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1

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno  

E-print Network

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000 Cancer: 6 Hallmarks #12;Breast Anatomy and Histology Normal Breast Histology - H&E Stain Ross and Pawlina;Breast Cancer Types of Breast Cancer: - Ductal Carcinoma in situ - Lobular Carcinoma in situ

Gleeson, Joseph G.

2

Abstract--Breast cancers can be histologically categorized (graded) based upon their architectural patterns and cellular  

E-print Network

Abstract-- Breast cancers can be histologically categorized (graded) based upon their architectural patterns and cellular types. Inaccurate histologic grading can result in inappropriate treatment for histologic grading that should enhance grading reliability. We present the initial efforts to develop

Breen, David E.

3

Histological and molecular types of breast cancer: is there a unifying taxonomy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, comprising multiple tumor entities associated with distinctive histological patterns and different biological features and clinical behaviors. Microarray-based high-throughput technologies have been employed to unravel the molecular characteristics of breast cancer, including its proclivity to disseminate to distant sites, and the molecular basis for histological grade. In addition, a breast cancer molecular taxonomy

Britta Weigelt; Jorge S. Reis-Filho

2009-01-01

4

Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histology Images with Deep Neural Networks  

E-print Network

Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histology Images with Deep Neural Networks Dan C. Cires-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mi- tosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained in histology sections is an important indicator for cancer screening and assessment. Normally, the count

Schmidhuber, Juergen

5

Menopausal hormone therapy and other breast cancer risk factors in relation to the risk of different histological subtypes of breast cancer: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancers of different histology have different clinical and prognostic features. There are also indications of differences in aetiology. We therefore evaluated the risk of the three most common histological subtypes in relation to menopausal hormone therapy and other breast cancer risk factors. METHODS: We used a population-based case-control study of breast cancer to evaluate menopausal hormone therapy and

Lena U Rosenberg; Cecilia Magnusson; Emma Lindström; Sara Wedrén; Per Hall; Paul W Dickman

2006-01-01

6

Metaplastic breast cancer: histologic characteristics, prognostic factors and systemic treatment strategies  

PubMed Central

Metaplastic breast cancer (MBC) is a rare subtype of invasive breast cancer that tends to have an aggressive clinical presentation as well as a variety of distinct histologic designations. Few systemic treatment options are available for MBC, as it has consistently shown a suboptimal response to standard chemotherapy regimens. These characteristics result in a worse overall prognosis for patients with MBC compared to those with standard invasive breast cancer. Due to its rarity, data focusing on MBC is limited. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, breast imaging findings, histologic and molecular characteristics of MBC as well as potential future research directions. PMID:24499560

2013-01-01

7

Histologic review of breast cancer cases in survivors of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

A panel of Japanese and American pathologists reviewed existing histologic material used to study breast cancer risk among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a population in which incidence studies have found a strong relationship between breast cancer risk and radiation dose. The primary charge to the panel was to define a body of confirmed cases in the Life

Shoji Tokuoka; Masahide Asano; Tsutomu Yamamoto; Masayoshi Tokunaga; Goi Sakamoto; William H. Hartmann; Robert V. P. Hutter; Charles E. Land; Donald E. Henson

1984-01-01

8

Genetic Reclassification of Histologic Grade Delineates New Clinical Subtypes of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histologic grading of breast cancer defines morphologic subtypes informative of metastatic potential, although not without considerable interobserver disagreement and clinical heterogeneity particularly among the moderately differen- tiated grade 2 (G2) tumors. We posited that a gene expression signature capable of discerning tumors of grade 1(G1 ) and grade 3 (G3) histology might provide a more objective measure of grade with

Anna V. Ivshina; Joshy George; Oleg Senko; Benjamin Mow; Thomas C. Putti; Johanna Smeds; Thomas Lindahl; Yudi Pawitan; John E. L. Wong; Edison T. Liu; Jonas Bergh; Vladimir A. Kuznetsov; Lance D. Miller

9

Influence of breast cancer histology on the relationship between ultrasound and pathology tumor size measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Establishing an accurate primary invasive breast cancer size is crucial for patient management. Although ultrasonographic measurement is reported to correlate reliably with the gold standard pathology measurement, few authors have examined the influence of histologic subtype on ultrasound measurement. The common subtypes of invasive breast carcinoma, ductal and lobular, have different growth patterns, which may influence the ability of ultrasound

Bobbi Pritt; Takamaru Ashikaga; Robert G Oppenheimer; Donald L Weaver

2004-01-01

10

Nuclear nano-morphology markers of histologically normal cells detect the "field effect" of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Accurate detection of breast malignancy from histologically normal cells ("field effect") has significant clinical implications in a broad base of breast cancer management, such as high-risk lesion management, personalized risk assessment, breast tumor recurrence, and tumor margin management. More accurate and clinically applicable tools to detect markers characteristic of breast cancer "field effect" that are able to guide the clinical management are urgently needed. We have recently developed a novel optical microscope, spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, which extracts the nanoscale structural characteristics of cell nuclei (i.e., nuclear nano-morphology markers), using standard histology slides. In this proof-of-concept study, we present the use of these highly sensitive nuclear nano-morphology markers to identify breast malignancy from histologically normal cells. We investigated the nano-morphology markers from 154 patients with a broad spectrum of breast pathology entities, including normal breast tissue, non-proliferative benign lesions, proliferative lesions (without and with atypia), "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue, and invasive carcinoma. Our results show that the nuclear nano-morphology markers of "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue can detect the presence of invasive breast carcinoma with high accuracy and do not reflect normal aging. Further, we found that a progressive change in nuclear nano-morphology markers that parallel breast cancer risk, suggesting its potential use for risk stratification. These novel nano-morphology markers that detect breast cancerous changes from nanoscale structural characteristics of histologically normal cells could potentially benefit the diagnosis, risk assessment, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22706633

Bista, Rajan K; Wang, Pin; Bhargava, Rohit; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Yang

2012-08-01

11

Impact of hormone replacement therapy on the histologic subtype of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increase in breast cancer risk, which correlates to\\u000a the duration of HRT use. We wanted to investigate a possible association between HRT use and the risk of a histologic subtype\\u000a of breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  From 1995 until 2004, 497 cases of primary ductal, lobular or ductulolobular breast cancer in postmenopausal

Rosanna A. Zanetti-Dällenbach; Elke M. Krause; Olav Lapaire; Uwe Gueth; Wolfgang Holzgreve; Edward Wight

2008-01-01

12

Reproductive factors and specific histological types of breast cancer: prospective study and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about how reproductive factors affect the risk of breast cancers of different histology. In an analysis of prospective data on 1.2 million middle-aged UK women, we used proportional hazards models to estimate the relative risks of six histological types in relation to menarche, childbearing and menopause. During 8.7 million person-years of follow-up, 17 923 ductal, 3332 lobular,

G K Reeves; K Pirie; J Green; D Bull; V Beral

2009-01-01

13

Gene expression profiles of estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers are detectable in histologically normal breast epithelium  

PubMed Central

Purpose Previously, we found that gene expression in histologically normal breast epithelium (NlEpi) from women at high breast cancer risk can resemble gene expression in NlEpi from cancer-containing breasts. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene expression characteristic of a cancer subtype might be seen in NlEpi of breasts containing that subtype. Experimental Design We examined gene expression in 46 cases of microdissected NlEpi from untreated women undergoing breast cancer surgery. From 30 age-matched cases (15 estrogen receptor (ER)+, 15 ER-) we used Affymetryix U133A arrays. From 16 independent cases (9 ER+, 7 ER-), we validated selected genes using qPCR. We then compared gene expression between NlEpi and invasive breast cancer using 4 publicly available datasets. Results We identified 198 genes that are differentially expressed between NlEpi from breasts with ER+ (NlEpiER+) compared to ER- cancers (NlEpiER-). These include genes characteristic of ER+ and ER- cancers (e.g., ESR1, GATA3, and CX3CL1, FABP7). QPCR validated the microarray results in both the 30 original cases and the 16 independent cases. Gene expression in NlEpiER+ and NlEpiER- resembled gene expression in ER+ and ER- cancers, respectively: 25-53% of the genes or probes examined in 4 external datasets overlapped between NlEpi and the corresponding cancer subtype. Conclusions Gene expression differs in NlEpi of breasts containing ER+ compared to ER- breast cancers. These differences echo differences in ER+ and ER- invasive cancers. NlEpi gene expression may help elucidate subtype-specific risk signatures, identify early genomic events in cancer development and locate targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:21059815

Graham, Kelly; Ge, Xijin; de las Morenas, Antonio; Tripathi, Anusri; Rosenberg, Carol L.

2010-01-01

14

Changes in Incidence of In Situ and Invasive Breast Cancer by Histology Type following Mammography Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate secular trends and correlates of incidence of breast cancer by histology type following the introduction of population-based mammography screening. Methods: Analysis of age-standardised incidence rates for 1,423 in situ and 16,157 invasive carcinomas recorded on the South Australian population-based cancer registry for the 1985-2004 diagnostic period. Multiple logistic regression was undertaken to compare socio- demographic characteristics by

Colin Luke; Kevin Priest; David Roder

2006-01-01

15

Breast Cancer Classification From Histological Images with Multiple Features and Random Subspace Classifier Ensemble  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Histological image is important for diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we present a novel automatic breaset cancer classification scheme based on histological images. The image features are extracted using the Curvelet Transform, statistics of Gray Level Co-occurence Matrix (GLCM) and Completed Local Binary Patterns (CLBP), respectively. The three different features are combined together and used for classification. A classifier ensemble approach, called Random Subspace Ensemble (RSE), are used to select and aggregate a set of base neural network classifiers for classification. The proposed multiple features and random subspace ensemble offer the classification rate 95.22% on a publically available breast cancer image dataset, which compares favorably with the previously published result 93.4%.

Zhang, Yungang; Zhang, Bailing; Lu, Wenjin

2011-06-01

16

Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in the field of breast cancer research. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of epithelial physiology. We present here Nectin-4/PVRL4 as a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast carcinoma. Methods Expression of Nectin-4 protein was measured on a panel of 78 primary cells and cell lines from different origins and 57 breast tumors by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Serum Nectin-4 was detected by ELISA and compared with CEA and CA15.3 markers, on panels of 45 sera from healthy donors, 53 sera from patients with non-metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) at diagnosis, and 182 sera from patients with MBC. Distribution of histological/serological molecular markers and histoclinical parameters were compared using the standard Chi-2 test. Results Nectin-4 was not detected in normal breast epithelium. By contrast, Nectin-4 was expressed in 61% of ductal breast carcinoma vs 6% in lobular type. Expression of Nectin-4 strongly correlated with the basal-like markers EGFR, P53, and P-cadherin, and negatively correlated with the luminal-like markers ER, PR and GATA3. All but one ER/PR-negative tumors expressed Nectin-4. The detection of Nectin-4 in serum improves the follow-up of patients with MBC: the association CEA/CA15.3/Nectin-4 allowed to monitor 74% of these patients compared to 67% with the association CEA/CA15.3. Serum Nectin-4 is a marker of disease progression, and levels correlate with the number of metastases (P = 0.038). Serum Nectin-4 is also a marker of therapeutic efficiency and correlates, in 90% of cases, with clinical evolution. Conclusion Nectin-4 is a new tumor-associated antigen for breast carcinoma. Nectin-4 is a new bio-marker whose use could help refine breast cancer taxonomy and improve patients' follow-up. Nectin-4 emerges as a potential target for breast cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17474988

Fabre-Lafay, Stéphanie; Monville, Florence; Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Ginestier, Christophe; Reymond, Nicolas; Finetti, Pascal; Sauvan, Richard; Adélaïde, José; Geneix, Jeannine; Lecocq, Eric; Popovici, Cornel; Dubreuil, Patrice; Viens, Patrice; Gonçalves, Anthony; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc

2007-01-01

17

Differential expression of cancer-associated fibroblast-related proteins according to molecular subtype and stromal histology in breast cancer.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics of breast cancer according to its cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype. Immunohistochemistry staining of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), Ki-67, podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP?), S100A4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFR?), PDGFR?, and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (NG2) was performed on tissue microarray consisting of 642 breast cancer cases. Samples were categorized into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, or triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) according to immunohistochemical results, whereas tumor stroma was classified into desmoplastic, sclerotic, normal-like, or inflammatory type based on histological findings. Expression of CAF-related proteins in the stroma differed depending on breast cancer molecular subtypes. All CAF-related protein expression was high (p < 0.05) in HER-2 type, whereas in luminal A, the expression of FAP?, PDGF?, PDGF?, and NG2 was low, and in TNBC, the expression of podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, and S100A4 was low. In the stromal component, CAF-related protein expression differed according to stromal phenotype (p < 0.001). The desmoplastic type showed high expression of podoplanin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase, S100A4, PDGFR?, and PDGFR?, whereas the sclerotic type exhibited low expression of FAP?, PDGF?, PDGF?, and NG2. The inflammatory type had high expression of FAP? and NG2 with low podoplanin, while normal-like type showed low expression of prolyl 4-hydroxylase and S100A4. Our results suggested that differential CAF-related protein expression depended on the molecular subtypes and stromal histologic features of breast cancer, indicating that in the future, this system could potentially use these markers for prognosis prediction and targeted therapy of breast cancer. PMID:25667103

Park, Sung Yeon; Kim, Hye Min; Koo, Ja Seung

2015-02-01

18

Expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors in different histological types of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) are involved in several key aspects of tumoral\\u000a growth, invasion and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to characterize on how the different histological types of\\u000a breast cancer differ in the expression of several components of this enzymatic system.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  An immunohistochemical study was performed in 50 ductal, 23 lobular, 14

J. M. Del Casar; S. González-Reyes; L. O. González; J. M. González; S. Junquera; M. Bongera; M. F. García; A. Andicoechea; C. Serra; F. J. Vizoso

2010-01-01

19

Different coexisting endometrial histological features in asymptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen.  

PubMed

In an attempt to assess the hypothesis that different endometrial sites may respond differently to tamoxifen exposure in postmenopausal women, hysteroscopic selected endometrial histology was investigated in 175 postmenopausal breast cancer patients who received continuous treatment with tamoxifen, and in 27 similar patients not treated with tamoxifen who served as controls. In the tamoxifen-treated patients 14 (8.0%) developed endometrial polyps. Of 14 patients, 8 (57.2%) each displayed atrophic endometrium in the same histologic specimen, 5 (35.7%) each had coexisting simple hyperplasia, and 1 (7.1%) other had complex hyperplasia. Another 21 (12.0%) developed simple or complex hyperplasia. The endometrial hyperplasia coexisted with atrophic endometrium in all these patients. All these lesions were selectively identified by hysteroscopic examination prior to the endometrial biopsy. In the control group 3 (11.0%) had simple hyperplasia and 2 (7.4%) had endometrial polyps. The above results support the hypothesis that the endometrium of postmenopausal breast cancer patients on tamoxifen treatment may possess different responses to tamoxifen exposure. PMID:9015703

Cohen, I; Altaras, M M; Shapira, J; Tepper, R; Cordoba, M; Figer, A; Zalel, Y; Dror, Y; Beyth, Y

1997-01-01

20

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

21

Use of Different Postmenopausal Hormone Therapies and Risk of Histology-and Hormone ReceptorDefined Invasive Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Use of Different Postmenopausal Hormone Therapies and Risk of Histology- and Hormone Receptor to the progestagen component of combined postmenopausal hormone therapy (CHT): progesterone, dydrogesterone, or other- and hormone receptor- defined breast cancer. Patients and Methods We used data from the French E3N cohort

Boyer, Edmond

22

High Preoperative CA 15-3 Concentrations Predict Adverse Outcome in Node-Negative and Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Study of 600 Patients with Histologically Confirmed Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: CA 15-3 is the most widely used serum marker in breast cancer. Currently, its main uses are in the surveillance of patients with diagnosed disease and monitoring the treatment of patients with advanced disease. Methods: Preoperative CA 15-3 concentrations were measured prospectively in 600 patients with histologi- cally confirmed breast cancer. Marker concentrations were related to patient outcome by

Michael J. Duffy; Catherine Duggan; Rachel Keane; Arnold D. K. Hill; Enda McDermott; John Crown; Niall O'Higgins

23

Prognostic Value of Tumor-Associated Macrophages According to Histologic Locations and Hormone Receptor Status in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor progression by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. However, in breast cancer, the clinical relevance of the TAM infiltration according to distinct histologic locations (intratumoral vs. stromal) and hormone receptor status is unclear. We investigated the significance of the levels of TAM infiltration in distinct histologic locations in invasive breast cancer. We also examined the relationship of the TAM levels with the clinicopathologic features of tumors, expression of EMT markers, and clinical outcomes. Finally, we analyzed the prognostic value of TAM levels according to hormone receptor status. High levels of infiltration of intratumoral, stromal and total TAMs were associated with high histologic grade, p53 overexpression, high Ki-67 proliferation index and negative hormone receptor status. Infiltration of TAMs was also correlated with overexpression of vimentin, smooth muscle actin and alteration of ?-catenin. Overall, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAMs was associated with poor disease-free survival, and was found to be an independent prognostic factor. In subgroup analyses by hormone receptor status, a high level of infiltration of intratumoral TAM was an independent prognostic factor in the hormone receptor-positive subgroup, but not in the hormone-receptor negative subgroup. Our findings suggest that intratumoral TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in breast cancer, especially in the hormone receptor-positive group, and the level of TAM infiltration may be used as a prognostic factor and even a therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25884955

Gwak, Jae Moon; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Dong Il; Seo, An Na; Park, So Yeon

2015-01-01

24

Large-scale computations on histology images reveal grade-differentiating parameters for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tumor classification is inexact and largely dependent on the qualitative pathological examination of the images of the tumor tissue slides. In this study, our aim was to develop an automated computational method to classify Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections based on cancer tissue texture features. METHODS: Image processing of histology slide images was used to detect and

Sokol Petushi; Fernando U Garcia; Marian M Haber; Constantine Katsinis; Aydin Tozeren

2006-01-01

25

CT findings of breast cancer with clinically complete response following neoadjuvant chemotherapy--histological correlation.  

PubMed

In breast cancer patients, several regimens of neoadjuvant chemotherapy have been developed in order to achieve prognostic advantages for individual patients. Though some percentages of breast cancer patients show clinically complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the histopathological specimens of these patients demonstrate a considerably high frequency of the existence of residual disease. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer patients showing clinically complete response (cCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, using thin-section (5 mm) helical CT (prone position) with bolus injection of contrast agent. Between April 1994 and March 2002, 9 patients with breast cancer showing cCR to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy, who had undergone thin-section CT study both before and following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, enrolled in the study. The mean age of the patients was 46.2 years and all of them were female. The clinical stages were, 8 patients in stage II, and one in stage IIIA. In the CT evaluation, residual disease was visualized in 5 out of the 9 patients. Histopathological examination disclosed the existence of residual cancers in 6 out of the 9 patients, but only non-invasive cancer was revealed in 1 out of the 6. As patients having residual disease composed only of non-invasive cancer are classified into the pathologically complete response group according to the WHO classification, 4 out of these 9 patients showing clinically complete response to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy were classified into pCR (pathologically complete response) group, and another 5 were classified into the pPR (pathologically partial response) group. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of the second CT study performed after neoadjuvant chemotherapy was evaluated as 77.8%, with a sensitivity of 80.0%, a specificity of 75.0%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 80.0%, and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 75.0%. Therefore, for precise evaluation of the neoadjuvant chemotherapeutic effect for breast cancer, thin-section CT studies are considered to be essential. PMID:12883716

Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Nishioka, Akihito; Kubota, Kei; Kariya, Shinji; Yoshida, Shoji; Maeda, Hironori; Tanaka, Yosuke; Moriki, Toshiaki; Tochika, Naoshige

2003-01-01

26

Breast cancer histological classification: agreement between the Office for National Statistics and the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Epidemiological studies rely on data supplied by central cancer registration sources to be timely, accurate and complete. Validation studies of such data at a national level are limited. Data collected for the Million Women Study was used to compare the level of agreement between the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP)

Toral Gathani; Diana Bull; Jane Green; Gillian Reeves; Valerie Beral

2005-01-01

27

MRI kinetics with volumetric analysis in correlation with hormonal receptor subtypes and histologic grade of invasive breast cancers.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to assess whether computer-assisted detection-processed MRI kinetics data can provide further information on the biologic aggressiveness of breast tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We identified 194 newly diagnosed invasive breast cancers presenting as masses on contrast-enhanced MRI by a HIPAA-compliant pathology database search. Computer-assisted detection-derived data for the mean and median peak signal intensity percentage increase, most suspicious kinetic curve patterns, and volumetric analysis of the different kinetic patterns by mean percentage tumor volume were compared against the different hormonal receptor (estrogen-receptor [ER], progesterone-receptor [PR], ERRB2 (HER2/neu), and triple-receptor expressivity) and histologic grade subgroups, which were used as indicators of tumor aggressiveness. RESULTS. The means and medians of the peak signal intensity percentage increase were higher in ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative (all p ? 0.001), and grade 3 tumors (p = 0.011). Volumetric analysis showed higher mean percentage volume of rapid initial enhancement in biologically more aggressive ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative tumors compared with ER-positive (64% vs 53.6%, p = 0.013), PR-positive (65.4% vs 52.5%, p = 0.001), and nontriple-negative tumors (65.3% vs 54.6%, p = 0.028), respectively. A higher mean percentage volume of rapid washout component was seen in ERRB2-positive tumors compared with ERRB2-negative tumors (27.5% vs 17.9%, p = 0.020). CONCLUSION. Peak signal intensity percentage increase and volume analysis of the different kinetic patterns of breast tumors showed correlation with hormonal receptor and histologic grade indicators of cancer aggressiveness. Computer-assisted detection-derived MRI kinetics data have the potential to further characterize the aggressiveness of an invasive cancer. PMID:25714321

Leong, Lester Chee Hao; Gombos, Eva C; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung

2015-03-01

28

Breast Histology Rules Matrix  

Cancer.gov

NOS (8010) and a specific carcinoma in situ or Adenocarcinoma in situ, NOS (8140) and a specific adenocarcinoma in situ or Intraductal carcinoma, NOS (8500) and a specific intraductal carcinoma (Table 1) The specific histology may be identified as type, subtype, predominantly, with features of, major, or with ____ differentiation, architecture or pattern.

29

Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images An ICPR 2012 contest  

PubMed Central

Introduction: In the framework of the Cognitive Microscope (MICO) project, we have set up a contest about mitosis detection in images of H and E stained slides of breast cancer for the conference ICPR 2012. Mitotic count is an important parameter for the prognosis of breast cancer. However, mitosis detection in digital histopathology is a challenging problem that needs a deeper study. Indeed, mitosis detection is difficult because mitosis are small objects with a large variety of shapes, and they can thus be easily confused with some other objects or artefacts present in the image. We added a further dimension to the contest by using two different slide scanners having different resolutions and producing red-green-blue (RGB) images, and a multi-spectral microscope producing images in 10 different spectral bands and 17 layers Z-stack. 17 teams participated in the study and the best team achieved a recall rate of 0.7 and precision of 0.89. Context: Several studies on automatic tools to process digitized slides have been reported focusing mainly on nuclei or tubule detection. Mitosis detection is a challenging problem that has not yet been addressed well in the literature. Aims: Mitotic count is an important parameter in breast cancer grading as it gives an evaluation of the aggressiveness of the tumor. However, consistency, reproducibility and agreement on mitotic count for the same slide can vary largely among pathologists. An automatic tool for this task may help for reaching a better consistency, and at the same time reducing the burden of this demanding task for the pathologists. Subjects and Methods: Professor Fr?d?rique Capron team of the pathology department at Piti?-Salp?tri?re Hospital in Paris, France, has selected a set of five slides of breast cancer. The slides are stained with H and E. They have been scanned by three different equipments: Aperio ScanScope XT slide scanner, Hamamatsu NanoZoomer 2.0-HT slide scanner and 10 bands multispectral microscope. The data set is made up of 50 high power fields (HPF) coming from 5 different slides scanned at ×40 magnification. There are 10 HPFs/slide. The pathologist has annotated all the mitotic cells manually. A HPF has a size of 512 ?m × 512 ?m (that is an area of 0.262 mm 2 , which is a surface equivalent to that of a microscope field diameter of 0.58 mm. These 50 HPFs contain a total of 326 mitotic cells on images of both scanners, and 322 mitotic cells on the multispectral microscope. Results: Up to 129 teams have registered to the contest. However, only 17 teams submitted their detection of mitotic cells. The performance of the best team is very promising, with F-measure as high as 0.78. However, the database we provided is by far too small for a good assessment of reliability and robustness of the proposed algorithms. Conclusions: Mitotic count is an important criterion in the grading of many types of cancers, however, very little research has been made on automatic mitotic cell detection, mainly because of a lack of available data. A main objective of this contest was to propose a database of mitotic cells on digitized breast cancer histopathology slides to initiate works on automated mitotic cell detection. In the future, we would like to extend this database to have much more images from different patients and also for different types of cancers. In addition, mitotic cells should be annotated by several pathologists to reflect the partial agreement among them. PMID:23858383

Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel; Loménie, Nicolas; Kulikova, Maria; Irshad, Humayun; Klossa, Jacques; Capron, Frédérique; Genestie, Catherine; Le Naour, Gilles; Gurcan, Metin N.

2013-01-01

30

The importance of preoperative elevated serum levels of CEA and CA15-3 in patients with breast cancer in predicting its histological type.  

PubMed

It is not known whether in patients with breast cancer the occurrence of elevated serum tumour markers depends on its histological type. The aim of the study was to assess relationship between breast cancer histological type and the presence of increased serum levels of CEA and CA 15-3. The study population was 428 patients (all women, mean age 52.5 years), treated at The Department of Surgery of Wroclaw Medical University from 2005 to 2008 due to breast cancer. All of them had their preoperative CA 15-3 and CEA serum concentrations measured. According to the TNM system, 21% of patients were in stage I, 32.5% in stage II, 46.5% in stage III of the disease. In patients with ductal type of the cancer the elevated serum levels of CEA and CA 15-3 were observed in 48.7% and 42.2%, in lobular type in 42.4% and 52.5%, and in non-ductal/tubular types in 48.1% and 40.4% (p=N/S). Stepwise logistic regression analyses showed that ductal breast cancer is related to elevated CEA and normal CA 15-3 serum levels. The histological types of breast cancer are not significantly related to elevated serum levels of CEA and/or CA 15-3. PMID:20529812

Agrawal, A K; Jelen, M; Rudnicki, J; Grzebieniak, Z; Zy?ko, D; Kielan, W; S?onina, J; Marek, G

2010-01-01

31

BREAST CANCER 4. BREAST CANCER  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER 29 4. BREAST CANCER 4.1. SUMMARY The average number of new cases diagnosed each year was 2,965 in women and 20 in men. Breast cancer was the most common cancer in women in Ireland breast cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 12 for women and 1 in 1,621 for men and was slightly higher

Paxton, Anthony T.

32

Histology of Prophylactically Removed Ovaries from BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Compared with Noncarriers in Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer Syndrome Kindreds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The literature reports conflicting studies claiming premalignant histological features in benign ovaries from women who may have hereditary predilections for ovarian carcinoma. To test the veracity of these claims, this investigation studied ovaries prophylactically removed from members of hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome families who carry BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and compared these with the ovaries of mutation-negative

Murray Joseph Casey; Chhanda Bewtra; Laura L Hoehne; Abraham D Tatpati; Henry T Lynch; Patrice Watson

2000-01-01

33

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... shun) therapy uses high-energy X-rays to kill the cancerous cells. Chemotherapy (say: kee-mo-THER- ... medicine that travels throughout the entire body and kills cancer cells. Back Continue Living With Breast Cancer ...

34

What Is Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts ... The remainder of this document refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in ...

35

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include Age - the ... the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through ...

36

Breast Multiple Primary and Histology Rules Matrix  

Cancer.gov

Breast Multiple Primary Rules – Matrix C500 – C509 (Excludes lymphoma and leukemia M9590 – 9989 and Kaposi sarcoma M9140) * Prepare one abstract. Use the histology coding rules to assign the appropriate histology code. ** Prepare two or more abstracts.

37

breast cancer  

E-print Network

Summary Among 288 breast cancer patients (118 with bilateral disease and 165 with diagnosis before 40 years of age), we identified 26 families with a history of breast cancer, including a minimum of three first- or second-degree relatives. Complete pedigrees with verified malignancy data from the Finnish cancer registry were constructed for 22 families. The median age at breast cancer diagnosis of the young probands (breast cancer at a younger age (median age 54 years) than the relatives of the older (bilateral) probands (median age 60 years). Standard life-table methods were used to compare the risk of breast cancer in the family members with that of the general population. Among the relatives of the young probands, the increased breast cancer risk occurred in the early post-menopausal period, whereas the risk estimate for the relatives of the bilateral probands closely followed that of the general population. In both groups, however, those family members reaching the age of 80 years had a cumulative probability of over 50 % of developing breast cancer. The standard life-table method proved useful when assessing the age-specific risk for familial breast cancer, taking into account numerous family members as well as their age at disease onset. This kind of analysis can be performed in populations for which reliable cancer registry data are available. It provides a useful tool for selecting individuals for imaging and mutation screening, counselling and experimental chemoprevention programmes.

unknown authors

38

Comparison of one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) method and routine histological investigation for intraoperative detection of lymph node metastasis in Polish women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is a part of the staging procedure in breast cancer patients. Intraoperative molecular analysis for SLN metastases using the one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) method based on reverse-transcription loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) has already been validated in breast cancer. In this study, we compare the intraoperative OSNA method to our routine histological investigation. To evaluate the performance of OSNA in comparison to histology, analysis of 74 SLN from 60 breast cancer patients was conducted with both methods. Of the 22 histologically positive samples, 14 were attributed to macrometastases (++) in the OSNA-CK19 assay and 8 to micrometastases (+). Two samples negative in histopathology were positive in the OSNA method (micrometastases +). Our results show that OSNA is an excellent method for the detection of metastases in lymph nodes and can be applied as an intraoperative diagnostic approach. Intraoperative molecular analysis for SLN metastases using the OSNA method reduces the number of admission days and duration of surgery. To our knowledge this is the first study referring to Polish women. PMID:23900867

Smolarz, B; Krawczyk, T; Westfal, B; Maciejczyk, R; Zadro?ny, M; Samulak, D; Michalska, M M; Mojs, E; Wilczak, M; Romanowicz-Makowska, H

2013-06-01

39

Histological assessment of breast lesions identified exclusively by magnetic resonance.  

PubMed

Radiologic-pathologic correlation of lesions diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) is precluded by insufficient data on histological characteristics of lesions suspicious on MR but not visible on concurrent mammogram or ultrasound. The objective of this study was to describe histological features of breast lesions diagnosed exclusively by MR. The participants underwent MR-guided breast biopsy between 2007 and 2012 for a suspicious lesion not identified by mammography or ultrasound. Histology slides were interpreted retrospectively by a breast pathologist. Of 126 patients (126 lesions), 34 (27%) had new breast cancer, 51 (40.5%) previous breast cancer, and 41 (32.5%) dense breasts or a significant family history of breast cancer. MR identified 23 (18.3%) invasive cancers: 20 were Grade 1 and 17 were ductal. Of the 126 lesions, 16 (13%) were ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), four were atypical ductal hyperplasia and atypical lobular hyperplasia (3%), and 68 (54%) were benign. Fifteen biopsies (12%) had no significant pathology. Five DCIS lesions were upgraded to T1 invasive cancers. Approximately 30 per cent of suspicious lesions detected exclusively by MR are invasive or in situ cancers that are predominantly low grade. Further studies are needed to determine if malignant lesions can be prospectively distinguished by MR characteristics. PMID:25264635

O'Connor, Victoria; Arena, Elizabeth; Albright, Joslyn; Brown, Nefertiti; O'Connor, Ryan; Chung, Maureen; DiNome, Maggie; Shamonki, Jaime

2014-10-01

40

6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

41

Learning about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

42

Fusion genes in breast cancer  

E-print Network

in breast cancer support the model that there are few commonly mutated genes, and many genes which are mutated much less frequently. Two genes stand out as often mutated in breast cancer across all subtypes: T P53 and PIK3C A. PIK3CA has been reported... distinguish between histologically similar tumours which are molecularly different (Rouzier et al., 2005). Gene expression profiling suggests that the different subtypes of breast cancer vary widely, harbouring different gene alterations and responding...

Batty, Elizabeth

2012-02-07

43

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... your family. First-degree relatives include your parents, siblings and children. Another sign of a risk of ... has had the disease. Many people have parents, siblings or children who have had breast cancer without ...

44

Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic  

MedlinePLUS

... here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer - Metaplastic Breast Cancer - Metaplastic This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer - Metaplastic. Use the menu below to choose the Overview section to ...

45

Contralateral Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer survivors constitute about 25% of the growing population of cancer survivors in the US. Contralateral breast cancer is the most common second cancer in women with primary breast cancer. With increasing cure rates comes increasing concern

46

Clinical and Histological Prognostic Factors in Axillary Node-Negative BreastCancer: Univariate and Multivariate Analysis with Relation to 5-Year Recurrence.  

PubMed

In the recent years several studies have shown that about 30% of cases with axillary node-nagative breast cancer suffer relapse of the disease. Our attempt was made to evaluate the most significant prognostic factors to predict this high risk group which may be benefited from adjuvant treatment. For this purpose, we selected 9 patients out of 80 cases of node-negative breast cancer who had been followed up at least for 5 years and had the recurrence of the disease. For comparison, 16 patients from the same group who did not have relapse were selected on a random basis. Histology, receptor status, AgNOR, DNA flow cytometry and various immunohistochemical parameters were compared between the groups with recurrence and that without recurrence. On univariate analysis, tumor size, immunohistochemical expressions of PCNA, MIB-1, c-erbB-2 and S-phase fraction were significantly different between the above two groups. By multivariate analysis, immunohistochemical c-erbB-2 expression (more than 50% of cancer cells) was an independent parameter. As a summary from our studies, c-erbB-2 immunohistochemical staining on paraffin sections might be the best independent prognostic factor in axillary node-negative breast cancers. PMID:11091532

Khanna; Tokuda; Shibuya; Tanaka; Sekine; Tajima; Osamura; Mitomi

1995-04-30

47

Stages of Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... IIIA Stage IIIB Stage IIIC Stage IV After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find ... bone cancer . The following stages are used for breast cancer: This section describes the stages of breast cancer . ...

48

Breast Cancer -- Male  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

49

Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

2010-01-01

50

Male Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

51

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female)  

E-print Network

--22000000 22 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female

Paxton, Anthony T.

52

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense Melissa Etheridge promotes breast cancer awareness CSI Breast Cancer Blogroll Being Cancer Debbie's Cancer Women with Cancer Breast Cancer Resources Breast Cancer Alltop Breast Cancer Sisterhood Europa Donna

Espinosa, Horacio D.

53

Mining microarray data to predict the histological grade of a Breast Mickael Fabreguea  

E-print Network

Mining microarray data to predict the histological grade of a Breast Cancer Mickael Fabreguea as prognostic and predictive tools. Materials and Methods: The method is based on sequential patterns used as features for class prediction. We applied it to classify breast cancer tumors according

Boyer, Edmond

54

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening Key Points for This Section Screening tests have risks. The risks of breast cancer screening tests include ... risk of dying from cancer . The risks of breast cancer screening tests include the following: Finding breast cancer ...

55

Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus  

PubMed Central

Objective Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries. Methods Information on age, SLE duration, cancer date, and histology was available. We analyzed information on histological type and performed multivariate logistic regression analyses of histological types according to age, SLE duration, and calendar year. Results We studied 180 breast cancers in the SLE cohort. Of the 155 cases with histology information, 11 were referred to simply as ‘carcinoma not otherwise specified’. In the remaining 144 breast cancers, the most common histological type was ductal carcinoma (n = 95; 66%) followed by lobular adenocarcinoma (n = 11; 8%), 15 cancers were of mixed histology, and the remaining ones were special types. In our regression analyses, the independent risk factors for lobular versus ductal carcinoma was age [odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.14] and for the ‘special’ subtypes it was age (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01–1.10) and SLE duration (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.00–1.11). Conclusions Generally, up to 80% of breast cancers are ductal carcinomas. Though our results are not definitive, in the breast cancers that occur in SLE, there may be a slight decrease in the ductal histological type. In our analyses, age and SLE duration were independent predictors of histological status. PMID:23887245

Cloutier, B. Tessier; Clarke, A. E.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Wang, Y.; Foulkes, W.; Gordon, C.; Hansen, J. E.; Yelin, E.; Urowitz, M. B.; Gladman, D.; Fortin, P. R.; Wallace, D. J.; Petri, M.; Manzi, S.; Ginzler, E. M.; Labrecque, J.; Edworthy, S.; Dooley, M. A.; Senécal, J. L.; Peschken, C. A.; Bae, S. C.; Isenberg, D.; Rahman, A.; Ruiz-Irastorza, G.; Hanly, J. G.; Jacobsen, S.; Nived, O.; Witte, T.; Criswell, L. A.; Barr, S. G.; Dreyer, L.; Sturfelt, G.; Bernatsky, S.

2014-01-01

56

Histological confirmation of breast cancer registration and self-reporting in England and Wales: a cohort study within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening  

PubMed Central

Background: In research studies, accurate information of cancer diagnosis is crucial. In women with breast cancer (BC), we compare cancer registration (CR) in England/Wales and self-reporting with independent confirmation. Methods: In the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening, notification of BC diagnosed between randomisation and 31 December 2009 was obtained through (1) CR (17 October 2011) and (2) self-reporting using postal-questionnaire. Breast cancer was confirmed using a detailed questionnaire (BC questionnaire BCQ) completed by the treating clinician (gold standard). Apparent sensitivity and positive-predictive value of CR/self-reporting vs BCQ were calculated. Results: Of 1065 women with possible BC notification, diagnosis was confirmed in 932 (87.5%). A total of 3.1% (28 out of 918) of BC CR and 12.4% (128 out of 1032) of women with self-reported BC only had in-situ carcinoma on BCQ. Another 4.6% (43 out of 932) of BCQ-confirmed cancer did not have a BC registration, and 3.6% (34 out of 932) did not self-report BC. Apparent sensitivity of CR and self-reporting vs BCQ were 95.4 and 96.4%, respectively. Positive-predictive value of self-reporting (87.1%) was significantly lower than that of CR (96.8%). Women aged<65 were more likely to over report in-situ carcinoma as BC. Overall, 73 (6.8%) women would have been misclassified/missed if CR, and 167 (15.6%) if self-reporting data alone was used. Conclusion: This study confirms the reliability of BC registration in England/Wales and highlights the fact that 1 in 10 women self-reporting BC might only have in-situ breast carcinoma. PMID:22596242

Fourkala, E O; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Burnell, M; Ryan, A; Manchanda, R; Dawnay, A; Jacobs, I; Widschwendter, M; Menon, U

2012-01-01

57

Breast Cancer: Early Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

58

Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

59

Expression of p21 ras gene products in breast cancer relates to histological types and to receptor and nodal status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Expression of the p21 product of theras gene family was investigated in a series of 142 infiltrating primary breast tumors by two specificras p21 monoclonal antibodies with an immunocytochemical technique. The majority of tumors demonstrated a varying number of positive cells. A significant association between p21 expression and tumor histotype was found: among ductal carcinomas the comedo variety was

Patrizia Querzoli; Elisabetta Marchetti; Alberto Bagni; Andrea Marzola; Guidalberto Fabris; Italo Nenci

1988-01-01

60

Differences in fluorescence profiles from breast cancer tissues due to changes in relative tryptophan content via energy transfer: tryptophan content correlates with histologic grade and tumor size but not with lymph node metastases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The correlation between histologic grade, an increasingly important measure of prognosis for patients with breast cancer, and tryptophan levels from tissues of 15 breast carcinoma patients was investigated. Changes in the relative content of key native organic biomolecule tryptophan were seen from the fluorescence spectra of cancerous and paired normal tissues with excitation wavelengths of 280 and 300 nm. Due to a large spectral overlap and matching excitation-emission spectra, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan-donor to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides-acceptor was noted. We used the ratios of fluorescence intensities at their spectral emission peaks, or spectral fingerprint peaks, at 340, 440, and 460 nm. Higher ratios correlated strongly with high histologic grade, while lower-grade tumors had low ratios. Large tumor size also correlated with high ratios, while the number of lymph node metastases, a major factor in staging, was not correlated with tryptophan levels. High histologic grade correlates strongly with increased content of tryptophan in breast cancer tissues and suggests that measurement of tryptophan content may be useful as a part of the evaluation of these patients.

Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

2014-12-01

61

Mayo Clinic researchers report that a new breast cancer risk prediction model may be more accurate than current model  

Cancer.gov

A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard.

62

CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast Cancer ... Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National Program of Cancer ...

63

Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... structures. Targeted therapy uses medicine to attack the gene changes in cancer cells. Hormone therapy is an example of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or systemic: Local ...

64

Review Epidemiology of Contralateral Breast Cancer 1  

E-print Network

Two to 11 % of women diagnosed with breast cancer will develop contralateral breast cancer in their lifetime. Women with a first primary are at a 2–6-fold increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer compared with the risk in the general population of women developing a first primary cancer. The incidence rate of contralateral breast cancer varies from four to eight per 1000 person-years. To assess the risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer among women with a first primary breast cancer, the epidemiological literature concerning these factors was reviewed and summarized. Studies have shown that a family history of breast cancer, an early age at initial diagnosis, and a lobular histology of the first primary breast cancer increase the risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. Although chemotherapy and tamoxifen therapy may reduce this risk, there are inconsistent results regarding the effects of radiotherapy and the effects of reproductive, environmental and other factors. Additional analytical studies addressing all potential risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer are necessary in view of the increasing incidence and survival of women with a first primary.

Yue Chen; Wendy Thompson; Robert Semenciw; Yang Mao

65

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives

unknown authors

66

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives ? Drinking alcohol ? Being physically inactive

unknown authors

67

Staging breast cancer: role of bone scanning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone scans using technetium-99m phosphate complexes and a rectilinear scanner were carried out on 192 women with primary operable breast cancer four to six weeks after operation. The lymph node status of all these patients was assessed histologically from triple node biopsy specimens. Only nine patients had positive scans, although 94 patients had histological evidence that the tumour had already

C J Davies; P A Griffiths; B J Preston; A H Morris; C W Elston; R W Blamey

1977-01-01

68

Hereditary breast cancer and family cancer syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) shows extant clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Clinically one finds the onset of breast cancer at an early age, an excess of bilaterality, and patterns of multiple primary cancer such as combinations of breast and ovarian carcinoma in the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. In addition to HBOC, one sees a variety of putative breast cancer-prone genotypes

Henry T. Lynch; Jane Lynch; Theresa Conway; Patrice Watson; Jean Feunteum; Gilbert Lenoir; Steven Narod; Robert Fitzgibbons

1994-01-01

69

Rehabilitation of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During 1996, 184,300 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. Although 44,300 women died of breast cancer [1], three fourths\\u000a of those women diagnosed will be cancer survivors. Breast cancer at presentation is a unique disease due to its insidious\\u000a onset. It often presents without warning, on a mammogram, on self-examination, or on physician examination. The disease affects\\u000a more young women

Krystina Kiel; Paula Kopp

70

Breast Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... lower your risk of cancer. NCI's Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool uses a woman's risk factors to estimate ... it is very important to have a cancer risk assessment and counseling about the different ways to prevent ...

71

Breast Cancer Trends  

MedlinePLUS

... Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2010, featuring prevalence of comorbidity and impact on survival among persons with lung, colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer. Cancer 2013. Note: Hispanic origin is not ...

72

Polyamine profiles in tumor, normal tissue of the homologous breast, blood, and urine of breast cancer sufferers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polyamines are involved in the development of breast cancer. We assayed polyamines in erythrocytes, urines, and breast tissues (tumor tissue and histologically normal breast tissue close to the tumor) of patients with invasive breast cancer (n=174) and benign breast disease (n=71, used as controls). Polyamine levels in red blood cells and urine were similar to the polyamine concentrations found in

Jean Levêque; Fabrice Foucher; Jean-Yves Bansard; Rene Havouis; Jean-Yves Grall; Jacques-Philippe Moulinoux

2000-01-01

73

General Information about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Childhood (for information about childhood breast cancer) Health history can affect the risk of developing breast cancer. ... for breast cancer include the following: A family history ( first-degree relative , such as mother, daughter, or ...

74

Triple-negative breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Perou's molecular classification defines tumors that neither express hormone receptors nor overexpress HER2 as triple-negative (TN) tumors. These tumors account for approximately 15% of breast cancers. The so-called basaloid tumors are not always synonymous with TN tumors; they differ in the fact that they express different molecular markers, have a higher histologic grade, and have a worse prognosis. Clinically

Reinaldo D Chacón; María V Costanzo

2010-01-01

75

Sexuality After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... on choosing a partner or having children, a diagnosis of breast cancer can be especially difficult. Sexual impact of surgery ... Relationship issues are also important because the cancer diagnosis can be ... But breast cancer can be a growth experience for couples – especially ...

76

Clinical management of women at increased risk for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large number of women in the population are at risk for the development of breast cancer. Methods now exist to accurately assess risk and to provide quantitative estimates of the chance of a woman developing breast cancer in her lifetime. Histologic assessment of premalignant breast pathology aids in the evaluation of risk. The availability of primary chemoprevention clinical trials

Victor G. Vogel; Anita Yeomans; Eric Higginbotham

1993-01-01

77

Predictors of Contralateral Breast Cancer in Patients With Unilateral Breast Cancer Undergoing Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) reduced the risk of contralateral breast cancer in unilateral breast cancer patients, it was difficult to predict which patients were most likely to benefit from the procedure. The objective of this study was to identify the clinicopathologic factors that predict contralateral breast cancer and thereby inform decisions regarding performing CPM in unilateral breast cancer patients. METHODS A total of 542 unilateral breast cancer patients who underwent CPM at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from January 2000 to April 2007 were included in the current study. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify clinicopathologic factors that predict contralateral breast cancer. RESULTS Of the 542 patients included in this study, 25 (5%) had an occult malignancy in the contralateral breast. Eighty-two patients (15%) had moderate-risk to high-risk histologic findings identified at final pathologic evaluation of the contralateral breast. Multivariate analysis revealed that 3 independent factors predicted malignancy in the contralateral breast: an ipsilateral invasive lobular histology, an ipsilateral multicentric tumor, and a 5-year Gail risk ?1.67%. Multivariate analysis also revealed that an age ?50 years at the time of the initial cancer diagnosis and an additional ipsilateral moderate-risk to high-risk pathology were independent predictors of moderate-risk to high-risk histologic findings in the contralateral breast. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicated that CPM may be a rational choice for breast cancer patients who have a 5-year Gail risk ?1.67%, an additional ipsilateral moderate-risk to high-risk pathology, an ipsilateral multicentric tumor, or an ipsilateral tumor of invasive lobular histology. PMID:19172584

Yi, Min; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Arun, Banu K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Babiera, Gildy V.; Hwang, Rosa F.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Yang, Wei; Hunt, Kelly K.

2015-01-01

78

Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-03

79

TCGA Proteomics: Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

80

Living Beyond Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... with Young Patients Diagnosed with Cancer Kristin N. Smith, a patient navigator at Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive ... with young patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Ms. Smith is the speaker for our webinar, Fertility and ...

81

Grading Breast Cancer Tissues Using Molecular Portraits*  

PubMed Central

Tumor progression and prognosis in breast cancer patients are difficult to assess using current clinical and laboratory parameters, where a pathological grading is indicative of tumor aggressiveness. This grading is based on assessments of nuclear grade, tubule formation, and mitotic rate. We report here the first protein signatures associated with histological grades of breast cancer, determined using a novel affinity proteomics approach. We profiled 52 breast cancer tissue samples by combining nine antibodies and label-free LC-MS/MS, which generated detailed quantified proteomic maps representing 1,388 proteins. The results showed that we could define in-depth molecular portraits of histologically graded breast cancer tumors. Consequently, a 49-plex candidate tissue protein signature was defined that discriminated between histological grades 1, 2, and 3 of breast cancer tumors with high accuracy. Highly biologically relevant proteins were identified, and the differentially expressed proteins indicated further support for the current hypothesis regarding remodeling of the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. The protein signature was corroborated using meta-analysis of transcriptional profiling data from an independent patient cohort. In addition, the potential for using the markers to estimate the likelihood of long-term metastasis-free survival was also indicated. Taken together, these molecular portraits could pave the way for improved classification and prognostication of breast cancer. PMID:23982162

Olsson, Niclas; Carlsson, Petter; James, Peter; Hansson, Karin; Waldemarson, Sofia; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Ryden, Lisa; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.

2013-01-01

82

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project Breast cancer is  

E-print Network

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project NEED Breast cancer is emerging as a uniquely on molecularly- driven research and to design models that adequately serve the study of breast cancer risk scientists and public health experts is dedicated to research on the primary prevention of breast cancer

Ginzel, Matthew

83

BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

2008-03-19

84

Metastatic Breast Cancer Network  

MedlinePLUS

... 15 QUESTIONS you may be asking about a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer. Click HERE . Our favorite short videos on HOW ... nonprofit advocacy group for those living with metastatic breast cancer Home | About Us | ... | Get Involved | Donate | Contact Us | Join Us | Terms & Policies

85

Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... be embarrassed to say anything. This can delay diagnosis. So, breast cancers may be found later in men. If it ... is a women’s disease, right? No, it’s not. Breast cancer can happen to anyone. Don’t let the surprise of the diagnosis distract you from the seriousness of this disease. ...

86

Reproducibility of histologic classification of gastric cancer.  

PubMed Central

A panel review of histologic specimens was carried out as part of a multi-centre case-control study of gastric cancer (GC) and diet. Comparisons of diagnoses of 100 GCs by six pathologists revealed agreement in histologic classification for about 70-80% of the cancers. Concordance was somewhat higher when using the Lauren rather than the Ming or World Health Organization classification systems. Histologic types from reading biopsy tissue agreed with those derived from surgical specimens for 65-75% of the 100 tumours. Intra-observer agreement in histologic classification, assessed by repeat readings up to 3 years apart by one pathologist, was 95%. The findings indicate that, although overall concordance was good, it is important to standardise diagnoses in multi-centre epidemiologic studies of GC by histologic type. PMID:2039701

Palli, D.; Bianchi, S.; Cipriani, F.; Duca, P.; Amorosi, A.; Avellini, C.; Russo, A.; Saragoni, A.; Todde, P.; Valdes, E.

1991-01-01

87

Breast cancer stem cells  

PubMed Central

Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarize what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically. PMID:23986719

Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

2013-01-01

88

Treatment Options by Stage (Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... Dictionary Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment of inflammatory breast cancer may include the ...

89

Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

90

Screening for Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context Breast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available. Objectives To review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities. Data Sources and Study Selection English-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta-analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed. Data Synthesis All major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities on screening mammograms do not have breast cancer with variability based on such factors as age of the woman and assessment category assigned by the radiologist. Studies comparing full-field digital mammography to screen film have not shown statistically significant differences in cancer detection while the impact on recall rates (percentage of screening mammograms considered to have positive results) was unclear. One study suggested that computer-aided detection increases cancer detection rates and recall rates while a second larger study did not find any significant differences. Screening clinical breast examination detects some cancers missed by mammography, but the sensitivity reported in the community is lower (28% to 36%) than in randomized trials (about 54%). Breast self-examination has not been shown to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality, but it does increase the number of breast biopsies performed because of false-positives. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are being studied for screening women at high risk for breast cancer but are not recommended for screening the general population. Sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging in high-risk women has been found to be much higher than that of mammography but specificity is generally lower. Effect of the magnetic resonance imaging on breast cancer mortality is not known. A balanced discussion of possible benefits and harms of screening should be undertaken with each woman. Conclusions In the community, mammography remains the main screening tool while the effectiveness of clinical breast examination and self-examination are less. New screening modalities are unlikely to replace mammography in the near future for screening the general population. PMID:15755947

Elmore, Joann G.; Armstrong, Katrina; Lehman, Constance D.; Fletcher, Suzanne W.

2011-01-01

91

Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer Or Other Cancers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-07-01

92

Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... develop cancer. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of breast cancer? These resources address the diagnosis or management of breast cancer and may include treatment providers. Gene Review: BRCA1 ...

93

PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2015-02-23

94

Surgery for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... as swelling of the arm and chest ( lymphedema ). Lymph node surgery To find out if the breast cancer ... nodes are checked in 2 major ways. Axillary lymph node dissection: In this operation, about 10 to 40 ( ...

95

Types of Breast Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... staged and treated like any other invasive cancer. Phyllodes tumor This very rare breast tumor develops in ... for these tumors include phylloides tumor and cystosarcoma phyllodes . These tumors are usually benign but on rare ...

96

Breast Cancer Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... Prosthesis • Chemotherapy and Side Effects • Radiation Therapy and Side Effects ©2013 Susan G. Komen ® Item No. KOMEED024000 12/13 You are not alone If you need breast cancer surgery, remember there are many women who have ...

97

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any ...

98

Breast and Gynecologic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials and the evaluation of new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and new technologies to identify premalignant

99

[Erythematous reticular mucinosis associated with breast cancer].  

PubMed

A case of reticular erythematous mucinosis of histology and atypical localization in a patient with breast cancer, is presented. This patient had a history of benign tumors of muscular origin localized in uterus and stomach. We focus on the rareness of this syndrome and its association with other tumors, a point not shown in the literature. PMID:1966466

Aparicio Martínez, J C; Marcos Sánchez, F; Juárez Ucelay, F; Llorente Domingo, P; Durán Pérez-Navarro, A

1990-02-01

100

Laterality of breast cancer in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer laterality of over 250,000 cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program in the United States was studied in relation to gender, race, tumor stage, histology, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, and marital status. The data, which include all invasive and in situ breast cancer cases in the SEER program during the

Helen A. Weiss; Susan S. Devesa; Louise A. Brinton

1996-01-01

101

Non-Cancerous Breast Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

102

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

103

Human Breast Cancer Histoid  

PubMed Central

Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

2011-01-01

104

Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue from breast cancer patients: association with phenotypes that are common in hereditary breast cancer.  

PubMed

Lobular inflammation (lobulitis) has been demonstrated in benign breast tissue adjacent to in situ and invasive breast cancers and, more recently, in nonneoplastic tissue from prophylactic mastectomy specimens for hereditary high-risk breast carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of lobulitis in benign breast tissue of patients with breast cancer and associated clinicopathologic features. We reviewed nonneoplastic breast tissue sections from 334 patients with invasive breast carcinoma to study lobulitis in normal breast tissue and to correlate its presence with clinicopathologic features of the associated tumor. Clinical information (age, menopausal status, and follow-up), tumor characteristics (type, grade, size, lymph node status, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor, HER2), and survival were recorded. Characteristics of women with and without lobulitis were cross-classified with categories of clinical, pathologic, and histologic characteristics, and differences in distributions were tested in univariate and multivariate analysis. Lobulitis was found in 26 (8%) of 334 patients. The lymphocytic infiltrate was predominantly T-cell type. In a multivariate model, lobulitis in patients with breast cancer was significantly associated with younger age, triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2)-negative cancers, and medullary phenotypes. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue, away from tumor, is associated with clinicopathologic features more commonly seen in hereditary breast cancer. PMID:24157064

Gulbahce, H Evin; Vanderwerf, Steve; Blair, Cindy; Sweeney, Carol

2014-01-01

105

Viruses and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

2010-01-01

106

The histological diagnosis of metastases to the breast from extramammary malignancies  

PubMed Central

This study aims to review histological and immunohistochemical features that are useful in the diagnosis of metastases to the breast. Histological features were compared between non?haematological metastases to the breast and 100 consecutive core biopsy specimens of primary invasive carcinomas of the breast. 18 non?haematological metastases to the breast were diagnosed over a 10?year period (0.3% of malignant mammary tumours). Elastosis and carcinoma in situ were seen only in primary mammary cancers. Two?thirds of tumours had features raising the possibility of metastasis, such as clear cell carcinoma suggestive of renal origin and small cell carcinoma suggestive of pulmonary origin. The features observed in haematological metastases are also described. Immunohistochemical panels to distinguish mammary carcinoma (oestrogen receptor, gross cystic fluid protein?15) from common metastases to the breast, including carcinoma of the lung (thyroid transcription factor?1), malignant melanoma (S100, HMB45, melan?A) and ovarian serous papillary carcinoma (Wilms' tumour 1), are discussed. The pathologist has a key role in considering the diagnosis of metastasis to the breast if the histological features are unusual for a primary mammary tumour. The clinical history is vital in some cases. Immunohistochemistry plays a useful supplementary role. PMID:18042689

Lee, Andrew H S

2007-01-01

107

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

2000-01-01

108

Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2012-11-14

109

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

110

Breast Cancer and the Environment  

MedlinePLUS

... Reports Activities Meetings Browse History Print Print Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach Released: ... With more than 230,000 new cases of breast cancer expected to be diagnosed in the United States ...

111

Breast Cancer in Young Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Podcasts Health-e-Cards Web Badges Infographics Twitter Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... lower your risk. What Is CDC Doing about Breast Cancer in Young Women? CDC works with public, non- ...

112

Your Body After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... only a few short weeks elapsed between her breast cancer diagnosis and her hair falling out from chemotherapy. “I ... Good Feel Better workshop after her mother’s third breast cancer diagnosis. Women can also find wigs and other products ...

113

Life After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... the appointment to lend support. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Emotional effects of treatment The last day of ... build up to your past schedule. When breast cancer treatment begins, many people think that their last day ...

114

Combined magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and histology imaging strategy in a human breast tumor xenograft model  

PubMed Central

Applications of molecular imaging in cancer and other diseases frequently require combining in vivo imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance and optical imaging, with ex vivo optical, fluorescence, histology, and immunohistochemical (IHC) imaging, to investigate and relate molecular and biological processes to imaging parameters within the same region of interest. We have developed a multimodal image reconstruction and fusion framework that accurately combines in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), ex vivo brightfield and fluorescence microscopic imaging, and ex vivo histology imaging. Ex vivo brightfield microscopic imaging was used as an intermediate modality to facilitate the ultimate link between ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI/MRSI. Tissue sectioning necessary for optical and histology imaging required generation of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction module for 2D ex vivo optical and histology imaging data. We developed an external fiducial marker based 3D reconstruction method, which was able to fuse optical brightfield and fluorescence with histology imaging data. Registration of 3D tumor shape was pursued to combine in vivo MRI/MRSI and ex vivo optical brightfield and fluorescence imaging data. This registration strategy was applied to in vivo MRI/MRSI, ex vivo optical brightfield/fluorescence, as well as histology imaging data sets obtained from human breast tumor models. 3D human breast tumor data sets were successfully reconstructed and fused with this platform. PMID:22945331

Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Amstalden van Hove, Erika R.; Chughtai, Kamila; Raman, Venu; Winnard, Paul T.; Heeren, Ron; Artemov, Dmitri; Glunde, Kristine

2014-01-01

115

Psychological Processes in Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a process that has a profound psychological impact on one in nine American women and their families. Despite pervasive depression in women during breast cancer surgery and treatment, a woman's psychological state before breast cancer is one of the best predictors of adjustment to the disease one year after surgery. Successful adjustment is found in women who

Renee Royak-Schaler

1992-01-01

116

Genetic factors and breast cancer laterality  

PubMed Central

Background Women are more likely to develop cancer in the left breast than the right. Such laterality may influence subsequent management, especially in elderly patients with heart disease who may require radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore possible factors for such cancer laterality. Methods In this work, clinical data for consecutive patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer were reviewed, with emphasis on clinical presentation and family history. Results Between 2005 and 2012, 687 patients with breast cancer were seen. Two women with incomplete data and eleven men were excluded. In total, 343 (50.9%) patients presented with left breast cancer, 311 (46.1%) with right breast cancer, and 20 (3.0%) with simultaneous bilateral malignancy. There were no significant differences between the three groups, especially in regards to clinical presentation and tumor characteristics. A total of 622 (92.3%) patients had unilateral primary, 20 (3.0%) had simultaneous bilateral, and 32 (4.7%) had metachronous primary breast cancer with subsequent contralateral breast cancer after 7.5–236 months. The worst 10-year survival was for bilateral simultaneous (18%) compared with unilateral (28%) and metachronous primaries (90%). There were no differences in survival in relation to breast cancer laterality, handedness, and presence or absence of a family history of cancer. There were significant similarities between patients and first-degree relatives in regards to breast cancer laterality, namely same breast (30/66, 45.5%), opposite breast (9/66, 13.6%), and bilateral cancer (27/66, 40.9, P=0.01163). This was more evident among patients and their sisters (17/32, 53.1%) or mothers (11/27, 40.7%, P=0.0689). There were also close similarities in relation to age at initial diagnosis of cancer for patients and their first-degree relatives for age differences of ?5 years (48/166, 28.9%), 6–10 years (34/166, 20.5%), and >11 years (84/166, 50.6%, P=0.12065). Conclusion High similarities between patients and their first-degree relatives in regards to cancer laterality and possibly age at initial diagnosis of cancer may suggest an underlying inherited genetic predisposition. PMID:24790468

Amer, Magid H

2014-01-01

117

Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-03-10

118

Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-19

119

Biomarkers for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Molecular biomarkers for breast cancer are of several types. Risk biomarkers are those associated with increased cancer risk and include mammographic abnormalities, proliferative breast disease with or without atypia, family clustering and inherited germ-line abnormalities. Surrogate endpoint biomarkers are tissue, cellular or molecular alterations that occur between cancer initiation and progression. These biomarkers are utilized as endpoints in short-term chemoprevention trials. Prognostic biomarkers provide information regarding outcome irrespective of therapy, while predictive biomarkers provide information regarding response to therapy. Candidate prognostic biomarkers for breast cancer include elevated proliferation indices such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); ER and PR overexpression; markers of oncogene overexpression such as c-erbB-2, TGF-a and EGFr; indicators of apoptotic imbalance including overexpression of bcl-2 and an increased bax/bcl-2 ratio; markers of disordered cell signaling such as p53 nuclear protein accumulation; alteration of differentiation signals such as overexpression of c-myc and related proteins; loss of differentiation markers such as TGF-b II receptor and retinoic acid receptor; and alteration of angiogenesis proteins such as VEGF overexpression. As our knowledge regarding molecular biomarkers for breast cancer increases, prognostic indices will be developed that combine the predictive power of individual molecular biomarkers with specific clinical and pathologic factors. PMID:12145573

Beenken, S W; Bland, K I

2002-08-01

120

Breast cancer imaging devices.  

PubMed

Conventional mammography is a screening procedure constrained by low specificity in the detection of breast cancer. Approximately 40% of women undergoing mammography screening have dense breast tissue, and conventional mammographic imaging has a sensitivity range of only 50%-85% for malignant lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now recommended for breast cancer screening in high-risk patients. However, approximately 15% of patients cannot tolerate MRI. These are the clinical situations in which positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma (BSG) camera systems fulfill a need for primary breast cancer imaging. Because breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among women, many nuclear medicine imaging techniques are essential in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disease. Nuclear medicine surgical techniques consist of sentinel lymph node localization and the use of radiolabeled seeds for intraoperative localization of nonpalpable breast cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the PEM Flex Solo II scanner, which has the capability for stereotactic biopsy, with an array of pixelated lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT), and a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm. Clear PEM is a scanner in development with cerium-doped LYSO (LYSO:Ce) crystals, multipixel avalanche photodiodes, depth of interaction measurement with a resolution of 1.3 mm. The Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera is a BSG device approved by the FDA with stereotactic biopsy guidance capability, a pixelated array of sodium iodide crystals, PS-PMTs, and an extrinsic spatial resolution of 6 mm at 3 cm from the camera. GE has just received clearance from the FDA for a molecular breast imaging camera, the Discovery NM 750 b, with pixelated cadmium zinc telluride crystals, semiconductor photoelements and an extrinsic resolution of 3.5 mm at 3 cm. The Society of Nuclear Medicine has issued guidelines for BSG camera image interpretation recommendations and clinical indications. Different crystals and camera architectures are under investigation to further improve resolution for both PEM and BSG imaging. PMID:21440698

Moadel, Renee M

2011-05-01

121

Breast mammographic pattern: a concatenation of confounding and breast cancer risk factors.  

PubMed

A mammographic pattern of > 25% radiodensity is associated with increased risk for breast cancer. Mammographic pattern is influenced by age, body weight, reproductive factors, and race/ethnicity. The interaction among these factors in predicting breast radiographic pattern, and their association with the presence of histologic markers of increased risk of breast cancer, is poorly defined. To elucidate the relations among epidemiologic, radiographic, and histologic markers of breast cancer risk, the authors studied these factors in an unselected forensic autopsy series, accumulated between 1978 and 1983, of 486 women aged 15-98 years at death. Older age and/or postmenopausal status was the strongest predictor of radiolucent breast pattern. Obesity, defined as a Quetelet index (weight(kg)/height(m)2) of > 25, and large breast size were also highly significant predictors of breast radiolucency. Factors related to parity were not significant predictors of breast parenchymal pattern. Native American race was an independent predictor of breast radiolucency in this population. A dense parenchymal pattern was associated with increased prevalence of marked cystic change and the presence of duct epithelial hyperplasia in women under age 35. The results support the association of breast radiodensity with ethnic/racial, reproductive, and histologic factors predictive of cancer risk. However, this association is overshadowed by the effects of obesity and aging or menopause. PMID:7572957

Bartow, S A; Pathak, D R; Mettler, F A; Key, C R; Pike, M C

1995-10-15

122

Breast Cancer Statistics  

Cancer.gov

The maps show a pattern of elevated mortality rates for female breast cancer extending from the Mid-Atlantic through the Northeastern states has persisted for many years. Established risk factors are believed to be largely responsible, but the remaining reasons are unknown.

123

Breast Cancer and Fatigue  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom in breast cancer patients and survivors. A rather nebulous concept, fatigue overlaps with sleepiness and depressed mood. In this chapter, we cover methods for assessing fatigue; describe the occurrence of fatigue before, during and after initial treatment; present possible underlying mechanisms of fatigue; and, enumerate approaches to its treatment. PMID:18769530

Bardwell, Wayne A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

2008-01-01

124

Breast Cancer Among Asian Women  

Cancer.gov

A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

125

Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3?years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

2013-01-01

126

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

127

Heritable Variation of ERBB2 and Breast Cancer Risk  

PubMed Central

Amplification of the epithelial growth factor receptor gene ERBB2 (HER2, NEU) in breast cancer is associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In mammary gland development, this receptor plays a role in ductal and lobuloalveolar differentiation. We conducted a systematic investigation of the role of genetic variation of the ERBB2 gene in breast cancer risk in a study of 842 histologically-confirmed invasive breast cancer cases and 1108 controls from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We observed that the ERBB2 gene resides within a locus of high linkage disequilibrium, comprised of three major ancestral haplotypes in the study population. These haplotypes are marked by simple tandem repeat and single nucleotide polymorphisms, including the missense variants I655V and P1170A. We observed a risk-modifying effect of a highly polymorphic simple tandem repeat within an evolutionarily conserved region, 4.4 kb upstream from the ERBB2 transcription start site. Under a dominant genetic model, the age-adjusted odds ratio was 1.74 (95% CI 1.27?2.37). Its association with breast cancer, and with breast cancer stratified by histology, by histological grade, and by stage, remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. In contrast, we observed no association of ERBB2 SNP haplotypes with breast cancer predisposition. PMID:19336545

Breyer, Joan P.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Airey, David C.; Cai, Qiuyin; Yaspan, Brian L.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Dai, Qi; Boulos, Fouad; Olivares, Maria G.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Page, David L.; Dupont, William D.; Zheng, Wei; Smith, Jeffrey R.

2009-01-01

128

Heritable variation of ERBB2 and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

Amplification of the epithelial growth factor receptor gene ERBB2 (HER2, NEU) in breast cancer is associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In mammary gland development, this receptor plays a role in ductal and lobuloalveolar differentiation. We conducted a systematic investigation of the role of genetic variation of the ERBB2 gene in breast cancer risk in a study of 842 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer cases and 1,108 controls from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We observed that the ERBB2 gene resides within a locus of high linkage disequilibrium, composed of three major ancestral haplotypes in the study population. These haplotypes are marked by simple tandem repeat and single nucleotide polymorphisms, including the missense variants I655V and P1170A. We observed a risk-modifying effect of a highly polymorphic simple tandem repeat within an evolutionarily conserved region, 4.4 kb upstream from the ERBB2 transcription start site. Under a dominant genetic model, the age-adjusted odds ratio was 1.74 (95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.37). Its association with breast cancer, and with breast cancer stratified by histology, by histologic grade, and by stage, remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. In contrast, we observed no association of ERBB2 single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes with breast cancer predisposition. PMID:19336545

Breyer, Joan P; Sanders, Melinda E; Airey, David C; Cai, Qiuyin; Yaspan, Brian L; Schuyler, Peggy A; Dai, Qi; Boulos, Fouad; Olivares, Maria G; Bradley, Kevin M; Gao, Yu-Tang; Page, David L; Dupont, William D; Zheng, Wei; Smith, Jeffrey R

2009-04-01

129

Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

130

[Breast cancer surgery].  

PubMed

The surgery for breast cancer is frequently the first step in a multi-disciplinary care. It allows for local control, but also to establish crucial prognostic factor indicating potential adjuvant therapy. The current trend s towards de-escalation of surgical treatment for reducing the functional and aesthetic morbidity. At the local level, this de-escalation has been made possible by performing most often breast conservative surgery because of the development of oncoplastic techniques, but also because of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At the axillary level, the reduction of morbidity has been made possible by the advent of the sentinel node biopsy which is more and more indicated year after year. PMID:24579336

Delpech, Yann; Barranger, Emmanuel

2013-12-01

131

Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

2014-11-04

132

Breast cancer in the elderly.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer in the elderly has attracted considerable interest in recent years for three main reasons. Firstly, information concerning the profile (clinical and biological) of the disease in the geriatric population is scarce; secondly, the number of patients is increasing, and thirdly there are conflicting data regarding the actual effectiveness of the different treatments. The present review attempts to outline the specific characteristics of this malignancy in the elderly in terms of histological pattern, stage at diagnosis, and outcome. The feasibility of standard therapies (mastectomy/lumpectomy, axillary clearance, and radio-therapy) in the elderly is carefully analysed, and compared to the efficacy of less aggressive procedures. The use of tamoxifen as a primary treatment, instead of surgery, is critically reconsidered, as well as its use as an adjuvant therapy. Finally, the effectiveness of systemic therapy in advanced disease is also discussed. Images Figure PMID:7494769

Bellet, M.; Alonso, C.; Ojeda, B.

1995-01-01

133

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women  

MedlinePLUS

... a woman drinks, the greater her risk of breast cancer. Reproductive and menstrual history : Women who had their first ... and Genetic Testing Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Cancer Mammograms Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for ...

134

Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... are different types of treatment for men with breast cancer. Different types of treatment are available for men ... standard treatment are used to treat men with breast cancer: Surgery Surgery for men with breast cancer is ...

135

Breast and Ovarian Cancers  

PubMed Central

Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression. Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression. PMID:22205677

Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E.; Couchman, John R.

2012-01-01

136

Breast Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

2014-01-01

137

Breast Cancer and Bone Loss  

MedlinePLUS

... of treatment is based on the type of breast cancer and other factors. Surgery is used to remove cancerous tissue in ... more serious condition of osteoporosis develops. What can breast cancer ... treatment, other factors that increase risk include a personal or family ...

138

Reproduction and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

2014-12-01

139

Mitotic indexes as prognostic predictors in female breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A series of 688 women with breast cancer were followed-up for a mean of 13 years. Tumour size, axillary lymph node status, histological grade, histological type and two mitotic indexes (M\\/V; MAI) were assessed and related to disease outcome. Primary tumour size (PPP=0.0001), and histological grade (P=0.0074) predicted axillary lymph node status. Recurrence as well as recurrence-free survival was

S. Aaltomaa; P. Lipponen; M. Eskelinen; V.-M. Kosma; S. Marin; E. Alhava; K. Syrjänen

1992-01-01

140

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

141

Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2011-12-07

142

Breast cancer treatment and chemoprevention.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To outline modern principles of surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic treatment of breast cancer, and to review preliminary data on breast cancer prevention. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted from 1966 to the beginning of 1999; most of the studies reviewed are randomized clinical trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Breast conservation surgery should be offered to all women with early breast cancer because studies demonstrate survival rates equivalent to those with mastectomy. If mastectomy is chosen, breast reconstruction should be offered. Most women with breast cancer are treated systemically with either chemotherapy or tamoxifen, or both, and mortality is substantially reduced. Data indicating that tamoxifen prevents breast cancer are promising; more studies with both tamoxifen and raloxifene are under way. All women should be strongly encouraged to enter clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: Because many issues face women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, they often seek out family physicians as advisors to help negotiate a complex treatment path. The possibility of preventing breast cancer will undoubtedly raise questions among family members of women with breast cancer that should appropriately be answered and referred, if necessary, by family physicians. PMID:10463092

Kotwall, C. A.

1999-01-01

143

CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER  

E-print Network

male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Women with HBOC tend to developCANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

144

The genetics of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the commonest cancer affecting women. A family history of breast cancer increases a woman's lifetime risk of developing the disease. Most of the genetic risk is due to low-risk and moderate-risk susceptibility alleles rather than high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these two tumour suppressor genes only account for about 2% of all breast

Alexandra J. Murray

2010-01-01

145

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

146

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

147

Oxidative stress in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the place of oxidative stress on breast cancer. Lipid peroxidation as evidenced\\u000a by malondialdehyde (MDA) and the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase\\u000a (GPx) were estimated in tissues of 10 fibroadenoma and 40 breast cancer patients. Lipid peroxidation in breast cancer tissues\\u000a was enhanced compared to nonmalignant

Faruk Tas; Hasan Hansel; Ahmet Belce; Sennur Ilvan; Andac Argon; Hakan Camlica; Erkan Topuz

2005-01-01

148

Correlation between Duffy blood group phenotype and breast cancer incidence  

PubMed Central

Background Different ethnicities have different distribution of Duffy blood group (DBG) phenotypes and different breast cancer morbidity. A study in our lab demonstrated that Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC, also known as DBGP, the Duffy protein phenotype), led to the inhibition of tumorigenesis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DBGP is correlated with breast cancer occurrence. Methods DBGP proteins were examined by indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-FYa and anti-FYb antibodies. The phenotypes were classified into four groups according to the agglutination reactions: FYa + FYb+, FYa + FYb-, FYa-FYb + and FYa-FYb-. The phenotypes and pathological diagnosis of consecutively hospitalized female patients (n = 5,022) suffering from breast cancer at the Shanghai Cancer Hospital and Henan Province Cancer Hospital were investigated. The relationships between DBGP expression with breast cancer occurrence, axillary lymph status, histological subtype, tumor size pathological grade and overall survival were analyzed. Results The incidence of breast cancer was significantly different between FYa + FYb + (29.8%), FYa + FYb- (33.2%), FYa-FYb + (45.6%) and FYa-FYb- (59.1%; P = 0.001). Significant different numbers of breast cancer patients had metastases to the axillary lymph nodes in the FYa + FYb + group (25.1%), FYa + FYb- (36.9%), FYa-FYb + (41.0%) and FYa-FYb- (50.0%, (P = 0.005). There was a statistical significance (p = 0.022) of the overall survival difference between patients with difference phenotypes. No significant difference was observed in cancer size (t-test, p > 0.05), histological cancer type (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05) or histological grade (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05) between every each DBGP group. Conclusions DBGP is correlated with breast cancer incidence and axillary lymph node metastasis and overall survival. Further investigations are required to determine the underlying mechanism of Duffy blood group phenotype on breast cancer risk. PMID:22928984

2012-01-01

149

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

150

Spectral histology of breast tissue using mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Histopathologic recognition is the gold standard in breast cancer diagnoses and is a primary determinant tool for cancer research. Unfortunately, the manual nature of histopathologic recognition leads to low throughput analysis, delays in decision-making and errors. Here, we present an automated means to accurate histologic recognition using mid-infrared molecular spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is combined with statistical pattern recognition and high throughput sampling to provide automated tissue segmentation into constituent cell types. The method does not need dyes or probes and dispenses with human input. Results demonstrate that the technique is capable of accurate histologic segmentation that can potentially become competitive with that attained by conventional immunohistochemical analyses.

Pounder, F. Nell; Bhargava, Rohit

2009-02-01

151

Breast cancer therapies weighed  

SciTech Connect

Even as the National Institutes of Health came under fire last week for giving short shrift to women in the institute's basic and clinical research programs, the report of a recent NIH consensus conference points up the need for more research on how to treat early breast cancer. Although the experts were able to agree on the best surgical treatment for women with early breast cancer, they couldn't resolve the more controversial issue of whether the patients should subsequently receive systemic treatment - chemotherapy or hormone therapy - to prevent recurrence of their disease. The panel reaffirmed that the removal of the lump and nearby lymph nodes, followed by irradiation, is just as effective as a mastectomy. But then came the contentious question: should women with early breast cancer, especially those without detectable lymph node metastases, receive drug therapy to prevent recurrence of the disease Currently, 70% of such cancers are successfully treated with surgery and radiation alone. For this reason, about 2 years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical alert saying that addition treatment with drugs or hormones is a credible therapeutic option worthy of careful attention for all early stage patients. This pronouncement engendered a storm of criticism. A consensus panel concluded that in cases where tumors are 1 centimeter or less in diameter and no lymph nodes are affected, the likelihood of recurrence is so small that the benefits of adjuvant therapy would be insignificant. But for the patients with larger tumors, the panel concluded that the decision is an individual one that depends on personal preferences and a variety of prognostic factors that can help to indicate whether a woman is at high risk of having a recurrence and should therefore have adjuvant therapy.

Holden, C.

1990-06-29

152

Breast-feeding may reduce breast-cancer risk.  

PubMed

A case control study of 6000 women with breast cancer and about 8000 women with cancer living in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin found that younger women who breast feed are at a 20% lower risk of developing breast cancer before menopause than those who have never breast fed or have breast fed only briefly. The younger a woman was when she first breast fed, the less likely she was to develop premenopausal breast cancer. The length of total time a woman breast fed in her life was inversely related to the risk of developing breast cancer before menopause. For example, if a woman breast feeds for 4-12 months, the risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal women is reduced 11% when compared to women who breast feed for less than 3 months and those who do not breast feed. The risk can be reduced by about 25%, if women breast feed for at least 2 years. Neither young age nor long duration of total time breast feeding appeared to influence the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause, however. One hypothesis is that breast feeding suppresses the production of ovarian hormones which may be associated with breast cancer. Since most breast cancer cases in the US are postmenopausal, the reduction in breast cancer cases would be rather small, however. Another study of about 90,000 US nurses found no relationship between breast feeding and breast cancer. The lack of a relationship may have been due to the fact that the nurses were much less likely to breast feed at a young age since they had a high educational level. Further, breast feeding practices have changed in the last 20-30 years from feeding every 4 hours to feeding on demand. In India most rural women breast feed, beginning when they are young. They even practice communal breast feeding, which allows women to work outside their homes. PMID:12179188

1994-04-30

153

Menopause after breast cancer: a survey on breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the younger age and the ever wider use of adjuvant chemotherapy and antiestrogens, menopausal symptoms are a frequent cause of concern for breast cancer patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of menopausal symptoms, and to explore the attitudes toward Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or other treatments and the willingness to take oestrogen in breast cancer patients. Methods: A

Nicoletta Biglia; Marilena Cozzarella; Franca Cacciari; Riccardo Ponzone; Riccardo Roagna; Furio Maggiorotto; Piero Sismondi

154

Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

2013-01-01

155

Breast cancer statistics and markers.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25313729

Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

2014-01-01

156

Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-17

157

Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-20

158

Early breast cancer.  

PubMed

Adoption of urbanised lifestyles together with changes in reproductive behaviour might partly underlie the continued rise in worldwide incidence of breast cancer. Widespread mammographic screening and effective systemic therapies have led to a stage shift at presentation and mortality reductions in the past two decades. Loco-regional control of the disease seems to affect long-term survival, and attention to surgical margins together with improved radiotherapy techniques could further contribute to mortality gains. Developments in oncoplastic surgery and partial-breast reconstruction have improved cosmetic outcomes after breast-conservation surgery. Optimum approaches for delivering chest-wall radiotherapy in the context of immediate breast reconstruction present special challenges. Accurate methods for intraoperative assessment of sentinel lymph nodes remain a clinical priority. Clinical trials are investigating combinatorial therapies that use novel agents targeting growth factor receptors, signal transduction pathways, and tumour angiogenesis. Gene-expression profiling offers the potential to provide accurate prognostic and predictive information, with selection of best possible therapy for individuals and avoidance of overtreatment and undertreatment of patients with conventional chemotherapy. Short-term presurgical studies in the neoadjuvant setting allow monitoring of proliferative indices, and changes in gene-expression patterns can be predictive of response to therapies and long-term outcome. PMID:19394537

Benson, John R; Jatoi, Ismail; Keisch, Martin; Esteva, Francisco J; Makris, Andreas; Jordan, V Craig

2009-04-25

159

Histologic Changes Associated With False-Negative Sentinel Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy in Patients With Confirmed Lymph Node-Positive Breast Cancer Before Treatment  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND A wide range of false-negative rates has been reported for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy after preoperative chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether histologic findings in negative SLNs after preoperative chemotherapy are helpful in assessing the accuracy of SLN biopsy in patients with confirmed lymph node-positive disease before treatment. METHODS Eighty-six patients with confirmed lymph node-positive disease at presentation underwent successful SLN biopsy and axillary dissection after preoperative chemotherapy at a single institution between 1994 and 2007. Available hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from patients with negative SLNs were reviewed, and associations between histologic findings in the negative SLNs and SLN status (true negative vs false negative) were evaluated. RESULTS Forty-seven (55%) patients had at least 1 positive SLN, and 39 (45%) patients had negative SLNs. The false-negative rate was 22%, and the negative predictive value was 67%. The negative SLNs from 17 of 34 patients with available slides had focal areas of fibrosis, some with associated foamy parenchymal histiocytes, fat necrosis, or calcification. These histologic findings occurred in 15 (65%) of 23 patients with true-negative SLNs and in only 2 (18%) of 11 patients with false-negative SLNs (P =.03, Fisher exact test, 2-tailed). The lack of these histologic changes had a sensitivity and specificity for identifying a false-negative SLN of 82% and 65%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Absence of treatment effect in SLNs after chemotherapy in patients with lymph node-positive disease at initial presentation has good sensitivity but low specificity for identifying a false-negative SLN. PMID:20564394

Brown, Alexandra S.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Shen, Jeannie; Huo, Lei; Babiera, Gildy V.; Ross, Merrick I.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Feig, Barry W.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Boughey, Judy C.; Ching, Christine D.; Gilcrease, Michael Z.

2015-01-01

160

Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-15

161

Bisphosphonates in Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone is the most common site of metastatic involvement in breast cancer. About 20–30% of patients with breast cancer have osseous metastases as the first site of metastatic disease and about 60–70% of patients will develop metastases to the bone during the course of their disease. Although bone metastases have usually only limited impact on overall survival, they cause significant

Peter Schmid; Kurt Possinger

2003-01-01

162

Hormonal Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer in Thai Women  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. We investigated the association of hormonal contraceptive use and breast cancer in Thai women. Methods A cohort study was conducted in Khon Kaen, Thailand. There were 70 cases of histologically confirmed breast cancer among 11 414 women aged 30 to 69 years who were recruited as participants in the cohort study during the period from 1990 through 2001. The study population was followed-up until December 31, 2011. To identify factors associated with incidence of breast cancer, hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results The 11 414 women provided a total observation time of 157 200 person-years. Breast cancer risk among women with a history of hormonal contraceptive use was 1.31 times that of women without such a history, but the difference was not statistically significant (95% CI, 0.65–2.65). No type of hormonal contraceptive was associated with a significant increase in breast cancer risk as compared with women who had never used hormonal contraceptives (oral contraception: HR = 1.35, 95% CI, 0.65–2.78; injection contraception: HR = 1.25, 95% CI, 0.56–2.80), and there was no relationship between duration of hormonal contraceptive use and breast cancer. Conclusions There was no association between hormonal contraceptive use and breast cancer; however, this finding should be viewed with caution due to the small number of cases. PMID:24614914

Poosari, Arisara; Promthet, Supannee; Kamsa-ard, Siriporn; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Longkul, Jirapat; Wiangnon, Surapon

2014-01-01

163

Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-05

164

CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... cdc.gov/vitalsigns www http://www.cdc.gov/cancer 36% Only 36% of uninsured adults aged 50– ... 74 are up-to-date with mammography screening. Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer 22M 22 million ...

165

Multimodal microscopy for automated histologic analysis of prostate cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the single most prevalent cancer in US men whose gold standard of diagnosis is histologic assessment of biopsies. Manual assessment of stained tissue of all biopsies limits speed and accuracy in clinical practice and research of prostate cancer diagnosis. We sought to develop a fully-automated multimodal microscopy method to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous tissue samples. METHODS:

Jin sTae Kwak; Stephen M Hewitt; Saurabh Sinha; Rohit Bhargava

2011-01-01

166

Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... certain breast conditions. Obesity is also a risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. # # # Related NCI Materials and Web pages: Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk Fact Sheet What ...

167

Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.  

PubMed

Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

2007-09-01

168

Genetic risk of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Several cutting-edge strategies are being used to evaluate candidate genetic risk factors for breast cancer. These include linkage analysis for mapping out BRCA1 and BRCA2, mutational screening of candidate risk genes like CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 and PALB2, which are associated with an intermediate level of breast cancer risk. Genome-wide association studies have revealed several low-penetrance breast cancer risk alleles. The predisposition factors are associated with different levels of breast cancer risk. Relative to control population, the risk in patients harboring high-risk BRCA1 and 2 mutations is over 10-fold, with intermediate penetrance genes 2 to 4-fold and with low penetrance alleles less than 1.5-fold. Overall, these factors account for about 25% of the genetic risk for breast cancer. In the remainder, genetic factors to contribute to the risk of breast cancer remain unknown and are a subject of current investigation. With discovery and validation of newer and clinically relevant predisposition factors, additional breast cancer risk categories may be recognized. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing allows identification of individuals at increased risk of breast cancer who are offered risk-reducing interventions. Targeted therapies are being developed that may refine management of patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further genome-wide studies are required to identify clinically relevant molecular factors that will allow more accurate and widely applicable genetic risk stratification. Current efforts in discovery, validation and qualification of molecular markers of breast cancer risk offer considerable promise in the future to develop more accurate breast cancer risk assessment along with development of more effective chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:20046159

Nasir, A; Shackelford, R E; Anwar, F; Yeatman, T J

2009-12-01

169

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Thomas Buchholz, M.D.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHouston, TX Nancy Davidson, M.D.University of Pittsburgh Cancer InstituteUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer CentersPittsburgh, PA Members William

170

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Hong Guo, Qing Zhang and Asoke K. Nandi, Feature Extraction, Classification, Breast Cancer Diagnosis. Abstract: Breast cancer diagnosis have been investigated by different machine learning methods. This paper proposes a new method for breast cancer

Fernandez, Thomas

171

Diet and breast cancer in Shanghai and Tianjin, China.  

PubMed Central

Various aspects of adult diet have been linked to breast cancer development. These include intake of fat (risk factor), and intake of fibre, soy protein and vitamins A, C and E (protective factors). Results of previous studies have been inconsistent. We examined the possible associations between breast cancer and various indices of nutrient and food intake in two Chinese populations who are at relatively low risk for breast cancer (one-fifth the rate in US white women). Two case-control studies of breast cancer were conducted in the cities of Shanghai and Tianjin, China. In Shanghai, 534 women aged 20-69 years with histologically confirmed breast cancer were recruited, whereas in Tianjin 300 women aged 20-55 years with histologically confirmed breast cancer were interviewed. All controls were community controls who were individually matched to the cases by sex and age (case-control ratio = 1:1). All interviews were conducted in person. Findings from the two studies were similar, although the diets in Shanghai and Tianjin were different in many respects. Cases and controls were similar in their consumption of soy protein, measured either in absolute levels or as percentages of total protein. Overall, all components of dietary fat (saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat) showed a modest, non-significant association with breast cancer after adjustment for energy intake and other non-dietary risk factors for breast cancer. Intake of crude fibre, carotene and vitamin C, on the other hand, exhibited strong, statistically significant inverse associations with breast cancer risk. The last three indices were highly correlated, rendering it impossible to disentangle their individual effects; they were closely associated with intake of green vegetables in the two study populations. Vitamin E intake was unrelated to breast cancer risk in Shanghai and Tianjin. In the multivariate logistic regression model which included all non-dietary risk factors for breast cancer and energy intake, Shanghai women in the lowest tertile of crude fibre intake and highest tertile of fat intake had a 2.9-fold increased risk for breast cancer relative to those in the highest tertile of crude fibre intake and lowest tertile of fat intake. The comparable relative risk in Tianjin women was 2.4. Our data indicate a strong protective effect against breast cancer development with intake of foods rich in fibre, vitamin C and carotene. Our results are also compatible with dietary fat having a modest, positive effect on breast cancer risk within the range of exposure experienced by women in China.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7779738

Yuan, J. M.; Wang, Q. S.; Ross, R. K.; Henderson, B. E.; Yu, M. C.

1995-01-01

172

RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-30

173

Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2015-03-03

174

Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-29

175

Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2015-03-06

176

Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-09

177

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

178

Breastfeeding in relation to risk of different breast cancer characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this present study was to examine duration of breastfeeding in relation to the risk of different subgroups of breast cancer. A prospective cohort, The Malmö Diet and Cancer study, including 14092 parous women, were followed during a mean of 10.2 years and a total of 424 incident breast cancers were diagnosed. Methods Tumours were classified regarding invasiveness, tumour size, axillary lymph node status, Nottingham grade, tumour proliferation (Ki67), HER2, cyclin D1 and p27, WHO histological type and hormone receptor status. Duration of breastfeeding was measured using total time of breastfeeding, categorized in quartiles using the lowest as the reference group (<4.0, ?4.0-?breast cancer was similar in all quartiles of breastfeeding. No strong results regarding breastfeeding duration and breast cancer subgroups were seen. A few results indicated an association between a relatively long duration of breastfeeding and tumours with high proliferation (Ki67) and grade III histological grade. Conclusions Breastfeeding duration was not associated with breast cancer risk and no strong results were seen with regard to breast cancer subgroups. PMID:24708573

2014-01-01

179

Dormancy in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Tumor dormancy describes a prolonged quiescent state in which tumor cells are present, but disease progression is not yet clinically apparent. Breast cancer is especially known for long asymptomatic periods, up to 25 years, with no evidence of the disease, followed by a relapse. Factors that determine the cell’s decision to enter a dormant state and that control its duration remain unclear. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in understanding how tumor cells circulating in the blood interact and extravasate into secondary sites and which factors might determine whether these cells survive, remain dormant, or become macrometastases. The mechanisms of tumor cell dormancy are still not clear. Two different hypotheses are currently discussed: tumor cells persist either by completely withdrawing from the cell cycle or by continuing to proliferate at a slow rate that is counterbalanced by cell death. Because dormant disseminated tumor cells may be the founders of metastasis, one hypothesis is that dormant tumor cells, or at least a fraction of them, share stem cell-like characteristics that may be responsible for their long half-lives and their suggested resistance to standard chemotherapy. Therefore, knowledge of the biology of tumor cell dormancy may be the basis from which to develop innovative targeted therapies to control or eliminate this tumor cell fraction. In this review, we discuss biological mechanisms and clinical implications of tumor dormancy in breast cancer patients. PMID:24367205

Banys, Malgorzata; Hartkopf, Andreas D; Krawczyk, Natalia; Kaiser, Tatjana; Meier-Stiegen, Franziska; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

2012-01-01

180

Epigenetics and Breast Cancers  

PubMed Central

Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Er?) dimers wherein the ligand ER? dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-?-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5?-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ER? dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ER? dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

2012-01-01

181

Primary cilia are decreased in breast cancer: analysis of a collection of human breast cancer cell lines and tissues.  

PubMed

Primary cilia (PC) are solitary, sensory organelles that are critical for several signaling pathways. PC were detected by immunofluorescence of cultured cells and breast tissues. After growth for 7 days in vitro, PC were detected in ?70% of breast fibroblasts and in 7-19% of epithelial cells derived from benign breast (184A1 and MCF10A). In 11 breast cancer cell lines, PC were present at a low frequency in four (from 0.3% to 4% of cells), but were absent in the remainder. The cancer cell lines with PC were all of the basal B subtype, which is analogous to the clinical triple-negative breast cancer subtype. Furthermore, the frequency of PC decreased with increasing degree of transformation/progression in the MCF10 and MDA-MB-435/LCC6 isogenic models of cancer progression. In histologically normal breast tissues, PC were frequent in fibroblasts and myoepithelial cells and less common in luminal epithelial cells. Of 26 breast cancers examined, rare PC were identified in cancer epithelial cells of only one cancer, which was of the triple-negative subtype. These data indicate a decrease or loss of PC in breast cancer and an association of PC with the basal B subtype. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. PMID:20530462

Yuan, Kun; Frolova, Natalya; Xie, Yi; Wang, Dezhi; Cook, Leah; Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Steg, Adam D; Serra, Rosa; Frost, Andra R

2010-10-01

182

Primary Cilia Are Decreased in Breast Cancer: Analysis of a Collection of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues  

PubMed Central

Primary cilia (PC) are solitary, sensory organelles that are critical for several signaling pathways. PC were detected by immunofluorescence of cultured cells and breast tissues. After growth for 7 days in vitro, PC were detected in ?70% of breast fibroblasts and in 7–19% of epithelial cells derived from benign breast (184A1 and MCF10A). In 11 breast cancer cell lines, PC were present at a low frequency in four (from 0.3% to 4% of cells), but were absent in the remainder. The cancer cell lines with PC were all of the basal B subtype, which is analogous to the clinical triple-negative breast cancer subtype. Furthermore, the frequency of PC decreased with increasing degree of transformation/progression in the MCF10 and MDA-MB-435/LCC6 isogenic models of cancer progression. In histologically normal breast tissues, PC were frequent in fibroblasts and myoepithelial cells and less common in luminal epithelial cells. Of 26 breast cancers examined, rare PC were identified in cancer epithelial cells of only one cancer, which was of the triple-negative subtype. These data indicate a decrease or loss of PC in breast cancer and an association of PC with the basal B subtype. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:857–870, 2010) PMID:20530462

Yuan, Kun; Frolova, Natalya; Xie, Yi; Wang, Dezhi; Cook, Leah; Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Steg, Adam D.; Serra, Rosa; Frost, Andra R.

2010-01-01

183

The many faces of triple negative breast cancer.  

PubMed

Triple negative breast tumors are described by the lack of immunohistochemical expression for hormone receptors (ER and PgR) and Her2 neu. The immunophenotype is, in general,associated with young age and high biological aggressiveness,its frequency in the literature ranging from 10 to 20%. In our study we performed a retrospective classification of triple negative breast cancers in order to show the large spectrum of lesions that can embrace this very special phenotype.Clinicopathological parameters evaluated included age, tumorsize and macroscopic appearance, histological subtype and association with in situ component, the degree of tumor differentiation (nuclear pleomorphism, mitosis count, the formation of tubules), presence of lymph nodes or distant metastases. Triple negative breast cancers represent a particular subtype of tumors but their, now famous, aggressiveness applies only to some histological subtypes. It is very important to correlate the histological features and the phenotypical expression. PMID:25149609

Com?nescu, M; Potec?, A; Cocosila, C; Potec?, T

2014-01-01

184

Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Ductal and Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer

2015-02-26

185

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

186

General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Key Points for This Section Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ...

187

Leptomeningeal metastases in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer may be characterized as either parenchymal brain metastasis (BM) or leptomeningeal (LM) metastasis. BM are much more common (about 80% of all CNS metastases), and have been more extensively studied than LM. CNS metastasis in breast cancer has been associated with reduced overall survival, with the shortest survival generally observed in cases of LM. Here, we review the epidemiology, prognostic factors, diagnostic tools, currently available treatments, and potential future therapies for LM from breast cancer. PMID:23593536

Scott, Brian J; Kesari, Santosh

2013-01-01

188

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

1998-01-01

189

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

190

Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities  

MedlinePLUS

... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

191

Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... the long term. Some people even start during cancer treatment. Making healthier choices For many people, a diagnosis ...

192

Benign breast disease and the risk of subsequent breast cancer in African American women  

PubMed Central

Benign breast disease (BBD) is an established risk factor for breast cancer among Caucasian women, but less is known about BBD in African American (AA) women. As AA women suffer from disproportionate mortality due to breast cancer, special focus on pathological characteristics that may influence disease risk is warranted. Benign breast biopsies from AA women were identified by the University Pathology Group in Detroit, Michigan. AA women age 20 to 84 who underwent a breast biopsy from 1997 to 2000 were eligible for the study. Subsequent breast cancers were identified through a linkage with the Detroit SEER program. The first biopsy was reviewed by the pathologist, and lesions were classified following Dupont and Page criteria along with involution and other histologic features. Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of developing a subsequent breast cancer with the histologic characteristics of BBD. 1,406 BBD biopsies from AA women were included in this study with a median follow-up of 10.1 years. The majority (68%) showed non-proliferative disease, 29% had proliferative disease without atypia, and 3% had proliferative disease with atypia. Subsequent incident breast cancers occurred in 55 women (3.9%). Women whose biopsies showed proliferative disease with atypia were over three-fold more likely to develop breast cancer as women who had non-proliferative disease (RR 3.29, 95% C.I. 1.21-8.93). Better characterization of the risk of breast cancer among women with BBD, considering both ethnicity and detailed molecular findings, can lead to better surveillance, earlier diagnosis, and, potentially, improved survival. PMID:23087047

Cote, Michele L.; Ruterbusch, Julie J.; Alosh, Barra; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Kim, Elizabeth; Albashiti, Bassam; Aldeen, Bashar Sharaf; Radisky, Derek C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Warzecha, Hind Nassar; Ali-Femhi, Rouba

2012-01-01

193

Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

2011-01-01

194

Ras activation in human breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic ras mutations are infrequent in breast cancer but Ras may be pathologically activated in breast cancer by overexpression of growth factor receptors which signal through Ras. Using a highly sensitive, coupled enzymatic assay, we measured Ras activation in 20 breast cancers, two fibroadenomas, and seven normal breast samples. Ras was highly activated compared to benign tissue in 11 of

Friederike C. von Lintig; Anna D. Dreilinger; Nissi M. Varki; Anne M. Wallace; Darren E. Casteel; Gerry R. Boss

2000-01-01

195

About Breast Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

196

Predicting features of breast cancer with gene expression patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from gene expression arrays hold an enormous amount of biological information. We sought to determine if global gene\\u000a expression in primary breast cancers contained information about biologic, histologic, and anatomic features of the disease\\u000a in individual patients. Microarray data from the tumors of 129 patients were analyzed for the ability to predict biomarkers\\u000a [estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2], histologic

Xuesong Lu; Zhigang C. Wang; J. Dirk Iglehart; Xuegong Zhang; Andrea L. Richardson

2008-01-01

197

Mouse models of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. This malignancy is a complex disease, which is defined by an intrinsic heterogeneity on the histopathological and molecular level as well as response to therapy and outcome. In addition to classical histopathological features, breast cancer can be categorized into at least five major subtypes based on comprehensive gene expression profiling: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, ERBB2-positive, and normal-like breast cancer. Genetically engineered mouse models can serve as tools to study the molecular underpinnings for this disease. Given the genetic complexity that drives the initiation and progression of individual breast cancer subtypes, it is evident that certain models can reflect only particular aspects of this malignancy. In this book chapter, we will primarily focus on advances in modeling breast cancer at defined stages of carcinogenesis using genetically engineered mice. We will discuss the ability as well as shortcomings of these models to faithfully recapitulate the spectrum of human breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25636464

Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Schmidt, Jeffrey W; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

2015-01-01

198

Triiodothyronine and breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

2014-01-01

199

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2013-05-07

200

Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

201

Birth weight and other prenatal factors and risk of breast cancer in Asian-Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the role of birth weight and other prenatal factors in the etiology of breast cancer in Asian-Americans.\\u000a We investigated the relation between birth weight and other prenatal factors and breast cancer risk in a population-based\\u000a case–control study in Los Angeles County that included 2,259 Asian-American women with incident, histologically confirmed\\u000a breast cancer and 2,019 control women,

Anna H. WuRoberta; Roberta McKean-Cowdin; Chiu-Chen Tseng

202

Olive oil, other dietary fats, and the risk of breast cancer (Italy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from a multicenter case-control study on breast cancer conducted in Italy have been used to analyze the relationship of olive oil and other dietary fats to breast cancer risk. Cases were 2,564 women hospitalized with histologically confirmed, incident breast cancer. Controls were 2,588 women admitted to the same network of hospitals for acute, non-neoplastic, non-hormone related, on-digestive tract disorders.

Carlo La Vecchia; Eva Negri; Silvia Franceschi; Adriano Decarli; Attilio Giacosa; Loren Lipworth

1995-01-01

203

Gene expression profiling predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer patients with the same stage of disease can have\\u000amarkedly different treatment responses and overall outcome. The\\u000astrongest predictors for metastases (for example, lymph node\\u000astatus and histological grade) fail to classify accurately breast\\u000atumours according to their clinical behaviour. Chemotherapy\\u000aor hormonal therapy reduces the risk of distant metastases by\\u000aapproximately one-third; however, 70 — 80% of

Laura J. van't Veer; Hongyue Dai; Marc J. van de Vijver; Yudong D. He; Augustinus A. M. Hart; Mao Mao; Hans L. Peterse; Karin van der Kooy; Matthew J. Marton; Anke T. Witteveen; George J. Schreiber; Ron M. Kerkhoven; Chris Roberts; Peter S. Linsley; René Bernards; Stephen H. Friend

2002-01-01

204

Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress  

MedlinePLUS

... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

205

Paying for Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... other federal laws. State efforts to ensure private health insurance coverage of mammography Many states require that private ... self-insured employer plans should check with their health insurance administrator to see what breast cancer early detection ...

206

[Maternity after breast cancer treatment].  

PubMed

Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-W?odarz, Izabela

2015-01-01

207

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes hormone therapy (including antiestrogens, LH-RH agonists, aromatase inhibitors, and SERMs) and its role in preventing and treating breast cancer. Includes information about possible side effects.

208

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... women, especially for those who started their periods early (before age 12) or reached menopause late (after age 55). Breast cancer is more common among women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy ...

209

Cholesterol and breast cancer pathophysiology.  

PubMed

Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes, thus impacting upon membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. In addition, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected because 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors (LXR), resulting in a reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides a rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

Nelson, Erik R; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P

2014-12-01

210

The TAILORx Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for Treatment (Rx), or TAILORx, which will examine whether a molecular test can assign women with early-stage breast cancer to the most appropriate and effective treatment.

211

Bilateral synchronous male breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Bilateral synchronous breast cancer is extremely rare. A 75-year-old man presented with a right breast mass, which ulcerated and a lump in the left breast. Right breast examination revealed a breast ulcer 7×10cm with everted edges and complete nipple destruction. The left breast showed a hard lump measuring 4×5cm in the nipple-areolar area, unattached to skin, or underlying structure. There was no palpable axillary lymph node bilaterally. A wedge biopsy of right breast ulcer and excision of the left breast lump confirmed bilateral invasive ductal carcinoma - Grade 2 tumor in both breasts. He had bilateral simple mastectomy and chemotherapy; defaulted for 18 months during treatment, and re-presented with bilateral tumor recurrence. The importance of this case report is to create more awareness that breast cancer can occur in males just as in females, though the incidence is rare in males. Early presentation and compliance with treatment modality provide a better outcome. PMID:25737181

Nwashilli, Nnamdi J.; Ugiagbe, Ezekiel E.

2015-01-01

212

Metals and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

2014-01-01

213

Metals and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D; Storchan, Geoffrey B; Parodi, Daniela A; Martin, Mary Beth

2013-03-01

214

Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-08

215

Choosing the right cell line for breast cancer research  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease. Gene expression profiling has contributed significantly to our understanding of this heterogeneity at a molecular level, refining taxonomy based on simple measures such as histological type, tumour grade, lymph node status and the presence of predictive markers like oestrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) to a more sophisticated classification comprising luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, HER2-positive and normal subgroups. In the laboratory, breast cancer is often modelled using established cell lines. In the present review we discuss some of the issues surrounding the use of breast cancer cell lines as experimental models, in light of these revised clinical classifications, and put forward suggestions for improving their use in translational breast cancer research. PMID:21884641

2011-01-01

216

Targeting autophagy in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

2014-01-01

217

Brain metastases in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Brain metastases are less common than bone or visceral metastases in patients with breast cancer. The overall prognosis of breast cancer patients with brain metastases remains poor, and these metastases are less responsive to systemic therapies. Brain metastasis is associated with a reduced quality of life due to progressive neurologic impairments. Recently, a trend of increased incidence of brain metastases in breast cancer has been noted. Reasons for this increased incidence include the more frequent use of sensitive detection methods such as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and increased awareness of brain metastasis among patients and clinicians. Adjuvant and systemic therapy with drugs that have a low blood-brain barrier penetrance can lead to an increased risk of brain metastases in breast cancer patients. Molecular subtype is a predictive factor for overall survival after developing brain metastases. Patients who do not have a poor prognosis based on previously identified prognostic factors should be treated with radiation therapy to control symptoms. Whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and surgery are tools for the local treatment of brain metastases. Novel molecular target therapy, including HER2-targeted therapy, has demonstrated an antitumor effect on brain metastases. In this review, we provide a practical algorithm for the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases. This review provides an overview of the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, prognostic factors and current and potential future management strategies of breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:25320339

Niikura, Naoki; Saji, Shigehira; Tokuda, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji

2014-12-01

218

Computer-aided detection of breast cancer nuclei  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer-aided detection system for tissue cell nuclei in histological sections is introduced and validated as part of the Biopsy Analysis Support System (BASS). Cell nuclei are selectively stained with monoclonal antibodies, such as the anti-estrogen receptor antibodies, which are widely applied as part of assessing patient prognosis in breast cancer. The detection system uses a receptive field filter to

Frank Schnorrenberg; Constantinos S. Pattichis; Kyriacos C. Kyriacou; Christos N. Schizas

1997-01-01

219

[New opportunities in imaging of breast cancer].  

PubMed

Complex tumor therapy development and new opportunities in surgery, which take into account both oncological principles as well as esthetic aspects, have set the requirements far higher for diagnostic imaging of the breast and for radiologists. Despite these new opportunities, X-ray mammography remains the basic examination. However, part of the cancers is hidden on the mammogram, which is partly a consequence of the dense glandular tissue and may also be influenced by the histological type of cancer. Besides reducing radiation dose, digital X-ray mammography improves the examination sensitivity of the dense breast. State of the art digital examination methods, such as tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced mammography, increase the accuracy of examination. Ultrasound mammography is the most important supplementary method of X-ray mammography. Among the new applications of ultrasound mammography, US elastography, which is based on different tissue elasticity, as well as automatic 3D ultrasound, can be highlighted. Furthermore, among imaging methods that provide functional or metabolic data, MR mammography is the most appropriate non-invasive, non-ionising method for the detection of malignancy and for structure examination. MR mammography is the most sensitive method for the detection of breast cancer and in 20-30% of cases, results in changes of the therapy, and it is also effective in the examination of the dense breast. High level of evidence proves that MR mammography is very useful in the screening of women at risk of breast cancer. Promising results prove that MR mammography will play more considerable role in the evaluation of the effectiveness of the therapy. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is based on the different diffusion of tissue water, qualitative analysis and quantitative evaluation can be performed. DCE-MR examines that contrast enhancement over time, which can mainly be useful for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of perfusion changes which may indicate the biological response to tumor therapy. The MR spectroscopic (MRSI) biochemical analysis increases the characterization of the lesions. Multimodal imaging techniques provide more accurate analysis, which is confirmed by more and more evidence, but none of the imaging methods are sufficiently specific to provide histological diagnosis. However, imagingguided biopsies enable precise histological or cytological confirmation. Technical development, new imaging methods, experienced radiologists and multi-disciplinary cooperation increase the accuracy of the diagnosis and the effectiveness of personalized therapy. PMID:25763913

Bidlek, Mária; Kovács, Eszter; Fehér, Krisztina; Gõdény, Mária

2015-03-11

220

Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Patient Section Who Are Interventional Radiologists? Multimedia Insurance Coverage IR Treatments Abdominal aortic aneurysms Angiography Angioplasty and stent placement Cancer - bone Cancer - breast Cancer - kidney Cancer - liver Cancer - lung ...

221

Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

222

Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (Breast CFR) and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (Colon CFR) were established by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a unique resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

223

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming  

E-print Network

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer. In 2004, breast cancer caused 519,000 deaths worldwide. In order to reduce the cancer deaths and thereby

Ludwig, Simone

224

Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Key words Abstract Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25% of all new cases of cancer. Most BC are sporadic while 5-10% are estimated to be due to an inherited predisposition. Autosomal dominant alterations in two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are likely to account for most familial cases of early-onset BC and\\/or ovarian cancer

Thierry Philip

2004-01-01

225

Microarray Profiling in Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. It arises from a variety of genetic, epigenetic, and chromosomal alterations.\\u000a The traditional prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer mainly focus on the clinical–pathological parameters, which\\u000a are unable to reveal the diverse molecular alterations of breast cancer and are imprecise in predicting breast cancer progression\\u000a and clinical outcomes. In recent

Yong Qian; Xianglin Shi; Vincent Castranova; Nancy L. Guo

226

Cyclophosphamide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2015-02-20

227

Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Info on Their Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Info on Their Cancer Problem more ... 2015) Monday, January 26, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Health Disparities Talking With Your Doctor MONDAY, Jan. ...

228

Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

2003-01-01

229

Bone Mineral Density and Risk of Breast Cancer Differences by Family History of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have suggested that bone mineral density (BMD) is related to risk of breast cancer in elderly women. This study investigated whether the level of breast cancer risk associated with BMD in women with a positive family history of breast cancer is different from that in women without a family history of breast cancer. Radial and calcaneus BMD were

Frances Leslie Lucas; Jane A. Cauley; Roslyn A. Stone; Steven R. Cummings; Molly T. Vogt

230

The molecular and clinicopathologic characteristics of bilateral breast cancer  

PubMed Central

In this study, we compared the clinicopathologic characteristics between the bilateral breast cancer (BiBC) and unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and investigated the role of CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) in BiBC. 48 BiBC and 1650 UBC were studied. We found BiBC patients were associated with family history of cancer, invasive lobular histology in the first tumor and an advanced nodal status as compared with UBC patients with. Survival analysis indicated that BiBC was not associated with impaired survival. The time interval between the development of first breast cancer and the contralateral cancer did not correlate with the prognosis. Patients with BiBC were more likely to have bone metastasis (P = 0.011) and visceral metastasis (P < 0.001) than those with UBC. However, CXCR4 was not found in any association with poor clinical outcome and increasing visceral metastasis in BiBC patients. PMID:24005135

Chen, S. F.; Du, C. W.; Yang, P.; Zhang, H. W.; Kwan, M.; Zhang, G. J.

2013-01-01

231

Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

2015-03-10

232

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

233

Breast cancer and fertility preservation  

PubMed Central

Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

2014-01-01

234

Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

235

Lipid biology of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

2014-01-01

236

Correlation between PET/CT results and histological and immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinomas*  

PubMed Central

Objective To correlate the results of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) performed with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts with histological/immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, where patients with biopsy-confirmed breast carcinomas were studied. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in prone position, with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts. PET/CT findings were compared with histological and immunohistochemical data. Results The authors identified 59 malignant breast lesions in 50 patients. The maximum diameter of the lesions ranged from 6 to 80 mm (mean: 32.2 mm). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type (n = 47; 79.7%). At PET/CT, 53 (89.8%) of the lesions demonstrated anomalous concentrations of 18F-FDG, with maximum SUV ranging from 0.8 to 23.1 (mean: 5.5). A statistically significant association was observed between higher values of maximum SUV and histological type, histological grade, molecular subtype, tumor diameter, mitotic index and Ki-67 expression. Conclusion PET/CT performed with specific protocol for assessment of breasts has demonstrated good sensitivity and was associated with relevant histological/immunohistochemical factors related to aggressiveness and prognosis of breast carcinomas. PMID:25741051

Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Lima, Eduardo Nóbrega Pereira; Chojniak, Rubens; Marques, Elvira Ferreira; de Souza, Juliana Alves; Graziano, Luciana; Andrade, Wesley Pereira; Osório, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno de Toledo

2014-01-01

237

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

238

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

239

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

240

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... 1007–1014. [PubMed Abstract] Nechuta S, Paneth N, Velie EM. Pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer risk: a ... 195. [PubMed Abstract] Kelsey JL, Gammon MD, John EM. Reproductive factors and breast cancer. Epidemiologic Reviews 1993; ...

241

Older women, breast cancer, and social support  

E-print Network

in older women with breast cancer: what do we know? What doWhat is happening? Are Findings Age differences in reactions to the breast cancerbreast cancer diagnosis and its subsequent treatment on older women [50]. What

Yoo, Grace J.; Levine, Ellen G.; Aviv, Caryn; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

2010-01-01

242

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

243

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

244

Invasive breast carcinomas in Ghana: high frequency of high grade, basal-like histology and high EZH2 expression  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer in African-American women has a worse outcome than in Caucasian women. The ancestors of most African-American women come from West Africa, including Ghana. The Polycomb group protein EZH2 is a marker of poor outcome in breast cancers from Caucasian women. The histopathological features and biomarker expression of African breast cancers remain obscure. Here, we investigated a cohort of Ghanaian breast cancers to better define the prevalent tumor types and to test if EZH2 protein may identify aggressive tumors. A group of 169 breast tissues (100 invasive carcinomas and 69 benign) from women treated at Komfo Anoyke Teaching Hospital between 2006 and 2011 were histologically classified and investigated for EZH2 expression. EZH2 nuclear expression we defined as high or low following previously published criteria. Of the 100 invasive carcinomas, 89 % were ductal, 2 % were lobular, and 9 % were metaplastic. Basal-like pathological features were present in 30 % of the tumors. Of the invasive carcinomas, 7 % were grade 1, 41 % grade 2, and 52 % grade 3. EZH2 protein was overexpressed in invasive carcinomas compared to benign breast (p < 0.0001). In invasive carcinomas nuclear EZH2 overexpression was significantly associated with basal-like subtype (p = 0.03) and high histologic grade (p < 0.05). Cytoplasmic EZH2, which has not been previously reported, was present in 16 % of invasive carcinomas and it was associated with triple negative status (p = 0.02). Our results provide the first comprehensive histopathological study of this patient population and uncover the association of EZH2 with high grade and basal-like tumors. We provide the basis for further detailed investigations on this cohort to advance diagnosis and treatment of African and African-American women. PMID:22527102

Pang, Judy; Toy, Kathy A.; Griffith, Ken A.; Awuah, Baffour; Quayson, Solomon; Newman, Lisa A.

2013-01-01

245

BRCA1 and Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-part animation explains the role of the BRCA1 protein in DNA repair and the development of breast cancer. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene can lead to breast cancer and other forms of cancer. Part 1 of the animation, Â?The function of BRCA1,Â? provides an overview of how the BRCA1 protein functions in healthy cells to detect and repair DNA damage. Part 2, Â?Mutations in BRCA1 Can Cause Cancer,Â? explains how individuals who inherit a single mutated copy of BRCA1 are at an increased risk of cancer, and how cancer develops when the second copy of BRCA1 becomes mutated. Animation is closed captioned. Run times of each animation part: approximately 1 minute 15 seconds.

2010-11-18

246

Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

247

Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-17

248

Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2013-10-07

249

Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

250

Ten genes for inherited breast cancer.  

PubMed

Inherited breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in ten different genes in pathways critical to genomic integrity. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations confer very high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. p53 and PTEN mutations lead to very high breast cancer risks associated with rare cancer syndromes. Mutations in CHEK2, ATM, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1, and PALB2 are associated with doubling of breast cancer risks. In addition, biallelic mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and PALB2 cause Fanconi anemia. The convergence of these genes in a shared role reveals underlying biology of these illnesses and suggests still other breast cancer genes. PMID:17292821

Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire

2007-02-01

251

Flow cytometric DNA hypertetraploidy tends to be more frequent in male than in female breast cancers.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to explore possible differences in DNA flow cytometric characteristics, particularly differences in distribution of DNA indices of aneuploid clones, between male and female breast cancers. We retrospectively analyzed 31 male breast cancers. Clinicopathological and DNA flow cytometric characteristics of male breast cancers (patient age, tumor size, histological type, histological grade, axillary lymph node status, hormone receptor expression, ploidy, and S-phase fraction) were compared with that of the control group of matched female breast cancers. Hormone receptors and HER-2/neu were investigated immunohistochemically with additional chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) analysis of HER-2/neu 2+ cases. Ploidy and S-phase fraction were determined by DNA flow cytometry. Comparison with clinicopathological features was made using ? (2) and t test. Aneuploidy was found in 78% of the cases, with the predomination of hypotetraploid clones (39%), followed by tetraploid (23%) and hypertetraploid clones (16%). We found higher frequency of hypertetraploidy in male breast cancers (16 and 6%, respectively) than in the control group of matched female breast cancers. Clinicopathological features of hypertetraploid male breast cancers did not differ from that of non-hypertetraploid cancers. Higher frequency of hypertetraploidy among male breast cancers might indicate different cytogenetical evolutionary pathway between male and female breast cancer. PMID:25471639

Bezi?, Joško; Šamija Proji?, Ivana; Proji?, Petar; Ljubkovi?, Jelena; Zeki? Tomaš, Sandra; Meljanac Salopek, Kristina; Pilji? Burazer, Marina; Tomi?, Snježana

2015-02-01

252

Older women, breast cancer, and social support  

E-print Network

Maly RC (1999) Coping with breast cancer in later life: thecoping mediates the effect of optimism on distress: a study of women with early stage breast cancer.breast cancer from racial/ ethnic minority communities are more likely to utilize religious and spiritual faith as an important coping

Yoo, Grace J.; Levine, Ellen G.; Aviv, Caryn; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

2010-01-01

253

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

Ginzel, Matthew

254

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

255

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter  

E-print Network

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter Special Interest Articles: ·Hormone receptor negative breast cancer: Improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy by targeting immune cells Page 1, cont. Page 6 (article from Breast Cancer Connections) Page 8 Editor: Karla Kerlikowske, MD Professor of Medicine

Walter, Peter

256

Perceptions of breast cancer across the lifespan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The risk of developing breast cancer increases with advancing age. There is evidence to suggest that delayed help-seeking for breast cancer symptoms is associated with poorer survival and that older women are more likely to delay in seeking help for such symptoms. This study examined age differences in beliefs regarding breast cancer and intentions to seek medical care for

Elizabeth A Grunfeld; Myra S Hunter; Amanda J Ramirez; Michael A Richards

2003-01-01

257

Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

258

Risk of prostate, breast and colorectal cancer after skin cancer diagnosis.  

PubMed

Ultraviolet radiation is the major cause of skin cancer, but promotes vitamin D synthesis, and vitamin D has been inversely related to the risk of several common cancers including prostate, breast and colorectum. We therefore computed the incidence of prostate, breast and colorectal cancer following skin cancer using the datasets of the Swiss cancer Registries of Vaud and Neuchâtel. Between 1974 and 2005, 6,985 histologically confirmed squamous cell skin cancers, 21,046 basal cell carcinomas and 3,346 cutaneous malignant melanomas were registered, and followed up to the end of 2005 for the occurrence of second primary cancer of the prostate, breast and colorectum. Overall, 680 prostate cancers were observed versus 568.3 expected (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.20; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.29), 440 breast cancers were observed versus 371.5 expected (SIR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.08-1.30) and 535 colorectal cancers were observed versus 464.6 expected (SIR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06-1.25). When basal cell, squamous cell and skin melanoma were considered separately, all the SIRs for prostate, breast and colorectal cancers were around or slightly above unity. Likewise, the results were consistent across strata of age at skin cancer diagnosis and location (head and neck versus others), and for male and female colorectal cancers. These findings, based on a population with a long tradition of systematic histologic examination of all surgically treated skin lesions, do not support the hypothesis that prostate, breast and colorectal cancer risk is decreased following skin cancer. PMID:18770862

Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Te, Van-Cong; Conconi, Manuela Maspoli; La Vecchia, Carlo

2008-12-15

259

Can we prevent breast cancer?  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004-2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14-42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48-52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

Saadat, Sabiha

2008-07-01

260

Loss of primary cilia occurs early in breast cancer development  

PubMed Central

Background Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell surface. Primary cilia play a critical role in development and disease through regulation of signaling pathways including the Hedgehog pathway. Recent mouse models have also linked ciliary dysfunction to cancer. However, little is known about the role of primary cilia in breast cancer development. Primary cilia expression was characterized in cancer cells as well as their surrounding stromal cells from 86 breast cancer patients by counting cilia and measuring cilia length. In addition, we examined cilia expression in normal epithelial and stromal cells from reduction mammoplasties as well as histologically normal adjacent tissue for comparison. Results We observed a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells on both premalignant lesions as well as in invasive cancers. This loss of cilia does not correlate with increased proliferative index (Ki67-positive cells). However, we did detect rare ciliated cancer cells present in patients with invasive breast cancer and found that these express a marker of basaloid cancers that is associated with poor prognosis (Cytokeratin 5). Interestingly, the percentage of ciliated stromal cells associated with both premalignant and invasive cancers decreased when compared to stromal cells associated with normal tissue. To understand how cilia may be lost during cancer development we analyzed the expression of genes required for ciliogenesis and/or ciliary function and compared their expression in normal versus breast cancer samples. We found that expression of ciliary genes were frequently downregulated in human breast cancers. Conclusions These data suggest that primary cilia are lost early in breast cancer development on both the cancer cells and their surrounding stromal cells. PMID:24987519

2014-01-01

261

Breast Cancer Organization of Screening Programs  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Breast Cancer: Mortality Rates | Screening

262

Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

2014-06-16

263

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer · UCSF's second highest ethnic group of breast cancer patients is Asian American compared to African Americans nationally. · The breast cancer rate for Asian

Mullins, Dyche

264

Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention  

SciTech Connect

The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

Jordan, V.C. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01

265

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

1998-01-01

266

Tamoxifen Therapy for Breast Cancer and Endometrial Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Tamoxifen is effective in treating breast cancer, reduces breast cancer incidence among high-risk women, and is associated with increased endometrial cancer risk. This study was designed to examine the possible modifying effects of endometrial cancer risk factors on the tamoxifen- endometrial cancer association. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of endometrial cancer (324 case patients and 671 individually matched

Leslie Bernstein; Dennis Deapen; James R. Cerhan; Stephen M. Schwartz; Jonathan Liff; Jeffrey A. Perlman; Leslie Ford

1999-01-01

267

Histological profile and age at diagnosis of breast and ovarian tumors: A register-based study in Espirito Santo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Breast and ovarian cancers are important public health problems in Brazil. However, in various locations in the Brazilian territory these types of cancer remain poorly characterized. Therefore, this study aimed to compare data collected from the Pathology Services of two Oncology Reference Hospitals in Espirito Santo state (Brazil) with the data in previous Brazilian studies. Histological type frequency and age at diagnosis of breast and ovarian tumors between 2001–2004 and 2009–2010 were analyzed. Tumor size, histological grade, lymph node status, hormone receptor status [estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR)] as well as HER2 and Ki-67 marker status were obtained for the cases of infiltrating ductal carcinomas of the breast during the period 2009–2010. Categorical variables were described by their absolute and/or relative frequencies, while quantitative variables were expressed as the mean ± standard deviation and median, using 95% confidence intervals. Chi-square tests were performed to examine whether or not the studied variables differed by age at the time of diagnosis. Malignant breast tumors (1,758) and 119 malignant ovarian tumors were examined. Mean ages for malignant breast and ovarian tumors were 53.59 and 52.98 years, respectively. An increased tumor frequency in the age group of ?35 years was observed for other malignant tumors of the breast during the period of 2009–2010, compared to 2001–2004. When considering only infiltrating ductal carcinomas with immunohistochemistry records available, there were 82.1% (133 cases) of ER+/PR+ tumors, 1.9% (3 cases) of ER?/PR?/HER2 3+ and 16.04% (26 cases) of ER?/PR?/HER2? tumors. The findings of this study demonstrated detailed information concerning breast and ovarian tumor behavior in the Espirito Santo state (Brazil), allowing for a precise comparison with other populations (Brazilian or international), which may be helpful in the planning of prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24649174

DE VARGAS WOLFGRAMM, ELDAMÁRIA; GAVIOLI, CAMILA FÁTIMA BIANCARDI; ENTRINGER, MAYARA LEMOS; ALVES, LYVIA NEVES REBELLO; STUR, ELAINE; DE CASTRO NETO, ALLAN KARDEC; MOTTA, LUCIENE LAGE DA; PEREIRA, FAUSTO EDMUNDO LIMA; LOURO, IURI DRUMOND

2013-01-01

268

Far Beyond the Usual Biomarkers in Breast Cancer: A Review  

PubMed Central

Research investigating biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and the prediction of treatment responses in breast cancer is rapidly expanding. However, no validated biomarker currently exists for use in routine clinical practice, and breast cancer detection and management remains dependent on invasive procedures. Histological examination remains the standard for diagnosis, whereas immunohistochemical and genetic tests are utilized for treatment decisions and prognosis determinations. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive review of literature published in PubMed on breast cancer biomarkers between 2009 and 2013. The keywords that were used together were breast cancer, biomarkers, diagnosis, prognosis and drug response. The cited references of the manuscripts included in this review were also screened. We have comprehensively summarized the performance of several biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and predicted drug responses of breast cancer. Finally, we have identified 15 biomarkers that have demonstrated promise in initial studies and several miRNAs. At this point, such biomarkers must be rigorously validated in the clinical setting to be translated into clinically useful tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of drug responses of breast cancer. PMID:25057307

dos Anjos Pultz, Brunna; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Oliveira, Ana Paula Lima; de Araújo, Rogério Agenor; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

2014-01-01

269

Immunohistochemical reactions of primary neuroendocrine breast cancer.  

PubMed

We performed immunohistochemical analysis of neuroendocrine breast cancer. The significance of this approach to differential diagnosis of this cancer form by detection of specific markers is demonstrated. The incidence of diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer has increased 8-fold over 5 years. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is responsible for 3.4% of all breast cancer cases. The disease is significantly more incident in patients over 60. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is characterized by high expression of neuron-specific enolase (100%) and chromagranin A (57%). The data indicate that irrespective of the location, macroscopic picture, and immunohistochemical profile of cytokeratins and steroid hormones, breast cancer is characterized by clear-cut expression of neuroendocrine markers in different combinations. Immunohistochemical detection of these markers makes it possible to detect the hormone-secreting elements and evaluate their role in the tumor pool, which is essential for the differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer, including studies of puncture biopsy specimens. PMID:25567197

Kirillina, M P; Loskutova, K S; Innokent'eva, A S; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

2015-01-01

270

Adjuvant Therapy of Primary Breast Cancer: A Review of Key Findings from the 7th International Conference, St. Gallen, February 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer research has developed at a rapid pace over the last decades. Recent discoveries promise to provide individualized treatment options, increased long-term survival for women with breast cancer, and the possibility of moving toward curative intent in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Age, race, tumor size, histological tumor type, axillary nodal status, standardized pathological grade, and hormone-recep- tor

MATTI S. AAPRO

271

Job Authority and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Using the 1957–2011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of women’s job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others’ pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which women’s occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions. PMID:25506089

Pudrovska, Tetyana

2014-01-01

272

Imaging in evaluation of response to neoadjuvant breast cancer treatment  

PubMed Central

The role of imaging for patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer is not only to evaluate the therapeutic response in terms of tumour shrinkage, but also to predict the histological response to chemotherapy, which is correlated to survival. Surgery and histopathological analysis after neoadjuvant therapy allow for an objective assessment of the accuracy of imaging techniques in evaluating response. The aim of this study is to compare the value of the different conventional and functional imaging techniques for determining response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:16154816

Ollivier, L; Balu-Maestro, C; Leclère, J

2005-01-01

273

Lifestyle changes for prevention of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women. Lifestyle changes are shown to be important in the prevention of breast cancer. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and vitamin and mineral use are key factors influencing the risk of breast cancer among women. Because these factors are related to each other, it is difficult to assess their individual roles in breast cancer. Some of these factors are alterable, meaning that women can decrease their risk for breast cancer by changing their behavior. Breast cancer is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity among women. Therefore, it is logical to try to find ways to decrease the risk of developing breast cancer. Lifestyle changes seem to be an easy, effective, and economical way to help prevention breast cancer. In women with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who are under radiotherapy treatment after undergoing a mastectomy, lifestyle changes are still very important. Some factors, such as smoking cessation and prevention of weight gain, may improve the long-term survival chances of these patients. Therefore, ways to increase women’s knowledge about the role of lifestyle changes in the prevention of breast cancer and in the survival of patients with diagnosed breast cancer should be considered and studied.

Hashemi, Seyed Hesam Bani; Karimi, Samieh; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

2014-01-01

274

Postpartum Remodeling, Lactation, and Breast Cancer Risk: Summary of a National Cancer Institute–Sponsored Workshop  

PubMed Central

The pregnancy–lactation cycle (PLC) is a period in which the breast is transformed from a less-developed, nonfunctional organ into a mature, milk-producing gland that has evolved to meet the nutritional, developmental, and immune protection needs of the newborn. Cessation of lactation initiates a process whereby the breast reverts to a resting state until the next pregnancy. Changes during this period permanently alter the morphology and molecular characteristics of the breast (molecular histology) and produce important, yet poorly understood, effects on breast cancer risk. To provide a state-of-the-science summary of this topic, the National Cancer Institute invited a multidisciplinary group of experts to participate in a workshop in Rockville, Maryland, on March 2, 2012. Topics discussed included: 1) the epidemiology of the PLC in relation to breast cancer risk, 2) breast milk as a biospecimen for molecular epidemiological and translational research, and 3) use of animal models to gain mechanistic insights into the effects of the PLC on breast carcinogenesis. This report summarizes conclusions of the workshop, proposes avenues for future research on the PLC and its relationship with breast cancer risk, and identifies opportunities to translate this knowledge to improve breast cancer outcomes. PMID:23264680

2013-01-01

275

Hormonal prevention of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer prevention can be provided by using SERMs or aromatase inhibitors depending on the ovarian status, with a global risk reduction of 50 to 60%. Prophylactic annexectomy offered to reduce ovarian risk in BRCA mutation carriers also lowers breast cancer risk by 50%. Main side effects include deep vein thrombosis for SERMs, hot flushes and joint pain (although less frequently than initially suspected) with aromatase inhibitors. Other strategies based on progesterone, insulin or prolactin signaling modulation may be offered in the future. Criteria for candidate selection remain to be established. PMID:24997772

Thomin, Anne; Friszer, Stéphanie; Fajac, Anne; Daraï, Émile; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

2014-07-01

276

Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-07-07

277

NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR), real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non malignant breast lesions and cancerous tissues. In particular, the NUCKS overexpression in ADH and DCIS indicates a significant role of this protein in neoplastic progression. PMID:19664271

Drosos, Yiannis; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Østvold, Anne Carine; Grundt, Kirsten; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Havaki, Sophia; Kollia, Panagoula; Kittas, Christos; Marinos, Evangelos; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki

2009-01-01

278

Nodular Fasciitis of the Breast Mimicking Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Nodular fasciitis is a benign proliferative lesion that is usually found in the soft tissue of the upper extremity and trunk in young to middle-aged persons. It has rarely been described in the breast. A 35-year-old woman had noticed a mass in her left breast. It was elastic-hard, 13?mm in size, and located mainly in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast. Mammography did not detect the mass. Ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion with an irregular margin. Neither fine-needle aspiration cytology nor core needle biopsy established a definitive diagnosis. Excisional biopsy was therefore performed. Histologically, the excised tumor tissue results were consistent with a diagnosis of nodular fasciitis of the breast. We report a case of nodular fasciitis of the breast, a rare histological type of breast tumor. PMID:24963435

Chishima, Takashi; Adachi, Shouko

2014-01-01

279

Everolimus and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer That Has Progressed or Recurred on Everolimus and Exemestane Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-12-02

280

Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2011-07-08

281

Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

282

19p13.1 is a triple negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus  

PubMed Central

The 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer. Here we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) status, using 48,869 breast cancer cases and 49,787 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Variants from 19p13.1 were not associated with breast cancer overall or with ER-positive breast cancer but were significantly associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk [rs8170 Odds Ratio (OR)=1.10, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.05 – 1.15, p=3.49 × 10-5] and triple negative (TN) (ER, PR and HER2 negative) breast cancer [rs8170 OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.13 – 1.31, p=2.22 × 10-7]. However, rs8170 was no longer associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk when TN cases were excluded [OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.07, p=0.62]. In addition, a combined analysis of TN cases from BCAC and the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (n=3,566) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8170 and TN breast cancer risk [OR=1.25, 95% CI 1.18 – 1.33, p=3.31 × 10-13]. Thus, 19p13.1 is the first triple negative-specific breast cancer risk locus and the first locus specific to a histological subtype defined by ER, PR, and HER2 to be identified. These findings provide convincing evidence that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer varies by tumor subtype and that triple negative tumors and other subtypes likely arise through distinct etiologic pathways. PMID:22331459

Stevens, Kristen N.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Vachon, Celine M.; Wang, Xianshu; Margolin, Sara; Lindblom, Annika; Nevanlinna, Heli; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Vrieling, Alina; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Nickels, Stefan; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Meindl, Alfons; Bartram, Claus R.; Schott, Sarah; Engel, Christof; Godwin, Andrew K.; Weaver, JoEllen; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sharma, Priyanka; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Miron, Penelope; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Fountzilas, George; Gogas, Helen J.; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Annie; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Peto, Julian; Johnson, Nichola; Fletcher, Olivia; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Puttawibul, Puttisak; Wiangnon, Surapon; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Hamann, Ute; Dünnebier, Thomas; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Pharoah, Paul P.; Dunning, Alison M; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcom W.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Hwang, Helena; Eccles, Diana M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Severi, Gianluca; Kosel, Matthew L.; Pankratz, V.S.; Slager, Susan; Olson, Janet E.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Lambrechts, Diether; Hatse, Sigrid; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Soini, Ylermi; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.

2012-01-01

283

Gastric cancer: Classification, histology and application of molecular pathology  

PubMed Central

Gastric cancer remains one of the deadly diseases with poor prognosis. New classification of gastric cancers based on histologic features, genotypes and molecular phenotypes helps better understand the characteristics of each subtype, and improve early diagnosis, prevention and treatment. The objective of this article is to review the new classification of gastric cancers and the up-to-date guidance in the application of molecular testing. PMID:22943016

El Hajj, Nassim; Sittler, Scott; Lammert, Nancy; Barnes, Robert; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia

2012-01-01

284

Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

2012-01-01

285

Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-02-03

286

Mechanisms involved in breast cancer liver metastasis.  

PubMed

Liver metastasis is a frequent occurrence in patients with breast cancer; however, the available treatments are limited and ineffective. While liver-specific homing of breast cancer cells is an important feature of metastasis, the formation of liver metastases is not random. Indeed, breast cancer cell factors contribute to the liver microenvironment. Major breakthroughs have been achieved recently in understanding breast cancer liver metastasis (BCLM). The process of liver metastasis consists of multiple steps and involves various factors from breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment. A further understanding of the roles of breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment is crucial to guide future work in clinical treatments. In this review we discuss the contribution of breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment to liver metastasis, with the aim to improve therapeutic efficacy for patients with BCLM. PMID:25779135

Ma, Rui; Feng, Yili; Lin, Shuang; Chen, Jiang; Lin, Hui; Liang, Xiao; Zheng, Heming; Cai, Xiujun

2015-12-01

287

[Breast cancer in the elderly].  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. The elderly comprise a large part of the breast cancer population, and there are important specific considerations for this population. Late diagnosis and substandard local and systemic therapies are frequent, which is only partially "compensated" by a more indolent tumour behaviour due to the increasing likelihood according to age of potentially hormone sensitive tumour status. Endocrine treatment remains a key component of systemic treatment in both advanced and early setting. However chemotherapy is a valid option, with interest strengthened by proven efficacy in adjuvant setting for aggressive phenotypes, better management of side effects and attempts to develop predictive index for toxicity. The recently reported laboratory studies on potential mechanisms for resistance to endocrine therapies that involve crosstalk between growth factor signalling pathways and hormonal receptors stimulate also new therapeutic approaches. PMID:18511367

Gutierrez, Maya; Ben Abid, Fatma; Ousbane, Amale; Gazzah, Anas; Debled, Marc; Girre, Véronique; Brain, Etienne G C

2008-05-28

288

Cytological grading of breast carcinoma on fine needle aspirates and its relation with histological grading  

PubMed Central

Background: Grading of breast carcinoma on fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is beneficial for selecting patients for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Aims: To grade the breast carcinoma on FNAC using Robinson grading system and to assess the concordance of cytological grading (CG) with histological grading (HG) using Elston-Ellis modification of Scarff-Bloom-Richardson grading system. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for 1-year, comprising of 50 female patients attending outpatient departments (OPD) as well as admitted in various surgical wards of a teaching hospital, diagnosed as breast carcinoma. FNAC smears were stained with May–Grunwald–Giemsa and Papanicolaou (Pap) stains and CG was done using Robinson system on Pap stained smears. The results were compared with HG system after resection of tumors. Results: Of 50 cases, 14 (28%) cases were graded as grade I, 24 (48%) grade II, and 12 (24%) grade III by CG, whereas 9 (18%), 28 (56%) and 13 (26%) cases were graded as grade I, II and III by HG. The result showed overall 72% concordance of CG with HG, with grade II and grade III showing highest degree of concordance (83.33%), which is comparable to previous studies. Kappa measurement showed a higher degree of agreement in high-grade tumors compared with low-grade tumors (0.73 in grade III, 0.53 in grade II and 0.39 in grade I). Conclusion: Cytological grading is comparable to HG in majority of cases. Because neoadjuvant chemotherapy is becoming increasingly popular as primary treatment modality of breast cancer, CG could be a useful parameter in selecting the mode of therapy and predicting tumor behavior.

Phukan, Jyoti Prakash; Sinha, Anuradha; Deka, Jatindra Prasad

2015-01-01

289

Sexuality After Breast Cancer: Need for Guideline  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical experiences have revealed that patients with breast cancer experience various sexual problems following their treatment. Breast cancer negatively impacts the sexual life of the afflicted couples, and as a traumatic event can influence women’s psychosexual functioning and intimate relationship. This review focuses on sexuality after breast cancer and on a growing need for bio-psycho-social guidelines for breast cancer treatment. Methods This study aims to review the literature on management, psychological outcomes and sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. Results Although the benefits of the current treatment strategies are well established, many cancer survivors are at risk for developing psycho physiological symptoms including sexual dysfunction. Cancer and treatment-related factors can influence sexual functioning. We review current treatment-related side effects on sexual functioning such as desire, arousal and orgasm in breast cancer patients. Despite the impact of medical treatment on survival of patients with breast cancer, no satisfactory steps have been taken towards improving sexual functioning of these patients. Conclusion Breast cancer affects many aspects of sexuality, including changes in physical functioning and in the perception of feminity. Sexual dysfunction following breast cancer should be diagnosed and managed as a systematic approach with multidisciplinary inputs. Healthcare professionals should assess the effects of medical and surgical treatment on the sexuality of breast cancer survivors.

Vaziri, Sh; Lotfi Kashani, F

2012-01-01

290

Par(-4)oxysm in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion that leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

2013-01-01

291

Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.  

PubMed

Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67. PMID:21655659

Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

2011-01-01

292

Unusual Aggressive Breast Cancer: Metastatic Malignant Phyllodes Tumor  

PubMed Central

For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor. PMID:23705037

Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

2013-01-01

293

Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.  

PubMed

For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor. PMID:23705037

Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

2013-02-01

294

Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

2015-02-05

295

Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications  

Cancer.gov

Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

296

Targeting Src in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical benefit of blocking oncogenic pathways in breast cancer and other malignancies has validated this approach and ushered in the era of molecularly targeted therapeutics. Src and its family members make up the largest group of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. In laboratory models, these proteins have been shown to play a critical role in cellular growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, and

R. S. Finn

2008-01-01

297

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

298

Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

299

Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)  

Cancer.gov

Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

300

The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

301

Risk factors for ductal and lobular breast cancer: results from the nurses' health study  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Ductal and lobular carcinomas are the two most common types of invasive breast cancer. Whether well-established risk factors are differentially associated with risk on the basis of histologic subtype is not clear. We prospectively investigated the association between a number of hormonal and nonhormonal exposures and risk defined by histologic subtype among 4,655 ductal and 659 lobular cases of

Joanne Kotsopoulos; Wendy Y Chen; Margaret A Gates; Shelley S Tworoger; Susan E Hankinson; Bernard A Rosner

2010-01-01

302

BRCA 1/2-Mutation Related and Sporadic Breast and Ovarian Cancers: More Alike than Different  

PubMed Central

No longer is histology solely predictive of cancer treatment and outcome. There is an increasing influence of tumor genomic characteristics on therapeutic options. Both breast and ovarian cancers are at higher risk of development in patients with BRCA 1/2-germline mutations. Recent data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have shown a number of genomic similarities between triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) and ovarian cancers. Recently, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promising activity in hereditary BRCA 1/2-mutated and sporadic breast and ovarian cancers. In this review, we will summarize the current literature regarding the genomic and phenotypic similarities between BRCA 1/2-mutation related cancers, sporadic TNBCs, and sporadic ovarian cancers. We will also review Phase I, II, and III data using PARP inhibitors for these malignancies and compare and contrast the results with respect to histology. PMID:24579064

Burgess, Melissa; Puhalla, Shannon

2014-01-01

303

Posttraumatic Stress Among Women With Breast Cancer and Their Daughters: Relationship With Daughters' Breast Cancer Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) in women with breast cancer, perceived risk of cancer in these women's daughters, and daughters' PTS related to their mothers' breast cancer were tested for relationships to daughters' breast self-examination (BSE) and mammography activity. Daughters' mammography frequency was related to her own PTS, but not to her perceived risk or her mothers' PTS. In contrast, daughters

Bret A. Boyer; Roseanne K. Cantor

2005-01-01

304

Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial  

Cancer.gov

The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies.

305

Oestrogens, Oestrogen Receptors and Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tamoxifen has been the endocrine treatment of choice for all stages of oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer for 20 years and the first chemical therapeutic to be tested to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women. It is now clear that the oestrogen receptor is proving to be an invaluable target for the treatment and chemoprevention of breast

D. J Bentrem; P Gaiha; V. C Jordan

2003-01-01

306

Breast Cancer and Autism  

PubMed Central

Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister’s company. Amy’s life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy’s risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy’s level of autism reveals marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction. She exhibits a total lack of development of spoken language, with no attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture. During the visit, she occupies herself with repetitive motor mannerisms. Susan believes that Amy struggles with overstimulation from tactile input. Therefore, she is combative with health-care providers and intolerant of invasive devices. Susan has an intimate understanding of Amy’s ability to communicate her needs and wants through nonverbal changes. RECURRENCE Approximately 2 months ago, Amy began favoring her right arm and appeared to be in pain when participating in various activities. Susan became aware of Amy’s pain issues by noticing that her posture was slightly altered and she was carrying herself differently. Further investigation with a CT scan showed concern for local disease recurrence involving the axillary lymph nodes. No distant metastases were seen. The standard of care for this diagnosis is surgical resection and consideration of radiation therapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (NCCN, 2012). Susan does not want Amy to undergo further surgery and believes radiation would be too difficult to maneuver. The next best option would be a medical approach with chemotherapy as the main modality. DIFFICULT DECISIONS If treatment is pursued, the advanced practitioner will need to perform regular examinations and prescribe and monitor chemotherapy. The delivery of therapy, requiring frequent blood draws and IV access, will be a challenge for the health-care staff. The APN is apprehensive about the ability to accomplish these tasks safely given Amy’s limited capacity to participate. The APN is also concerned with how treatment will affect Amy’s life. The APN may have her own individual conflict of morals to contend with, given the limited understanding of the patient vs. nontreatmen

Radcliff, Lisa

2013-01-01

307

Reversibility of liver failure secondary to metastatic breast cancer by vinorelbine and cisplatin chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The development of liver metastases from breast cancer is associated with a very poor prognosis, estimated at 4 months median survival. Since treatment with many chemotherapeutic agents is relatively contraindicated, we assessed the safety, tolerability and potential efficacy of combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and cisplatin (ViP). Method Pilot study in 11 patients with histologically confirmed breast carcinoma, radiological evidence of

Ricky A. Sharma; Marios P. Decatris; Sundar Santhanam; Rajarshi Roy; Ahmed E. Osman; Christine B. Clarke; Subhash Khanna; Kenneth J. O'Byrne

2003-01-01

308

Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.  

PubMed

An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:25489714

Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

2015-01-01

309

Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), a joint effort co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is the next phase of a program that began with the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC) in 2003. The BCERP supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

310

Tuberculosis of the breast masquerading as breast cancer  

PubMed Central

A 57-year-old female from Ghana was found to have fungating breast lesion and treated for breast cancer with empirical chemotherapy in her home country. On presentation to our breast surgical department in the UK, triple assessment and core biopsy showed the fungating mass to be a caseating granuloma in keeping with Tuberculosis infection. PMID:24960741

Peiris, L; Alam, N; Agrawal, A

2012-01-01

311

Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity  

MedlinePLUS

... Right to Know Campaign Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

312

Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2012-12-12

313

Women with familial risk for breast cancer have an increased frequency of aldehyde dehydrogenase expressing cells in breast ductules  

PubMed Central

Background Knowledge is limited regarding the association between stem cells in histologically benign breast tissue and risk factors for breast cancer, and hence we addressed this issue in the present study. Recently, we assessed the histology of benign breast tissue from cancer and non-cancer patients for cells positive for the putative stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 A1 (ALDH), and the findings indicated an association between expression of ALDH and the hormonal factors menopause and hormone therapy. The current investigation examined possible associations between various known clinical and genetic risk factors for breast cancer and cellular expression of ALDH in ductules in benign human breast tissue. Methods The study included breast surgery patients that were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without breast cancer (n?=?23), had BRCA1/2 (n?=?28) or sporadic (n?=?21) breast cancer, or required non-cancer-related mammoplasty (n?=?34). The distribution and frequency of ALDH-immunolabelled cells were correlated to patient subgroups with different risk factors, using mammoplasty patients as a control group. Statistical analyses comprised linear and logistic regression, Spearman’s rank test, Pearson’s test, and Fisher’s exact test. In two-tailed tests, p?breast cancer and a high frequency of ALDH+ cells (p?=?0.001) at all ductular levels in all groups, regardless of BRCA status, age, parity, or occurrence of cancer. In pre-menopausal non-BRCA cancer patients, the frequency of ALDH+ cells increased with age (p?cancer patients (p?=?0.02). Among post-menopausal patients, only on-going hormone replacement therapy was correlated with a high number of ALDH+ cells (p?histologically normal breast tissue, we found a positive association between the frequency of ductular ALDH+ cells and several breast cancer risk factors, particularly family history of this disease, which supports previous evidence that ALDH plays a role in breast cancer. PMID:24188377

2013-01-01

314

Cancer stem cells in breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a critical role in breast cancer initiation, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. It is thought that they are either generated from normal mammary stem/progenitor cells or from mammary epithelial cells by epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Breast CSCs are characterized by the activation of stemness-related pathways, such as the Notch and Wnt pathways, and by the expression of certain stem cell markers, such as CD44, EpCAM and ALDH1. CSCs form a minor population, whose proportion depends on various factors, including environmental conditions. Since CSCs are highly resistant to chemotherapy, additional treatment of breast cancer patients with CSC-specific drugs, such as salinomycin and gamma-secretase inhibitors which target the Wnt or Notch pathway, respectively, will be required. Interestingly, an equilibrium seems to exist between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells, and there are indications that CSCs can be recruited from non-stem cancer cells. As a consequence, it may be necessary to combine a therapy targeting CSCs with common chemotherapy that targets the bulk tumor to avoid the regeneration of CSCs. PMID:23468411

Dittmer, Jürgen; Rody, Achim

2013-07-01

315

FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-03-02

316

Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.  

PubMed

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

317

Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies  

PubMed Central

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

318

Oncogene amplification in breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

To refine the analysis of gene amplification in breast cancer, the authors have developed sensitive methods that can be used to screen nucleic acid prepared from a variety of sources. In their analysis, Southern hybridization and DNA dot-blot analysis were used to screen 49 breast cancer DNAs for Myc, Neu, and Int-2 gene amplification. The analysis detected minimal one extra gene copy) as well as expanded (two or more extra gene copies) gene amplifications, and in addition, distinguished between gene amplification and aneuploidy as the cause of extra gene copies. These quantitative methods were adapted to patient specimens routinely available in the anatomic pathology laboratory, including fresh tumor tissue, tumor nuclei discarded during estrogen receptor analysis, and paraffin blocks. One minimal gene amplification was found in three cases of intraductal cancer. Of 25 cases of nonmetastatic invasive cancer, 28% had at least one extra Myc gene, whereas 24% had Neu, and 21% had Int-2 gene amplification. Of 21 cases of metastatic invasive cancer, 43% had Myc, 43% had Neu, and 40% had Int-2 gene amplification. Among the nonmetastatic cancers, 47% had one, 12% had two, and 4% had three amplified genes. Within the metastatic cancers, 48% had one, 28% had two, and 5% had three amplified genes. Our data suggest relationships between tumor progression and both incidence and size of Myc, Neu, and Int-2 gene amplification. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1849359

Donovan-Peluso, M.; Contento, A. M.; Tobon, H.; Ripepi, B.; Locker, J.

1991-01-01

319

Inflammatory Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... or appear pitted, like the skin of an orange (called peau d'orange ). These symptoms are caused by the buildup of ... erythema (redness), edema (swelling), and a peau d’orange appearance and/or abnormal breast warmth, with or ...

320

Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment: A Patient and Doctor Dialogue  

MedlinePLUS

... may never get breast cancer. Although a family history of breast cancer increases your risk of breast cancer, ... stage breast cancer. Women who have a family history of breast cancer do have an increased risk of ...

321

Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

322

NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

323

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

324

Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

Stevens, R.G.

1987-08-01

325

Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

326

BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table of Contents Page Introduction to the Women's Health Interdisciplinary Research Center (WHIRC) 3 Overview Cancer Prevention 27 Aging and Breast Cancer 30 Slone Epidemiology Center Black Women's Health Study

Spence, Harlan Ernest

327

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer September 18, 2013 2:00 ­ 4:00 PM Reception. Speakers in the symposium will cover: (1) basic research in breast cancer metastasis, (2) drug discovery basic research ideas to drugs and inhibitors as therapeutic interventions for cancer treatment

328

[Sexuality after breast cancer - surviving breast cancer as a couple].  

PubMed

Being struck by the disease breast cancer usually implies a deep impact on the sexual life of the afflicted couples. In experiencing this crisis anxieties concerning treatment, surgery, chronic diseases and death predominate and push all thoughts of sexuality to the background. All energy is applied to cope with the medical problems. Thus ideas on sex appear to be non-appropriate and tend to be postponed to the undefined future. The following paper begins with a grid showing developments of gender-specific attitudes in relation to medical treatment. Next we would like to introduce: "The Model of Sexual Re-Bonding after Breast Cancer". This psycho-dynamic model was developed in our therapy sessions with breast cancer patients and their partners over the last decade. It offers patients and their partners - as well as (psycho-) oncological professionals - the opportunity to share congruent and incongruent views and attitudes towards sexuality as treatment progresses, shows when and how conflicts may arise and how to cope with them. PMID:20473729

Traun-Vogt, Gabriele; Herdina, Peter F

2010-04-01

329

Is steroid receptor profile in contralateral breast cancer a marker of independence of the corresponding primary tumour?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) profiles between primary and corresponding contralateral breast cancer (CBC) to investigate whether CBC should be considered relapse of a primary or as a feature of the multicentric origin of breast cancer. We adjusted for patient age, menopausal status, histology and adjuvant therapy. In spite of the general application of a cut-off

D Coradini; S Oriana; L Mariani; R Miceli; G Bresciani; E Marubini; G Di Fronzo

1998-01-01

330

Naive beliefs about breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

We examined the beliefs women have about their risk of breast cancer. Participants were 86 women, ages 18 to 90, with and without a family history of breast cancer. They were interviewed individually about their risk and their beliefs about risk factors for breast cancer. The results showed that participants form their risk estimates primarily from the absence or presence of a family history of breast cancer. When asked to compare their risk with the risk of others, only participants without a family history viewed their chances of getting breast cancer as lower than the chances of others. On an absolute risk measure, all participants overestimated their risk. Different risk measures can lead to different conclusions about how women perceive their risk. In addition, the nearly exclusive focus of women on family history may create difficulties for genetic counselors providing information about breast cancer risk. PMID:9520608

McCaul, K D; O'Donnell, S M

1998-01-01

331

Aspirin and NSAIDs for breast cancer chemoprevention.  

PubMed

Novel treatment strategies are needed for breast cancer chemoprevention. Tamoxifen is the only drug approved for the chemoprevention of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, to date, no treatment exists for the chemoprevention of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. NSAID use is associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the effect of NSAID on breast cancer are not well defined. NSAIDs inhibit cyclooxygenases, thus preventing the formation of prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane. NSAIDs also exert other biological effects, including generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of nuclear factor-?B-mediated signals. This review synthesizes the evidence on the COX-2-independent mechanisms of action of aspirin, salicylates, and other NSAIDs on breast cancer. PMID:25380191

Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia Ch

2014-11-01

332

From the Cover: Prospective identification of tumorigenic breast cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in United States women, accounting for >40,000 deaths each year. These breast tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of breast cancer cells. Using a model in which human breast cancer cells were grown in immunocompromised mice, we found that only a minority of breast cancer cells had the ability to form new

Muhammad Al-Hajj; Max S. Wicha; Adalberto Benito-Hernandez; Sean J. Morrison; Michael F. Clarke

2003-01-01

333

Gamma-ray detector guidance of breast cancer therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Over 75% of breast cancer patients are eligible for breast conserving therapy. Breast conserving therapy involves a lumpectomy to excise the gross tumour, followed by adjuvant radiation therapy to eradicate residual microscopic disease. Recent advances in the understanding of breast cancer biology and recurrence have presented the opportunity to

Ananth Ravi

2009-01-01

334

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

Fantini, Sergio

335

Hypoxia-inducible factor-2a is associated with ABCG2 expression, histology-grade and Ki67 expression in breast invasive ductal carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Hypoxia is an important factor involved in the progression of solid tumors and has been associated with various indicators of tumor metabolism, angiogenesis and metastasis. But little is known about the contribution of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-2a (HIF-2a) to the drug resistance and the clinicopathological characteristics in breast cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed on the tissue microarray paraffin sections of surgically removed samples from 196 invasive breast cancer patients with clinicopathological data. The correlations between the expression of HIF-2a and ABCG2 as well as other patients' clinicopathological data were investigated. Results The results showed that HIF-2a was expressed in different intensities and distributions in the tumor cells of the breast invasive ductal carcinoma. A positive staining for HIF-2a was defined as a brown staining observed mainly in the nucleus. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between HIF-2a expression and ABCG2 expression (p = 0.001), histology-grade (p = 0.029), and Ki67 (p = 0. 043) respectively. Conclusion HIF-2a was correlated with ABCG2 expression, histology-grade and Ki67 expression in breast invasive ductal carcinoma. HIF-2a could regulate ABCG2 in breast cancer cells, and could be a novel potential bio-marker to predict chemotherapy effectiveness. The hypoxia/HIF-2a/ABCG2 pathway could be a new mechanism of breast cancer multidrug-resistance. Virtual slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2965948166714795 PMID:22452996

2012-01-01

336

Expression and prognostic significance of lysozyme in male breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Lysozyme, one of the major protein components of human milk that is also synthesized by a significant percentage of breast carcinomas, is associated with lesions that have a favorable outcome in female breast cancer. Here we evaluate the expression and prognostic value of lysozyme in male breast cancer (MBC). Methods Lysozyme expression was examined by immunohistochemical methods in a series of 60 MBC tissue sections and in 15 patients with gynecomastia. Staining was quantified using the HSCORE (histological score) system, which considers both the intensity and the percentage of cells staining at each intensity. Prognostic value of lysozyme was retrospectively evaluated by multivariate analysis taking into account conventional prognostic factors. Results Lysozyme immunostaining was negative in all cases of gynecomastia. A total of 27 of 60 MBC sections (45%) stained positively for this protein, but there were clear differences among them with regard to the intensity and percentage of stained cells. Statistical analysis showed that lysozyme HSCORE values in relation to age, tumor size, nodal status, histological grade, estrogen receptor status, metastasis and histological type did not increase the statistical significance. Univariate analysis confirmed that both nodal involvement and lysozyme values were significant predictors of short-term relapse-free survival. Multivariate analysis, according to Cox's regression model, also showed that nodal status and lysozyme levels were significant independent indicators of short-term relapse-free survival. Conclusion Tumor expression of lysozyme is associated with lesions that have an unfavorable outcome in male breast cancer. This milk protein may be a new prognostic factor in patients with breast cancer. PMID:12473177

Serra, Carlos; Vizoso, Francisco; Alonso, Lorena; Rodríguez, Juan C; González, Luis O; Fernández, María; Lamelas, María L; Sánchez, Luis M; García-Muñiz, José L; Baltasar, Aniceto; Medrano, Justo

2002-01-01

337

Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-14

338

Early psychological adjustment in breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: A significant proportion of breast cancer patients experiences psychiatric morbidity in the first year after a breast cancer diagnosis and\\/or beginning of treatment. This study attempted to identify and understand the risk factors for developing such problems. Methods: A consecutive series of 87 patients, aged 40–75 years, was assessed prior to diagnosis of breast cancer and followed-up approximately 8

Chiara Nosarti; Jonathan V Roberts; Timothy Crayford; Kwame McKenzie; Anthony S David

2002-01-01

339

Clinical proteomics in breast cancer: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer imposes a significant healthcare burden on women worldwide. Early detection is of paramount importance in reducing\\u000a mortality, yet the diagnosis of breast cancer is hampered by the lack of an adequate detection method. In addition, better\\u000a breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients eligible for adjuvant therapy. Hence, new markers for early\\u000a diagnosis, accurate prognosis and prediction

Marie-Christine W. Gast; Jan H. M. Schellens; Jos H. Beijnen

2009-01-01

340

[Prenatal diethylstilbestrol exposure and breast cancer].  

PubMed

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen prescribed to prevent miscarriages until 1977. Its role in the development of vaginal adenocarcinoma and cervical dysplasia is known and screening codified. Recent cohort studies show that exposure to DES in utero increases breast cancer risk especially after 40 years. This article reports the observation of a breast cancer of exceptional gravity in a patient exposed to DES in utero. It details the risk of breast cancer for "DES daughters" and support possible screening modalities. PMID:23102737

Frigo, S; Malina, C; Mathelin, C

2012-12-01

341

Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-12-29

342

MK2206 in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

2015-03-16

343

Endocrine therapy of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

Cavalli, F.

1986-01-01

344

Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

2015-04-09

345

Implications of Functional Proteomics in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems of the Western world. Recent advances in genomics and gene expression-profiling approaches have enriched our understanding of this heterogeneous disease. However, progress in functional proteomics in breast cancer research has been relatively slow. Allied with genomics, the functional proteomics approach will be important in improving diagnosis through better classification of breast cancer and in predicting prognosis and response to different therapies, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapy. In this review, we will present functional proteomic approaches with a focus on the recent clinical implications of utilizing the reverse-phase protein array platform in breast cancer research. PMID:24664486

Chae, Young Kwang

2014-01-01

346

Metastatic breast cancer – ASCO 2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  BACKGROUND: In the ASCO Annual Meeting, important recent developments in haematology and oncology were presented. In the 2010\\u000a ASCO meeting, interest in the field of metastatic breast cancer focused on Poly-(ADP-Ribose)-Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors\\u000a and novel treatment options in Her2-positive disease. METHODS: For this review article, authors searched proceedings of the\\u000a 2010 ASCO Annual Meeting. Abstracts providing important new insights were

R. Bartsch; R. Ziebermayr

2010-01-01

347

Presenting Painless Breast Cancer Detection!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson culminates the unit with the Go Public phase of the legacy cycle. In the associated activity, students depict a tumor amidst healthy body tissue using a Microsoft Excel® graph. In addition, students design a brochure for both patients and doctors advertising a new form of painless yet reliable breast cancer detection. Together, the in-class activity and the take-home assignment function as an assessment of what students have learned throughout the unit.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

348

Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend ?=?0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

2015-04-15

349

Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, progressive, currently, are classified according to in pattern of gene expression luminal A, luminal B, basal and HER-2neu + and Triple-negative, 75% to 80% have receptors positive hormonal and 15% to 20% are positive for hER-2neu and 10% to 20% are triple negative, with hormone receptor negative and HER2-neu and their diagnostic is made by exclusion, the Metabolic Syndrome is related to a higher incidence of these cancers where the insulin-leptin axis-adiponectin are implicated in carcinogenesis. PMID:25083463

Vargas-Aguilar, VM; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adanm; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Tovar-Rodriguez, JM

2013-01-01

350

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

351

Iron homeostasis in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Iron is an essential element and a critical component of molecules involved in energy production, cell cycle and intermediate metabolism. However, the same characteristic chemistry that makes it so biologically versatile may lead to iron-associated toxicity as a consequence of increased oxidative stress. The fact that free iron accumulates with age and generates ROS led to the hypothesis that it could be involved in the etiogenesis of several chronic diseases. Iron has been consistently linked to carcinogenesis, either through persistent failure in the redox balance or due to its critical role in cellular proliferation. Several reports have given evidence that alterations in the import, export and storage of cellular iron may contribute to breast cancer development, behavior and recurrence. In this review, we summarize the basic mechanisms of systemic and cellular iron regulation and highlight the findings that link their deregulation with breast cancer. To conclude, progresses in iron chelation therapy in breast cancer, as a tool to fight chemotherapy resistance, are also reviewed. PMID:24486738

Marques, Oriana; da Silva, Berta Martins; Porto, Graça; Lopes, Carlos

2014-05-28

352

Breast cancer in the elderly.  

PubMed

The study population was derived from 482 patients with breast cancer treated at the Department of Oncology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, between 1992 and 1999. The main purpose of our study was to evaluate differences in breast cancer characteristics and treatment in a population of women with breast cancer older than 65 years compared to younger women group (less than 65 years). We have analyzed disease parameters (stage of the disease, size of primary tumor, tumor differentiation grade and steroid receptor status) and parameters associated to treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy and chemotherapy) in both age groups. In older women, we found significantly higher rates of tumors grade 1 (p = 0.0049), tumors > 2 cm and tumors with a high steroid receptor status (p = 0.0013). Evaluation of treatment modalities showed that in older women a significantly higher proportion were treated with hormonal therapy (p < 0.001) compared to younger patients. In evaluation of clinical outcome after a median follow-up of 58 months, in older women the cumulative 5-year disease-free survival rate was 65%, while cumulative 5-year survival was 83%, which was not significantly different from the younger women (p > 0.005). PMID:16285580

Podolski, P; Markulin Grgi?, L; Kukura, V; Budisi?, Z; Santek, F

2005-01-01

353

Breast Cancer Knowledge  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Transcript For patients diagnosed with cancer, information and education often help lead to more informed treatment decisions. ... have identified a critical need for improved patient education. I’m Dr. Cindy Haines of HealthDay TV, ...

354

Detecting Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the unit challenge: To develop a painless means of identifying cancerous tumors. Solving the challenge depends on an understanding of the properties of stress and strain. After learning the challenge question, students generate ideas and consider the knowledge required to solve the challenge. Then they read an expert's opinion on ultrasound imaging and the potentials for detecting cancerous tumors. This interview helps to direct student research and learning towards finding a solution.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

355

Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

2015-01-08

356

Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

Williams, Norman R; Pigott, Katharine H; Brew-Graves, Chris; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S

2014-05-01

357

Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

2014-01-01

358

The dream and reality of histology agnostic cancer clinical trials.  

PubMed

Emerging technologies and progress in data processing allowed for new insights on gene expression, genomics and epigenomics, and mechanisms of cancer genesis and progression. The development of new therapeutic strategies should therefore be triggered by the understanding of the underlying biology through sophisticated clinical trials. Therefore, the methodology and the design of cancer clinical trials as well as the methods of their implementation are under profound changes. Targeting specific pathways has open the hope of a more focused and personalized medicine which has the potential to bring more efficient and tailored treatments to patients. It has been questioned therefore whether clinical trials traditionally designed for specific tumor types could not re-visited towards trials gathering patients based on molecular features rather than pure pathology criteria. The complexity of the cancer biology being the result of so many different interactive mechanisms whether driving or not the process of cancer cells is an additional level of complexity to approach more inclusive clinical trial access. Nevertheless, a number of innovative solutions to address biological challenges across histologies have been initiated and the question of whether histology agnostic trials could be conceived is a logical next question. This paper questions the advantages and the limits of clinical trials performed across tumor types bearing similar selected molecular features and looks further into the feasibility of such histology agnostic trials. PMID:25349876

Lacombe, Denis; Burock, Susen; Bogaerts, Jan; Schoeffski, Patrick; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Stupp, Roger

2014-09-12

359

Serum CEA and CA 15-3 as prognostic factors in primary breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, we investigated the association of the serum levels of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 with disease free survival and death from disease in 1046 women with breast cancer without metastases at the time of primary diagnosis in relation to age and the established prognostic factors tumour size, lymph node status, histological grading

F G Ebeling; P Stieber; M Untch; D Nagel; G E Konecny; U M Schmitt; A Fateh-Moghadam; D Seidel

2002-01-01

360

Analysis of menstrual, reproductive, and life-style factors for breast cancer risk in Turkish women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between menstrual, reproductive, and life-style factors and breast\\u000a cancer in Turkish women. In a hospital-based case-control study in Ankara, 622 patients with histologically confirmed breast\\u000a cancer were compared with 622 age-matched controls, admitted to the same hospital for acute and non-neoplastic diseases. Unconditional\\u000a logistic regression was used to estimate odds

Betul Oran; Ismail Celik; Mustafa Erman; Esmen Baltali; Nurullah Zengin; Figen Demirkazik; Sabahat Tezcan

2004-01-01

361

What Is Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... normally have lower levels of female hormones that affect the growth of breast cells. The lymph (lymphatic) system of the breast The lymph system is important to understand because it is one of the ways that breast cancers can spread. This system has several parts. Lymph ...

362

A Comparative and Evaluative Study of Two Cytological Grading Systems in Breast Carcinoma with Histological Grading: An Important Prognostic Factor  

PubMed Central

Objective. Cytonuclear gradings in the breast carcinoma raise the level of FNA reportage and improves patient management. Our aim was to evaluate and compare two cytological grading methods (Robinson's and Mouriquand's) in breast carcinoma and correlate it with Nottingham modification of Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) histological grading. Materials and Methods. 30 cytologically proven cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma were graded cytologically and histologically. Cytograding was done by Robinson's and Mouriquand's methods (grades I to III) followed by comparison of the two methods. Cytogradings were correlated with SBR grading method. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, and concordance and discordance rates were evaluated. Results. An overall concordance of 76.66% between cytogradings, of 83.33% between Robinson's method and SBR, and of 66.66% between Mouriquand's method and SBR was seen. Robinson's method correlated best with SBR in all the three nuclear grades. Robinson's method showed a diagnostic accuracy of 90% with 91.30% sensitivity while Mouriquand's method had an accuracy of 76.66% with 95.65% sensitivity. The specificity by Mouriquand's method was quite low (14.28%) as compared to Robinson's method (85.71%). Conclusion. Comprehensive cytological grading of breast cancer by Robinson's method seems better because of more objective set of criteria, easy reproducibility, and specificity.

Dixit, Alok; Chandra, Subrat; Kaur, Swarn

2014-01-01

363

Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - April 30, 1998  

Cancer.gov

"Breast Cancer Prevention Trial" Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Statement of Leslie Ford, M.D. Associate Director for Early Detection and Community Oncology National Cancer Institute Before the Congressional

364

Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... a woman wait 2 years after treatment for breast cancer before trying to have a baby, so that any early return of the cancer would be detected. This may affect a woman’s decision to become pregnant . The fetus ...

365

Mutations linked to breast cancer treatment resistance  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a type of mutation that develops after breast cancer patients take anti-estrogen therapies. The mutations explain one reason why patients often become resistant to this therapy.

366

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes what is known about the relationship between pregnancy, miscarriage, abortion, and the risk of breast cancer. It also briefly describes what is known about reproductive history and the risk of other cancer types.

367

Optical spectra analysis for breast cancer diagnostics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Minimally invasive probe and optical biopsy system based on optical spectra recording and analysis seem to be a promising tool for early diagnostics of breast cancer. Light scattering and absorption spectra are generated continuously as far as the needle-like probe with one emitting and several collecting optical fibers penetrates through the tissues toward to the suspicious area. That allows analyzing not only the state of local site, but also the structure of tissues along the needle trace. The suggested method has the advantages of automated on-line diagnosing and minimal tissue destruction and in parallel with the conventional diagnostic procedures provides the ground for decision-making. 165 medical trials were completed in Nizhny Novgorod Regional Oncology Centre, Russia. Independent diagnoses were the results of fine biopsy and histology. Application of wavelet expansion and clasterization techniques for spectra analysis revealed several main spectral types for malignant and benign tumors. Automatic classification algorithm demonstrated specificity ˜90% and sensitivity ˜91%. Large amount of information, fuzziness in criteria and data noisiness make neural networks to be an attractive analytic tool. The model based on three-layer perceptron was tested over the sample of 29 `cancer' and 29 `non-cancer' cases and demonstrated total separation.

Belkov, S. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Lyubynskaya, T. E.; Maslov, N. V.; Nuzhny, A. S.; da Silva, L. B.; Rubenchik, A.

2011-11-01

368

Anastrozole in Treating Aromatase Inhibitor Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Female Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Musculoskeletal Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-09-16

369

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

1976-01-01

370

Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab Followed By Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-05-07

371

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy  

E-print Network

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy S irradiation for cases of early stage breast cancer. Delivering higher doses to more localized volumes demands, France Keywords: Finite Element model; breast soft tissues; partial breast irradiation; breast phantom. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

Risk determination and prevention of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is an increasing public health problem. Substantial advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, but the introduction of methods to predict women at elevated risk and prevent the disease has been less successful. Here, we summarize recent data on newer approaches to risk prediction, available approaches to prevention, how new approaches may be made, and the difficult problem of using what we already know to prevent breast cancer in populations. During 2012, the Breast Cancer Campaign facilitated a series of workshops, each covering a specialty area of breast cancer to identify gaps in our knowledge. The risk-and-prevention panel involved in this exercise was asked to expand and update its report and review recent relevant peer-reviewed literature. The enlarged position paper presented here highlights the key gaps in risk-and-prevention research that were identified, together with recommendations for action. The panel estimated from the relevant literature that potentially 50% of breast cancer could be prevented in the subgroup of women at high and moderate risk of breast cancer by using current chemoprevention (tamoxifen, raloxifene, exemestane, and anastrozole) and that, in all women, lifestyle measures, including weight control, exercise, and moderating alcohol intake, could reduce breast cancer risk by about 30%. Risk may be estimated by standard models potentially with the addition of, for example, mammographic density and appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This review expands on four areas: (a) the prediction of breast cancer risk, (b) the evidence for the effectiveness of preventive therapy and lifestyle approaches to prevention, (c) how understanding the biology of the breast may lead to new targets for prevention, and (d) a summary of published guidelines for preventive approaches and measures required for their implementation. We hope that efforts to fill these and other gaps will lead to considerable advances in our efforts to predict risk and prevent breast cancer over the next 10 years. PMID:25467785

Howell, Anthony; Anderson, Annie S; Clarke, Robert B; Duffy, Stephen W; Evans, D Gareth; Garcia-Closas, Montserat; Gescher, Andy J; Key, Timothy J; Saxton, John M; Harvie, Michelle N

2014-01-01

373

The Reproductive Factors Linked to Breast Cancer Risk  

E-print Network

The Reproductive Factors Linked to Breast Cancer Risk The breast is a reproductive organ, so it makes sense that breast cancer risk would be related to reproductive variables. A woman's own estrogen contributes to the normal development and functioning of the breast, as well as to breast cancer risk. Being

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

374

Locally advanced breast cancer in octogenarian women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elderly patients are more likely to present with locally advanced breast cancer than younger patients. Furthermore, due to the accelerated aging of the western population, the incidence of breast cancer in this population is expected to steadily rise in the coming decades. So far, no guidelines are available for the management of octogenarian patients presenting with inoperable disease, what frequently

Max Mano; Ghislaine Fraser; Pauline McIlroy; Lynne Stirling; Helen MacKay; Diana Ritchie; Peter Canney

2005-01-01

375

Perinatal factors increase breast cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging evidence suggests that breast cancer may originate during early life. In particular, offspring of mothers who during pregnancy exhibited behaviors that are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer, may be at risk. These behaviors include intake of high fat diet or alcohol, or stressful life style. We have found that neonatal exposure to handling that leads to improved

Leena Hilakivi-Clarke; Robert Clarke; Marc E. Lippman

1994-01-01

376

Breast cancer, prostaglandins and patient survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prostaglandins may have both undesirable and desirable effects in malignant disease. Their possible roles in breast cancer were studied by examining the relationships between different variables and the amounts of prostaglandin-like material (PG-LM) extracted from 141 breast carcinomas. Univariate analysis indicates a direct correlation with patient age and menopausal status, with a greater yield from cancers of post- compared with

A Bennett; DA Berstock; F Dische; L Singh; RP A'Hern

1989-01-01

377

THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)  

EPA Science Inventory

The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

378

Discovery helps show how breast cancer spreads  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (home of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center) have discovered why breast cancer patients with dense breasts are more likely than others to develop aggressive tumors that spread. The finding opens the door to drug treatments that prevent metastasis.

379

Race, Ethnicity Affect Breast Cancer Survival  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Race, Ethnicity Affect Breast Cancer Survival, Study Shows New research finds biological differences ... 2015) Tuesday, January 13, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Health Disparities TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ...

380

Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort is an international resource of multi-generational families, data, and biospecimens established in 1995 for interdisciplinary collaborative research on the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer. Questionnaire data, clinical data and (when available) biospecimens have been collected for over 30,000 women and men from nearly 12,000 families.

381

Improving Breast Cancer Care for Older Women  

Cancer.gov

Earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and the overall increase in average lifespan continue to expand the number of breast cancer survivors who are aged 65 and older. This population is already estimated to be one million of the total 2.3 million breast cancer survivors.

382

Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... 7 ). This study found that the age of breast cancer diagnosis was significantly earlier in women who used these ... PubMed Abstract] McGrath KG. An earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis related to more frequent use of antiperspirants/deodorants ...

383

Editorial breast cancer treatment: Room for improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is an emotive disease as it is virtually confined to women, the incidence of cancer of the male breast being less than one percent. It is estimated that it will affect about one in twelve Irish women during the course of their lives. It is the commonest malignancy affecting women - and 4% of Irish women will die

Maurice A. Stokes; Thomas F. Gorey

1994-01-01

384

Risk factors for breast cancer among young women in southern Iran.  

PubMed

Age standardized incidence rates of breast cancer in developed countries is nearly threefold higher than in developing countries. Iran has had one of the lowest incidence rates for breast cancer in the world, but during the last four decades increasing incidence rates of breast cancer made it the most prevalent cancer in Iranian women. After adjustment for age, Iranian young women are at relatively higher risk of breast cancer than their counterparts in developed countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate some established risk factors of breast cancer in Iranian young women. A hospital-based case control study comprising 521 women with histologically confirmed, incident breast cancer and 521 controls frequency-matched by age and province of residence was conducted. Logistic regression performed to investigate associations of reproductive and anthropometric factors with breast cancer risk. In multivariate analysis, family history [odds ratio (OR): 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-2.42], oral contraceptives (OC) usage (OR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.11-2.08), low parity (OR parity ? 3 vs. 1-2: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.23-0.49), employment (OR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.05-3.23) and shorter period of breast feeding (OR ? 37 months vs. < 37: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.44-0.84) were related to a higher risk of breast cancer in young women. This was the first study focusing on risk factors of breast cancer in Iranian young women. The trend of decreasing parity and shortened duration of breast feeding along with OC usage might partly explain the rapid rising of breast cancer incidence in Iranian young women. PMID:21064105

Ghiasvand, Reza; Maram, Esfandiar Setoudeh; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Tabatabaee, Seyed Hamid Reza

2011-09-15

385

Breast Cancer Stem Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a One aspect of the analogy between embryogenesis and cancer is the emphasis on rapid cell division and self-renewal from a\\u000a small number of immortal cells. A key understanding in developmental biology is the concept of determination and its consequences,\\u000a in the form of lineage totipotency, pluripotency, multipotency, and unipotency. The normal cell fate decision point involves\\u000a epigenetic mechanisms that are

Bert Gold; Michael Dean

386

Molecular Diagnostics for Breast Cancer Precursors  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute, Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a method of profiling ductal carcinoma of the breast. The implementation of mammographic screening for breast cancer has led to the frequent identification of early tumors that are confined to the ductal system of the breast. These tumors are termed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

387

Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant  

PubMed Central

Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant. PMID:23198167

El-Charnoubi, Waseem Asim Ghulam; Foged Henriksen, Trine; Joergen Elberg, Jens

2011-01-01

388

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective association?  

E-print Network

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192­196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective to breast cancer risk. We have examined the association between mastalgia and breast cancer in the patient breast cancer risk factor information, 1532 (28%) reported breast pain as an incidental complaint

Apkarian, A. Vania

389

Histological subtypes of ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  It has become common to divide ductal carcinomain situ (DCIS) of the breast into two main groups, comedo or noncomedo by tumor morphology. But noncomedo DCIS can be further stratified\\u000a into several morphological patterns that exhibit several different growth patterns and most DCIS lesions have more than one\\u000a pattern. In this study, DCIS elements were classified by morphological pattern and

Hideyuki Ajisaka; Koichiro Tsugawa; Masakuni Noguchi; Koichi Miwa; Akitaka Nonomura

2002-01-01

390

Vanderbilt study finds more breast cancer patients opting for mastectomy  

Cancer.gov

Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows.

391

KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

2014-11-28

392

GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-12-15

393

Adenosquamous Variant of Metaplastic Carcinoma of Breast – An Unusual Histological Variant  

PubMed Central

Metaplastic carcinoma of breast refers to a heterogeneous group of neoplasms characterized by intimate admixture of adenocarcinoma with dominant areas of spindle cell, squamous cell and/ or mesenchymal differentiation. They constitute the rarest histological variant of invasive ductal carcinoma. These carcinomas have aggressive clinical behaviour and show suboptimal response to standard treatment. A 49-year-old female presented with lump in the left breast for one year. She was diagnosed as infiltrating ductal carcinoma breast with triple negative hormone status by trucut biopsy. She completed four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Postchemotherapy, axillary nodes decreased in size but the size of the primary tumour remained the same. Hence, she underwent modified radical mastectomy and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. Grossly, there was a solitary cyst measuring 4x3cm. Histologically, cyst enclosing malignant cells which resemble mature squamous epithelial cells. Also, seen are malignant cells in glandular pattern.

Arunalatha, P.; Chandramouleeswari, K.; Lily, S. Mary; Ramya, S.

2015-01-01

394

Preventive treatments for breast cancer: recent developments.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a burden for western societies, and an increasing one in emerging economies, because of its high incidence and enormous psychological, social, sanitary and economic costs. However, breast cancer is a preventable disease in a significant proportion. Recent developments in the armamentarium of effective drugs for breast cancer prevention (namely exemestane and anastrozole), the new recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to use preventative drugs in women at high risk as well as updated Guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Society of Clinical Oncology should give renewed momentum to the pharmacological prevention of breast cancer. In this article we review recent major developments in the field and examine their ongoing repercussion for breast cancer prevention. As a practical example, the potential impact of preventive measures in Spain is evaluated and a course of practical actions is delineated. PMID:25445174

Alés-Martínez, J E; Ruiz, A; Chacón, J I; Lluch Hernández, A; Ramos, M; Córdoba, O; Aguirre, E; Barnadas, A; Jara, C; González, S; Plazaola, A; Florián, J; Andrés, R; Sánchez Rovira, P; Frau, A

2015-04-01

395

Ospemifene, vulvovaginal atrophy, and breast cancer.  

PubMed

The incidence and severity of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients has a significant impact on quality of life. While the etiology of VVA is primarily related to low estrogen levels seen in menopause, women with breast cancer have an added risk of VVA induced by a combination of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and menopause. Ospemifene is a new, non-hormonal selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) triphenylethylene derivative that is effective in treating VVA in postmenopausal women. Although other SERMs have antagonistic effects on the vagina, ospemifene exerts an estrogen-like effect on the vaginal epithelium. This review will focus on data demonstrating the antiestrogenic activity of ospemifene in several unique breast cancer animal models, and the implications for utilizing ospemifene in patients with breast cancer suffering from VVA. Additional research addressing the expanded use of ospemifene in breast cancer patients is also warranted. PMID:23332519

Wurz, Gregory T; Soe, Lin H; DeGregorio, Michael W

2013-03-01

396

High frequency of lobular breast cancer in distant metastases to the orbit.  

PubMed

Metastasis to the periocular soft tissue of the orbit is a rare manifestation of metastatic cancer. Infiltrating lobular breast cancer (ILBC) is a special breast cancer subtype, which accounts for 10-15% of all mammary carcinomas and for ~1% of all malignancies. Here, we report on a high frequency of lobular breast cancer in patients with orbital metastases identified in an original series of metastatic tumor specimens and by a systematic literature review. A series of 14 orbital metastases was compiled from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues. All cases were subjected to histological re-review and detailed immunophenotypical characterization. In addition, we performed a meta-analysis of 68 previously published case reports describing orbital metastases, with special reference to breast cancer subtypes. Based on clinical history, histomorphology, immunophenotype, and/or comparison with matched primary tumors, orbital metastases were derived from breast cancer in 8/14 cases, seven of which were classified as metastatic lobular breast cancer. Other entities included non-small cell lung cancer (4/14), infiltrating ductal breast cancer (1/14), prostate cancer (1/14) and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (1/14). In line with this original series of orbital metastases, lobular breast cancer was the most common malignancy in 72 patients with orbital metastases described in 68 independent case reports. In conclusion, lobular breast cancer represents the cancer subtype with the highest prevalence among orbital metastases. The high frequency of ILBC in orbital metastases illustrates the special metastatic behavior of this tumor entity and may have implications for the understanding of the organotropism of metastatic lobular breast cancer. PMID:25355547

Raap, Mieke; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Dämmrich, Maximilian; Christgen, Henriette; Steinmann, Diana; Länger, Florian; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans; Christgen, Matthias

2015-01-01

397

High frequency of lobular breast cancer in distant metastases to the orbit  

PubMed Central

Metastasis to the periocular soft tissue of the orbit is a rare manifestation of metastatic cancer. Infiltrating lobular breast cancer (ILBC) is a special breast cancer subtype, which accounts for 10–15% of all mammary carcinomas and for ?1% of all malignancies. Here, we report on a high frequency of lobular breast cancer in patients with orbital metastases identified in an original series of metastatic tumor specimens and by a systematic literature review. A series of 14 orbital metastases was compiled from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues. All cases were subjected to histological re-review and detailed immunophenotypical characterization. In addition, we performed a meta-analysis of 68 previously published case reports describing orbital metastases, with special reference to breast cancer subtypes. Based on clinical history, histomorphology, immunophenotype, and/or comparison with matched primary tumors, orbital metastases were derived from breast cancer in 8/14 cases, seven of which were classified as metastatic lobular breast cancer. Other entities included non-small cell lung cancer (4/14), infiltrating ductal breast cancer (1/14), prostate cancer (1/14) and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (1/14). In line with this original series of orbital metastases, lobular breast cancer was the most common malignancy in 72 patients with orbital metastases described in 68 independent case reports. In conclusion, lobular breast cancer represents the cancer subtype with the highest prevalence among orbital metastases. The high frequency of ILBC in orbital metastases illustrates the special metastatic behavior of this tumor entity and may have implications for the understanding of the organotropism of metastatic lobular breast cancer. PMID:25355547

Raap, Mieke; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Dämmrich, Maximilian; Christgen, Henriette; Steinmann, Diana; Länger, Florian; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans; Christgen, Matthias

2015-01-01

398

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

399

Role of KCNMA1 in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

KCNMA1 encodes the ?-subunit of the large conductance, voltage and Ca2+-activated (BK) potassium channel and has been reported as a target gene of genomic amplification at 10q22 in prostate cancer. To investigate the prevalence of the amplification in other human cancers, the copy number of KCNMA1 was analyzed by fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) in 2,445 tumors across 118 different tumor types. Amplification of KCNMA1 was restricted to a small but distinct fraction of breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer with the highest prevalence in invasive ductal breast cancers and serous carcinoma of ovary and endometrium (3–7%). We performed an extensive analysis on breast cancer tissue microarrays (TMA) of 1,200 tumors linked to prognosis. KCNMA1 amplification was significantly associated with high tumor stage, high grade, high tumor cell proliferation, and poor prognosis. Immunofluorescence revealed moderate or strong KCNMA1 protein expression in 8 out of 9 human breast cancers and in the breast cancer cell line MFM223. KCNMA1-function in breast cancer cell lines was confirmed by whole-cell patch clamp recordings and proliferation assays, using siRNA-knockdown, BK channel activators such as 17ß-estradiol and the BK-channel blocker paxilline. Our findings revealed that enhanced expression of KCNMA1 correlates with and contributes to high proliferation rate and malignancy of breast cancer. PMID:22899999

Oeggerli, Martin; Tian, Yuemin; Ruiz, Christian; Wijker, Barbara; Sauter, Guido; Obermann, Ellen; Güth, Uwe; Zlobec, Inti; Sausbier, Matthias; Kunzelmann, Karl; Bubendorf, Lukas

2012-01-01

400

Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

2015-02-17

401

What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... doctor after treatment for breast cancer in men What happens after treatment for breast cancer in men? For many men with breast cancer, ... radiation. To learn more, see our document Lymphedema: What Every Woman With Breast Cancer Should Know (the information also applies to men). ...

402

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer Skye H. Cheng) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who Using gene expression profiles to develop prediction tree models effectively identifies breast cancer

West, Mike

403

By Jessica Kueck Breast Cancer and BRCA1  

E-print Network

on protein stability Proteomics Why BRCA1 mainly causes breast and ovarian cancer #12;By Jessica Kueck Breast Cancer and BRCA1 #12;Breast cancer facts breastcancer.org 1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer 20-30% of cases are hereditary 5-10% of cases are germline mutations Mutations

Skop, Ahna

404

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer Shannon T. Baileya,b,c,1) More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER- breast cancers, which frequently harbor

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

405

Breast Cancer Research and ISSN 0167-6806  

E-print Network

1 23 Breast Cancer Research and Treatment ISSN 0167-6806 Breast Cancer Res Treat DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2266-3 Cognitive function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia A. Reuter

406

Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative  

E-print Network

Legend Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative Brain Metastases / Leptomeningeal dz Non in HER2 Positive Breast Cancer 127511 - Neratinib for HER2 positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases 117526 - Immunotherapy with Globo H-KLH (OPT-822) for Metastatic Breast Cancer No Interventional Clinical

Walter, Peter

407

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast  

E-print Network

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast cancer by providing postFoundation.org We are the only non-profit breast cancer organization to hope Bras for Body & Soul® The program. The program provides a private, understanding environment for breast cancer survivors to be properly fitted

Bejerano, Gill

408

Breast magnetic resonance imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast MRI is becoming an important tool for the improved management of breast cancer. The technical attributes of high contrast, high-resolution breast MRI acquisitions are summarized. The fundamentals of image interpretation are outlined, including lesion enhancement, morphological features, and extent categories. The indications for breast MRI include compromised mammography, staging of disease within the breast and adjacent structures, difficult histology,

Steven E Harms

1998-01-01

409

Radial scars and subsequent breast cancer risk: Results from the Nurses’ Health Studies  

PubMed Central

Introduction Radial scars (RS) are benign proliferative lesions associated with an increased risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, it remains unclear whether RS are an independent risk factor for breast cancer or whether their association with breast cancer is due to their common occurrence with other proliferative lesions known to increase breast cancer risk. Methods We performed an updated analysis of the association between RS and subsequent breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study among 460 cases and 1792 controls with benign breast disease (BBD) in the Nurses’ Health Studies. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between RS in BBD biopsy specimens and breast cancer risk, adjusted for matching factors and breast cancer risk factors, including histologic category of concurrent BBD. Results In multivariable models prior to adjustment for histologic category of BBD, RS were associated with a two-fold increased risk of breast cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.4, 2.8). This association was attenuated but still significant after adjustment for BBD histologic category (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.3). In models adjusted for BBD histologic category and other covariates, risk appeared greater among women with multiple RS (1 RS, OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 0.9, 2.3; ?2 RS, OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.5, 5.0; p-heterogeneity = 0.12). There were also suggestions of a greater risk associated with RS among women age ?50 years at biopsy (p-heterogeneity = 0.07) and for estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative (ER?/PR?) tumors compared with other hormone receptor subtypes (p-heterogeneity = 0.19). Conclusions RS appear to be an independent histologic risk factor for breast cancer. Larger studies are needed to further evaluate whether risk is increased when multiple RS are present and whether associations vary by age at biopsy or by hormone receptor status of the breast tumor. PMID:23609472

Aroner, Sarah A.; Collins, Laura C.; Connolly, James L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tamimi, Rulla M.

2013-01-01

410

Disparities in breast cancer and african ancestry: a global perspective.  

PubMed

Recognition of breast cancer disparities between African-American and White American women has generated exciting research opportunities investigating the biologic and hereditary factors that contribute to the observed outcome differences, leading to international studies of breast cancer in Africa. The study of breast cancer in women with African ancestry has opened the door to unique investigations regarding breast cancer subtypes and the genetics of this disease. International research efforts can advance our understanding of race/ethnicity-associated breast cancer disparities within the USA; the pathogenesis of triple negative breast cancer; and hereditary susceptibility for breast cancer. PMID:25639288

Newman, Lisa A

2015-03-01

411

Characteristics of BRCA1/2 Mutation-Positive Breast Cancers in Korea: A Comparison Study Based on Multicenter Data and the Korean Breast Cancer Registry  

PubMed Central

Purpose Mutations in BRCA genes are the main cause of hereditary breast cancer in Korea. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of breast cancers involving BRCA1 (BRCA1 group) and BRCA2 (BRCA2 group) mutations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with BRCA1 (BRCA1 group) or BRCA2 (BRCA2 group) mutation positive breast cancer from multiple centers and compared the data to that of the Korean Breast Cancer Society registry (registry group). Results The patients of the BRCA1 group were diagnosed at a younger age (median age, 37 years) and had tumors of higher histological (61.3% with histological grade 3) and nuclear (37.5% with nuclear grade 3) grade than those of the registry group. In addition, the frequency of ductal carcinoma in situ in the BRCA1 group was lower (3.7%) than in the registry group, and the BRCA1 group were more likely to be triple-negative breast cancer (61.3%). Patients in the BRCA2 group were also younger at diagnosis (mean age, 41 years) and were more likely to have involvement of the axillary node than the registry group (45.5% vs. 33.5%, p=0.002). The BRCA1 and BRCA2 groups did not show a correlation between tumor size and axillary node involvement. Conclusion We report the characteristics of BRCA mutation positive breast cancer patients in the Korean population through multicenter data and nation-wide breast cancer registry study. However, BRCA-mutated breast cancers appear highly complex, and further research on their molecular basis is needed in Korea. PMID:25013433

Yu, Jong-Han; Son, Byung Ho; Kim, Sung-Won; Park, Sue K.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Kim, Lee Su; Noh, Woo-Chul; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Jeeyeon; Jung, Jin Hyang; Jung, Sang Seol; Gong, Gyungyup; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

2014-01-01

412

Do Women with Breast Cancer Overestimate Their Risk for Cancer in the Unaffected Breast?  

MedlinePLUS

... the Unaffected Breast? The full report is titled “Perceptions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction With Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among ... included questions related to decision making, knowledge, risk perception, and breast cancer worry. What did the researchers ...

413

Functional Viability Profiles of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

The design of targeted therapeutic strategies for cancer has been driven by the identification of tumor specific genetic changes. However, the large number of genetic alterations present in tumor cells means that it is difficult to discriminate between genes that are critical for maintenance of the disease state from those that are merely coincidental. Even when critical genes can be identified, directly targeting these is often challenging, meaning that alternative strategies such as exploiting synthetic lethality may be beneficial. To address these issues, we have carried out a functional genetic screen in over 30 commonly used models of breast cancer to identify genes that are critical for the growth of specific breast cancer subtypes. In particular, we describe potential new therapeutic targets for PTEN mutated cancers and for ER+ve breast cancers. We also show that large-scale functional profiling allows the classification of breast cancers into subgroups distinct from established subtypes. PMID:21984977

Brough, Rachel; Frankum, Jessica R.; Sims, David; Mackay, Alan; Mendes-Pereira, Ana M.; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Rafiq, Rumana; Ahmad, Amar S.; Cerone, Maria Antonietta; Natrajan, Rachael; Sharpe, Rachel; Shiu, Kai-Keen; Wetterskog, Daniel; Dedes, Konstantine J.; Lambros, Maryou B.; Rawjee, Teeara; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Turner, Nicholas C.; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

2011-01-01

414

Management options of breast cancer related osteoporosis.  

PubMed

Breast cancer therapy after surgery has been improved in recent years. Adjuvant therapies like aromatase inhibitors are being extensively used among breast cancer survivors. This leaded to cancer related and iatrogenic osteoporosis. Management of these patients needs to be focused and differentiated from the standard age related osteoporosis in women. All guidelines consider mandatory to assess fracture risk periodically in all breast cancer survivors. Risk assessment diagnostic FRAX tool is the most used but it's not born specifically for cancer related osteoporosis. The therapeutic management of this kind of osteoporosis has been studied by different societies. Since breast cancer survivors are at risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis, counseling regarding modifiable risk factors is mandatory and advocated. The beginning of the treatment should be tailored in each patient. PMID:25285137

Becorpi, Angelamaria; Sisti, Giovanni; Sorbi, Flavia; Malosso, Elena Rita Magro; Guaschino, Secondo

2014-05-01

415

Management options of breast cancer related osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Breast cancer therapy after surgery has been improved in recent years. Adjuvant therapies like aromatase inhibitors are being extensively used among breast cancer survivors. This leaded to cancer related and iatrogenic osteoporosis. Management of these patients needs to be focused and differentiated from the standard age related osteoporosis in women. All guidelines consider mandatory to assess fracture risk periodically in all breast cancer survivors. Risk assessment diagnostic FRAX tool is the most used but it’s not born specifically for cancer related osteoporosis. The therapeutic management of this kind of osteoporosis has been studied by different societies. Since breast cancer survivors are at risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis, counseling regarding modifiable risk factors is mandatory and advocated. The beginning of the treatment should be tailored in each patient. PMID:25285137

Becorpi, Angelamaria; Sisti, Giovanni; Sorbi, Flavia; Malosso, Elena Rita Magro; Guaschino, Secondo

2014-01-01

416

Using social marketing to increase breast cancer screening among African American women: perspectives from African American breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Despite progressive preventative techniques, intervention programs, and guidelines to help reduce breast cancer mortality, African American women (AAW) remain affected by breast cancer in greater numbers compared to Caucasians. As rates of breast cancer mortality continue to increase among AAW, a greater need for change emerges, which should include crafting culturally specific social marketing programs that promote breast cancer

Patricia Yvonne Talbert

2008-01-01

417

Par-4 prevents breast cancer recurrence  

PubMed Central

Therapy resistance and disease recurrence are two of the most challenging aspects in breast cancer treatment. A recent article in Cancer Cell makes a significant contribution toward a better understanding of this therapeutic problem by establishing downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the primary determinant of breast cancer recurrence. This viewpoint brings forth the importance of their findings and its implications on future research and therapy. PMID:24164776

2013-01-01

418

Melatonin, environmental light, and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although many factors have been suggested as causes for breast cancer, the increased incidence of the disease seen in women\\u000a working in night shifts led to the hypothesis that the suppression of melatonin by light or melatonin deficiency plays a major\\u000a role in cancer development. Studies on the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea experimental models of human breast cancer indicate that melatonin

V. Srinivasan; D. W. Spence; S. R. Pandi-Perumal; I. Trakht; A. I. Esquifino; D. P. Cardinali; G. J. Maestroni

2008-01-01

419

Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957337

McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

2007-12-01

420

Metachronous Double Primary Cancer after Treatment of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The pattern of double primary cancer after treatment for breast cancer is important for patient survival. Materials and Methods We analyzed 108 cases of metachronous double primary cancer in breast cancer patients treated from 1999 to 2012. Results Metachronous double primary cancers occurred in 108 of 2,657 patients (4.1%) with breast cancer. The median time to the occurrence of second cancer after diagnosis of the first was 58.4±41.2 months (range, 6.9 to 180.2 months). The most common cancer was thyroid cancer, which occurred in 45 patients (41.7%). This was followed by gastric cancer in 16 patients (14.8%), endometrial cancer in 10 patients (9.3%), and cervical cancer in seven patients (6.5%). The relative risk showed a significant increase in endometrial (4.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 13.79), gastric (2.61; 95% CI, 1.68 to 4.06), and thyroid cancer (1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.79). At 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer, secondary cancer occurred in 48 patients (44.4%), with 50.0% of the endometrial, 56.3% of the stomach, and 37.8% of the thyroid cancer cases being diagnosed after 5 years. Median survival after diagnosis of the second cancer was 123.9±11.2 months. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the anatomic site. Conclusion The incidence of endometrial, stomach, and thyroid cancer increased significantly after treatment with primary breast cancer, and survival was dependent on early detection and the type of second primary cancer. A prolonged follow-up examination for metachronous double primary cancer is needed to provide early detection and improve survival time in patients with breast cancer. PMID:25544582

Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hong Suk

2015-01-01

421

Main controversies in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

2014-01-01

422

Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer.  

PubMed

The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

2006-01-01

423

Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

2006-01-01

424

Image-Based Histologic Grade Estimation Using Stochastic Geometry Analysis  

E-print Network

Image-Based Histologic Grade Estimation Using Stochastic Geometry Analysis Sokol Petushia Jasper of histologic grading of breast carcinoma due to its subjectivity has tradi- tionally diminished the prognostic value of histologic breast cancer grading. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness

Breen, David E.

425

Declining Second Primary Ovarian Cancer After First Primary Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose Although ovarian cancer incidence rates have declined in the United States, less is known of ovarian cancer trends among survivors of breast cancer. Therefore, we examined second primary ovarian cancers after first primary breast cancer. Methods Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (1973 to 2008). Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the observed numbers of ovarian cancers among survivors of breast cancer compared with the expected numbers in the general population. Absolute rates were measured as the incidence rates for second primary ovarian cancer by year of diagnosis of the first primary breast cancer adjusted for age of breast cancer diagnosis and years since diagnosis. Results SIRs for second primary ovarian cancer were elevated over the entire study period (SIR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.3), whereas the absolute rates declined with an estimated annual percentage change near 1% (?1.34% to ?0.09% per year). Secular trends for second ovarian cancers were similar after estrogen receptor (ER) –positive and ER-negative breast cancers, whereas the age-specific patterns varied significantly by ER expression (P for interaction < .001). The largest SIR was among women age less than 50 years with ER-negative breast cancer (SIR, 4.35; 95% CI, 3.5 to 5.4). Conclusion Persistently elevated SIRs along with decreasing absolute rates over the entire study period suggest that ovarian cancers in both the general population and survivors of breast cancer are declining in parallel, possibly because of common risk factor exposures. Analytic studies are needed to further assess the parallel overall trends and the age-specific interaction by ER expression. PMID:23284037

Schonfeld, Sara J.; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Visvanathan, Kala; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Anderson, William F.

2013-01-01

426

Tissue factor over-expression by human pancreatic cancer cells BXPC3 is related to higher prothrombotic potential as compared to breast cancer cells MCF7  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer histology influences the risk of venous thromboembolism and tissue factor (TF) is the key molecule in cancer-induced hypercoagulability. We investigated the relation between TF expression by pancreatic and breast cancer cells (BXPC3 and MCF7 respectively) and their capacity to trigger in vitro thrombin generation in normal human plasma. Flow cytometry and Western blot analysis for TF expression were performed

Grigoris T. Gerotziafas; Vassiliki Galea; Elisabeth Mbemba; Amir Kartechi; Mouna Sassi; Hela Baccouche; Claudie Prengel; Patrick van Dreden; Mohamed Hatmi; Jean François Bernaudin; Ismail Elalamy

427

Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-03-31

428

Dietary Fat in Breast Cancer Survival  

PubMed Central

Laboratory evidence suggests a plausible role for dietary fat in breast cancer pathophysiology. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the epidemiological evidence on the impact of total dietary fat and fat subtypes, measured pre- and/or postcancer diagnosis, in relation to breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality among breast cancer survivors. Studies were included if they were in English, had a sample size ?200, and presented the hazard ratio/rate ratio for recurrence, diseasespecific mortality, or all-cause mortality (n = 18). Although the results are mixed, most studies suggested that higher saturated fat intake prediagnosis was associated with increased risk of breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality. Postdiagnostic trans fat intake was associated with a 45% and 78% increased risk of all-cause mortality. Higher monounsaturated fat intake before and after diagnosis was generally associated with increased risk of all-cause and breast cancer–specific mortality, albeit the majority of the studies were statistically nonsignificant. Two studies evaluating omega-3 fat intake suggested an inverse association with all-cause mortality. Although there were too few studies on fat subtypes to draw definitive conclusions, high consumption of saturated fatmay exert a detrimental effect on breast cancer–specific and all-cause mortality, whereas omega-3 fat may be beneficial. The inconsistent and limited evidence warrants research to assess the impact of consumption of fat subtypes on breast cancer recurrence and mortality. PMID:23701588

Makarem, Nour; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.; Parekh, Niyati

2013-01-01

429

Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors - Office of Cancer Survivorship  

Cancer.gov

Earlier studies have shown that women who are overweight at the time of breast cancer diagnosis are twice as likely to experience recurrence and death as lighter women. Additionally, women who gained weight (approximately 5 lbs.) after breast cancer diagnosis had a 60-percent increased risk of death compared to women who did not gain weight.

430

Patient pathway for breast cancer: turning points and future aspirations.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT? Improved survival from breast cancer can be attributed to a number of advances in the patient pathway from screening to advanced disease. The benefit of population screening has been established with national programs implemented. There has been improvement in the methodology of diagnostic assessment, relating to imaging techniques, methods of obtaining histological evidence and evaluation of lymph node status. Sentinel node biopsy is now routine, as is oncoplastic surgery. New forms and improved adjuvant systemic therapies are being explored. The prognosis of breast cancer can be more reliably evaluated to provide individualized information and to personalize treatments. Developments have also been seen in other areas improving the treatment and care of patients with advanced disease. PMID:25804121

Parks, Ruth Mary; Cheung, Kwok-Leung

2015-04-01

431

Axillary staging of breast cancer and the sentinel node  

PubMed Central

Pathological aspects of axillary nodal staging of breast cancer and in particular sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy are reviewed. SLN biopsy seems an almost ideal staging procedure because it has both high accuracy and a low false negative rate. It may also allow a cost effective use of more sensitive methods of metastasis detection. However, the biological relevance of metastases detected only by modern tools remains to be elucidated. This review focuses on standard axillary staging and the histopathological investigation of SLNs, with emphasis on the intraoperative setting. Future trends including ancillary studies, quality control issues, prediction of non-SLN involvement, and suggestions concerning the minimum requirements for the histology of axillary SLNs are also discussed. Key Words: axillary staging • breast cancer • sentinel lymph node PMID:11064665

Cserni, G

2000-01-01

432

Screening and self examination for breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the major form of cancer in women, with nearly 30,000 new cases and over 15,000 deaths in the United Kingdom each year. Breast screening by mammography has been shown in randomised trials to reduce mortality from breast cancer in women aged 50 and over. An NHS breast screening programme has been in operation in the United Kingdom since 1988. Its aim is to reduce mortality from breast cancer by 25% in the population of women invited to be screened. The uptake of mammography among the eligible population may be the single most important determinant if the programme is to be effective. Primary care teams have an important part to play in encouraging women to attend for screening and in providing information, advice, and reassurance at all stages of the screening process. To date, routine breast self examination has not been shown to be an effective method of screening for breast cancer and should not therefore be promoted as a primary screening procedure. There is, however, a case to be made for women to become more "breast aware." PMID:8044097

Austoker, J.

1994-01-01

433

Older women, breast cancer, and social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  One in ten women over the age of 65 will develop breast cancer. Despite this high incidence of breast cancer among older women,\\u000a social support for them is often inadequate. This paper describes a qualitative study of the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis\\u000a on older women from racially\\/ethnically diverse populations and their subsequent need for social support.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Forty-seven older

Grace J. Yoo; Ellen G. Levine; Caryn Aviv; Cheryl Ewing; Alfred Au

2010-01-01

434

Coping and adjustment to breast cancer.  

PubMed

This study examined possible predictors of adjustment to breast cancer. Sixty-one women participated soon after they were diagnosed with Stage I or Stage II breast cancer. Measures were gathered at diagnosis and again 4 months later. Predictor variables included aspects of the disease and treatment process and reported coping behavior. The most consistent predictor of distress and, to a lesser extent, quality of life, was avoidant coping: women who reported more avoidant coping were more distressed. These data fit well with most previous research and suggest one way of identifying women who may be more at risk for special difficulties coping with the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:10390735

McCaul, K D; Sandgren, A K; King, B; O'Donnell, S; Branstetter, A; Foreman, G

1999-01-01

435

Pertuzumab for the treatment of breast cancer.  

PubMed

HER2-targeted therapies have revolutionized the outcome of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. Pertuzumab is the first in a new class of monoclonal antibodies that target the extracellular dimerization domain of HER2 receptors, also known as HER dimerization inhibitors. The development of pertuzumab and preclinical and clinical data in breast cancer are reviewed. Regulatory affairs related to pertuzumab and the recent accelerated approval granted by the FDA for the treatment of breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting are also covered. This process opens doors for further approvals which could considerably shorten the time between initial drug development and availability. PMID:24921704

Lynce, Filipa; Swain, Sandra M

2014-10-01

436

Anticancer activity of bisphosphonates in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Despite progress in surgical and adjuvant therapy, a subset of patients with early stage breast cancer experience disease recurrence and/or distant metastases. Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow are believed to be the source of late relapses in bone and other tissues. Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis, and agents that modify the bone microenvironment could therefore affect the disease course. Bisphosphonates are an effective bone-targeted therapeutic option for preventing cancer treatment- induced bone loss (CTIBL) in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Bisphosphonates inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, thereby inhibiting the release of growth factors necessary to promote cancer cell growth, differentiation, and tumor formation in bone. Preclinical and clinical data also suggest anticancer synergy between cytotoxic chemotherapy agents and bisphosphonates. Recent trials of zoledronic acid in the adjuvant setting in breast cancer have demonstrated reduced disease recurrence in bone and other sites. Currently, several ongoing clinical trials are evaluating whether antiresorptives can inhibit disease recurrence and the development of bone metastases from breast cancer. Based on recent data, the role of bisphosphonates in the breast cancer setting is expected to expand in the future. With recent changes to treatment guidelines, routine use of bisphosphonates to prevent bone loss during adjuvant therapy is likely to become standard practice, especially for patients receiving endocrine therapy. Furthermore, the use of zoledronic acid to reduce the risk of recurrence is emerging based on ongoing clinical research. PMID:21864231

Gnant, Michael

2012-02-01

437

Clinicopathological Characteristics of Triple-negative Breast Cancers in the Northeast Region of Turkey  

PubMed Central

Background: Triple-negative (TN) breast cancer is a subtype of breast cancer characterised by a loss of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) expression, and the absence of human epidermal growth factor (HER2) overexpression. Aims: To identify the relationships between clinicopathological characteristics of TN breast cancers in the northeast region of Turkey and disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Study Design: Retrospective clinical study. Methods: Seven hundred and eighty non-metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled in this study. The relationships between TN breast cancer and other breast cancers with respect to clinicopathological characteristics, as well as DFS and OS, were studied. Results: The triple-negative phenotype was detected in 204 patients (27.1%). Patients with triple-negative breast cancer had more grade 2–3 tumours compared to those with other types of breast cancer (92.5% versus 84.3%, p=0.004). Invasive ductal carcinoma histology, on the other hand, was less prevalent in patients with TN breast cancer (77% versus 84.5%, p=0.016). No significant differences were identified between the groups in other clinicopathological variables. Relapse and mortality rates were higher in the TN group during the follow-up of both groups [57 (27.9%) versus 89 (16.2%), p<0.001 for relapse; 27 (13.2%) versus 37 (6.8%), p=0.005 for mortality]. The univariate analysis demonstrated shorter DFS and OS for patients with TN breast cancer compared to those with other types of breast cancer. In the multivariate analysis, patients with TN breast cancer were 2.21 times more likely to develop relapse, while the likelihood of death increased 3.21-fold (p<0.001 and p<0.001). Conclusion: Triple-negative breast cancers demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course compared to other breast cancers. More effective strategies should be developed for the treatment of this subgroup of breast cancer. PMID:25207183

Y?ld?z, Bülent; Fidan, Evren; Özdemir, Feyyaz; Sezen, Orhan; Kavgac?, Halil; Ayd?n, Faz?l

2014-01-01

438

mTOR inhibition in management of advanced breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The mTOR pathway is becoming increasingly important in several cancers including breast cancer. This review will focus on the role of its inhibition in the management of advanced breast cancer. PMID:22988350

Nag, Shona

2012-01-01

439

Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories This chart provides information about average, moderate ... for cancer risk. Keep reading to understand your risks for breast and ovarian cancer and whether genetic ...

440

75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the chances of developing breast cancer. I encourage all women and...mitigate them, and to visit Cancer.gov to learn about the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of breast and other cancers. Screenings and early...

2010-10-08

441

76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...lower the chances of developing breast cancer. I encourage all Americans to talk to their doctors about breast cancer, and to visit www.Cancer.gov to learn more about symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening...

2011-10-07

442

77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...mammograms can help to detect breast cancer early. I encourage women and...their health care provider about breast cancer, and to visit www.Cancer.gov to learn more about symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. My...

2012-10-04

443

Monitoring care of female breast cancer patients in  

E-print Network

Monitoring care of female breast cancer patients in Northern Ireland diagnosed 2006 (with in Northern Ireland diagnosed 2006 (with comparisons to 1996 & 2001). N. Ireland Cancer Registry 2010 .............................................................................................................. 9 OVERVIEW OF BREAST CANCER IN NORTHERN IRELAND ............................................. 12

Müller, Jens-Dominik

444

Gamma-secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, or Recurrent Triple Negative Invasive Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-09

445

GPER Function in Breast Cancer: An Overview  

PubMed Central

The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER, formerly known as GPR30) has attracted increasing interest, considering its ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in different cell types, including the hormone-sensitive tumors like breast cancer. As observed for other GPCR-mediated responses, the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor is a fundamental integration point in the biological action triggered by GPER. A wide number of natural and synthetic compounds, including estrogens and anti-estrogens, elicit stimulatory effects in breast cancer through GPER up-regulation and activation, suggesting that GPER function is associated with breast tumor progression and tamoxifen resistance. GPER has also been proposed as a candidate biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer, opening a novel scenario for a more comprehensive assessment of breast tumor patients. PMID:24834064

Lappano, Rosamaria; Pisano, Assunta; Maggiolini, Marcello

2014-01-01

446

Mammographic features of early breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mammographic detection of breast cancer at the earliest possible stage requires optimal radiographic technique and a full knowledge of the subtle features with which very small cancers can present. Although some early cancers are identified as characteristic clusters of calcifications or as spiculated or multinodular (knobby) masses, others demonstrate less typical and sometimes much less obvious mammographic signs: the single

Edward A. Sickles

1984-01-01

447

Histological Analysis of ?? T Lymphocytes Infiltrating Human Triple-Negative Breast Carcinomas  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women and the second most common cancer worldwide after lung cancer. The remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancers influences numerous diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic factors. Triple-negative breast carcinomas (TNBCs) lack expression of HER2 and the estrogen and progesterone receptors and often contain lymphocytic infiltrates. Most of TNBCs are invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) with poor prognosis, whereas prognostically more favorable subtypes such as medullary breast carcinomas (MBCs) are somewhat less frequent. Infiltrating T-cells have been associated with an improved clinical outcome in TNBCs. The prognostic role of ?? T-cells within CD3+ tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes remains unclear. We analyzed 26 TNBCs, 14 IDCs, and 12 MBCs, using immunohistochemistry for the quantity and patterns of ?? T-cell infiltrates within the tumor microenvironment. In both types of TNBCs, we found higher numbers of ?? T-cells in comparison with normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. The numbers of infiltrating ?? T-cells were higher in MBCs than in IDCs. ?? T-cells in MBCs were frequently located in direct contact with tumor cells, within the tumor and at its invasive border. In contrast, most ?? T-cells in IDCs were found in clusters within the tumor stroma. These findings could be associated with the fact that the patient’s prognosis in MBCs is better than that in IDCs. Further studies to characterize these ?? T-cells at the molecular and functional level are in progress. PMID:25540645

Hidalgo, Jose Villacorta; Bronsert, Peter; Orlowska-Volk, Marzenna; Díaz, Liliana B.; Stickeler, Elmar; Werner, Martin; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Kayser, Gian; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Fisch, Paul

2014-01-01

448

Computer-Aided Assessment of Tumor Grade for Breast Cancer in Ultrasound Images  

PubMed Central

This study involved developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for discriminating the grades of breast cancer tumors in ultrasound (US) images. Histological tumor grades of breast cancer lesions are standard prognostic indicators. Tumor grade information enables physicians to determine appropriate treatments for their patients. US imaging is a noninvasive approach to breast cancer examination. In this study, 148 3-dimensional US images of malignant breast tumors were obtained. Textural, morphological, ellipsoid fitting, and posterior acoustic features were quantified to characterize the tumor masses. A support vector machine was developed to classify breast tumor grades as either low or high. The proposed CAD system achieved an accuracy of 85.14% (126/148), a sensitivity of 79.31% (23/29), a specificity of 86.55% (103/119), and an AZ of 0.7940.

2015-01-01

449

Local linear wavelet neural network for breast cancer recognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer deaths in women today and it is the most common type of cancer in women. Many sophisticated\\u000a algorithm have been proposed for classifying breast cancer data. This paper presents some experiments for classifying breast\\u000a cancer tumor and proposes the use local linear wavelet neural network for breast cancer recognition by training its

M. R. Senapati; A. K. Mohanty; S. Dash; P. K. Dash

450

German family study on hereditary breast-ovarian cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated 5% to 10% of all breast and ovarian cancers are attributed to dominant susceptibility genes. Two such genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, were recently identified. The involvement of these genes was studied in 43 German breast only and breast-ovarian cancer families. All families contained three or more cases of breast or ovarian cancer, with at least two diagnosed under

U Hamann; H Becher; T Zimmermann; K Pella; G Bastert; J Chang-Claude

1996-01-01

451

Ultra-Wideband Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection  

E-print Network

Ultra-Wideband Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection Hossein Kassiri Bidhendi, Hamed Mazhab system design and its advantages for breast cancer detection after reading this chapter. Keywords Breast cancer detection · Breast imaging · Ultra-wideband imaging · UWB transceiver · UWB pulses · UWB

Genov, Roman

452

Cryotherapy in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy and Nail Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Who Are Receiving Paclitaxel  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Pain; Peripheral Neuropathy; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

2015-02-06

453

Effects of childhood body size on breast cancer tumour characteristics  

PubMed Central

Introduction Although a role of childhood body size in postmenopausal breast cancer risk has been established, less is known about its influence on tumour characteristics. Methods We studied the relationships between childhood body size and tumour characteristics in a Swedish population-based case-control study consisting of 2,818 breast cancer cases and 3,111 controls. Our classification of childhood body size was derived from a nine-level somatotype. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, derived from fitting unconditional logistic regression models. Association between somatotype at age 7 and tumour characteristics were evaluated in a case-only analysis where P values for heterogeneity were obtained by performing one degree of freedom trend tests. Results A large somatotype at age 7 was found to be associated with decreased postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Although strongly associated with other risk factors such as age of menarche, adult body mass index and mammographic density, somatotype at age 7 remained a significant protective factor (odds ratio (OR) comparing large to lean somatotype at age 7 = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.91, P trend = 0.004) after adjustment. The significant protective effect was observed within all subgroups defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, with a stronger effect for ER-negative (0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.75, P trend = 0.002), than for ER-positive (0.80, 95% CI = 0.62-1.05, P trend = 0.062), tumours (P heterogeneity = 0.046). Somatotype at age 7 was not associated with tumour size, histology, grade or the presence or absence of metastatic nodes. Conclusions Greater body size at age 7 is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, and the associated protective effect is stronger for the ER-negative breast cancer subtype than for the ER-positive subtype. PMID:20398298

2010-01-01

454

New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed. PMID:25516852

Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Etet, Paul Faustin Seke; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

2014-01-01

455

Bone scan in the breast cancer patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

The demonstration of pathology in the breast with technetium 99m diphosphonate scans together with the well established value of demonstrating bony lesions that may not be apparent by x-ray constitutes reason for obtaining 99m technetium phosphonate bone scans pre-operatively on patients in whom breast cancer surgery is being considered.

Bell

1975-01-01

456

Systems Biology and Genomics of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

It is now accepted that breast cancer is not a single disease, but instead it is composed of a spectrum of tumor subtypes with distinct cellular origins, somatic changes, and etiologies. Gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays has contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular heterogeneity of breast tumor formation, progression, and recurrence. For example, at least two clinical diagnostic assays exist (i.e., OncotypeDX RS and Mammaprint®) that are able to predict outcome in patients using patterns of gene expression and predetermined mathematical algorithms. In addition, a new molecular taxonomy based upon the inherent, or “intrinsic,” biology of breast tumors has been developed; this taxonomy is called the “intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer,” which now identifies five distinct tumor types and a normal breast-like group. Importantly, the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer predict patient relapse, overall survival, and response to endocrine and chemotherapy regimens. Thus, most of the clinical behavior of a breast tumor is already written in its subtype profile. Here, we describe the discovery and basic biology of the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer, and detail how this interacts with underlying genetic alternations, response to therapy, and the metastatic process. PMID:21047916

Perou, Charles M.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

2011-01-01

457

Knowledge of Breast Cancer and Screening Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To assess young women's breast health knowledge and explore its relation to the use of screening mammography. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women aged 25-45 residing in Toronto, Canada, with no history of breast cancer and mammography received an information brochure and four questionnaires which assessed their knowledge of…

Vahabi, Mandana

2005-01-01

458

CARM1 is an important determinant of ER?-dependent breast cancer cell differentiation and proliferation in breast cancer cells.  

PubMed

Breast cancers with estrogen receptor ? (ER?) expression are often more differentiated histologically than ER?-negative tumors, but the reasons for this difference are poorly understood. One possible explanation is that transcriptional cofactors associated with ER? determine the expression of genes which promote a more differentiated phenotype. In this study, we identify one such cofactor as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), a unique coactivator of ER? that can simultaneously block cell proliferation and induce differentiation through global regulation of ER?-regulated genes. CARM1 was evidenced as an ER? coactivator in cell-based assays, gene expression microarrays, and mouse xenograft models. In human breast tumors, CARM1 expression positively correlated with ER? levels in ER-positive tumors but was inversely correlated with tumor grade. Our findings suggest that coexpression of CARM1 and ER? may provide a better biomarker of well-differentiated breast cancer. Furthermore, our findings define an important functional role of this histone arginine methyltransferase in reprogramming ER?-regulated cellular processes, implicating CARM1 as a putative epigenetic target in ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:21282336

Al-Dhaheri, Mariam; Wu, Jiacai; Skliris, Georgios P; Li, Jun; Higashimato, Ken; Wang, Yidan; White, Kevin P; Lambert, Paul; Zhu, Yuerong; Murphy, Leigh; Xu, Wei

2011-03-15

459

[Special considerations in breast cancer treatment of an augmented breast].  

PubMed

Breast augmentation surgery involving the use of implants has been one of the most popular plastic surgical procedures for decades. As the multi-million female population who received breast implants ages, the risk of cancer is increasing rapidly, therefore the incidence of malignant disease in association with breast implants will increase as well. Although there is no relationship between tumor development and implants, these cases require special considerations in diagnostics, therapy and follow-up methods. Appropriate multidisciplinary treatment of tumors in augmented breasts corresponding with modern oncoplastic principles can only be accomplished based on adequate oncological, breast and plastic surgical knowledge. Supposing a possible increase of this condition in Hungary, too, authors provide a wide review of the literature on the special oncological and esthetic considerations, for the first time in Hungarian language. PMID:21979221

Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Kunos, Csaba; Pesthy, Pál; Bartal, Alexandra; Szabó, Eva; Kásler, Miklós

2011-10-16

460

Targeting SH2 domains in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed cancer types in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer-related disease in the USA. SH2 domains recruit signaling proteins to phosphotyrosine residues on aberrantly activated growth factor and cytokine receptors and contribute to cancer cell cycling, metastasis, angiogenesis and so on. Herein we review phosphopeptide mimetic and small-molecule approaches targeting the SH2 domains of Grb2, Grb7 and STAT3 that inhibit their targets and reduce proliferation in in vitro breast cancer models. Only STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated in in vivo models and have led to tumor reduction. Taken together, these studies suggest that targeting SH2 domains is an important approach to the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25495984

Morlacchi, Pietro; Robertson, Fredika M; Klostergaard, Jim; McMurray, John S

2014-01-01

461

Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Khmer (Khmer) ... Traditional) PDF American Cancer Society Return to top French (français) Breast Biopsy Biopsie mammaire - français (French) Bilingual ...

462

Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... seroma (buildup of clear fluid in the wound). Lymph node surgery To determine if the breast cancer has ... bloodstream to other parts of the body. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) In this procedure, anywhere from about ...

463

Zoledronic Acid Improves Early Breast Cancer Treatment  

Cancer.gov

The addition of zoledronic acid (Zometa®) to adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer significantly improves clinical outcomes beyond those achieved with endocrine therapy alone, according to findings presented at the 2008 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

464

Dyadic Coping in Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Couples facing metastatic breast cancer (MBC) must learn to cope with stressors that can affect both partners’ quality of life as well as the quality of their relationship. Common dyadic coping involves taking a \\

Hoda Badr; Cindy L. Carmack; Deborah A. Kashy; Massimo Cristofanilli; Tracey A. Revenson

2010-01-01

465

Investigation into taxane resistant breast cancer   

E-print Network

One group of chemotherapeutics that are used successfully to treat breast cancer, alone or in co