cancer (27/66, 40.9, P=0.01163). This was more evident among patients and their sisters (17/32, 53.1%) or mothers (11/27, 40.7%, P=0.0689). There were also close similarities in relation to age at initial diagnosis of cancer for patients and their first-degree relatives for age differences of ?5 years (48/166, 28.9%), 6–10 years (34/166, 20.5%), and >11 years (84/166, 50.6%, P=0.12065). Conclusion High similarities between patients and their first-degree relatives in regards to cancer laterality and possibly age at initial diagnosis of cancer may suggest an underlying inherited genetic predisposition. PMID:24790468

Amer, Magid H

2014-01-01

108

Breast size, breast reduction, and cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

reduction surgery does suggest some increased surveillance around surgery. Seven of them had breast cancers (including five in situ carcinomas) identified from routine histopathology evaluation of tissue removed during surgery. Some or all such tumors would have emerged within a few years. Their early removal may explain the especially marked deficit of breast cancer in the first 10 years after

Silvia Franceschi; Epidemiology Unit; Thurfjell E; Hsieh C-c; Lipworth L; Ekbom A; Adami HO

1997-01-01

109

Columnar cell lesions, mammographic density and breast cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Mammographic density is the third largest risk factor for ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer. However,\\u000a the question of whether risk-mediating precursor histological changes, such as columnar cell lesions (CCLs), can be found\\u000a in dense but non-malignant breast tissues has not been systematically addressed. We hypothesized that CCLs may be related\\u000a to breast composition, in particular breast

Gulisa Turashvili; Steven McKinney; Lisa Martin; Karen A. Gelmon; Peter Watson; Norman Boyd; Samuel Aparicio

2009-01-01

110

Small Beginnings: Do They Matter? The Importance of Lymphovascular Invasion in Early Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the era of tailored therapy, the evaluation of systemic treatment of breast cancer has been increasingly dominated by consideration of biological features of the tumor and the host. Established breast cancer prognostic factors — those that determine natural history of breast cancer — include axillary nodal status, tumor size, histological grade, hormone receptor status, HER-2 expression, and presence of

Mamatha Chivukula; Adam Brufsky; Nancy E. Davidson

111

Vitamin D and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

2012-01-01

112

Cyclophosphamide With or Without Veliparib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

113

Sexuality after breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer (BC) may affect three main domains of women's sexuality: sexual identity, sexual function and sexual relationship. Age, lymphedema, side-effects of surgery, radio-, chemo- and hormonotherapy, pregnancy-related problems, infertility, iatrogenic premature menopause, with its cohort of symptoms secondary to the chronic loss of estrogens on the brain, on the sensory organs, on the pathophysiology of sexual response and on

A. Graziottin; V. Rovei

2007-01-01

114

Breast Cancer Among Asian Women  

Cancer.gov

A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

115

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

116

Activation of Host Wound Responses in Breast Cancer Microenvironment  

PubMed Central

Cancer progression is mediated by processes that are also important in wound repair. As a result, cancers have been conceptualized as overhealing wounds or wounds that do not heal, and gene expression signatures reflective of wound repair have shown value as predictors of breast cancer survival. Despite the widespread acknowledgment of commonalities between host responses to wounds and host responses to cancer, the gene expression responses of normal tissue adjacent to cancers have not been well characterized. Using RNA extracted from histologically normal breast tissue from 107 patients, including 60 reduction mammoplasty patients and 47 cancer patients, we measured whole genome expression profiles and identified a gene expression signature that is induced in response to breast cancer. This signature represents an in vivo wound response signature that is differentially expressed in the normal tissue of breast cancer patients compared to those without disease and is highly accurate (at least 92% sensitivity and 98% specificity) in distinguishing diseased and nondiseased. The in vivo wound response signature is highly prognostic of breast cancer survival and there is a strong association between the groups identified by this signature and those identified using serum-treated fibroblasts and other microenvironment-derived or -related signatures. The prevalence of the wound response signature in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast cancer suggests that microenvironment response is an important variable in breast cancer progression and may be an important target for clinical interventions. PMID:19887484

Lee, Myung Hee; Carter, Matthew; Fan, Cheng; Cowan, David W.; Perez, Erick Roman; Pirone, Jason R.; Perou, Charles M.; Jerry, D. Joseph; Schneider, Sallie Smith

2009-01-01

117

Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer.  

PubMed

Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3 years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

2013-01-01

118

Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-17

119

Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer

2014-08-06

120

Inflammatory breast cancer: high risk of contralateral breast cancer compared to comparably staged non-inflammatory breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the most lethal form of breast cancer, has characteristics linked to higher risk of contralateral\\u000a breast cancer. However, no large studies have examined risk of contralateral breast cancer following IBC. We calculated absolute\\u000a risk of invasive contralateral breast cancer among 5,631 IBC and 174,634 comparably staged non-IBC first breast cancer cases\\u000a who survived at least 2 months

Catherine SchairerLinda; Linda M. Brown; Phuong L. Mai

2011-01-01

121

Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

2014-11-04

122

Breast Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

2014-01-01

123

Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy of women in the Western world. Many risk factors are associated with the development and progression of breast cancer; however, diet/nutrition constitutes a highly modifiable risk. Breast cancer is considered to...

R. C. Simmen

2011-01-01

124

Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story  

MedlinePLUS

... Library Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Posted in: Risk and Prevention , ... Share Text Highlight Glossary Terms Join Our Male Breast Cancer Online Community If you are a man living ...

125

Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... cause normal breast cells to become cancerous. Inherited gene mutations Certain inherited DNA mutations can dramatically increase ... of breast cancer that runs in families. Acquired gene mutations Most DNA mutations related to breast cancer ...

126

Waist Size and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... about their health, including details about fertility, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, use of hormone ... were diagnosed with breast cancer. Infertility treatment, family history of breast and ovarian cancer and use of ...

127

Adiponectin and Breast Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone, is closely and inversely associated with insulin resistance and was recently found to be inversely and independently associated with en- dometrial cancer. Because insulin resistance in the setting of obesity has also been associated with the development of breast cancer, we have hypothesized that decreased adi- ponectin levels might underlie the association between breast cancer and

CHRISTOS MANTZOROS; ELENI PETRIDOU; NICK DESSYPRIS; CHARILAOS CHAVELAS; MARIA DALAMAGA; DELIA MARINA ALEXE; YANNIS PAPADIAMANTIS; CHRISTOS MARKOPOULOS; EVANGELOS SPANOS; GEORGE CHROUSOS; DIMITRIOS TRICHOPOULOS

128

Silicone Breast Implants Are Not Linked to Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

In one of the largest studies on the long-term health effects of silicone breast implants, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Md., found no association between breast implants and the subsequent risk of breast cancer.

129

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

130

Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2011-12-07

131

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

132

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

133

Ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence.  

PubMed

The overview by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists Collaborative Group on the impact of loco-regional treatments for breast cancer on long term survival was a milestone publication which partially clarified the significance of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR). In the aftermath of this overview, a conference was convened in London in October 2006 to discuss various aspects of IBTR and in particular whether this represents a marker or determinant of risk for distant metastases. An international panel of speakers covered a range of issues including biological paradigms, the effect of IBTR on survival and whether surgery itself can have a detrimental effect on patient outcome. Other topics included the limits to breast conserving surgery, systemic treatments for IBTR and the role of radiotherapy in minimising IBTR. It was concluded that IBTR is a determinant of distant relapse in approximately 25% of cases and a marker of risk in 75% of cases. However, current surgical practice should not favour increased rates of mastectomy on the basis of the recent meta-analysis of randomised trials. PMID:18249542

Benson, John R; della Rovere, G Querci

2008-02-01

134

Breast Cancer in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: Use of Breast Imaging for Detection.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The purposes of this article are to describe two cases of breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals and to review eight cases previously reported in the literature. CONCLUSION. Breast cancer occurs in male-to-female transsexuals who receive high doses of exogenous estrogen and develop breast tissue histologically identical to that of a biologically female breast. This exposure to estrogen results in increased risk of breast cancer. The first patient described is a male-to-female transsexual with screening-detected ductal carcinoma in situ and a family history of breast cancer. The other patient is a male-to-female transsexual with invasive ductal carcinoma that was occult on diagnostic digital mammographic and ultrasound findings but visualized on digital breast tomosynthesis and breast MR images. The analysis of the eight previously reported cases showed that breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals occurs at a younger age and is more frequently estrogen receptor negative than breast cancer in others born biologically male. Screening for breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals should be undertaken for those with additional risk factors (e.g., family history, BRCA2 mutation, Klinefelter syndrome) and should be available to those who desire screening, preferably in a clinical trial. PMID:25415740

Maglione, Katharine D; Margolies, Laurie; Jaffer, Shabnam; Szabo, Janet; Schmidt, Hank; Weltz, Christina; Sonnenblick, Emily B

2014-12-01

135

Mitotic indexes as prognostic predictors in female breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A series of 688 women with breast cancer were followed-up for a mean of 13 years. Tumour size, axillary lymph node status, histological grade, histological type and two mitotic indexes (M\\/V; MAI) were assessed and related to disease outcome. Primary tumour size (PPP=0.0001), and histological grade (P=0.0074) predicted axillary lymph node status. Recurrence as well as recurrence-free survival was

S. Aaltomaa; P. Lipponen; M. Eskelinen; V.-M. Kosma; S. Marin; E. Alhava; K. Syrjänen

1992-01-01

136

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

137

Menopause after breast cancer: a survey on breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the younger age and the ever wider use of adjuvant chemotherapy and antiestrogens, menopausal symptoms are a frequent cause of concern for breast cancer patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of menopausal symptoms, and to explore the attitudes toward Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or other treatments and the willingness to take oestrogen in breast cancer patients. Methods: A

Nicoletta Biglia; Marilena Cozzarella; Franca Cacciari; Riccardo Ponzone; Riccardo Roagna; Furio Maggiorotto; Piero Sismondi

138

Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation  

MedlinePLUS

... Near You About the Program The NBCCEDP Conceptual Framework Social Ecological Model Screening Program Data Screening Program ... and Resources Related Links Contact a Local Program Web Badges Cancer Home Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation ...

139

Breast cancer statistics and markers.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25313729

Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

2014-01-01

140

Benign Breast Disease and the Risk of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Benign breast disease is an important risk factor for breast cancer. We studied a large group of women with benign breast disease to obtain reliable estimates of this risk. methods We identified all women who received a diagnosis of benign breast disease at the Mayo Clinic between 1967 and 1991. Breast-cancer events were obtained from medical records and questionnaires.

Lynn C. Hartmann; Thomas A. Sellers; Marlene H. Frost; Wilma L. Lingle; Amy C. Degnim; Karthik Ghosh; Robert A. Vierkant; Shaun D. Maloney; V. Shane Pankratz; David W. Hillman; Vera J. Suman; Jo Johnson; Cassann Blake; Thea Tlsty; Celine M. Vachon; L. Joseph Melton III; Daniel W. Visscher

2005-01-01

141

Mammographic screening for breast cancer: A review  

PubMed Central

In 2011, BreastScreen Australia celebrated 20 years of mammographic screening for breast cancer in Australia. There has been a reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the last two decades, coincident with mammographic screening. However, there are concerns that mammographic screening may result in overdiagnosis of breast cancer and that the reduction in mortality from breast cancer is the result of better treatment rather than screening. This article reviews the evidence on which mammographic screening for breast cancer is based, considers the issue of overdiagnosis of breast cancer by screening mammography, and assesses the role of screening mammography in the reduction in breast cancer mortality seen over the last two decades.

Lee, Warwick; Peters, Gudrun

2013-01-01

142

If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the Other Breast  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... PhD, Université de Montréal) VIDEO: If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the ... Back to Home Page VIDEO: If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the ...

143

Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-25

144

Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-17

145

Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-15

146

Communication with Breast Cancer Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer survivors must manage chronic side effects of original treatment. To manage these symptoms, communication must include both biomedical and contextual lifestyle factors. Sixty breast cancer survivors and 6 providers were recruited to test a conceptual model developed from uncertainty in illness theory and the dimensions of a patient-centered relationship. Visits were audio-taped, then coded using the Measure of

Margaret F. Clayton; William N. Dudley; Adrian Musters

2008-01-01

147

Sexual Life After Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The trauma of being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer can impact greatly on womens? psychosexual functioning and intimate relationships. Survivors of breast cancer report that issues of body image, sexuality and partner communication rarely are addressed by traditional health care providers (Ganz, Rowland, Desmond, Meyerowitz, & Wyatt, 1998). Psychotherapy can help women cope with difficult changes in body image

Lisa M. Anllo

2000-01-01

148

Green Tea and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

2014-01-01

149

Caecal metastasis from breast cancer presenting as intestinal obstruction  

PubMed Central

Background Gastrointestinal metastsasis from the breast cancer are rare. We report a patient who presented with intestinal obstruction due to solitary caecal metastasis from infiltrating ductal carcinoma of breast. We also review the available literature briefly. Case presentation A 72 year old lady with past history of breast cancer presented with intestinal obstruction due to a caecal mass. She underwent an emergency right hemicolectomy. The histological examination of the right hemicolectomy specimen revealed an adenocarcinoma in caecum staining positive for Cytokeratin 7 and Carcinoembryonic antigen and negative for Cytokeratin 20, CDX2 and Estrogen receptor. Eight out of 11 mesenteric nodes showed tumour deposits. A histological diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma was given. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of solitary metastasis to caecum from infiltrating ductal carcinoma of breast. Awareness of this possibility will aid in appropriate management of such patients. PMID:18471290

Birla, Rashmi; Mahawar, Kamal Kumar; Orizu, Mavis; Siddiqui, Muhammad S; Batra, Arun

2008-01-01

150

Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-05

151

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Thomas Buchholz, M.D.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHouston, TX Nancy Davidson, M.D.University of Pittsburgh Cancer InstituteUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer CentersPittsburgh, PA Members William

152

BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 4 Basic/Translational Research Carcinogenesis and Signaling Group 5R) Signaling in Breast Cancer 6 NF-B Family of Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer 7 Transgenic Mouse

Spence, Harlan Ernest

153

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Hong Guo, Qing Zhang and Asoke K. Nandi, Feature Extraction, Classification, Breast Cancer Diagnosis. Abstract: Breast cancer diagnosis have been investigated by different machine learning methods. This paper proposes a new method for breast cancer

Fernandez, Thomas

154

Validation study of the prognostic value of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-based risk in Caucasian breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a Japanese study, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) based risk determined by CDK 1 and 2 activities was associated with risk of distance recurrence in early breast cancer patients. The aim of our study was to validate this risk categorization in European early breast cancer patients. We retrospectively analyzed frozen breast cancer specimens of 352 Dutch patients with histologically confirmed primary

J G H van Nes; V T H B M Smit; H Putter; P J Kuppen; S J Kim; M Daito; J Ding; M Shibayama; S Numada; K Gohda; T Matsushima; H Ishihara; S Noguchi; C J H van de Velde; CJH van de Velde

2009-01-01

155

Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

We report a case of lasting fever and cough with pulmonary infiltrates progressing 4 months after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for breast cancer. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated alveolar opacities outside the irradiated pulmonary area. Laboratory data revealed neutrophilia and increased levels of C-reactive protein. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid displayed increased lymphocyte counts, and transbronchial lung biopsy revealed histological patterns compatible with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). Corticosteroid therapy resulted in marked clinical improvement. From the histological and clinical findings, this case was judged to be a case of COP induced after radiotherapy for breast cancer, similar to those reported recently. PMID:16110298

Akita, Kenji; Ikawa, Aiko; Shimizu, Shigeki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

2005-01-01

156

Histo-biological comparative analysis of bilateral breast cancer.  

PubMed

Bilateral breast cancer occurs in approximately 7% of surviving breast cancer patients. However, a dilemma exists concerning the notion of whether this represents a de novo second primary tumor versus a breast metastasis. We analyzed 81 patients with bilateral breast cancer, 47 (58%) synchronous tumors and 34 (42%) metachronous tumors. Additionally, charts were reviewed for age, family history, full histology data and biological receptors. We found there were no significant differences in concordance between the first and second primary tumors (in both synchronous and metachronous bilateral breast cancer) with respect to histology; grade; T-category; N-category; ER, PR and HER-2 status. In addition, there was no significant difference in the strength of correlation between ER and PR in the first and secondary primary tumors. Our findings suggest that the differentiation of the origin of contralateral breast cancer based on routine histological and biological concordance is inconclusive. Furthermore, the dilemma will continue to exist until additional molecular approaches are applied routinely for research purposes to resolve the debate. PMID:24062258

Baker, Bilal; Morcos, Basem; Daoud, Faiez; Sughayer, Maher; Sughayyer, Maher; Shabani, Hisham; Salameh, Habeeb; Almasri, Mahmoud

2013-12-01

157

The role of galactography in the detection of breast cancer.  

PubMed

The authors report on a series of 529 consecutive patients examined on physical examination, mammography, nipple discharge cytology and galactography. The criterion for galactography was essentially bloody nipple discharge (73% of cases). Serous nipple discharge was not considered worthy of routine galactography since it is associated with an extremely low incidence of breast cancer. Surgical excision and histologic examination of the discharging duct was performed in 200 cases. Eighteen cases of breast cancer were detected (10 infiltrating, 8 intraductal) of which 9, 6, 7 or 7 were suspected on physical examination, mammography, cytology or galactography, respectively. All combined tests suspected 13 of 18 breast cancers; 3 intraductal breast cancers were biopsied because of evidence of multiple papillomas on galactography, and 2 infiltrating breast cancers were operated because of persistent bloody nipple discharge in the absence of any other sign. No breast cancer was suspected on galactography alone. Galactography is indicated in the presence of bloody nipple discharge, and a biopsy should be performed when breast cancer or multiple papillomas are suspected. The diagnosis and excision of a single papilloma (breast cancer was never misdiagnosed as a single papilloma on galactography) is not worthwhile since a single papilloma is a benign lesion, and the benefit of its excision is still unclear. PMID:3368972

Ciatto, S; Bravetti, P; Berni, D; Catarzi, S; Bianchi, S

1988-04-30

158

Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-29

159

Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2013-11-21

160

RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-30

161

Triple-negative breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Perou's molecular classification defines tumors that neither express hormone receptors nor overexpress HER2 as triple-negative (TN) tumors. These tumors account for approximately 15% of breast cancers. The so-called basaloid tumors are not always synonymous with TN tumors; they differ in the fact that they express different molecular markers, have a higher histologic grade, and have a worse prognosis. Clinically they occur in younger women as interval cancer, and the risk of recurrence is higher within the first 3 years. Distant recurrences in the brain and visceral metastases are more common than in hormone receptor-positive tumors. Therapeutically, despite being highly chemosensitive, their progression-free time is generally short. In terms of chemotherapeutic treatment, anthracyclines and taxanes are useful drugs, and high response rates have been described for the combination of ixabepilone-capecitabine and platinums. The combination with antiangiogenic drugs has also proven useful. A group of new drugs, poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase inhibitors, showed favorable results in TN tumors with BRCA mutation. There are currently several ongoing studies with new drugs including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, c-kit inhibitors, Raf/Mek/Map kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. PMID:21050424

2010-01-01

162

Adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in Western Europe and the U.S. Adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the rate\\u000a of cancer recurrence, thereby contributing to the recent decline of breast cancer mortality. Notably, a number of important\\u000a developments occurred over the past decades. Starting with first generation regimens like CMF, the next step was the introduction\\u000a of anthracyclines into

R. Bartsch; G. G. Steger

2008-01-01

163

Pathology of hereditary breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are predisposed to breast cancer. The BRCA1-associated breast cancers have distinct morphology, being more often medullary-like, triple negative and showing a ‘basal’ phenotype. On the other hand, BRCA2 and BRCAX cancers are a heterogeneous group without a specific phenotype. When incorporated into risk assessment models, pathology data improves prediction of carrier

Leonard Da Silva; Sunil R Lakhani

2010-01-01

164

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

165

Relaxin and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Relaxin is a peptide hormone of luteal origin with a broad range of biological activities on tissues and organs of the female reproductive system as well as on other targets not directly related to the reproductive function. The mammary gland is one of the major targets for relaxin, which has been shown to promote growth and differentiation of mammary parenchyma and stroma. Based on the recognition of the mammotrophic action of relaxin, further research could show that this peptide also influences the behaviour of breast cancer cells in vitro. In fact, when relaxin was added to the culture medium of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells for short exposure times it had a biphasic effect on their growth, stimulating cell proliferation at low, nanomolar concentrations and inhibiting it at high, micromolar concentrations. In the longer times, relaxin had a marked growth-inhibitory effect on MCF-7 cells at any concentration assayed, and concurrently promoted cell differentiation and expression of adhesion molecules which are known to binder the spreading ability of cancer cells. The positive effect of relaxin on MCF-7 cell differentiation was even enhanced when these cells were cocultured with myoepithelial cells, thus recreating a microenvironment reminiscent of the tissue architecture of the mammary ducts in vivo. Concerning the mechanisms of action of relaxin on MCF-7 cells, it seems that the growth-inhibiting and differentiation-promoting effects of the peptide are mediated through the activation of the synthetic pathway of nitric oxide. PMID:9180842

Bani, D

1997-02-01

166

Epigenetics and Breast Cancers  

PubMed Central

Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Er?) dimers wherein the ligand ER? dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-?-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5?-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ER? dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ER? dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

2012-01-01

167

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

168

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

169

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

1998-01-01

170

Targeted therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases that are clinically subdivided as hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2(+)), and triple-negative breast cancer, to guide therapeutic interventions. Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 are among the most successful cancer therapeutics. However, de novo or acquired resistance is common, despite the development of newer agents against these pathways. As our understanding of tumor biology improves, novel targets are being identified. Notably, inhibitors against several pathways [including, among others, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR), cell-cycle regulation, heat shock protein, and epigenetic pathways] have demonstrated promising activity in clinical trials, and the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus has been approved for advanced or metastatic aromatase inhibitor-resistant ER(+) breast cancer. At present, there are no established targeted agents for triple-negative breast cancer (negative ER, progesterone receptor, and HER2). Although poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors have shown promising activity in BRCA-related cancers, its value in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancers remains to be demonstrated. In this Review, we present a basic understanding of the major targeted agents in current practice and under development for the treatment of breast cancer in the context of the three clinical subgroups. PMID:23988612

Mohamed, Ali; Krajewski, Kenneth; Cakar, Burcu; Ma, Cynthia X

2013-10-01

171

Cancer following breast reduction surgery in Denmark  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intuitively, breast tissue mass should be directly related to a woman'srisk of breast cancer, simply because having more cells at risk would seem toincrease the potential for malignant transformation. However, studiesattempting to link breast size with breast cancer risk have beeninconsistent. Limitations include crude measures of breast size, theinability to distinguish glandular from adipose tissue, and the confoundinginfluence of co-factors

John D. Jr. Boice; Søren Friis; Joseph K. McLaughlin; Lene Mellemkjaer; William J. Blot; Joseph F. Jr. Fraumeni; Jørgen H. Olsen

1997-01-01

172

Second primary cancers of the breast: incidence and risk factors.  

PubMed Central

Between 1946 and 1976 over 9,000 women with breast cancer were seen within one year of diagnosis at the A. Maxwell Evans Clinic (AMEC) in Vancouver, British Columbia. By 1978, 275 had a subsequent diagnosis of a second primary in the contralateral breast: 100 were diagnosed within 1 year, and 175 after 1 year of the first primary. Two separate comparison groups of AMEC patients with unilateral breast cancer were selected to identify risk factors for bilateral breast cancer and to determine the incidence. The average annual incidence rates for a second primary in the contralateral breast were 5.0, 4.1 and 3.0 per 1,000 women for women less than 45 years, 45-54 years, and over 55 years of age at diagnosis of first primary breast cancer, respectively. These rates remained stable for at least 15 years after the diagnosis of the first primary. Two risk factors were found for bilateral cancer within 1 year of the first primary, histologic diagnosis of lobular carcinoma and absence of pathologic involvement of axillary nodes; one risk factor was found for bilateral breast cancer after 1 year of the first primary, family history of breast cancer. PMID:6691900

Hislop, T. G.; Elwood, J. M.; Coldman, A. J.; Spinelli, J. J.; Worth, A. J.; Ellison, L. G.

1984-01-01

173

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , BS ; Kamaneh Montazeri , MD ; Sara Tolaney , MD ; Javid Moslehi , MD ... javid.moslehi{at}vanderbilt.edu Next Section Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

174

Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

175

Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

2013-01-01

176

Veliparib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-16

177

Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

2011-01-01

178

About Breast Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

179

Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

180

Tailored Treatment for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, doctors will use a test called the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay, which measures the activity of a set of genes in breast tumor tissue, to determine which women will receive adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to hormone therapy.

181

Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-26

182

How Is Breast Cancer Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... has not been shown to detect cancer early. Biopsy A biopsy is done when mammograms, other imaging ... the breast can be removed. Fine needle aspiration biopsy In a fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, the ...

183

Fostering early breast cancer detection.  

PubMed

This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

2014-12-01

184

Breast Cancer and the Environment  

MedlinePLUS

... paying more attention to how experiences as a baby, a child, or an adolescent may influence the risk for breast cancer when women reach middle and older ages. But this gap of many decades between environmental exposures at younger ...

185

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes hormone therapy (including antiestrogens, LH-RH agonists, aromatase inhibitors, and SERMs) and its role in preventing and treating breast cancer. Includes information about possible side effects.

186

Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

187

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2013-05-07

188

Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Advanced or Metastatic  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hormone-resistant Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-09-30

189

FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-04

190

Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention.\\u000a Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet,

Angela R. Bradbury; Olufunmilayo I. Olopade

2007-01-01

191

Fusion genes in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth M. Batty Clare College, University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge in candidature for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy November 2010 ii... is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. It has not been submitted whole or in part for any other qualification at any other University. iii Summary Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth Batty...

Batty, Elizabeth

2012-02-07

192

Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

193

Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer patients with the same stage of disease can have\\u000amarkedly different treatment responses and overall outcome. The\\u000astrongest predictors for metastases (for example, lymph node\\u000astatus and histological grade) fail to classify accurately breast\\u000atumours according to their clinical behaviour. Chemotherapy\\u000aor hormonal therapy reduces the risk of distant metastases by\\u000aapproximately one-third; however, 70 — 80% of

Laura J. van't Veer; Hongyue Dai; Marc J. van de Vijver; Yudong D. He; Augustinus A. M. Hart; Mao Mao; Hans L. Peterse; Karin van der Kooy; Matthew J. Marton; Anke T. Witteveen; George J. Schreiber; Ron M. Kerkhoven; Chris Roberts; Peter S. Linsley; René Bernards; Stephen H. Friend

2002-01-01

194

Olive oil, other dietary fats, and the risk of breast cancer (Italy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from a multicenter case-control study on breast cancer conducted in Italy have been used to analyze the relationship of olive oil and other dietary fats to breast cancer risk. Cases were 2,564 women hospitalized with histologically confirmed, incident breast cancer. Controls were 2,588 women admitted to the same network of hospitals for acute, non-neoplastic, non-hormone related, on-digestive tract disorders.

Carlo La Vecchia; Eva Negri; Silvia Franceschi; Adriano Decarli; Attilio Giacosa; Loren Lipworth

1995-01-01

195

Personalized therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a complex disease characterized by many morphological, clinical and molecular features. For many years, this disease has been classified according to histopathologic criteria, known as the tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) staging system. Clinical criteria that include immunohistochemical markers, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), provide a classification of breast cancer and dictates the optimal therapeutic approach for treatment. With genomic techniques, such as real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing, breast cancer diagnostics is going through a significant evolution. Genomic and transcriptomic technologies make the analysis of gene expression signatures and mutation status possible so that tumors may now be classified more accurately with respect to diagnosis and prognosis. The -omic era has also made the possible identification of new biomarkers involved in breast cancer development, survival and invasion that can be gradually incorporated either into clinical testing or clinical trials. Together, clinical and molecular criteria can contribute to a more personalized management of the breast cancer patient. This article will present the progress made in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer using molecular information provided by genomic and transcriptomic technologies. PMID:24635704

De Abreu, F B; Schwartz, G N; Wells, W A; Tsongalis, G J

2014-07-01

196

Diagnosis delay in Libyan female breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Aims To study the diagnosis delay and its impact on stage of disease among women with breast cancer on Libya. Methods 200 women, aged 22 to 75 years with breast cancer diagnosed during 2008–2009 were interviewed about the period from the first symptoms to the final histological diagnosis of breast cancer. This period (diagnosis time) was categorized into 3 periods: <3 months, 3–6 months, and >6 months. If diagnosis time was longer than 3 months, the diagnosis was considered delayed (diagnosis delay). Consultation time was the time taken to visit the general practitioner after the first symptoms. Retrospective preclinical and clinical data were collected on a form (questionnaire) during an interview with each patient and from medical records. Results The median of diagnosis time was 7.5 months. Only 30.0% of patients were diagnosed within 3 months after symptoms. 14% of patients were diagnosed within 3–6 months and 56% within a period longer than 6 months. A number of factors predicted diagnosis delay: Symptoms were not considered serious in 27% of patients. Alternative therapy (therapy not associated with cancer) was applied in 13.0% of the patients. Fear and shame prevented the visit to the doctor in 10% and 4.5% of patients, respectively. Inappropriate reassurance that the lump was benign was an important reason for prolongation of the diagnosis time. Diagnosis delay was associated with initial breast symptom(s) that did not include a lump (p?breast cancer awareness and training of general practitioners to reduce breast cancer mortality by promoting early detection. The treatment guidelines should pay more attention to the early phases of breast cancer. Especially, guidelines for good practices in managing detectable of tumors are necessary. PMID:22909280

2012-01-01

197

Choosing the right cell line for breast cancer research  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease. Gene expression profiling has contributed significantly to our understanding of this heterogeneity at a molecular level, refining taxonomy based on simple measures such as histological type, tumour grade, lymph node status and the presence of predictive markers like oestrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) to a more sophisticated classification comprising luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, HER2-positive and normal subgroups. In the laboratory, breast cancer is often modelled using established cell lines. In the present review we discuss some of the issues surrounding the use of breast cancer cell lines as experimental models, in light of these revised clinical classifications, and put forward suggestions for improving their use in translational breast cancer research. PMID:21884641

2011-01-01

198

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 1990s, breast cancer advocates petitioned the United States Congress to investigate the high rates of breast cancer on Long Island in the state of New York. The resulting law led to the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP) — more than ten research projects designed to study the possible causes of this increased incidence of cancer.

Deborah M. Winn

2005-01-01

199

Assisted reproduction and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in reproductive age women. Although well known causal link between estrogen and breast cancer, the impact of ovulation induction on the risk of breast cancer still remains to be clarified. One of the recently recognized long term adverse effects of adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy given for breast cancer is premature ovarian failure and infertility, both of which significantly compromise the quality of life of a cancer survivor. Thanks to significant developments in assisted reproductive technologies these patients may benefit from a wide range of fertility preservation options. The most established technique is embryo cryopreservation; oocyte cryopreservation can be considered in single women; both of which require at least 2 weeks of ovarian stimulation beginning with the onset of the patient's menstrual cycle. Novel ovarian stimulation protocols using tamoxifen and letrozole can be used to increase the margin of safety in estrogen sensitive breast tumors. When there is no time available for ovulation induction, ovarian tissue can be cryopreserved for future transplantation without delay in cancer therapy. The benefit of ovarian protection by gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues is unproven and unlikely, and thus this treatment should not be recommended as the sole method of fertility preservation. PMID:17923831

Sonmezer, M; Atabekoglu, C

2007-08-01

200

Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

2003-01-01

201

Does multicentric\\/multifocal breast cancer differ from unifocal breast cancer? An analysis of survival and contralateral breast cancer incidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose we evaluated whether patients with multifocal\\/multicentric (M\\/M) breast cancer have different outcomes compared to unifocal\\u000a (U) disease in terms of survival and the development of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) disease. Methods women diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer were classified as having U or M\\/M disease. Prognostic factors were prospectively\\u000a collected and obtained from the breast cancer outcome unit

Rinat Yerushalmi; Hagen Kennecke; Ryan Woods; Ivo A. Olivotto; Caroline Speers; Karen A. Gelmon

2009-01-01

202

Hormone therapy and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Use or nonuse of hormone therapy (HT) is a controversial decision for menopausal women that has taken on increasing significance as the large number of baby boomers enter this life stage. Studies suggest benefits of HT for prevention of osteoporosis and coronary artery disease, as well as a possible increased risk for cancer, particularly breast cancer. Because of this risk for breast cancer, women with a family history may feel differently about HT. However, differences have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in attitudes toward HT of menopausal women with and without a family history of breast cancer. A nonexperimental, cross-sectional design was used. The setting included various sites located in a rural community in northwestern Pennsylvania. A convenience sample of 110 was obtained. A Health Belief Model attitudinal scale was completed by the participants. Although there were no significant differences in attitudes toward HT between the groups, ancillary analysis revealed a significant difference (P = .04) in frequency of reported fear of breast cancer regarding HT in those women with a family history of breast cancer and those without such a history. The findings of this study point to a need for further research on attitudes of women regarding HT and how they may affect postmenopausal healthcare management. PMID:11858293

Zimmerman, V L; Smeltzer, S C

2000-01-01

203

Metabolomics in noninvasive breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer remains the most leading cause of death among women worldwide. Common methods for diagnosis and surveillance include mammography, histopathology and blood tests. The major drawback of mammography is the high rate of false reports, aside from the risk from repeated exposure to harmful ionizing radiations; histopathology is time consuming and often prone to subjective interpretations; blood-based tests are attractive, but lack the sensitivity and specificity. Obviously, more sensitive biomarkers for early detection and molecular targets for better treating breast cancer are urgently needed. Fortunately, molecular level 'omics' diagnosis is becoming increasingly popular; metabolomics, diagnosis based on 'metabolic fingerprinting' may provide clinically useful biomarkers applied toward identifying metabolic alterations and has introduced new insights into the pathology of breast cancer. By applying advanced analytical and statistical tools, metabolomics involves the comprehensive profiling of the full complement of low molecular weight compounds in a biological system and could classify the basis of tumor biology of breast cancer, to identify new prognostic and predictive markers and discover new targets for future therapeutic interventions. This advanced bioanalytic methods may now open new avenues for diagnostics in cancer via discovery of biomarkers. In this review we take a closer look at the metabolomics used within the field of breast cancer diagnosis. Further, we highlight the most interesting metabolomics publications and discuss these in detail; additional studies are mentioned as a reference for the interested reader. A general trend is an increased focus on biological interpretation rather than merely the ability to classify samples. PMID:23669185

Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Xi-jun

2013-09-23

204

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

205

Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

206

Breast cancer following augmentation mammoplasty (United States)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:Although clinical reports have raised concern that breast implants may either increase the risk of breast cancer or delay its diagnosis, epidemiologic studies have generally shown implant recipients to be at a reduced risk of subsequent breast cancer. A large retrospective cohort study was undertaken to clarify effects of cosmetic breast implantation.

Louise A. Brinton; Jay H. Lubin; Mary Cay Burich; Theodore Colton; S. Lori Brown; Robert N. Hoover

2000-01-01

207

Changes in breast cancer reports after pathology second opinion.  

PubMed

Breast cancer pathology reports contain valuable information about the histologic diagnosis, prognostic factors and predictive indicators of therapeutic response. A second opinion may be requested by medical oncologists and surgeons, when a patient is referred from another institution for treatment. We report the experience with pathology second opinion in selected patients referred to the Breast Oncology Unit. 205 cases referred to the Breast Oncology Unit were selected for second opinion after clinical evaluation, between 2002 and 2012. The cases reviewed included 102 core needle biopsies, 88 surgical specimens from the breast and 18 lymphadenopathies, 14 from the axillary region. Pathology second opinion was based on a review of hematoxylin-eosin preparations, recuts of submitted paraffin blocks and written external pathology reports. Immunohistochemical studies for hormone receptors, HER2, myoepithelial cells, and other markers were performed in selected cases. A case was reclassified as showing major change when second opinion showed a potential for significant change in prognosis or treatment. Otherwise, it was considered to represent minor change or to be concordant. In 52 cases (25.4%), the pathology review showed changes. Thirty-three (16%) patients were reclassified for major changes and 19 (9.2%) as minor changes. In six patients, more than one major change was identified. The major discrepancies identified were related to the histologic classification (12 cases), the presence or absence of invasion in ductal carcinoma (15 cases), the results of hormone receptors (5 cases), and HER2 (7 cases). Major changes in histologic classification included two cases diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma and reclassified as benign, four cases with diagnosis of breast cancer reclassified as metastatic lung cancer, one case diagnosed as small cell carcinoma of lung metastatic in the breast, reclassified as primary carcinoma of the breast, and three cases with diagnosis of breast cancer in the axilla reclassified as primary cutaneous adnexal carcinomas (2) and metastatic melanoma (1), respectively. In two cases, the histologic type of the primary breast tumor was changed. Second opinion in breast pathology may uncover significant discrepancies that impact on patient management and prognosis. Major discrepancies are most frequently related to the assessment of the presence or absence of invasion in ductal carcinoma, the results of predictive makers of therapeutic response, and the differential diagnosis of breast cancer and nonmammary tumors in the breast, the axilla, and at distant sites. PMID:24689830

Marco, Vicente; Muntal, Teresa; García-Hernandez, Felip; Cortes, Javier; Gonzalez, Begoña; Rubio, Isabel T

2014-01-01

208

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

209

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

210

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

211

Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the breast cancer research-training program is to recruit and train potential future researchers in breast cancer research. We recruited 15 individuals, interviewed eight, and chose five for the program. During the 12-week program, trainees...

G. P. Zaloga

2004-01-01

212

Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Breast Cancer Research Training Program is to recruit and train potential future researchers in breast cancer research. During the 3-year grant, we recruited 75 applicants to the program, interviewed 22 candidates, and hired 15 students...

G. P. Zaloga, K. L. Spear

2006-01-01

213

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

214

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

215

Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk Introduction A woman’s hormone levels normally change ... that may influence a woman’s chances of developing breast cancer later in life. As a result, over several ...

216

Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer Key Points There is no conclusive research linking ... antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer. Research studies of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and ...

217

If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... PhD, Newcastle University) VIDEO: If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer - Dr. Susan Love, MD, David Geffen School of ... to Home Page VIDEO: If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer - Dr. Susan Love, MD, David Geffen School of ...

218

Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... Policy Makers CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Share Compartir ... for breast cancer live long and healthy lives. Women with Disabilities Are Less Likely to Have Received ...

219

Glycolytic Enzymes in Breast Cancer, Benign Breast Disease and Normal Breast Tissue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The activities of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, enolase and pyru-vate kinase were studied in breast cancer tissues, in comparison to benign breast disease and normal breast tissues. The enzyme activities in breast cancer were significantly increased compared to normal and benign breast tissues (p < 0.001). Also the increase in activity in benign disease compared to normal was statistically significant (p

A. Hennipman; J. Smits; B. van Oirschot; J. C. van Houwelingen; G. Rijksen; J. P. Neyt; J. A. M. van Unnik; G. E. J. Staal

1987-01-01

220

Endothelin-1 Enriched Tumor Phenotype Predicts Breast Cancer Recurrence  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Breast cancer recurrence can develop years after primary treatment. Crosstalk between breast cancer cells and their stromal microenvironment may influence tumor progression. Our primary study aim was to determine whether endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in tumor and stroma predicts breast cancer relapse. The secondary aim was to determine ET-1/endothelin receptor A (ETAR) role on signaling pathways and apoptosis in breast cancer. Experimental Design. Patients with histologically documented stages I–III invasive breast cancer were included in the study. ET-1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tumor cells and stroma was analyzed. Association between ET-1 expression and clinical outcome was assessed using multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate disease-free survival (DFS). In addition, the effect of ET-1/ETAR on signaling pathways and apoptosis was evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Results. With a median followup of 7 years, ET-1 non-enriched tumor phenotype had a significant association with favorable disease-free survival (HR = 0.16; 95% CI 0.03–0.77; P value <0.02). ER negativity, advanced stage of disease and ET-1-enriched tumor phenotype were all associated with a higher risk for recurrence. Experimental study demonstrated that ET-1 stimulation promoted Akt activation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, silencing of ETAR induced apoptosis in both hormone receptor negative and hormone receptor positive breast cancer cells. Conclusions. We found ET-1 expression in tumor and stroma to be an independent prognostic marker for breast cancer recurrence. Prospective studies are warranted to examine whether ET-1 expression in tumor/stroma could assist in stratifying patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer for adjuvant therapy. PMID:23844294

Sikorskii, Alla; Gallo, Kathleen A.; Wiese, David A.; Madhukar, Burra V.; Chivu, Simona C.; Chitneni, Shalini; Dimitrov, Nikolay V.

2013-01-01

221

BRCA1 and Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-part animation explains the role of the BRCA1 protein in DNA repair and the development of breast cancer. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene can lead to breast cancer and other forms of cancer. Part 1 of the animation, ÃÂThe function of BRCA1,ÃÂ provides an overview of how the BRCA1 protein functions in healthy cells to detect and repair DNA damage. Part 2, ÃÂMutations in BRCA1 Can Cause Cancer,ÃÂ explains how individuals who inherit a single mutated copy of BRCA1 are at an increased risk of cancer, and how cancer develops when the second copy of BRCA1 becomes mutated. Animation is closed captioned. Run times of each animation part: approximately 1 minute 15 seconds.

2010-11-18

222

Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

223

Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.  

PubMed

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

224

Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

225

Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-05-15

226

Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2013-10-07

227

Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-17

228

Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-18

229

Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-04-02

230

Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

231

Molecular apocrine differentiation is a common feature of breast cancer in patients with germline PTEN mutations  

PubMed Central

Introduction Breast carcinoma is the main malignant tumor occurring in patients with Cowden disease, a cancer-prone syndrome caused by germline mutation of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN characterized by the occurrence throughout life of hyperplastic, hamartomatous and malignant growths affecting various organs. The absence of known histological features for breast cancer arising in a PTEN-mutant background prompted us to explore them for potential new markers. Methods We first performed a microarray study of three tumors from patients with Cowden disease in the context of a transcriptomic study of 74 familial breast cancers. A subsequent histological and immunohistochemical study including 12 additional cases of Cowden disease breast carcinomas was performed to confirm the microarray data. Results Unsupervised clustering of the 74 familial tumors followed the intrinsic gene classification of breast cancer except for a group of five tumors that included the three Cowden tumors. The gene expression profile of the Cowden tumors shows considerable overlap with that of a breast cancer subgroup known as molecular apocrine breast carcinoma, which is suspected to have increased androgenic signaling and shows frequent ERBB2 amplification in sporadic tumors. The histological and immunohistochemical study showed that several cases had apocrine histological features and expressed GGT1, which is a potential new marker for apocrine breast carcinoma. Conclusions These data suggest that activation of the ERBB2-PI3K-AKT pathway by loss of PTEN at early stages of tumorigenesis promotes the formation of breast tumors with apocrine features. PMID:20712882

2010-01-01

232

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

233

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

Ginzel, Matthew

234

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter  

E-print Network

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter Special Interest Articles: ·Hormone receptor negative breast cancer: Improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy by targeting immune cells Page 1, cont. Page 6 (article from Breast Cancer Connections) Page 8 Editor: Karla Kerlikowske, MD Professor of Medicine

Walter, Peter

235

FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... and Territorial Data NCHS Home FastStats Home Mammography/Breast Cancer Data are for the U.S. Mammography use Percent ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

236

Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically confirmed leukemia reported to the Connecticut Tumor Registry (CTR) between 1935 and 1984. A total of 48 cases of leukemia following breast cancer were included in the study. Two controls were individually matched to each leukemia case on the basis of age, calendar year when diagnosed with breast cancer, and survival time. Leukemia diagnoses were verified by one hematologist. Radiation dose to active bone marrow was estimated by medical physicists on the basis of the original radiotherapy records of study subjects. Local radiation doses to each of the 16 bone marrow components for each patient were reconstructed; the dose averaged over the entire body was 530 rad (5.3 Gy). Based on this dosage and assuming a linear relationship between dose and affect, a relative risk (RR) in excess of 10 would have been expected. However, there was little evidence that radiotherapy increased the overall risk of leukemia (RR = 1.16; 90% confidence interval (CI), 0.6 to 2.1). The risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, one of the few malignancies without evidence for an association with ionizing radiation, was not significantly increased (RR = 1.8; n = 10); nor was the risk for all other forms of leukemia (RR = 1.0; n = 38). There was no indication that risk varied over categories of radiation dose.

Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stovall, M.; Flannery, J.T.; Moloney, W.C.

1989-01-01

237

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming  

E-print Network

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer after lung cancer and the fifth most common cause of cancer death

Ludwig, Simone

238

Subsequent Pregnancy After Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 213,000 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in the US during 2006. Of these, 25% and 10% occurred in women\\u000a younger than 50 and 40 years, respectively (Howe et al. 2006). As women are delaying childbearing for personal reasons, including\\u000a cultural, educational, and professional reasons (Ventura 1989), there has been an increasing number of patients in whom breast

Fedro Peccatori; Saverio Cinieri; Laura Orlando; Giulia Bellettini

239

Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

240

Loss of primary cilia occurs early in breast cancer development  

PubMed Central

Background Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell surface. Primary cilia play a critical role in development and disease through regulation of signaling pathways including the Hedgehog pathway. Recent mouse models have also linked ciliary dysfunction to cancer. However, little is known about the role of primary cilia in breast cancer development. Primary cilia expression was characterized in cancer cells as well as their surrounding stromal cells from 86 breast cancer patients by counting cilia and measuring cilia length. In addition, we examined cilia expression in normal epithelial and stromal cells from reduction mammoplasties as well as histologically normal adjacent tissue for comparison. Results We observed a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells on both premalignant lesions as well as in invasive cancers. This loss of cilia does not correlate with increased proliferative index (Ki67-positive cells). However, we did detect rare ciliated cancer cells present in patients with invasive breast cancer and found that these express a marker of basaloid cancers that is associated with poor prognosis (Cytokeratin 5). Interestingly, the percentage of ciliated stromal cells associated with both premalignant and invasive cancers decreased when compared to stromal cells associated with normal tissue. To understand how cilia may be lost during cancer development we analyzed the expression of genes required for ciliogenesis and/or ciliary function and compared their expression in normal versus breast cancer samples. We found that expression of ciliary genes were frequently downregulated in human breast cancers. Conclusions These data suggest that primary cilia are lost early in breast cancer development on both the cancer cells and their surrounding stromal cells. PMID:24987519

2014-01-01

241

Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

2014-06-16

242

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer · UCSF's second highest ethnic group of breast cancer patients is Asian American compared to African Americans nationally. · The breast cancer rate for Asian

Mullins, Dyche

243

Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention  

SciTech Connect

The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

Jordan, V.C. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01

244

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

1998-01-01

245

Far Beyond the Usual Biomarkers in Breast Cancer: A Review  

PubMed Central

Research investigating biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and the prediction of treatment responses in breast cancer is rapidly expanding. However, no validated biomarker currently exists for use in routine clinical practice, and breast cancer detection and management remains dependent on invasive procedures. Histological examination remains the standard for diagnosis, whereas immunohistochemical and genetic tests are utilized for treatment decisions and prognosis determinations. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive review of literature published in PubMed on breast cancer biomarkers between 2009 and 2013. The keywords that were used together were breast cancer, biomarkers, diagnosis, prognosis and drug response. The cited references of the manuscripts included in this review were also screened. We have comprehensively summarized the performance of several biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and predicted drug responses of breast cancer. Finally, we have identified 15 biomarkers that have demonstrated promise in initial studies and several miRNAs. At this point, such biomarkers must be rigorously validated in the clinical setting to be translated into clinically useful tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of drug responses of breast cancer. PMID:25057307

dos Anjos Pultz, Brunna; da Luz, Felipe Andres Cordero; de Faria, Paulo Rogerio; Oliveira, Ana Paula Lima; de Araujo, Rogerio Agenor; Silva, Marcelo Jose Barbosa

2014-01-01

246

Mammographic density, MRI background parenchymal enhancement and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

Mammographic density (MD), representing connective and epithelial tissue (fibroglandular tissue, FGT) is a major risk factor for breast cancer. In an analysis of an autopsy series (Bartow SA, Pathak DR, Mettler FA. Radiographic microcalcification and parenchymal patterns as indicators of histologic "high-risk" benign breast disease. Cancer 1990; 66: 1721-1725, Bartow SA, Pathak DR, Mettler FA et al. Breast mammographic pattern: a concatenation of confounding and breast cancer risk factors. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 142: 813-819), MD was found to be strongly correlated with the collagen and epithelial content of the breast (Li T, Sun L, Miller N et al. The association of measured breast tissue characteristics with MD and other risk factors for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2005; 14: 343-349), and another report showed that breast epithelium was highly concentrated in the areas of collagen concentration (Hawes D, Downey S, Pearce CL et al. Dense breast stromal tissue shows greatly increased concentration of breast epithelium but no increase in its proliferative activity. Breast Cancer Res 2006; 8: R24). Collagen comprises the overwhelming majority of the FGT, occupying an area on the slides obtained from the autopsy series some 15 times the area of glandular tissue. The relationship of MD with breast cancer risk appears likely to be due to a major extent to increasing epithelial cell numbers with increasing MD. FGT is also seen in breast magnetic resonance imaging (breast MRI) and, as expected, it has been shown that this measure of FGT (MRI-FGT) is highly correlated with MD. A contrast-enhanced breast MRI shows that normal FGT 'enhances' (background parenchymal enhancement, BPE) after contrast agent is administered(Morris EA. Diagnostic breast MR imaging: current status and future directions. Radiol Clin North Am 2007; 45: 863-880, vii., Kuhl C. The current status of breast MR imaging. Part I. Choice of technique, image interpretation, diagnostic accuracy, and transfer to clinical practice. Radiology 2007; 244: 356-378), and a recent study suggests that BPE is also a major breast cancer risk factor, possibly as important as, and independent of MD (King V, Brooks JD, Bernstein JL et al. BPE at breast MR imaging and breast cancer risk. Radiology 2011; 260: 50-60). BPE is much more sensitive to the effects of menopause and tamoxifen than is FGT (King V, Gu Y, Kaplan JB et al. Impact of menopausal status on BPE and fibroglandular tissue on breast MRI. Eur Radiol 2012; 22: 2641-2647, King V, Kaplan J, Pike MC et al. Impact of tamoxifen on amount of fibroglandular tissue, BPE, and cysts on breast MRI. Breast J 2012; 18: 527-534). Changes in MD and BPE may be most useful in predicting response to chemopreventive agents aimed at blocking breast cell proliferation. More study of the biological basis of the effects of MD and BPE is needed if we are to fully exploit these factors in developing chemopreventive approaches to breast cancer. PMID:24131968

Pike, M C; Pearce, C L

2013-11-01

247

Mammographic density, MRI background parenchymal enhancement and breast cancer risk  

PubMed Central

Mammographic density (MD), representing connective and epithelial tissue (fibroglandular tissue, FGT) is a major risk factor for breast cancer. In an analysis of an autopsy series (Bartow SA, Pathak DR, Mettler FA. Radiographic microcalcification and parenchymal patterns as indicators of histologic “high-risk” benign breast disease. Cancer 1990; 66: 1721–1725, Bartow SA, Pathak DR, Mettler FA et al. Breast mammographic pattern: a concatenation of confounding and breast cancer risk factors. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 142: 813–819), MD was found to be strongly correlated with the collagen and epithelial content of the breast (Li T, Sun L, Miller N et al. The association of measured breast tissue characteristics with MD and other risk factors for breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2005; 14: 343–349), and another report showed that breast epithelium was highly concentrated in the areas of collagen concentration (Hawes D, Downey S, Pearce CL et al. Dense breast stromal tissue shows greatly increased concentration of breast epithelium but no increase in its proliferative activity. Breast Cancer Res 2006; 8: R24). Collagen comprises the overwhelming majority of the FGT, occupying an area on the slides obtained from the autopsy series some 15 times the area of glandular tissue. The relationship of MD with breast cancer risk appears likely to be due to a major extent to increasing epithelial cell numbers with increasing MD. FGT is also seen in breast magnetic resonance imaging (breast MRI) and, as expected, it has been shown that this measure of FGT (MRI-FGT) is highly correlated with MD. A contrast-enhanced breast MRI shows that normal FGT ‘enhances’ (background parenchymal enhancement, BPE) after contrast agent is administered(Morris EA. Diagnostic breast MR imaging: current status and future directions. Radiol Clin North Am 2007; 45: 863–880, vii., Kuhl C. The current status of breast MR imaging. Part I. Choice of technique, image interpretation, diagnostic accuracy, and transfer to clinical practice. Radiology 2007; 244: 356–378), and a recent study suggests that BPE is also a major breast cancer risk factor, possibly as important as, and independent of MD (King V, Brooks JD, Bernstein JL et al. BPE at breast MR imaging and breast cancer risk. Radiology 2011; 260: 50–60). BPE is much more sensitive to the effects of menopause and tamoxifen than is FGT (King V, Gu Y, Kaplan JB et al. Impact of menopausal status on BPE and fibroglandular tissue on breast MRI. Eur Radiol 2012; 22: 2641–2647, King V, Kaplan J, Pike MC et al. Impact of tamoxifen on amount of fibroglandular tissue, BPE, and cysts on breast MRI. Breast J 2012; 18: 527–534). Changes in MD and BPE may be most useful in predicting response to chemopreventive agents aimed at blocking breast cell proliferation. More study of the biological basis of the effects of MD and BPE is needed if we are to fully exploit these factors in developing chemopreventive approaches to breast cancer. PMID:24131968

Pike, M. C.; Pearce, C. L.

2013-01-01

248

Estrogen metabolism and breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

2015-01-28

249

Paclitaxel (Taxol) in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a diterpine plant compound that was isolated initially from the bark of the western yew tree, Taxus brevifolia, but can now be produced by semisynthesis from a renewable source. Paclitaxel is the first new agent in the past decade to have confirmed single agent activity in breast cancer in excess of 50%. A 28% response rate has been reported in doxorubicin-refractory patients. Ongoing studies include attempts to combine paclitaxel with other drugs used for breast cancer treatment and with radiation. PMID:7908664

Arbuck, S G; Dorr, A; Friedman, M A

1994-02-01

250

Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

2014-10-28

251

Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Multidrug Resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer encountered in women and the second leading cause of death after lung cancer.\\u000a Thus, breast cancer is a serious health concern for all women. Fortunately, a high proportion of breast cancer patients are\\u000a diagnosed at an early stage due to an increase in the screening programs and the awareness of the

Can Atalay

252

Smoking and breast cancer recurrence after breast conservation therapy.  

PubMed

Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P < 0.001). With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P = 0.039). In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0-22.4). Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:24693439

Bishop, Jennifer D; Killelea, Brigid K; Chagpar, Anees B; Horowitz, Nina R; Lannin, Donald R

2014-01-01

253

Skeletal manifestations of treatment of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M; Van Poznak, Catherine

2013-12-01

254

Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-07-07

255

MRI Detects Cancers in the Opposite Breast of Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of women who were diagnosed with cancer in one breast detected over 90 percent of cancers in the other breast that were missed by mammography and clinical breast exam at initial diagnosis, according to a new study. Given the established rates of mammography and clinical breast exams for detecting cancer in the opposite, or contralateral breast, adding an MRI scan to the diagnostic evaluation effectively doubled the number of cancers immediately found in these women.

256

Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

257

Hormone Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Women Who Have Undergone Surgery for Node-Negative Breast Cancer (The TAILORx Trial)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2014-10-16

258

Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2011-07-08

259

Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

260

Nodular Fasciitis of the Breast Mimicking Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Nodular fasciitis is a benign proliferative lesion that is usually found in the soft tissue of the upper extremity and trunk in young to middle-aged persons. It has rarely been described in the breast. A 35-year-old woman had noticed a mass in her left breast. It was elastic-hard, 13?mm in size, and located mainly in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast. Mammography did not detect the mass. Ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion with an irregular margin. Neither fine-needle aspiration cytology nor core needle biopsy established a definitive diagnosis. Excisional biopsy was therefore performed. Histologically, the excised tumor tissue results were consistent with a diagnosis of nodular fasciitis of the breast. We report a case of nodular fasciitis of the breast, a rare histological type of breast tumor. PMID:24963435

Chishima, Takashi; Adachi, Shouko

2014-01-01

261

19p13.1 is a triple-negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus.  

PubMed

The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05-1.15; P = 3.49 × 10(-5)] and triple-negative (ER-, PR-, and HER2-negative) breast cancer (rs8170: OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31; P = 2.22 × 10(-7)). However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when triple-negative cases were excluded (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.89-1.07; P = 0.62). In addition, a combined analysis of triple-negative cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC; N = 3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and triple-negative breast cancer risk (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.18-1.33; P = 3.31 × 10(-13)]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple-negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histologic subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple-negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

Stevens, Kristen N; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christoph; Godwin, Andrew K; Weaver, Joellen; Pathak, Harsh B; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, María Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dünnebier, Thomas; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcom W; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Sherman, Mark E; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Hooning, Maartje J; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L; Pankratz, V S; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J

2012-04-01

262

Respective Prognostic Value of Genomic Grade and Histological Proliferation Markers in Early Stage (pN0) Breast Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Genomic grade (GG) is a 97-gene signature which improves the accuracy and prognostic value of histological grade (HG) in invasive breast carcinoma. Since most of the genes included in the GG are involved in cell proliferation, we performed a retrospective study to compare the prognostic value of GG, Mitotic Index and Ki67 score. Methods A series of 163 consecutive breast cancers was retained (pT1–2, pN0, pM0, 10-yr follow-up). GG was computed using MapQuant Dx(R). Results GG was low (GG-1) in 48%, high (GG-3) in 31% and equivocal in 21% of cases. For HG-2 tumors, 50% were classified as GG-1, 18% as GG-3 whereas 31% remained equivocal. In a subgroup of 132 ER+/HER2? tumors GG was the most significant prognostic factor in multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusted for age and tumor size (HR?=?5.23, p?=?0.02). Conclusions In a reference comprehensive cancer center setting, compared to histological grade, GG added significant information on cell proliferation in breast cancers. In patients with HG-2 carcinoma, applying the GG to guide the treatment scheme could lead to a reduction in adjuvant therapy prescription. However, based on the results observed and considering (i) the relatively close prognostic values of GG and Ki67, (ii) the reclassification of about 30% of HG-2 tumors as Equivocal GG and (iii) the economical and technical requirements of the MapQuant micro-array GG test, the availability in the near future of a PCR-based Genomic Grade test with improved performances may lead to an introduction in clinical routine of this test for histological grade 2, ER positive, HER2 negative breast carcinoma. PMID:22529987

Reyal, Fabien; Bollet, Marc A.; Caly, Martial; Gentien, David; Carpentier, Sabrina; Peyro-Saint-Paul, Hélène; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Cottu, Paul; Dieras, Véronique; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sastre-Garau, Xavier

2012-01-01

263

Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-06-02

264

Par(-4)oxysm in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion that leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

2013-01-01

265

Genome evolution during progression to breast cancer.  

PubMed

Cancer evolution involves cycles of genomic damage, epigenetic deregulation, and increased cellular proliferation that eventually culminate in the carcinoma phenotype. Early neoplasias, which are often found concurrently with carcinomas and are histologically distinguishable from normal breast tissue, are less advanced in phenotype than carcinomas and are thought to represent precursor stages. To elucidate their role in cancer evolution we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing of early neoplasias, matched normal tissue, and carcinomas from six patients, for a total of 31 samples. By using somatic mutations as lineage markers we built trees that relate the tissue samples within each patient. On the basis of these lineage trees we inferred the order, timing, and rates of genomic events. In four out of six cases, an early neoplasia and the carcinoma share a mutated common ancestor with recurring aneuploidies, and in all six cases evolution accelerated in the carcinoma lineage. Transition spectra of somatic mutations are stable and consistent across cases, suggesting that accumulation of somatic mutations is a result of increased ancestral cell division rather than specific mutational mechanisms. In contrast to highly advanced tumors that are the focus of much of the current cancer genome sequencing, neither the early neoplasia genomes nor the carcinomas are enriched with potentially functional somatic point mutations. Aneuploidies that occur in common ancestors of neoplastic and tumor cells are the earliest events that affect a large number of genes and may predispose breast tissue to eventual development of invasive carcinoma. PMID:23568837

Newburger, Daniel E; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Weng, Ziming; Salari, Raheleh; Sweeney, Robert T; Brunner, Alayne L; Zhu, Shirley X; Guo, Xiangqian; Varma, Sushama; Troxell, Megan L; West, Robert B; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

2013-07-01

266

Genome evolution during progression to breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Cancer evolution involves cycles of genomic damage, epigenetic deregulation, and increased cellular proliferation that eventually culminate in the carcinoma phenotype. Early neoplasias, which are often found concurrently with carcinomas and are histologically distinguishable from normal breast tissue, are less advanced in phenotype than carcinomas and are thought to represent precursor stages. To elucidate their role in cancer evolution we performed comparative whole-genome sequencing of early neoplasias, matched normal tissue, and carcinomas from six patients, for a total of 31 samples. By using somatic mutations as lineage markers we built trees that relate the tissue samples within each patient. On the basis of these lineage trees we inferred the order, timing, and rates of genomic events. In four out of six cases, an early neoplasia and the carcinoma share a mutated common ancestor with recurring aneuploidies, and in all six cases evolution accelerated in the carcinoma lineage. Transition spectra of somatic mutations are stable and consistent across cases, suggesting that accumulation of somatic mutations is a result of increased ancestral cell division rather than specific mutational mechanisms. In contrast to highly advanced tumors that are the focus of much of the current cancer genome sequencing, neither the early neoplasia genomes nor the carcinomas are enriched with potentially functional somatic point mutations. Aneuploidies that occur in common ancestors of neoplastic and tumor cells are the earliest events that affect a large number of genes and may predispose breast tissue to eventual development of invasive carcinoma. PMID:23568837

Newburger, Daniel E.; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Weng, Ziming; Salari, Raheleh; Sweeney, Robert T.; Brunner, Alayne L.; Zhu, Shirley X.; Guo, Xiangqian; Varma, Sushama; Troxell, Megan L.; West, Robert B.; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

2013-01-01

267

Personalized Therapy in Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Systemic treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer is based on endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and molecular targeted therapy – with the major problems of immense overtreatment of patients who would not relapse without systemic therapy and the failure of treatment in others whose disease still recurs. These deficits can only be overcome by the identification of new and better prognostic

Frederik Marmé; Andreas Schneeweiss

2012-01-01

268

Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications  

Cancer.gov

Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

269

The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

270

Management of metastatic breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systemic treatment almost certainly prolongs the median survival of women with metastatic breast cancer, and it may prolong the survival of a small number of patients substantially. Even with conventional therapy, 10% or more patients may live into the second decade after recurrence. However, the disease cannot be eradicated, and the primary goal of treatment remains palliation and improvement of

Karmen Wong; I. Craig Henderson

1994-01-01

271

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

272

Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

2007-04-24

273

Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)  

Cancer.gov

Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

274

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... their periods early (before age 12) or reached menopause late (after age 55). Breast cancer is more common among women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy until after age 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have ...

275

Dominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families  

E-print Network

cancer fami- lies containing members with ovarian cancer or male breast cancer (1). However, mutations of female breast cancer but no cases of male breast cancer or ovarian cancer (1). It is, therefore, likelyDominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Amanda B

Nyholt, Dale R.

276

Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.  

PubMed

Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67. PMID:21655659

Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

2011-01-01

277

Unusual Aggressive Breast Cancer: Metastatic Malignant Phyllodes Tumor  

PubMed Central

For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor. PMID:23705037

Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

2013-01-01

278

Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial  

Cancer.gov

The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies.

279

Breast density and breast cancer risk: a practical review.  

PubMed

New legislation in several states requiring breast density notification in all mammogram reports has increased awareness of breast density. Estimates indicate that up to 50% of women undergoing mammography will have high breast density; thus, with increased attention and high prevalence of increased breast density, it is crucial that primary care clinicians understand the implications of dense breasts and are able to provide appropriate counseling. This review provides an overview of breast density, specifically by defining breast density, exploring the association between breast density and breast cancer risk, both from masking and as an independent risk factor, and reviewing supplemental screening options as part of a larger framework for counseling patients with dense breasts. PMID:24684876

Wang, Amy T; Vachon, Celine M; Brandt, Kathleen R; Ghosh, Karthik

2014-04-01

280

BRCA 1/2-Mutation Related and Sporadic Breast and Ovarian Cancers: More Alike than Different  

PubMed Central

No longer is histology solely predictive of cancer treatment and outcome. There is an increasing influence of tumor genomic characteristics on therapeutic options. Both breast and ovarian cancers are at higher risk of development in patients with BRCA 1/2-germline mutations. Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have shown a number of genomic similarities between triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) and ovarian cancers. Recently, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising activity in hereditary BRCA 1/2-mutated and sporadic breast and ovarian cancers. In this review, we will summarize the current literature regarding the genomic and phenotypic similarities between BRCA 1/2-mutation related cancers, sporadic TNBCs, and sporadic ovarian cancers. We will also review Phase I, II, and III data using PARP inhibitors for these malignancies and compare and contrast the results with respect to histology. PMID:24579064

Burgess, Melissa; Puhalla, Shannon

2014-01-01

281

Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), a joint effort co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is the next phase of a program that began with the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC) in 2003. The BCERP supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

282

Immunohistochemical Profile and Morphology in Triple – Negative Breast Cancers  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose: Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) is defined by a lack of expression of the steroid hormone receptors (oestrogen and progesterone), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is characterized by distinct molecular, histological and clinical features. It is a high risk breast cancer that lacks the benefit of a specific therapy. Our study was aimed at pathologically illustrating triple-negative breast carcinoma and at evaluating the expression of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) ,cytokeratin 5/6 (CK 5/6) and Ki-67 among triple-negative breast cancer cases. Further, we aimed to probe whether triple–negative phenotype could be a surrogate marker for the basal phenotype and to correlate the expression of the basal markers (CK 5/6 and EGFR) with the clinico-pathological prognostic parameters. Methods: The expression of EGFR, CK 5/6 and Ki-67 were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 50 triple-negative breast cancer cases. Statistical Analysis: A statistical analysis was implemented by using the SPSS version 20.0. The Chi-square test was conducted to assess the relationship between the immunohistochemical markers and other variables. The Fischer exact test was used when the expected cell counts were less than 5. Results: The women with triple-negative breast cancer were younger, with the adverse pathological characteristics of a high tumour grade, tumour necrosis, frequent nodal metastases and high proliferation. 37 (74%) of the 50 triple-negative breast carcinomas showed the expression of the basal markers (EGFR and /or CK 5/6). We observed a statistically significant association between the basal marker expression and the presence of tumour necrosis. Conclusion: The triple-negative breast cancers in our population harbour adverse pathobiological features and a five marker immunohistochemical panel can be reliably used to define the basal-like cancers. The “Triple-negative” status cannot be used as a surrogate for the “basal marker expression”. PMID:23998066

Rao, Chandrika; Shetty, Jayaprakash; Prasad, Kishan HL

2013-01-01

283

Classification and prognosis of invasive breast cancer: from morphology to molecular taxonomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many years, patient age, axillary lymph node status, tumor size, histological features (especially histological grade and lymphovascular invasion), hormone receptor status, and HER2 status have been the major factors used to categorize patients with breast cancer in order to assess prognosis and determine the appropriate therapy. These factors are most often viewed in combination to group patients into various

Stuart J Schnitt

2010-01-01

284

Risk factors for ductal and lobular breast cancer: results from the nurses' health study  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Ductal and lobular carcinomas are the two most common types of invasive breast cancer. Whether well-established risk factors are differentially associated with risk on the basis of histologic subtype is not clear. We prospectively investigated the association between a number of hormonal and nonhormonal exposures and risk defined by histologic subtype among 4,655 ductal and 659 lobular cases of

Joanne Kotsopoulos; Wendy Y Chen; Margaret A Gates; Shelley S Tworoger; Susan E Hankinson; Bernard A Rosner

2010-01-01

285

Ductal carcinoma in situ and the emergence of diversity during breast cancer evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Human invasive breast cancers (IBC) show enormous histologic and biological diversity. This study comprehensively evaluated diversity in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the immediate precursors of IBCs. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The extent of diversity for conventional histologic grade and standard prognostic biomarkers assessed by immunohistochemistry was evaluated in a series of pure DCIS (n = 200) compared with a contemporaneous

D. C. Allred; Y. Wu; S. Mao; I. D. Nagtegaal; S. Lee; C. M. Perou; S. K. Mohsin; P. O'Connell; A. Tsimelzon; D. Medina

2008-01-01

286

Cancer stem cells in breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a critical role in breast cancer initiation, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. It is thought that they are either generated from normal mammary stem/progenitor cells or from mammary epithelial cells by epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Breast CSCs are characterized by the activation of stemness-related pathways, such as the Notch and Wnt pathways, and by the expression of certain stem cell markers, such as CD44, EpCAM and ALDH1. CSCs form a minor population, whose proportion depends on various factors, including environmental conditions. Since CSCs are highly resistant to chemotherapy, additional treatment of breast cancer patients with CSC-specific drugs, such as salinomycin and gamma-secretase inhibitors which target the Wnt or Notch pathway, respectively, will be required. Interestingly, an equilibrium seems to exist between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells, and there are indications that CSCs can be recruited from non-stem cancer cells. As a consequence, it may be necessary to combine a therapy targeting CSCs with common chemotherapy that targets the bulk tumor to avoid the regeneration of CSCs. PMID:23468411

Dittmer, Jürgen; Rody, Achim

2013-07-01

287

Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2012-12-12

288

Molecular Changes in Primary Breast Tumors and the Nottingham Histologic Score  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathological grade is routinely used to stratify breast cancer patients into favorable and less favorable outcome groups.\\u000a Mechanisms by which genomic changes in breast tumors specifically contribute to the underlying components of tumor grade –\\u000a tubule formation, nuclear pleomorphism, and mitoses — are unknown. This study examined 26 chromosomal regions known to be\\u000a altered in breast cancer in 256 invasive

Rachel E. Ellsworth; Jeffrey A. Hooke; Brad Love; Darrell L. Ellsworth; Craig D. Shriver

2009-01-01

289

Radiation Dose and Breast Cancer Risk in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the risk of breast cancer in relation to radiation dose and chemotherapy among survivors of childhood cancer. Methods We conducted a case-control study of breast cancer in a cohort of 6,647 women who were 5-year survivors of childhood cancer and who were treated during 1970 through 1986. One hundred twenty patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer were identified and were individually matched to four selected controls on age at initial cancer and time since initial cancer. Medical physicists estimated radiation dose to the breast tumor site and ovaries on the basis of medical records. Results The odds ratio for breast cancer increased linearly with radiation dose, and it reached 11-fold for local breast doses of approximately 40 Gy relative to no radiation (P for trend < .0001). Risk associated with breast irradiation was sharply reduced among women who received 5 Gy or more to the ovaries (P = .002). The excess odds ratio per Gy was 0.36 for those who received ovarian doses less than 5 Gy and was 0.06 for those who received higher doses. Radiation-related risk did not vary significantly by age at exposure. Borderline significantly elevated risks were seen for doxorubicin, dactinomycin, dacarbazine, and carmustine. Conclusion Results confirm the radiation sensitivity of the breast in girls age 10 to 20 years but do not demonstrate a strong effect of age at exposure within this range. Irradiation of the ovaries at doses greater than 5 Gy seems to lessen the carcinogenic effects of breast irradiation, most likely by reducing exposure of radiation-damaged breast cells to stimulating effects of ovarian hormones. PMID:19620485

Inskip, Peter D.; Robison, Leslie L.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Whitton, John A.; Diller, Lisa; Kenney, Lisa; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meadows, Anna T.; Neglia, Joseph P.

2009-01-01

290

Breast Cancer Patients Might Prefer 'Invisible Tattoo'  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Breast Cancer Patients Might Prefer 'Invisible Tattoo' Dark ink used to mark treatment area is ... TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Using "invisible" tattoos instead of permanent dark ink ones when breast ...

291

Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast carcinoma in situ : Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive condition in which abnormal cells ... other tissues in the breast. In some cases, DCIS may become invasive cancer and spread to other ...

292

Loss of imprinting of IGF2 and not H19 in breast cancer, adjacent normal tissue and derived fibroblast cultures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Insulin-like growth factors are involved in the paracrine growth regulation of human breast tumor cells. IGF2 is imprinted in most tissues, and shows expression of the paternal allele only. To investigate whether disruption of this monoallelic IGF2 expression is involved in breast cancer development, a series of primary tumors and adjacent, histologically normal, breast tissue samples, as well as matched

C. E. P van Roozendaal; A. J. M Gillis; J. G. M Klijn; B van Ooijen; C. J. C Claassen; A. M. M Eggermont; S. C Henzen-Logmans; J. W Oosterhuis; J. A Foekens; L. H. J Looijenga

1998-01-01

293

Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.  

PubMed

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

294

Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies  

PubMed Central

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

295

Fertility after breast cancer treatment.  

PubMed

In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established fertility preservation strategy, providing a 25-35% chance of pregnancy. In addition, oocyte freezing can be considered as an alternative in patients who are single and in those who do not wish a sperm donor. Although ovarian tissue harvesting appears to be safe, experience regarding ovarian transplantation is still limited due to low utilization, so the true value of this procedure remains to be determined. Nevertheless, in clinical situations in which chemotherapy needs to be started in young patients facing premature ovarian failure, ovarian tissue preservation seems to be a promising option for restoring fertility, especially in conjunction with other options like immature oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation of oocytes, oocyte vitrification, or embryo cryopreservation. It seems that in vitro maturation is a useful strategy because it improves oocyte or cryopreservation outcome in breast cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation. PMID:24315568

Kasum, Miro; Beketi?-Oreškovi?, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Oreškovi?, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

2014-02-01

296

How can grafted breast cancer models be optimized?  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most frequent spontaneous malignancy diagnosed in women and is characterized by a broad histological diversity. Progression of the disease has a metastasizing trend and can be resistant to hormonal and chemotherapy. Animal models have provided some understanding of these features and have allowed new treatments to be proposed. However, these models need to be revised because they have some limitations in predicting the clinical efficacy of new therapies. In this review, we discuss the biological criteria to be taken into account for a realistic animal model of breast cancer graft (tumor implantation site, animal immune status, histological diversity, modern imaging). We emphasize the need for more stringent monitoring criteria, and suggest adopting the human RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria to evaluate treatments in animal models. PMID:22057217

Mollard, Severine; Mousseau, Yoanne; Baaj, Yasser; Richard, Laurence; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Monteil, Jacques; Funalot, Benoit

2011-01-01

297

77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the...States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans...000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and tens of...

2012-10-04

298

NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

299

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

300

76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the...commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously...early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this year,...

2011-10-07

301

What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Additional resources for breast cancer What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Research into the causes, prevention, ... many medical centers throughout the world. Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits ...

302

78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of...America stands in solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every corner of...

2013-10-04

303

75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8572 of October 1, 2010 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the...been made in the fight against breast cancer, it remains the most frequently...will be claimed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we...

2010-10-08

304

Does breast cancer change patients’ dietary habits?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The results of epidemiological studies on diet and cancer are often difficult to interpret on an individual level and may influence patients’ beliefs, attitudes and behaviour. This study investigated the behaviour of breast cancer patients and their attitudes to dietary changes and the need of dietary advice during their disease.Patients and methods: The study population consisted of breast cancer

EK Salminen; HK Lagström; SP Heikkilä; SJ Salminen

2000-01-01

305

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer September 18, 2013 2:00 ­ 4:00 PM Reception. Speakers in the symposium will cover: (1) basic research in breast cancer metastasis, (2) drug discovery basic research ideas to drugs and inhibitors as therapeutic interventions for cancer treatment

306

Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and ovarian cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

307

[Mammographic detection of early breast cancer].  

PubMed

For the discovery of minimal breast cancer with mammography, photos under appropriate conditions are required, and for the abnormal shadows in the breast, detailed readings of the shadows and photos on the spot under the sufficient pressure over the breast enable us to draw clearer pictures. It is desirable to examine micro-calcification to perform accurate biopsy and histopathology; with serial section of the specimen. Furthermore, it has become important for the diagnosis of lesion with galactography for nipple discharge to detect early breast cancer. Henceforth, the role of mammography among all graphic diagnosis will become greater for the discovery of early breast cancer. PMID:3172495

Watanabe, S

1988-08-01

308

Digital dermal patterns in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Fingerprints of 570 breast cancer cases and the same number of matched controls were obtained from the population-based finger print file in Hawaii for studying the association between breast cancer and digital dermal patterns and ridge counts. The results showed that breast cancer patients had a significant excess of radial loops on the left hand. It was also found that the frequency of ulnar loops on the left hand was significantly elevated for premenopausal women with breast cancer, whereas an excess of radial loops on the left hand was observed for the postmenopausal women with breast cancer. No significant difference for the total and absolute ridge counts was found between breast cancer patients and controls. PMID:3615667

Huang, C M; Mi, M P

1987-04-01

309

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

Fantini, Sergio

310

From the Cover: Prospective identification of tumorigenic breast cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in United States women, accounting for >40,000 deaths each year. These breast tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of breast cancer cells. Using a model in which human breast cancer cells were grown in immunocompromised mice, we found that only a minority of breast cancer cells had the ability to form new

Muhammad Al-Hajj; Max S. Wicha; Adalberto Benito-Hernandez; Sean J. Morrison; Michael F. Clarke

2003-01-01

311

Axillary surgery in breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgeons have routinely removed ipsilateral axillary lymph nodes from women with breast cancer for over 100 years. The procedure\\u000a provides important staging information, enhances regional control of the malignancy and may improve survival. As screening\\u000a of breast cancer has increased, the mean size of newly diagnosed primary invasive breast cancers has steadily decreased and\\u000a so has the number of women

A. Millet; C. A. Fuster; A. Lluch; F. Dirbas

2007-01-01

312

Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-03-27

313

Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-06-27

314

Axillary metastases from occult breast cancer. Our experience.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with occult breast cancer who presented with a hard metastatic nodule in the left axilla. Although histology identified a metastatic carcinoma in the lymph nodes, numerous tests failed to detect the primary tumor. Resected lymph node was positive for both estrogen and progesterone receptors, suggesting the breast as the site of the primary tumor. Left modified radical mastectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an invasive lobular carcinoma (2.5 x 2 mm in size) with extensive lymphatic involvement, which strongly expressed both vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D. PMID:24576904

Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Polistena, Andrea; D'Ermo, Giuseppe; Lucchini, Roberta; Triola, Roberta; Conti, Claudia; Avenia, Stefano; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; De Toma, Giorgio; Avenia, Nicola

2014-02-01

315

Organotropism of Breast Cancer Metastasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer causes mortality by metastasizing to a variety of vital organs, such as bone, lung, brain and liver. Effective\\u000a therapeutic intervention of this deadly process relies on a better mechanistic understanding of metastasis organotropism.\\u000a Recent studies have confirmed earlier speculations that metastasis is a non-random process and is dependent on intricate tumor-stroma\\u000a interactions at the target organ. Both the

Xin Lu; Yibin Kang

2007-01-01

316

Molecular profiling in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular profiling has provided biological evidence for the heterogeneity of breast cancer through the identification of\\u000a intrinsic subtypes like Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2+\\/ER? and basal-like. It has also led to the development of clinically applicable\\u000a gene expression-based prognostic panels like the Mammaprint® and Oncotype Dx™. The increasingly sophisticated understanding\\u000a allowed by this and similar technology promises future individualized therapy.

Shannon R. Morris; Lisa A. Carey

2007-01-01

317

The Genetics of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Breast cancer (BC) is a complex and heterogeneous disease caused by interaction of both genetic and nongenetic risk factors.\\u000a The biological diversity of sporadic BCs consists in the development of several BC subtypes, which are systematically different\\u000a from one another and which present specific genetic and phenotypic features. Recently, with the advent of cDNA microarrays\\u000a it has been possible to

Antonio Russo; Valentina Agnese; Sergio Rizzo; Laura Paglia; Viviana Bazan

318

Presenting Painless Breast Cancer Detection!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson culminates the unit with the Go Public phase of the legacy cycle. In the associated activity, students depict a tumor amidst healthy body tissue using a Microsoft Excel® graph. In addition, students design a brochure for both patients and doctors advertising a new form of painless yet reliable breast cancer detection. Together, the in-class activity and the take-home assignment function as an assessment of what students have learned throughout the unit.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

319

Genetic determinants of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western\\u000aworld and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will\\u000ahave a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2).\\u000aThe degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the general population\\u000a(2). The vast majority of

A. M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd

2007-01-01

320

Implications of Functional Proteomics in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems of the Western world. Recent advances in genomics and gene expression-profiling approaches have enriched our understanding of this heterogeneous disease. However, progress in functional proteomics in breast cancer research has been relatively slow. Allied with genomics, the functional proteomics approach will be important in improving diagnosis through better classification of breast cancer and in predicting prognosis and response to different therapies, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapy. In this review, we will present functional proteomic approaches with a focus on the recent clinical implications of utilizing the reverse-phase protein array platform in breast cancer research. PMID:24664486

Chae, Young Kwang

2014-01-01

321

Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects  

PubMed Central

Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials.

Kolberg, H.-C.; Luftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schutz, F.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kummel, S.

2012-01-01

322

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

323

Iron homeostasis in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Iron is an essential element and a critical component of molecules involved in energy production, cell cycle and intermediate metabolism. However, the same characteristic chemistry that makes it so biologically versatile may lead to iron-associated toxicity as a consequence of increased oxidative stress. The fact that free iron accumulates with age and generates ROS led to the hypothesis that it could be involved in the etiogenesis of several chronic diseases. Iron has been consistently linked to carcinogenesis, either through persistent failure in the redox balance or due to its critical role in cellular proliferation. Several reports have given evidence that alterations in the import, export and storage of cellular iron may contribute to breast cancer development, behavior and recurrence. In this review, we summarize the basic mechanisms of systemic and cellular iron regulation and highlight the findings that link their deregulation with breast cancer. To conclude, progresses in iron chelation therapy in breast cancer, as a tool to fight chemotherapy resistance, are also reviewed. PMID:24486738

Marques, Oriana; da Silva, Berta Martins; Porto, Graça; Lopes, Carlos

2014-05-28

324

The dream and reality of histology agnostic cancer clinical trials.  

PubMed

Emerging technologies and progress in data processing allowed for new insights on gene expression, genomics and epigenomics, and mechanisms of cancer genesis and progression. The development of new therapeutic strategies should therefore be triggered by the understanding of the underlying biology through sophisticated clinical trials. Therefore, the methodology and the design of cancer clinical trials as well as the methods of their implementation are under profound changes. Targeting specific pathways has open the hope of a more focused and personalized medicine which has the potential to bring more efficient and tailored treatments to patients. It has been questioned therefore whether clinical trials traditionally designed for specific tumor types could not re-visited towards trials gathering patients based on molecular features rather than pure pathology criteria. The complexity of the cancer biology being the result of so many different interactive mechanisms whether driving or not the process of cancer cells is an additional level of complexity to approach more inclusive clinical trial access. Nevertheless, a number of innovative solutions to address biological challenges across histologies have been initiated and the question of whether histology agnostic trials could be conceived is a logical next question. This paper questions the advantages and the limits of clinical trials performed across tumor types bearing similar selected molecular features and looks further into the feasibility of such histology agnostic trials. PMID:25349876

Lacombe, Denis; Burock, Susen; Bogaerts, Jan; Schoeffski, Patrick; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Stupp, Roger

2014-09-12

325

Detecting Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the unit challenge: To develop a painless means of identifying cancerous tumors. Solving the challenge depends on an understanding of the properties of stress and strain. After learning the challenge question, students generate ideas and consider the knowledge required to solve the challenge. Then they read an expert's opinion on ultrasound imaging and the potentials for detecting cancerous tumors. This interview helps to direct student research and learning towards finding a solution.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

326

[Comparative histological and cytological characteristics of peripheral lung cancer].  

PubMed

Peripheral pulmonary carcinoma was analysed retrospectively histologically, histochemically, and cytologically. The examination material (smears taken at percutaneous thoracic aspirational biopsy, resected lung or lung lobe) had been obtained from 113 patients with PPC among whom 85 patients underwent pulmon- or lobe-ectomy. Cytological examination of specimens from percutaneous thoracic biopsy allowed the diagnosis of PPC to be established in 90.6% of cases and to determine correctly the histological type of cancer in 85.7%. No regular correlation between the levels of tissue and cellular differentiation in squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma was found. Argyrophilic granules (Grimelius reaction) were detected in cells of combined oat cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma of transitional type. Because of the existence of combined tumors in the lungs consisting of cells of different types of differentiation it is suggested that complex histological types of pulmonary carcinoma can develop from a common polypotent precursor cell. PMID:6303278

Zolotarevski?, V B; Kogan, E A; Ablitsov, Iu A

1983-01-01

327

Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

Williams, Norman R; Pigott, Katharine H; Brew-Graves, Chris; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S

2014-05-01

328

Current and future role of neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy is a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of locally advanced operable, primarily non-operable or inflammatory breast cancer. Neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy is an option for breast cancer patients who would require adjuvant chemotherapy otherwise based on clinical and histological examination and imaging. The use of neoadjuvant systemic therapy in operable breast cancer is currently increasing because of its advantages that include higher rates of breast conserving surgery and the possibility of measuring early in-vivo response to systemic treatment. The timing of axillary sentinel lymph node diagnosis (i.e. before or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) is critical in that it may influence the likelihood of axillary preservation. It is not yet clear if neoadjuvant therapy might improve outcomes in certain subgroups of breast cancer patients. Neoadjuvant treatment modalities require a close collaboration between oncology professionals, including surgeons, gynecologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists and pathologists. The most important parameter for treatment success and improved overall survival is the achievement of a pathologic complete response (pCR), although the role of pCR in patients with luminal A like tumours might be less informative. Identification of patient subgroups with high pCR rates may allow less invasive surgical or radiological interventions. Patients not achieving a pCR may be candidates for postoperative clinical trials exploring novel systemic treatments. PMID:25034931

Untch, Michael; Konecny, Gottfried E; Paepke, Stefan; von Minckwitz, Gunter

2014-10-01

329

Interleukin-8 in Breast Cancer Progression  

PubMed Central

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a chemokine that has an autocrine and/or paracrine tumor-promoting role and significant potential as a prognostic and/or predictive cancer biomarker. In breast cancer, which is mostly determined by expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), IL-8 could play a specific role. IL-8 is highly expressed in ER? breast cancers, but it increases invasiveness and metastatic potential of both ER? and ER+ breast cancer cells. It is also highly expressed in HER2+ breast cancers. Because of the complex crosstalk between these receptors and IL-8, its role is mainly determined by delicate balance in their signaling pathways. Therefore, the main point of this review was to analyze the possible influence of IL-8 in breast cancer progression related to its interaction with ER and HER2 and the consequent therapeutic implications of these relations. PMID:23697558

Milovanovic, Jelena

2013-01-01

330

Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - April 21, 1998  

Cancer.gov

"Breast Cancer Prevention Trial" Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Statement of Richard D. Klausner, M.D. Director, National Cancer Institute Before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human

331

Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - April 30, 1998  

Cancer.gov

"Breast Cancer Prevention Trial" Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Statement of Leslie Ford, M.D. Associate Director for Early Detection and Community Oncology National Cancer Institute Before the Congressional

332

Treatment Options by Stage (Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... effective or better than the standard treatment . Many of today's standard treatments for cancer are based on earlier ... used in women who have a high risk of getting breast cancer. Most surgeons believe that this is a more aggressive treatment ...

333

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes what is known about the relationship between pregnancy, miscarriage, abortion, and the risk of breast cancer. It also briefly describes what is known about reproductive history and the risk of other cancer types.

334

Donor Immune Cells Attack Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In patients with metastatic breast cancer, immune cells from a genetically matched donor can attack and shrink tumors, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

335

Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

1992-12-31

336

Breast edema in breast cancer patients following breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is commonly used in breast cancer treatment. Despite its benefits, some women will be troubled by breast edema. Breast edema may cause an unsatisfactory cosmetic result, influencing the quality of life. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the incidence of breast edema and to identify risk factors of breast edema in breast cancer patients following BCS and radiotherapy. A systematic literature search was performed using different electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, Embase) until June 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) research studies that included female breast cancer patients who were treated with BCS and radiotherapy and (2) studies that investigated the incidence of breast edema and/or risk factors of breast edema. Exclusion criteria were (1) reviews or case studies and (2) studies published before 1995. We identified in total 28 papers which represented 4,011 patients. There was a great variation in the incidence of breast edema (0-90.4 %). We identified several possible risk factors for breast edema namely increasing irradiated breast volume, increasing boost volume, the use of a photon boost, increasing breast separation, a higher density of the breast tissue, a large tumor, a higher specimen weight, postoperative infection, acute postoperative toxicity, and diabetes mellitus. However, their prognostic value remains uncertain. Breast edema is a common complaint after BCS and radiotherapy. A number of possible risk factors associated with breast edema were identified, but further research is warranted. PMID:25164973

Verbelen, Hanne; Gebruers, Nick; Beyers, Tinne; De Monie, Anne-Caroline; Tjalma, Wiebren

2014-10-01

337

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

1976-01-01

338

Can some patients avoid adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the risk of relapse and mortality for women with early-stage breast cancer. However, many women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer experience the toxic effects associated with adjuvant chemotherapy without any meaningful benefit. There are a variety of clinicopathological factors—including hormone receptor expression, histology, and proliferation markers such as Ki-67—that can be used to try to identify patients

Fatima Cardoso; Philippe L. Bedard

2011-01-01

339

Anastrozole in Treating Aromatase Inhibitor Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Female Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Musculoskeletal Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-09-16

340

Histologic features predict local recurrence after breast conserving therapy of phyllodes tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pathologists can distinguish benign phyllodes tumors, which very rarely metastasize, from malignant phyllodes tumors, which metastasize in approximately one fourth of patients. However, whether these same histologic criteria can be used to predict the likelihood that a phyllodes tumor will locally recur after breast conserving therapy remains controversial.

1999-01-01

341

Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab Followed By Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-05-07

342

Histological subtypes of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  It has become common to divide ductal carcinomain situ (DCIS) of the breast into two main groups, comedo or noncomedo by tumor morphology. But noncomedo DCIS can be further stratified\\u000a into several morphological patterns that exhibit several different growth patterns and most DCIS lesions have more than one\\u000a pattern. In this study, DCIS elements were classified by morphological pattern and

Hideyuki Ajisaka; Koichiro Tsugawa; Masakuni Noguchi; Koichi Miwa; Akitaka Nonomura

2002-01-01

343

Ductographic Findings of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Ductography has become the gold standard for the evaluation of patients exhibiting pathologic nipple discharges. In nine patients (age range, 29-67 years; median age, 51 years) with invasive (n=5) or intraductal (n=4) cancer, ductographic findings were recorded, then correlated with mammographic and sonographic findings. Common ductographic findings included complete ductal obstruction, multiple irregular filling defects in the nondilated peripheral ducts, ductal wall irregularities, periductal contrast extravasation, and ductal displacement. Faint microcalcifications or ill-defined masses, which were not opacified by contrast material, were often discovered adjacent to ductal abnormalities. Mammographically and sonographically occult diffusely spreading intraductal cancers often manifested as pathologic nipple discharge. In such cases, meticulous ductographic examinations and interpretations were crucial in order not to miss breast cancers. PMID:15782017

Cho, Nariya; Chung, Sun Yang; Cha, Joo Hee; Cho, Kyung Soo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun

2005-01-01

344

Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53,

Paul T. Spellman; Laura Heiser; Joe W. Gray

2009-01-01

345

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy  

E-print Network

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy S irradiation for cases of early stage breast cancer. Delivering higher doses to more localized volumes demands, France Keywords: Finite Element model; breast soft tissues; partial breast irradiation; breast phantom. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

The Genomic Signature of Breast Cancer Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early pregnancy imprints in the breast permanent genomic changes or a signature that reduces the susceptibility of this organ to cancer. The breast attains its maximum development during pregnancy and\\u000a lactation. After menopause, the breast regresses in both nulliparous and parous women containing lobular structures designated\\u000a Lob.1. The Lob 1 found in the breast of nulliparous women and of parous

Jose Russo; Gabriela Balogh; Daniel Mailo; Patricia A. Russo; Rebecca Heulings; Irma H. Russo

347

Editorial breast cancer treatment: Room for improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is an emotive disease as it is virtually confined to women, the incidence of cancer of the male breast being less than one percent. It is estimated that it will affect about one in twelve Irish women during the course of their lives. It is the commonest malignancy affecting women - and 4% of Irish women will die

Maurice A. Stokes; Thomas F. Gorey

1994-01-01

348

The increasing efficacy of breast cancer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy in women and although identification of this multi-system disease has increased, the survival rates have not dramatically altered over the past four decades. Optimium treatment of patients with breast cancer is a subject of great debate and traditionally may be divided into surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone manipulation.Halsted's radical mastectomy, although initially superseded by

A. Gordon

1997-01-01

349

Can passive smoking cause breast cancer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of the data from the “Erie County study on smoking and health” on the effect of smoking on breast cancer incidence showed that active smoking appears to increase breast cancer mortality when compared to nonsmoking women as reported in the January–February edition of this journal. The present report separates nonsmoking women into two categories: (1) nonexposed nonsmoking women

G. H. Miller

2002-01-01

350

Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the breast cancer research training program is to recruit and train potential future researchers in breast cancer research. From a total of 90 applications for summer research, we selected a total of five students. During the 12 week progra...

G. P. Zaloga

2005-01-01

351

Cancers by Body Location/System: Breast  

Cancer.gov

Cancers by Body Location/System: Breast To find a cancer: select a body location or system — AIDS-RelatedBreastDigestive/GastrointestinalEndocrine and NeuroendocrineEye GenitourinaryGerm CellGynecologicHead and NeckHematologic/Blood MusculoskeletalNeurologicRespiratory/ThoracicSkinUnknown

352

Melatonin and Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Experimental data from animals suggest a pro- tective role for the pineal hormone melatonin in the etiology of breast cancer, but results from the few retrospective case- control studies that examined the association in hu- mans have been inconsistent. To determine whether low levels of endogenous melatonin are associated with an in- creased risk for developing breast cancer, we

Ruth C. Travis; Diane S. Allen; Ian S. Fentiman; Timothy J. Key

2004-01-01

353

Industrialization, electromagnetic fields, and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed Central

The disparity between the rates of breast cancer in industrialized and less-industrialized regions has led to many hypotheses, including the theory that exposure to light-at-night and/or electromagnetic fields (EMF) may suppress melatonin and that reduced melatonin may increase the risk of breast cancer. In this comprehensive review we consider strengths and weaknesses of more than 35 residential and occupational epidemiologic studies that investigated the association between EMF and breast cancer. Although most of the epidemiologic data do not provide strong support for an association between EMF and breast cancer, because of the limited statistical power as well as the possibility of misclassification and bias present in much of the existing data, it is not possible to rule out a relationship between EMF and breast cancer. We make several specific recommendations for future studies carefully designed to test the melatonin-breast cancer and EMF-breast cancer hypotheses. Future study designs should have sufficient statistical power to detect small to moderate associations; include comprehensive exposure assessments that estimate residential and occupational exposures, including shift work; focus on a relevant time period; control for known breast cancer risks; and pay careful attention to menopausal and estrogen receptor status. PMID:10229714

Kheifets, L I; Matkin, C C

1999-01-01

354

Improving Breast Cancer Care for Older Women  

Cancer.gov

Earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and the overall increase in average lifespan continue to expand the number of breast cancer survivors who are aged 65 and older. This population is already estimated to be one million of the total 2.3 million breast cancer survivors.

355

Predicting Posttraumatic Growth in Breast Cancer Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide variability exists with respect to how breast cancer survivors respond to common psychological and psychosocial challenges of their disease, ranging from posttraumatic stress disorder to posttraumatic growth. This cross-sectional study examined contextual, disease-related, and intraindividual predictors of posttraumatic growth in 224 randomly selected breast cancer survivors. A series of hierarchical regression analyses found that age at diagnosis, marital status,

Keith M. Bellizzi; Thomas O. Blank

2006-01-01

356

Jewish religion and risk of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground The excess risk of breast cancer among Jewish women has been attributed to the effects of difference in lifestyle and reproductive patterns, but there is now evidence that Jewish women may be more likely than other women to inherit mutations in breast-cancer genes. We investigated whether any excessive risk among Jewish women is confined to those with a family

K. M Egan; D Trichopoulos; M. J Stampfer; W. C Willett; P. A Newcomb; A Trentham-Dietz; M. P Longnecker; J. A Baron

1996-01-01

357

Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort is an international resource of multi-generational families, data, and biospecimens established in 1995 for interdisciplinary collaborative research on the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer. Questionnaire data, clinical data and (when available) biospecimens have been collected for over 30,000 women and men from nearly 12,000 families.

358

Keeping breast cancer survivors lymphoedema-free.  

PubMed

With the increasing number of breast cancer survivors, post-treatment interventions to improve quality of life are gaining priority. Current breast cancer treatment modalities put patients at risk of developing upper-extremity lymphoedema. Upper-extremity lymphoedema is a common and overlooked complication of breast cancer treatment. Health professionals play an important role in identifying breast cancer and promptly referring these patients for further interventions. After successful completion of breast cancer treatment, these patients continue to have regular evaluations by their oncologists; and, provided there are no signs and symptoms of breast cancer, primary and community care health professionals will continue to play an essential role in the management of this unique patient group. As breast cancer treatment places these patients at a lifetime risk of developing upper-extremity lymphoedema, radiation oncologists, surgical and medical oncologists, and primary care practitioners must be knowledgeable and educate these patients about risk reduction behaviours. Prevention, prompt identification, and treatment of lymphoedema are the goals for achieving positive and cost-effective patient outcomes. This article aims to provide health professionals with specific educational tools with regard to the prevention, recognition, and management of upper-extremity lymphoedema; these tools should be used to change the ongoing trends in the management of breast cancer survivors' follow-up care. PMID:20606611

Fleysher, Larisa A

359

Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs and Breast Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and breast cancer have produced mixed results. Incident invasive cases of breast cancer from the Multiethnic Cohort (African Americans, Caucasians, Japanese Americans, Latinas, and Native Hawaiians from Hawaii and California) were identified from 1993 to 2002. Data on aspirin, acetaminophen, and other NSAID (ibuprofen, naproxen, indomethacin) use were based on a self-administered questionnaire

Jasmeet K. Gill; Gertraud Maskarinec; Lynne R. Wilkens; Malcolm C. Pike; Brian E. Henderson; Laurence N. Kolonel

360

Breast cancer: Multidisciplinary care and clinical outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multidisciplinary approach to the management of breast cancer is the standard of care in developed health systems. We performed a systematic review to assess the extent and quality of evidence on whether multidisciplinary care (MDC), or related aspects of care contribute to clinical outcomes in breast cancer, and in particular whether these influence survival. Only two primary studies have

Nehmat Houssami; Richard Sainsbury

2006-01-01

361

Bras Blameless for Breast Cancer Risk: Study  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Bras Blameless for Breast Cancer Risk: Study Contrary to media reports, researchers found ... 2014) Friday, September 5, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Page Breast Cancer FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When it ...

362

Healthy Lifestyle May Boost Breast Cancer Survival  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Healthy Lifestyle May Boost Breast Cancer Survival Proper diet, exercise, weight control among factors ... Preidt Thursday, October 16, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Healthy Living THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

363

THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)  

EPA Science Inventory

The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

364

After Breast Cancer, Depression Risk Lingers  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. After Breast Cancer, Depression Risk Lingers Study finds survivors more likely ... 2015) Tuesday, October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Depression TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women ...

365

3D imaging finds more breast cancers.  

PubMed

In the largest such study to date, researchers have found that breast cancer screening using a combination of traditional 2D digital mammography and 3D imaging detects more invasive breast cancers and reduces false alarms compared with traditional mammography alone. PMID:25185169

2014-09-01

366

Breast cancer as a global health concern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health data indicate that the global burden of breast cancer in women, measured by incidence, mortality, and economic costs, is substantial and on the increase. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one million women are diagnosed with breast cancer every year, and more than 410,000 will die from the disease. In low- and middle-income countries (LMCs), the infrastructure

Steven S. Coughlin; Donatus U. Ekwueme

2009-01-01

367

Discovery helps show how breast cancer spreads  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (home of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center) have discovered why breast cancer patients with dense breasts are more likely than others to develop aggressive tumors that spread. The finding opens the door to drug treatments that prevent metastasis.

368

Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer  

PubMed Central

Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

2010-01-01

369

Breast cancer expresses functional NMDA receptors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate here that functional NMDAR1 and NMDAR2 receptors are expressed by Mcf-7 and SKBR3 breast cancer cell lines,\\u000a and possibly by most or all high-grade breast tumors, and that these receptors are important for the growth of human breast\\u000a cancer xenografts in mice. RT-PCR demonstrated mRNA for both NMDAR1 and NMDAR2 receptors are expressed in both Mcf-7 and SKBR3

William G. North; Guohong Gao; Vincent A. Memoli; Roy H. Pang; Launa Lynch

2010-01-01

370

Molecular Diagnostics for Breast Cancer Precursors  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute, Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a method of profiling ductal carcinoma of the breast. The implementation of mammographic screening for breast cancer has led to the frequent identification of early tumors that are confined to the ductal system of the breast. These tumors are termed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

371

Axillary lymphoma masquerading as inflammatory breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Primary non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) of the breast, and its extranodal spread to the breast resulting from systemic lymphoma, are recognised albeit uncommon conditions. However, lymphoma involving the axilla, presenting with the clinical appearance of inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) without infiltration of breast dermal lymphatics has not been reported previously. As highlighted by the two cases presented here, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with clinical IBC. The cases highlight the importance of careful histological analysis to distinguish IBC from NHL, since management strategies and prognosis are quite different. PMID:21614245

Taubman, KL; McKay, MJ

2006-01-01

372

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective association?  

E-print Network

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192�196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective to breast cancer risk. We have examined the association between mastalgia and breast cancer in the patient breast cancer risk factor information, 1532 (28%) reported breast pain as an incidental complaint

Apkarian, A. Vania

373

The influence of cosmetic breast augmentation on the stage distribution and prognosis of women subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine whether cosmetic breast implants impair the early detection of breast cancer, and adversely influence survival. This analysis derives from a cohort of 24,558 women who received bilateral cosmetic breast implants, and 15,893 women who underwent other plastic surgery procedures at the same practices in Ontario and Quebec, Canada, between 1974 and 1989. Incident cancers and vital status through 1997 were determined by record linkage to the Canadian Cancer Registry and Canadian Mortality Database. Analyses are based on a total of 182 and 202 incident cases of breast cancer identified among the implant and control groups, respectively. Contingency table analyses were performed to test for differences in the stage distribution of breast cancers between the 2 groups. Potential differences in survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models. Women who received breast implants were more likely to have advanced stage breast carcinoma relative to the other plastic surgery patients (crude and adjusted ps histological type, period of diagnosis or length of follow-up. The delayed diagnosis in augmented women did not appear to influence the overall prognosis. Breast cancer-specific survival was similar in both groups (hazard ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval = 0.65-1.74). In conclusion, this study suggests that breast implants delay the detection of breast cancer, but there was no statistically significant difference in survival between the breast implant and other plastic surgery groups. PMID:19569048

Xie, Lin; Brisson, Jacques; Holowaty, Eric J; Villeneuve, Paul J; Mao, Yang

2010-05-01

374

Ospemifene, vulvovaginal atrophy, and breast cancer.  

PubMed

The incidence and severity of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients has a significant impact on quality of life. While the etiology of VVA is primarily related to low estrogen levels seen in menopause, women with breast cancer have an added risk of VVA induced by a combination of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and menopause. Ospemifene is a new, non-hormonal selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) triphenylethylene derivative that is effective in treating VVA in postmenopausal women. Although other SERMs have antagonistic effects on the vagina, ospemifene exerts an estrogen-like effect on the vaginal epithelium. This review will focus on data demonstrating the antiestrogenic activity of ospemifene in several unique breast cancer animal models, and the implications for utilizing ospemifene in patients with breast cancer suffering from VVA. Additional research addressing the expanded use of ospemifene in breast cancer patients is also warranted. PMID:23332519

Wurz, Gregory T; Soe, Lin H; DeGregorio, Michael W

2013-03-01

375

Breast Density, Hormone Replacement, and Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

Research has shown that women age 45 or older who have at least 75 percent dense tissue on a mammogram are at an elevated risk of developing breast cancer. Reasons for this are not completely understood.

376

Benign Breast Disease: Toward Molecular Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Optimal early detection and prevention strategies for breast cancer are predicated on the health professional's ability to identify individuals at significantly increased risk for this disease. The purpose of this research is to bring molecular risk predi...

L. C. Hartmann

2006-01-01

377

Benign Breast Disease: Toward Molecular Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Optimal early detection and prevention strategies for breast cancer are predicated on our ability to identify individuals at significantly increased risk for this disease. Unfortunately only a minority of the over 200, 000 women who are diagnosed with bre...

L. C. Hartmann

2005-01-01

378

GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

379

Breast cancer detection using time reversal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer among women. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have certain limitations in detecting breast cancer, especially during its early stage of development. A number of studies have shown that microwave breast cancer detection has potential to become a successful clinical complement to the conventional X-ray mammography. Microwave breast imaging is performed by illuminating the breast tissues with an electromagnetic waveform and recording its reflections (backscatters) emanating from variations in the normal breast tissues and tumour cells, if present, using an antenna array. These backscatters, referred to as the overall (tumour and clutter) response, are processed to estimate the tumour response, which is applied as input to array imaging algorithms used to estimate the location of the tumour. Due to changes in the breast profile over time, the commonly utilized background subtraction procedures used to estimate the target (tumour) response in array processing are impractical for breast cancer detection. The thesis proposes a new tumour estimation algorithm based on a combination of the data adaptive filter with the envelope detection filter (DAF/EDF), which collectively do not require a training step. After establishing the superiority of the DAF/EDF based approach, the thesis shows that the time reversal (TR) array imaging algorithms outperform their conventional conterparts in detecting and localizing tumour cells in breast tissues at SNRs ranging from 15 to 30dB.

Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Hossein

380

Cancer stem cell-related gene periostin: a novel prognostic marker for breast cancer.  

PubMed

We investigated the expression status of periostin in breast cancer stem cells and its clinical implications in order to lay a foundation for managing breast cancer. CD44+/CD24-/line- tumor cells (CSC) from clinical specimens were sorted using flow cytometry. Periostin expression status was detected in CSC cells and 1,086 breast cancer specimens by Western blot and immunohistochemistry staining, with the CSC ratio determined by immunofluorescence double staining. The relationship between the periostin protein and clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis was subsequently determined. As a result, CSC cells are more likely to generate new tumors in mice and cell microspheres that are deficient in NOD/SCID compared to the control group. Periostin protein was expressed higher in CSC cells compared to the control cells and was found to be related to CSC chemotherapy resistance. Moreover, periostin expression was found to be related to the CSC ratio in 1,086 breast cancer specimens (P?=?0.001). In total, 334 (30.76%) of the 1,086 breast cases showed high periostin expression. After universal and Spearman regression correlation analysis, periostin was observed to be related to histological grade, CSC ratio, lymph node metastasis, tumor size, and triple-negative breast cancer (all P<0.05). Furthermore, periostin was shown to attain a significantly more distant bone metastasis and worse disease-specific survival than those with none or low-expressed periostin protein (P?=?0.001). In the Cox regression test, periostin protein was detected as an independent prognostic factor (P?=?0.001). In conclusion, periostin was found to be related to the CSC and an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer. It is also perhaps a potential target to breast cancer. PMID:23056395

Xu, Dongyang; Xu, Hong; Ren, Ying; Liu, Caigang; Wang, Xuemei; Zhang, Hao; Lu, Ping

2012-01-01

381

Normal breast stem cells, malignant breast stem cells, and the perinatal origin of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both experimental and epidemiological evidence support the concept that the in utero environment can influence an individual's risk of breast cancer in adult life. Recently identified breast stem cells may\\u000a be the key to understanding the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. It has been theorized that breast cancers arise from\\u000a breast stem cells. Our emerging view of the characteristics of normal

Todd M. Savarese; Hoi Pang Low; Inkyung Baik; William C. Strohsnitter; Chung-Cheng Hsieh

2006-01-01

382

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

383

Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival  

MedlinePLUS

... for Clinical Trials Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival For some women with breast ... took it for 5 years. (See the table.) Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death 5 to 14 Years after ...

384

Breast cancer after breast augmentation with silicone implants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although epidemiological studies have failed to demonstrate an increased incidence of breast cancer in women who had undergone\\u000a prior prosthetic augmentation mammoplasty (PAM), it has been reported that when breast cancer arises in this group it presents\\u000a mostly in a palpable form and at a more advanced stage. This is thought to be secondary to suboptimal mammographic evaluation\\u000a caused

Anthony C. Cahan; Roy Ashikari; Peter Pressman; Hiram Cody; Saul Hoffman; John E. Sherman

1995-01-01

385

Nipple Discharge: An Early Warning Sign of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Nipple discharge (ND) can be the earliest presenting symptom of breast cancer. We hereby present two cases of breast cancer with no palpable mass manifesting as isolated ND, which was whitish in color. In both cases, cytology of the discharge revealed highly pleomorphic cells indicating a high grade malignancy. Mammography showed diffuse, extensive microcalcifications. Simple mastectomy with axillary clearance was done. Histology in both cases revealed diffusely spreading intraductal carcinoma, with focus of microinvasion in one case. ND if scanty or not blood stained is often ignored by the patients and at times, the clinicians. This article highlights that ND can be an early warning sign of intraductal carcinomas that are non-invasive in early stage. Irrespective of the color or nature of the discharge, unilateral ND needs to be evaluated. Proper clinical assessment, cytological evaluation of the ND, and mammography ought to be performed in all such cases. Considering the low level of awareness in women regarding the warning signs of breast cancer, the current focus is to create “breast awareness.” Women should be sensitized to recognize any unusual changes in their breasts and report to their health care providers at the earliest. PMID:23189234

Parthasarathy, Veda; Rathnam, Usharani

2012-01-01

386

Obesity and breast cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Compared to normal weight women, women with obesity have higher mortality from breast cancer but are less often screened.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVES: To examine the relation between mammography use and weight category and to examine the influence of race, illness burden,\\u000a and other factors on this relationship.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN AND SETTING: The 1998 National Health Interview Survey, a U.S. civilian population-based survey.

Christina C. Wee; Ellen P. McCarthy; Roger B. Davis; Russell S. Phillips

2004-01-01

387

Breast cancer subtyping from plasma proteins  

PubMed Central

Background Early detection of breast cancer in blood is both appealing clinically and challenging technically due to the disease's illusive nature and heterogeneity. Today, even though major breast cancer subtypes have been characterized, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+, and basal-like, little is known about the heterogeneity of breast cancer in blood, which could help to discover minimally invasive protein biomarkers with which clinical researchers can detect, classify, and monitor different breast cancer subtypes. Results In this study, we performed an integrative pathway-assisted clustering analysis of breast cancer subtypes from plasma proteome samples collected from 80 patients diagnosed with breast cancer and 80 healthy women. First, four breast cancer subtypes and additionally unknown subtype (according to existing annotation) were determined based on pathology lab test results in primary tumors of enrolled patients. Next, we developed and applied four distance metrics, i.e., Protein Intensity, Q-Value, Pathway Profile, and Distance Score Function, to measure and characterize these cancer subtypes. Then, we developed a permutation test to evaluate the significant protein level changes in each biological pathway for each breast cancer subtype, using q-value. Lastly, we developed a pathway-protein matrix for each of the four distance methods to estimate the distance between breast cancer subtypes, for which further Pathway Association Network analysis were performed. Conclusions We found that 1) the luminal group (luminal A and luminal B) are clustered together, as well as the basal group (basal-like and HER2+) and 2) luminal A and luminal B are more close to each other than basal-like and HER2+ to each other. Our results were consistent with a recent independent breast cancer research from the Cancer Genome Atlas Network using genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our results showed that changes of different breast cancer subtypes at the pathway level are more profound and less variable than those at the molecular level. Similar subtypes share distinct yet similar pathway activation networks, while dissimilar subtypes are different also at the level of pathway activation networks. The results also showed that distance or similarity of cancer subtypes based on pathway analysis might be able to provide further insight into the intrinsic relationship of breast cancer subtypes. We believe integrative pathway-assisted proteomics analysis described here can become a model for reliable clustering or classification of other cancer subtypes. PMID:23369492

2013-01-01

388

Review: mitochondrial defects in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences. PMID:21892280

Salgado, Josefa; Honorato, Beatriz; García-Foncillas, Jesús

2008-01-01

389

Breast Cancer-Race, Ethnicity, and Survival: A Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the literature on breast cancer was conducted to identify gaps in knowledge as it relates breast cancer risk, race, and survival. The discussion has been divided into three broad categories: (1) breast cancer basics and the relationships between risks, race, and survival; (2) influence of race and socioeconomic status on breast cancer morbidity and mortality; and (3)

Jennifer B. Campbell

2002-01-01

390

BRCA1 and BRCA2 in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer, one of the most common serious malignancies affecting women, occurs in hereditary and sporadic forms. Hereditary breast cancer accounts for 5–10% of all cases and has some distinctive clinical features compared with sporadic breast cancer. The recently identified genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 appear to account for the majority of hereditary breast cancer in US and European populations. Both

Xiaohong Yang; Marc E. Lippman

1999-01-01

391

Adaptation of Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer Brain Metastases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brain metastases are among the most feared complications in breast cancer, as no therapy exists that prevents or elimi- nates breast cancer spreading to the brain. New therapeutic strategies depend on specific knowledge of tumor cell properties that allow breast cancer cell growth within the brain tissue. To provide information in this direction, we established a human breast cancer cell

Emily I. Chen; Johannes Hewel; Joseph S. Krueger; Claire Tiraby; Martin R. Weber; Anastasia Kralli; Katja Becker; John R. Yates; Brunhilde Felding-Habermann

2007-01-01

392

Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative  

E-print Network

Legend Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative Brain Metastases / Leptomeningeal dz Non in HER2 Positive Breast Cancer 127511 - Neratinib for HER2 positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases 117526 - Immunotherapy with Globo H-KLH (OPT-822) for Metastatic Breast Cancer No Interventional Clinical

Walter, Peter

393

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer Shannon T. Baileya,b,c,1) More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER- breast cancers, which frequently harbor

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

394

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer Skye H. Cheng) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who Using gene expression profiles to develop prediction tree models effectively identifies breast cancer

West, Mike

395

Breast Cancer Research and ISSN 0167-6806  

E-print Network

1 23 Breast Cancer Research and Treatment ISSN 0167-6806 Breast Cancer Res Treat DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2266-3 Cognitive function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia A. Reuter

396

Breast cancer detection using automated whole breast ultrasound and mammography in radiographically dense breasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Mammography, the standard method of breast cancer screening, misses many cancers, especially in dense-breasted women. We compared\\u000a the performance and diagnostic yield of mammography alone versus an automated whole breast ultrasound (AWBU) plus mammography\\u000a in women with dense breasts and\\/or at elevated risk of breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  AWBU screening was tested in 4,419 women having routine mammography (Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:

Kevin M. Kelly; Judy Dean; W. Scott Comulada; Sung-Jae Lee

2010-01-01

397

Benign breast changes and the risk for subsequent breast cancer: an update of the 1985 consensus statement. Cancer Committee of the College of American Pathologists.  

PubMed

The Cancer Committee of the College of American Pathologists has prepared an update of the consensus statement on premalignant breast lesions and breast cancer risk that was originally published in the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine in 1986. The objective of this publication is to better define the relative breast cancer risk associated with specific histologic abnormalities by incorporating data derived from recent case-control studies. Explanatory notes are used to document and explain specific risk classifications. In addition to refining the degree of risk associated with individual lesions, such as fibroadenoma and atypical hyperplasia, this update includes a discussion of age-specific breast cancer risk and provides examples that can be used when counseling patients. PMID:9870852

Fitzgibbons, P L; Henson, D E; Hutter, R V

1998-12-01

398

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast  

E-print Network

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast cancer by providing postFoundation.org We are the only non-profit breast cancer organization to hope Bras for Body & Soul® The program. The program provides a private, understanding environment for breast cancer survivors to be properly fitted

Bejerano, Gill

399

A comparison of hormonal profiles between breast cancer and benign breast disease: a case-control study  

PubMed Central

Background Benign breast disease (BBD), particularly proliferative BBD, is an established breast cancer risk factor. However, there has been no systematic attempt to compare the hormonal profiles of the two conditions. In a case–control investigation in Athens, Greece, we compared levels of estrogens, testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), as well as their principal binding proteins, between breast cancer patients, women with BBD by histological type (proliferative and nonproliferative) and women with no breast pathology. Patients and methods We studied 466 women with incident breast cancer, 704 women with BBD and 244 healthy women. We used multiple regression to compare log-transformed serum hormone levels of breast cancer patients with those of healthy women and women with BBD by histological type (proliferative and nonproliferative BBD). Results The hormonal profile of breast cancer in our study was in line with the generally accepted hormonal profile of this disease, as reported from large cohort studies. Compared with healthy women, breast cancer patients tended to have higher levels of steroid hormones. The evidence was strong for estrone (difference 21.5%, P < 0.001), weaker for testosterone (difference 15.8%, P = 0.07) and weaker still for estradiol (difference 12.0%, P = 0.18). Also compared with healthy women, breast cancer patients had barely higher levels of IGF-1 (difference 2.0%, P = 0.51), but had significantly lower levels of IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) (difference ?6.7%, P = 0.001). Compared with women with BBD, breast cancer patients had nonstatistically significantly lower levels of steroid hormones, but they had higher levels of IGF-1 [difference 5.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7% to 10.6%] and lower levels of IGFBP-3 (difference ?3.7%, 95% CI ?6.7% to ?0.7%). Differences were more pronounced when breast cancer patients were contrasted to women with proliferative BBD. Conclusions Our findings suggest that high levels of IGF-1 may be an important factor toward the evolution of BBD to breast cancer. PMID:23723293

Lagiou, P.; Samoli, E.; Lagiou, A.; Zourna, P.; Barbouni, A.; Georgila, C.; Tsikkinis, A.; Vassilarou, D.; Minaki, P.; Sfikas, C.; Spanos, E.; Trichopoulos, D.

2013-01-01

400

Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is generally acknowledged as an important field of cancer research, not only as an academic matter but also as a crucial aspect of clinical practice. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells in self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes, and the utilization of common signaling pathways and the stem cell niche. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cells in their chemoresistance and their tumorigenic and metastatic activities. In this review, we focus on recent reports regarding the identification of CSC markers and the molecular mechanism of CSC phenotypes to understand the basic properties and molecular target of CSCs. In addition, we especially focus on the CSCs of breast cancer since the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can lead to the enrichment of CSCs in patients with that disease. The identification of CSC markers and an improved understanding of the molecular mechanism of CSC phenotypes should lead to progress in cancer therapy and improved prognoses for patients with cancer. PMID:24212663

Takahashi, Ryou-u; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Ono, Makiko; Ochiya, Takahiro

2011-01-01

401

The clinical significance between activation of nuclear factor kappa B transcription factor and overexpression of HER2\\/neu oncoprotein in Taiwanese patients with breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study investigated the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) activity in human breast cancer with overexpression of HER-2\\/neu oncoprotein, as well as its role on expression of different histological grades of cancer cells taken from Taiwanese breast cancer patients. Materials and methods: Specimens were collected from 82 female breast cancer patients. The HER-2\\/neu oncoprotein was measured by immunohistochemistry.

Ming-Feng Hou; Shwu-Bin Lin; Shyng-Shiou F. Yuan; Shih-Meng Tsai; Szu-Hua Wu; Fu Ou-Yang; Jan-Shih Hsieh; Kun-Bow Tsai; Tsung-Jen Huang; Li-Yu Tsai

2003-01-01

402

Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95 % CI 1.06-1.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality, regardless of type of treatment and duration of diabetes, despite the significant association of diabetes with unfavorable tumor characteristics. Our large prospective cohort study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. The increased total mortality associated with diabetes was mainly driven by increased risk of dying from diseases other than breast cancer. Thus, the continuum of care for breast cancer patients with diabetes should include careful attention to CVD risk factors and other non-cancer conditions. PMID:25261292

Luo, Juhua; Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

2014-11-01

403

Functional Viability Profiles of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

The design of targeted therapeutic strategies for cancer has been driven by the identification of tumor specific genetic changes. However, the large number of genetic alterations present in tumor cells means that it is difficult to discriminate between genes that are critical for maintenance of the disease state from those that are merely coincidental. Even when critical genes can be identified, directly targeting these is often challenging, meaning that alternative strategies such as exploiting synthetic lethality may be beneficial. To address these issues, we have carried out a functional genetic screen in over 30 commonly used models of breast cancer to identify genes that are critical for the growth of specific breast cancer subtypes. In particular, we describe potential new therapeutic targets for PTEN mutated cancers and for ER+ve breast cancers. We also show that large-scale functional profiling allows the classification of breast cancers into subgroups distinct from established subtypes. PMID:21984977

Brough, Rachel; Frankum, Jessica R.; Sims, David; Mackay, Alan; Mendes-Pereira, Ana M.; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Rafiq, Rumana; Ahmad, Amar S.; Cerone, Maria Antonietta; Natrajan, Rachael; Sharpe, Rachel; Shiu, Kai-Keen; Wetterskog, Daniel; Dedes, Konstantine J.; Lambros, Maryou B.; Rawjee, Teeara; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Turner, Nicholas C.; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

2011-01-01

404

Management options of breast cancer related osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Breast cancer therapy after surgery has been improved in recent years. Adjuvant therapies like aromatase inhibitors are being extensively used among breast cancer survivors. This leaded to cancer related and iatrogenic osteoporosis. Management of these patients needs to be focused and differentiated from the standard age related osteoporosis in women. All guidelines consider mandatory to assess fracture risk periodically in all breast cancer survivors. Risk assessment diagnostic FRAX tool is the most used but it’s not born specifically for cancer related osteoporosis. The therapeutic management of this kind of osteoporosis has been studied by different societies. Since breast cancer survivors are at risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis, counseling regarding modifiable risk factors is mandatory and advocated. The beginning of the treatment should be tailored in each patient. PMID:25285137

Becorpi, Angelamaria; Sisti, Giovanni; Sorbi, Flavia; Malosso, Elena Rita Magro; Guaschino, Secondo

2014-01-01

405

[Vitamin D and breast cancer].  

PubMed

The active form of vitamin D, in conjunction with his own receptor, affect a multitude of biological processes in the cell (inter alia it influences the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes). There is an increasing volume of scientific publications examining the relationships between serum vitamin D levels, vitamin D supplementation and malignant diseases. Some articles suggest inverse relationship between the low serum levels of vitamin D and the breast cancer risk and mortality, whilst other publications do not support this view. Thus the present opinion is conflicted. Vitamin D can exert a beneficial influence on the symptoms and outcomes of a large number of ailments, but its role in affecting cancer is still not completely clear. PMID:25002311

Nagykálnai, Tamás; Landherr, László; Nagy, András Csaba

2014-07-13

406

Par-4 prevents breast cancer recurrence  

PubMed Central

Therapy resistance and disease recurrence are two of the most challenging aspects in breast cancer treatment. A recent article in Cancer Cell makes a significant contribution toward a better understanding of this therapeutic problem by establishing downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the primary determinant of breast cancer recurrence. This viewpoint brings forth the importance of their findings and its implications on future research and therapy. PMID:24164776

2013-01-01

407

Bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women worldwide. Emerging results from clinical trials in patients with\\u000a breast cancer suggest that, in addition to preventing cancer treatment-induced bone loss, bisphosphonates may improve disease-free\\u000a survival (DFS). Although the first adjuvant studies using the early generation oral bisphosphonate clodronate suggested potential\\u000a reductions in distant recurrence versus placebo in patients with early

Michael Gnant; Peter Dubsky; Florian Fitzal; Thomas Bachleitner-Hofmann; Ruth Exner; Peter Blaha; Raimund Jakesz; Walter Schippinger; Richard Greil

2009-01-01

408

Using social marketing to increase breast cancer screening among African American women: perspectives from African American breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Despite progressive preventative techniques, intervention programs, and guidelines to help reduce breast cancer mortality, African American women (AAW) remain affected by breast cancer in greater numbers compared to Caucasians. As rates of breast cancer mortality continue to increase among AAW, a greater need for change emerges, which should include crafting culturally specific social marketing programs that promote breast cancer

Patricia Yvonne Talbert

2008-01-01

409

Main controversies in breast cancer.  

PubMed

In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it's integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

2014-08-10

410

Main controversies in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

2014-01-01

411

Imaging in breast cancer: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy  

PubMed Central

A technique called in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be performed along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain information about the chemical content of breast lesions. This information can be used for several clinical applications, such as monitoring the response to cancer therapies and improving the accuracy of lesion diagnosis. Initial MRS studies of breast cancer show promising results, and a growing number of research groups are incorporating the technique into their breast MRI protocols. This article introduces 1H-MRS of the breast, reviews the literature, discusses current methods and technical issues, and describes applications for treatment monitoring and lesion diagnosis. PMID:15987466

Bolan, Patrick J; Nelson, Michael T; Yee, Douglas; Garwood, Michael

2005-01-01

412

Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast\\u000a cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial\\u000a ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1\\/2 mutation positive

A. Latif; H. J. McBurney; S. A. Roberts; F. Lalloo; A. Howell; D. G. Evans; W. G. Newman

2010-01-01

413

Understanding and management of male breast cancer: a critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a rare disease in men representing nearly 1% of the total breast cancer cases worldwide. While treatments\\u000a developed for women with breast cancer are often applied to treat men with breast cancer, however, lack of awareness of this\\u000a disease leads to its detection at a later stage in men. This review discusses male breast cancer and draws

Kartikeya Pant; Udayan Dutta

2008-01-01

414

Use of Combination Thermal Therapy & Radiation in Breast-Conserving Treatment of Extensive Intraductal Breast Cancer (Breast Cancer).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report for a research project supporting the development of a technique for breast cancer treatment using ultrasound hyperthermia as an adjuvant to standard treatment using radiation. A breast treatment applicator and associated instrume...

G. Svensson

1999-01-01

415

Genetic Susceptibility to Triple Negative Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 expression, account for 12-24% of all breast cancers. TNBC is associated with early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes have been associated with up to 15% of TNBC, and TNBC accounts for 70% of breast tumors arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers and 16-23% of breast tumors in BRCA2 carriers. Whether germline mutations in other breast cancer susceptibility genes also predispose to TNBC remains to be determined. Common variation in a subset of the 72 known breast cancer susceptibility loci identified through genome wide association studies and other large-scale genotyping efforts have also been associated with risk of TNBC (TOX3, ESR1, RAD51L1, TERT, 19p13.1, 20q11, MDM4, 2p24.1, and FTO). Furthermore, variation in the 19p13.1 locus and the MDM4 locus has been associated with TNBC but not other forms of breast cancer suggesting that these are TNBC-specific loci. Thus, TNBC can be distinguished from other breast cancer subtypes by a unique pattern of common and rare germline predisposition alleles. Additional efforts to combine genetic and epidemiological data are needed to better understand the etiology of this aggressive form of breast cancer, to identify prevention and therapeutic targets, and to impact clinical practice through development of risk prediction models. PMID:23536562

Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

2013-01-01

416

Dietary Fat in Breast Cancer Survival  

PubMed Central

Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ?200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, diseasespecific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer–specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fatmay exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality. PMID:23701588

Makarem, Nour; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.; Parekh, Niyati

2013-01-01

417

Differentiating Lymphovascular Invasion from Retraction Artifact on Histological Specimen of Breast Carcinoma and Their Implications on Prognosis  

PubMed Central

On a pathological specimen of breast cancer cells, retraction artifact during histological processing mimics true lymphovascular invasion (LVI). The accurate determination of the presence or absence of LVI is a factor in determining risk of having a positive sentinel node, or having additional positive axillary nodes after a positive sentinel node biopsy in women with early-stage breast cancer. The determination of nodal risk influences the decision of the treating physicians as to whether a sentinel node biopsy or completion axillary dissection is necessary. On slide preparation, ideal factors favoring true LVI include: a definite endothelial lining, with endothelial nuclei that seem to protrude into the lymphatic space; invasion in one lymphatic vessel (LV) lumen with nearby cancer glands that have minimal or no retraction; a tumor embolus in a LV clear lumen with outside nearby tumor bulk; a tumor embolus that is different in shape than its surrounding clear LV space; and a positive stain for fibrin, CD31, or CD34 on tumor embolus periphery. PMID:23346180

Zaorsky, Nicholas George; Patil, Ninad; Tuluc, Madalina

2012-01-01

418

No association of breast cancer risk with integrin beta3 (ITGB3) Leu33Pro genotype  

PubMed Central

To pursue a borderline increased risk of breast cancer for carriers of two integrin beta3 (ITGB3) 33Pro alleles found in a recent prospective study, we conducted a case–control study of 1088 women with breast cancer and 4815 female controls. Leu33Pro heterozygotes, homozygotes and heterozygotes+homozygotes vs noncarriers had odds ratios for breast cancer of 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.8–1.1), 0.8 (0.5–1.2) and 1.0 (0.8–1.1), respectively. After stratification for conventional risk factors, odds ratio for breast cancer in heterozygotes, homozygotes and heterozygotes+homozygotes vs noncarriers were not increased above 1.0 in any of the 14 strata examined. This was also true after stratification for tumour histological subtype and cancer stage at the time of diagnosis. PMID:15970922

Bojesen, S E; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Axelsson, C K; Nordestgaard, B G

2005-01-01

419

Dichotomous roles for the orphan nuclear receptor NURR1 in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background NR4A orphan nuclear receptors are involved in multiple biological processes which are important in tumorigenesis such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and glucose utilization. The significance of NR4A family member NURR1 (NR4A2) in breast cancer etiology has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the impact of NURR1 expression on breast transformation, tumor growth, and breast cancer patient survival. Methods We determined the expression of NURR1 in normal breast versus breast carcinoma in tissue microarrays (immunohistochemistry), tissue lysates (immunoblot), and at the mRNA level (publically available breast microarrays). In addition NURR1 expression was compared among breast cancer patients in cohorts based on p53 expression, estrogen receptor ? expression, tumor grade, and lymph node metastases. Kaplan-Meier survival plots were used to determine the correlation between NURR1 expression and relapse free survival (RFS). Using shRNA-mediated silencing, we determined the effect of NURR1 expression on tumor growth in mouse xenografts. Results Results from breast cancer tissue arrays demonstrate a higher NURR1 expression in the normal breast epithelium compared to breast carcinoma cells (p???0.05). Among cases of breast cancer, NURR1 expression in the primary tumors was inversely correlated with lymph node metastases (p???0.05) and p53 expression (p???0.05). Clinical stage and histological grade were not associated with variation in NURR1 expression. In gene microarrays, 4 of 5 datasets showed stronger mean expression of NURR1 in normal breast as compared to transformed breast. Additionally, NURR1 expression was strongly correlated with increase relapse free survival (HR?=?0.7) in a cohort of all breast cancer patients, but showed no significant difference in survival when compared among patients whom have not been treated systemically (HR?=?0.91). Paradoxically, NURR1 silenced breast xenografts showed significantly decreased growth in comparison to control, underscoring a biphasic role for NURR1 in breast cancer progression. Conclusions NURR1 function presents a dichotomy in breast cancer etiology, in which NURR1 expression is associated with normal breast epithelial differentiation and efficacy of systemic cancer therapy, but silencing of which attenuates tumor growth. This provides a strong rationale for the potential implementation of NURR1 as a pharmacologic target and biomarker for therapeutic efficacy in breast cancer. PMID:23517088

2013-01-01

420

From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, one in eight women will be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed - as well as the second most fatal - cancer in American women. It is estimated that there will be nearly 200,000 diagnoses of breast cancer this year; more than 40,000 of these

Martineau; Rebecca M

2012-01-01

421

Breast cancer incidence and prevalence estimated from survival and mortality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Survival probability for female breast cancer patients was used to estimate incidence rates from breast cancer mortality data in Italy. The female breast cancer survival curve from the Lombardy Cancer Registry (LCR) was used to test the method on data from four local cancer registries, covering areas in different regions of Italy. In spite of the well known geographic variability

Riccardo Capocaccia; Arduino Verdecchia; Andrea Micheli; Milena Sant; Gemma Gatta; Franco Berrino

1990-01-01

422

Fertility preservation for breast cancer patients.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common neoplasm in women and accounts for 26% (182,460) of all new cancer cases among women. With the use of screening mammography and advancement in other diagnostic modalities, many cases of breast cancer now can be diagnosed and treated at early stages of the disease. Unfortunately, adjuvant chemotherapy regimens commonly used in the treatment of breast cancer may cause premature ovarian failure due to their cytotoxic effects on the germ cells in the ovary. Therefore preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors at reproductive age has become an important quality of life issue. Fertility preservation is a recently emerged field of reproductive medicine that may help protect the reproductive capability of the cancer survivors and allow them to have children in the future. Embryo freezing is the most established fertility preservation strategy. But conventional ovarian stimulation protocols are contraindicated in breast cancer patients because of the rise of estrogen and its metabolites to supraphysiological levels. Recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide a safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen levels comparable with those achieved in the natural cycle. Oocyte freezing can be considered in single women and in those who do not wish donor sperm. Ovarian tissue freezing could also be an option in breast cancer patients who do not wish or have a time for an in vitro fertilization cycle, which requires 10 to 14 days of ovarian stimulation. PMID:19806518

Oktem, Ozgur; Oktay, Kutluk

2009-11-01

423

TLRs: linking inflammation and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality in the females. Intensive efforts have been made to understand the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of breast cancer. The physiological conditions that lead to tumorigenesis including breast cancer are not well understood. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are essential components of innate immune system that protect the host against bacterial and viral infection. The emerging evidences suggest that TLRs are activated through pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as endogenous molecules, which lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways. This leads to increased levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines mounting inflammation. Several evidences support the view that chronic inflammation can lead to cancerous condition. Inflammation aids in tumor progression and metastasis. Association of inflammation with breast cancer is emerging. TLR mediated activation of NF-?B and IRF is an essential link connecting inflammation to cancer. The recent reports provide several evidences, which suggest the important role of TLRs in breast cancer pathogenesis and recurrence. The current review focuses on emerging studies suggesting the strong linkages of TLR mediated regulation of inflammation during breast cancer and its metastasis emphasizing the initiation of the systematic study. PMID:25093807

Bhatelia, Khyati; Singh, Kritarth; Singh, Rajesh

2014-11-01

424

Pathology-confirmed granuloma mimicking liver metastasis of breast cancer.  

PubMed

For patients with breast cancer, obtaining tissue samples from liver lesion becomes more and more important for both differential diagnosis and subsequent treatment. However, the procedure is not considered as mandatory routine and is not frequently performed. We here reported about a patient with breast cancer history and a solitary liver metastasis that was clinically diagnosed by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and position emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT). However, pathologic diagnosis after partial hepatectomy (between sections VII and VIII) revealed multifocal granulomas. The case further addresses the importance of core needle biopsy, or surgical biopsy, for obtainment of a histological diagnosis, especially in the presence of a solitary lesion, even when the lesion has a typical medical imaging supporting metastasis, and uptake of radioactive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) by PET-CT. PMID:24474453

Li, Ting; Fan, Minhao; Shui, Ruohong; Hu, Silong; Zhang, Yunyan; Hu, Xichun

2014-01-01

425

Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy  

PubMed Central

There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients’ overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current “state of play” with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk’s role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25114846

Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

2014-01-01

426

Paclitaxel, Nab-paclitaxel, or Ixabepilone With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC or Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-01

427

Mechanisms of bone metastases of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer development is a multi-step process driven by genetic alterations that elicit the progressive transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. The altered cell proliferation phenotype of cancer involves a poorly characterized sequence of molecular events, which often result in the development of distant metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the skeleton is among the most common

Robert J Griffin; Issam Makhoul

2009-01-01

428

Thermoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer: comparison to histology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ex vivo imaging of fresh prostate specimens was performed to test the hypothesis that the thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism generated with very high frequency electromagnetic (EM) irradiation is sensitive to prostate cancer. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after radical prostatectomy, performed as part of normal care. Irradiation pulsewidth was 700 ns and duty cycle was extremely low. Typical specific absorption rate (SAR) throughout the prostate was 70-90 kW/kg during pulsing, but time-averaged SAR was below 2 W/kg. TA pressure pulses generated by rapid heating due to EM energy deposition were detected using single element transducers. 15g/L glycine powder mixed into DI water served as acoustic couplant, which was chilled to prevent autolysis. Spatial encoding was performed by scanning in tomographic "step-and-shoot" mode, with 3 mm translation between slices and 1.8-degree rotation between tomographic views. Histology slides for 3 cases scanned with 2.25 MHz transducers were marked for comparison to TA reconstructions. These three cases showed little, moderate, and severe involvement in the histology levels surrounding the verumontanum. TA signal strength decreased with percent cancerous involvement. When VHF is used for tissue heating, the TA contrast mechanism is driven by ionic content and we observed suppressed TA signal from diseased prostate tissue in the peripheral zone. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity.

Patch, S. K.; Griep, S. K.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.; Hull, D.

2014-03-01

429

GPER Function in Breast Cancer: An Overview  

PubMed Central

The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER, formerly known as GPR30) has attracted increasing interest, considering its ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in different cell types, including the hormone-sensitive tumors like breast cancer. As observed for other GPCR-mediated responses, the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor is a fundamental integration point in the biological action triggered by GPER. A wide number of natural and synthetic compounds, including estrogens and anti-estrogens, elicit stimulatory effects in breast cancer through GPER up-regulation and activation, suggesting that GPER function is associated with breast tumor progression and tamoxifen resistance. GPER has also been proposed as a candidate biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer, opening a novel scenario for a more comprehensive assessment of breast tumor patients. PMID:24834064

Lappano, Rosamaria; Pisano, Assunta; Maggiolini, Marcello

2014-01-01

430

Reproductive history and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

The fact that reproductive factors have significant influence on the risk of breast cancer is well known. Early age of first full-term birth is highly protective against late-onset breast cancers, but each pregnancy, including the first one, increases the risk of early-onset breast cancer. Estradiol and progesterone induce receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) in estrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PgR)-positive luminal cells. RANKL then acts in a paracrine fashion on the membranous RANK of ER/PgR-negative epithelial stem cells of the breast. This reaction cascade is triggered by chorionic gonadotropin during the first trimester of pregnancy and results in the morphological and functional development of breast tissue. On the other hand, the administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the early steps of weaning protects against tumor growth through reduction of the acute inflammatory reaction of post lactation remodeling of breast tissue. This is experimental evidence that may explain the short-term tumor-promoting effect of pregnancy. The protective effect of prolonged breast feeding may also be explained, at least in a part, by a reduced inflammatory reaction due to gradual weaning. Delay of first birth together with low parity and short duration of breast feeding are increasing social trends in developed countries. Therefore, breast cancer risk as a result of reproductive factors will not decrease in these countries in the foreseeable future. In this review, the significance of reproductive history with regard to the risk of breast cancers will be discussed, focusing on the age of first full-term birth and post lactation involution of the breast. PMID:22711317

Kobayashi, Shunzo; Sugiura, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoshiaki; Shiraki, Norio; Yanagi, Takeshi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Toyama, Tatsuya

2012-10-01

431

Breast Cancer Risk - Genes, Environment and Clinics  

PubMed Central

The information available about breast cancer risk factors has increased dramatically during the last 10 years. In particular, studies of low-penetrance genes and mammographic density have improved our understanding of breast cancer risk. In addition, initial steps have been taken in investigating interactions between genes and environmental factors. This review concerns with actual data on this topic. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) with a case–control design, as well as large-scale validation studies, have identified and validated more than a dozen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer risk. They are located not only in or close to genes known to be involved in cancer pathogenesis, but also in genes not previously associated with breast cancer pathogenesis, or may even not be related to any genes. SNPs have also been identified that alter the lifetime risk in BRCA mutation carriers. With regard to nongenetic risk factors, studies of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have revealed important information on how to weigh up the risks and benefits of HRT. Mammographic density (MD) has become an accepted and important breast cancer risk factor. Lifestyle and nutritional considerations have become an integral part of most studies of breast cancer risk, and some improvements have been made in this field as well. More than 10 years after the publication of the first breast cancer prevention studies with tamoxifen, other substances such as raloxifene and aromatase inhibitors have been investigated and have also been shown to have preventive potential. Finally, mammographic screening systems have been implemented in most Western countries during the last decade. These may be developed further by including more individualized methods of predicting the patient?s breast cancer risk.

Fasching, P. A.; Ekici, A. B.; Adamietz, B. R.; Wachter, D. L.; Hein, A.; Bayer, C. M.; Haberle, L.; Loehberg, C. R.; Jud, S. M.; Heusinger, K.; Rubner, M.; Rauh, C.; Bani, M. R.; Lux, M. P.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Hartmann, A.; Beckmann, M. W.

2011-01-01

432

MRI Evaluation of the Contralateral Breast in Women with Recently Diagnosed Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even after careful clinical and mammographic evaluation, cancer is found in the contralateral breast in up to 10% of women who have received treatment for unilat- eral breast cancer. We conducted a study to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve on clinical breast examination and mammography in detecting contralateral breast cancer soon after the initial diagnosis of unilateral

Constance D. Lehman; Constantine Gatsonis; Christiane K. Kuhl; R. Edward Hendrick; Etta D. Pisano; Lucy Hanna; Sue Peacock; Stanley F. Smazal; Daniel D. Maki; Thomas B. Julian; Elizabeth R. DePeri; David A. Bluemke; Mitchell D. Schnall

2007-01-01

433

Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast cancer, shorter radiation schedules are as efficacious for local control and short-term cosmetic results as traditional fractionation regimens. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is done in specialized cancer centres; regional radiation is recommended for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes. Postmastectomy radiation has been shown to have survival benefits for high-risk premenopausal patients. Systemic metastases from breast cancer usually respond satisfactorily to radiation. CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy continues to have an important role in treatment of breast cancer. There have been great advances in radiation therapy in the last decade, but they have raised controversy. Further studies are needed to address the controversies. PMID:12113193

Chow, Edward

2002-01-01

434

Inequalities in breast cancer care and outcome.  

PubMed Central

Comparisons across Europe suggest that survival from breast cancer is less good in the United Kingdom than in many countries. The care given in some UK breast cancer units is exemplary. However, it is difficult to escape the conclusion that a substantial number of women who present with breast cancer receive suboptimal care. Cancer registry-based studies have clearly demonstrated variations between surgeons and between hospitals in the management of early breast cancer. Although variations in surgical practice per se may have little impact on survival, there is evidence that differences in the use of systemic adjuvant therapy influence outcome. Five-year survival seems to be greater in women treated by surgeons seeing more than 30-50 new cases of breast cancer each year. This may be because such patients are more likely to be treated by a multidisciplinary team and to receive adjuvant therapy. Proposals that would increase the overall quality of breast cancer care and remove current inequalities must be carefully considered and should then be implemented. PMID:9303363

Richards, M.; Sainsbury, R.; Kerr, D.

1997-01-01

435

DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy  

PubMed Central

Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

2010-01-01

436

Rcl, a Novel Breast Cancer Oncoprotein.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rcl is an undefined protein whose expression can be induced by the oncoproteins c-Myc and HER2/Neu, both of which are heavily implicated in breast tumorigenesis. As such, Rcl may be an important downstream effector of c-Myc and HER2/Neu in breast cancer. ...

R. Janknecht

2004-01-01

437

Medullary cancer of the breast revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common as well as unusual, heretofore unmentioned histopathologic features observed in 336 typical and 273 atypical medullary breast cancers from 6404 patients enrolled in various stage I and II protocols of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Projects (NSABP) are presented. Both medullary types exhibited comparable pathologic findings, except for the infiltrative border and\\/or slight or absent tumor lymphoid

Edwin R. Fisher; Julia P. Kenny; Richard Sass; Nikolay V. Dimitrov; Richard H. Siderits; Bernard Fisher

1990-01-01

438

Systems biology and genomics of breast cancer.  

PubMed

It is now accepted that breast cancer is not a single disease, but instead it is composed of a spectrum of tumor subtypes with distinct cellular origins, somatic changes, and etiologies. Gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays has contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular heterogeneity of breast tumor formation, progression, and recurrence. For example, at least two clinical diagnostic assays exist (i.e., OncotypeDX RS and Mammaprint®) that are able to predict outcome in patients using patterns of gene expression and predetermined mathematical algorithms. In addition, a new molecular taxonomy based upon the inherent, or "intrinsic," biology of breast tumors has been developed; this taxonomy is called the "intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer," which now identifies five distinct tumor types and a normal breast-like group. Importantly, the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer predict patient relapse, overall survival, and response to endocrine and chemotherapy regimens. Thus, most of the clinical behavior of a breast tumor is already written in its subtype profile. Here, we describe the discovery and basic biology of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer, and detail how this interacts with underlying genetic alternations, response to therapy, and the metastatic process. PMID:21047916

Perou, Charles M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

2011-02-01

439

Profiling Breast Cancer by Array CGH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast tumors display a wide variety of genomic alterations. This review focuses on DNA copy number variations in these tumors as measured by the recently developed microarray-based form of comparative genomic hybridization. The capabilities of this new technology are reviewed. Initial applications of array CGH to the analysis of breast cancer, and the mechanisms by which the particular types of

Donna G. Albertson

2003-01-01

440

Knowledge of Breast Cancer and Screening Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To assess young women's breast health knowledge and explore its relation to the use of screening mammography. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women aged 25-45 residing in Toronto, Canada, with no history of breast cancer and mammography received an information brochure and four questionnaires which assessed their knowledge of…

Vahabi, Mandana

2005-01-01

441

Endocrine resistance in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Abstract Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are synthetic molecules which bind to estrogen receptors (ER) and can modulate their transcriptional capabilities in different ways in diverse estrogen target tissues. Unfortunately, the use of resistant therapy is associated with acquired resistance. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to be responsible for endocrine resistance in breast cancer, including MIR-451, FGF and FGFR, ADAM12, fibronectin and other soluble stromal factors, PELP1-KDM1, HER2, NOTCH, ?EF1, mTOR, AKT/mTOR, Pi3K/AKT, Pi3K/AKT/mTOR, NF?B, LMTK3, IGF1R, cyclin E2, IRF1, Tab2, and SRC-1. Further research is needed to know more about endocrine resistance. PMID:24245601

Zheng, L H; Zhao, Y H; Feng, H L; Liu, Y J

2014-10-01

442

Paclitaxel Versus Docetaxel for Early Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Weekly treatment with the drug paclitaxel (Taxol®) in addition to standard chemotherapy proved most effective in extending overall survival among women with early-stage breast cancer, according to the April 17, 2008, New England Journal of Medicine.

443

Cataract Extraction and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To prospectively examine the association between cataract extraction and breast cancer risk among 66,782 postmenopausal women who were 50 years or older in the Nurses' Health Study cohort from 1984 to 1998.

Shumin M. Zhang; Walter C. Willett; Frank B. Hu; Edward L. Giovannucci; JoAnn E. Manson; Graham A. Colditz; Susan E. Hankinson

2004-01-01

444

Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this clinical trial, postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer that has been surgically removed will be randomly assigned to receive either anastrozole or exemestane for five years.

445

Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Khmer (Khmer) Korean ( ... PDF American Cancer Society Return to top French (français) Breast Biopsy Biopsie mammaire - français (French) Bilingual PDF ...

446

Epstein-Barr Virus and Breast Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Studies on the association of EBV with Breast cancer have had notably inconsistent results. This is attributable partly to two persistent methodological problems: the technical challenges of localizing EBV to tumor cells, and the failure to address the ep...

W. C. Chan

2004-01-01

447

Zoledronic Acid Improves Early Breast Cancer Treatment  

Cancer.gov

The addition of zoledronic acid (Zometa®) to adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer significantly improves clinical outcomes beyond those achieved with endocrine therapy alone, according to findings presented at the 2008 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

448

Asymptomatic Bladder Metastasis from Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected. PMID:24716084

Di Fino, Giuseppe; Massenio, Paolo; Ruocco, Nicola; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

449

Optimizing Postoperative Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, women with early-stage breast cancer deemed by their doctors to be at high risk for recurrence will receive adjuvant chemotherapy with either cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin or paclitaxel given four times over an 8-week period.

450

A Radial Sclerosing Lesion Mimicking Breast Cancer on Mammography in a Young Woman  

PubMed Central

A spiculated mass on a mammogram is highly suggestive of malignancy. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a radial sclerosing lesion that mimicked breast cancer on mammography. She visited her physician after palpating a lump in her left breast. Mammography showed architectural distortion in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast. Ultrasonography showed a low echoic area with an ambiguous boundary. Core needle biopsy was performed because of the suspicion of malignancy. Histological examination did not reveal any malignant cells. After 6 months, the breast lump became larger and the patient was referred to our hospital. Mammography performed in our hospital showed a spiculated mass, and therefore mammotome biopsy was performed. Histological examination revealed dense fibroelastic stroma with a wide variety of mastopathic changes, leading to a diagnosis of a radial sclerosing lesion. One year after the biopsy, the lump on her left breast had disappeared and mammography showed no spiculated mass. PMID:22539921

Furukawa, Masashi; Taira, Naruto; Iha, Shigemichi; Nogami, Tomohiro; Shien, Tadahiko; Omori, Masako; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

2012-01-01

451

Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention  

PubMed Central

Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17?-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed. PMID:15084232

Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

2004-01-01

452

CARM1 is an important determinant of ER?-dependent breast cancer cell differentiation and proliferation in breast cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Breast cancers expressing estrogen receptor ? (ER?) are often more differentiated histologically than ER?-negative tumors, but the reasons for this difference are poorly understood. One possible explanation is that transcriptional co-factors associated with ER? determine the expression of genes which promote a more differentiated phenotype. In this study, we identify one such cofactor as coactivator associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), a unique co-activator of ER? that can simultaneously block cell proliferation and induce differentiation through global regulation of ER?-regulated genes. CARM1 was evidenced as an ER? co-activator in cell-based assays, gene expression microarrays, and mouse xenograft models. In human breast tumors, CARM1 expression positively correlated with ER? levels in ER+ tumors but was inversely correlated with tumor grade. Our findings suggest that co-expression of CARM1 and ER? may provide a better biomarker of well-differentiated breast cancer. Further, our findings define an important functional role of this histone arginine methyltransferase in re-programming ER?-regulated cellular processes, implicating CARM1 as a putative epigenetic target in ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:21282336

Al-Dhaheri, Mariam; Wu, Jiacai; Skliris, Georgios P.; Li, Jun; Higashimato, Ken; wang, Yidan; White, Kevin P.; Lambert, Paul; Zhu, Yuerong; Murphy, Leigh; Xu, Wei

2011-01-01

453

Lung cancer risks in women with previous breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of the adverse effects of breast cancer treatment is becoming increasingly important in light of the earlier detection and prolonged survival of the patients. The beneficial effect of post-surgical radiotherapy has lately been challenged. The Swedish Cancer Registry (SCR) was used to identify approximately 141?000 women with breast cancer, diagnosed between 1958 and 1997, followed-up for the occurrence of

M Prochazka; F Granath; A Ekbom; P. G Shields; P Hall

2002-01-01

454

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and risk of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Healthy eating patterns and keeping physically active are potentially more important for chronic disease prevention than intake or exclusion of specific food items or nutrients. To this end, many health organizations routinely publish dietary and lifestyle recommendations aimed at preventing chronic disease. Using data from the Canadian National Breast Screening Study, we investigated the association between breast cancer risk and adherence to two sets of guidelines specific for cancer prevention, namely the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines and the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Recommendations. At baseline, 49,613 women completed dietary and lifestyle questionnaires and height and weight measurements were taken. During a mean follow-up of 16.6 years, 2,503 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of meeting each guideline, and number of guidelines met, with breast cancer risk. The two sets of guidelines yielded similar results. Specifically, adherence to all six ACS guidelines was associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk when compared to subjects adhering to at most one guideline (HR?=?0.69; 95% CI?=?0.49-0.97); similarly, adherence to six or seven of the WCRF/AICR guidelines was also associated with a 31% reduction in breast cancer risk (HR?=?0.69; 95% CI?=?0.47-1.00). Under either classification, meeting each additional guideline was associated with a 4-6% reduction in breast cancer risk. These results suggest that adherence to cancer prevention guidelines is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:24723234

Catsburg, Chelsea; Miller, Anthony B; Rohan, Thomas E

2014-11-15

455

Association between dietary intake of folate and MTHFR and MTR genotype with risk of breast cancer.  

PubMed

We investigated the association between dietary intake of folate, vitamin B6, and the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype with breast cancer. A matched case-control study was conducted, and 413 patients with newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed breast cancer and 436 controls were recruited. Folate intake, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 levels were calculated, and the MTHFR C677T and A1298C and MTR A2756G polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Breast cancer cases were generally older, older at first live birth, and younger at menarche, had a higher body mass index, were smokers, had higher energy intake, and more first-degree relatives with breast cancer as well as more live births compared to controls. With respect to energy intake, we found that higher energy intake were more likely to increase the risk of breast cancer. The MTHFR 667TT genotype was associated with a moderately increased risk of breast cancer when compared with the CC genotype, and a significant odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval, CI) was found (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.06-2.73). Individuals carrying T allele were associated with higher risk of breast cancer when compared with C allele (OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.06-1.70). We did not find a significant effect of the MTHFR A1298C and MTR A2756G on the risk of breast cancer. We did not find any association between folate intake and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms. In conclusion, we found that the MTHFR C667T polymorphism is associated with the risk of breast cancer, indicating that this genotype plays a role in breast cancer development. PMID:25366783

He, J M; Pu, Y D; Wu, Y J; Qin, R; Zhang, Q J; Sun, Y S; Zheng, W W; Chen, L P

2014-01-01

456

Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17?-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these

Jane L Limer; Valerie Speirs

2004-01-01

457

Challenges in managing breast cancer during pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer occurring anytime during gestation, lactation or within one year after delivery. The optimal management of pregnant women with breast cancer is challenging and not well established; the main concern is the effect of the drugs on the developing fetus and long-term complications after in utero exposure to anti-cancer drugs. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for early breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Modified radical mastectomy is standard of care in first trimester, whereas breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy with lymph node dissection) can be performed preferably in the second and third trimester. Of note, breast-conserving surgery is not contraindicated per se during the first trimester, but owing to the potential impact of delaying radiotherapy. Radiation therapy is not favored during pregnancy. Moreover, tamoxifen is contraindicated during pregnancy; the agent has been associated with birth defects in up to 20% of exposures. Chemotherapy is generally contraindicated during the first trimester because of the possible damage to organogenesis. Anthracyclines-based regimens are the most widely used is breast cancer treatment and were been shown to be associated with favourable safety profile when administered during pregnancy. As for taxanes, more limited data is available. The use of trastuzumab is contraindicated during pregnancy, given the apparent risk of oligo- and/or anhydramnios as well as the unknown long-term sequelae on the fetus. It is obvious that, diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy adds complexity to cancer treatment recommendations. In all cases, a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach among obstetricians, gynaecologists, surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, pediatricians and hematologists is clearly warranted. PMID:23819029

Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bartsch, Rupert; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios

2013-01-01

458

Dietary Carbohydrates, Fiber, and Breast Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dietary fiber, fiber fractions, carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load were prospectively assessed five times over 18 years with a validated food frequency questionnaire in relation to breast cancer risk among 88,678 women (aged 34-59 years at baseline) in the Nurses' Health Study. Incident breast cancer occurred in 4,092 of these women between 1980 and 1998. The authors observed no

Michelle D. Holmes; Simin Liu; Susan E. Hankinson; Graham A. Colditz; David J. Hunter; Walter C. Willett

2004-01-01

459

The emerging landscape of breast cancer susceptibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The genetic basis of inherited predisposition to breast cancer has been assiduously investigated for the past two decades and has been the subject of several recent discoveries. Three reasonably well-defined classes of breast cancer susceptibility alleles with different levels of risk and prevalence in the population have become apparent: rare high-penetrance alleles, rare moderate-penetrance alleles and common low-penetrance alleles. The

Michael R Stratton; Nazneen Rahman

2007-01-01

460

TGFBR1 Signaling and Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade mutations discovered in genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PTEN, have emerged as high-penetrance susceptibility ge