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1

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer Skye H. Cheng) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who Using gene expression profiles to develop prediction tree models effectively identifies breast cancer

West, Mike

2

[Psychosocial aspects of bilateral subcutaneous reduction mastectomy in breast cancer].  

PubMed

The authors administered a questionnaire to 56 women with breast cancer who had bilateral subcutaneous mastectomies after Stroembeck/Beller since 1985. In this study, psychological aspects were investigated. There was no change in social behavior; isolation was not noticed. The negative effects on the body image were well accepted and discussed with relatives and friends. Psychological or emotional suffering was rare compared to patients with simple mastectomy. No change in sexual behavior was reported. The sexual function of the mamillae was significantly reduced. Although some cosmetic deformities were obvious, most patients would again choose the subcutaneous reduction mastectomy as operation of choice. PMID:2741597

De Wilde, R; Hesseling, M; Hirschberg, M; Mohr, B; Strunk, C

1989-01-01

3

[Nursing experience with a schizophrenic breast cancer patient after mastectomy].  

PubMed

This case study used cognitive therapy to improve the life quality of a 46-year-old woman with chronic schizophrenia who had undergone a mastectomy for breast cancer. This case had suffered from schizophrenia for over 24 years and was hospitalized in the chronic ward of our hospital. Breast cancer was revealed during an annual comprehensive physical checkup. In May 2012, this case received a right mastectomy at a local hospital. After the surgery, she was readmitted to the psychiatric acute ward for further care from May 30th to August 28th, 2012. A holistic nursing assessment was conducted that addressed five major aspects. The major nursing problems found during hospitalization were: acute pain, body image disturbance, and low self-esteem. A decline in pain score from 10 to 4 was achieved by developing rapport with the patient, empathizing with her distress, and providing active care to the wound. Her body image changed because of loosing her breast. Her acceptance of the loss improved through helping her to explore her feelings of change. To improve her self-esteem, we offered cognitive therapy to change her negative thinking process. She became more sanguine and cheerful. Moreover, her dependence in terms of activities of daily living decreased. This individualized intervention contributed to the recovery of a post-mastectomy, schizophrenic patient from low self-esteem. PMID:25271038

Lin, Jia-Rong; Lin, Mei-Ling

2014-10-01

4

[Primary breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer].  

PubMed

Primary breast reconstruction in connection with mastectomy is a well-established procedure. The reconstruction may be carried out by the submuscular implantation of a prosthesis, in some cases preceded by tissue expansion. In situations where there is insufficient skin--or muscle-coverage, a musculocutaneous transposition flap may be used. The aim of breast reconstruction is to prevent the psychosocial sequelae of mastectomy. From experiences with secondary reconstruction, it seems that the reconstruction especially helps correct loss of feminine identity and negative body-image. Certain investigations indicate that primary reconstruction results in a clearly reduced postoperative psychological stress, whereas the extent of social and sexual sequelae seems not to vary when compared to results of secondary reconstruction. Conditions for adjuvant treatment as well as for follow-up concerning loco-regional tumour reappearance do not seem to be affected by the reconstruction. In studies published to date, consisting of relatively small patient groups and short observation periods, numbers without relapse and overall survival are found to be equivalent to that following mastectomy without reconstruction. PMID:7879297

Elberg, J J; Blichert-Toft, M; Drzewiecki, K T

1995-02-20

5

Body Image of Greek Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Mastectomy or Breast Conserving Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to assess and compare the body image of breast cancer patients (n = 70) whom underwent breast conserving surgery or mastectomy, as well as to compare patients’ scores with that of a sample of healthy control women (n = 70). A secondary objective of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the 10-item Greek version

Fotios Anagnostopoulos; Spyridoula Myrgianni

2009-01-01

6

Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... women have breast reconstruction to rebuild the breast after a mastectomy. Sometimes mastectomy is done to prevent breast cancer. Only high-risk patients have this type of surgery. NIH: National Cancer Institute

7

Breast reconstruction after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women at high risk for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Several studies have shown the effectiveness of bilateral prophylactic mastectomies (BPM) at reducing the risk of developing breast cancer in women by more than 90%. A growing number of women at high risk for breast cancer are electing to undergo prophylactic mastectomy as part of a risk reduction strategy. This unique group of women frequently chooses to undergo reconstructive surgery as a part of their immediate treatment plan. Breast reconstruction after BPM has profound physiological and emotional impact on body image, sexuality, and quality of life. These factors should be taken into consideration and addressed when consulting the patient prior to BPM and reconstructive surgery. The timing of reconstructive surgery, the type of mastectomy performed, the reconstructive modalities available, and the possibility to preserve the nipple-areola complex, should all be discussed with the patient prior to surgery. In this article, we review our experience and the current existing literature on breast reconstruction for high-risk women after BPM. PMID:19775335

Eldor, Liron; Spiegel, Aldona

2009-01-01

8

Researchers find that Angelina Jolie's preventive mastectomy raised awareness, but not knowledge of breast cancer risk  

Cancer.gov

Angelina Jolie heightened awareness about breast cancer when she announced in May 2013 that she had undergone a preventive double mastectomy, but a new study by the University of Maryland School of Public Health reveals that despite widespread awareness of Jolie's story, most Americans could not correctly answer questions about breast cancer risk.

9

"Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

2011-01-01

10

Mastectomy - discharge  

MedlinePLUS

... discharge; Total mastectomy - discharge; Simple mastectomy - discharge; Modified radical mastectomy - discharge ... see if the cancer spread. For a modified radical mastectomy, the surgeon removed the entire breast along ...

11

Sexual Desire and Satisfaction in Sexual Life Affecting Factors in Breast Cancer Survivors After Mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine impact of treatment and personality characteristics, and support need for femininity and body image on sexual desire and sexual satisfaction of women with breast cancer. The sample consisted of 123 married women who previously underwent mastectomy and applied to medical oncology clinics of a university hospital. Sexual desire of the women in

Neziha Karabulut; Behice Erci

2009-01-01

12

Univ. of Md. study reports young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival with breast-conservation therapy as mastectomy:  

Cancer.gov

Young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates with a lumpectomy and radiation treatment, known as breast-conservation therapy, as with mastectomy, a new study conducted at the University of Maryland has found.

13

Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available\\u000a studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study\\u000a was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This\\u000a randomized

Xiao-Mei Li; Hong Yan; Kai-Na Zhou; Shao-Nong Dang; Duo-Lao Wang; Yin-Ping Zhang

2011-01-01

14

Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: usama.mahmood@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-08-01

15

Incidence of breast cancer in Italy: mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed between 2000 and 2005  

PubMed Central

Objectives We aimed to determine the incidence of women's breast cancer in Italy without using statistical approximations. Methods We analyzed the national hospitalizations database at the Ministry of Health to calculate the number of major surgeries in Italian women (mastectomies and quadrantectomies) due to breast cancer between 2000 and 2005, overall and by age groups (<44, 45–64, 65–74 and ? 75 years old). Results Over the six years examined, an overall number of 100,745 mastectomies and 168,147 quadrantectomies were performed. A total of 41,608 major surgeries due to breast cancer were performed in the year 2000 and this number rose to 47,200 in 2005, with a 13.4% increase over six years. Conclusion by analyzing the hospitalizations database concerning major breast surgery, incidence of breast cancer in Italy was found to be 26.5% higher than the official estimations which have been computed using statistical models (namely 47,200 vs. 37,300 cases in year 2005). PMID:19545369

Piscitelli, Prisco; Santoriello, Antonio; Buonaguro, Franco M; Di Maio, Massimo; Iolascon, Giovanni; Gimigliano, Francesca; Marinelli, Alessandra; Distante, Alessandro; Serravezza, Giuseppe; Sordi, Emiliano; Cagossi, Katia; Artioli, Fabrizio; Santangelo, Michele; Fucito, Alfredo; Gimigliano, Raffaele; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Crespi, Massimo; Giordano, Antonio

2009-01-01

16

Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: 15-year experience.  

PubMed

Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy (SNSM) and primary reconstruction have been popular for breast cancer treatment in the last decade. An advantage of the SNSM technique is the removal of all breast tissue as a radical surgical procedure while preserving native breast integrity, nipple-areola complex (NAC), and submammary fold. This retrospective 15-year clinical study analyzes medical records from our breast surgery database collected at our department between 1997 and 2012. A total number of 3757 patients were treated for breast cancer; 411 (10.9%) patients had a skin-sparing mastectomy with the median (range) length follow-up of 63 months. This is the longest follow-up for SNSM in breast cancer patients; 3.7% of patients who underwent SNSM developed disease local recurrence, whereas occult NAC involvement with cancer occurred in 7.7% and local recurrence in the NAC in 1.2%. Partial necrosis of the NAC developed in 9.4% and total necrosis in 0.7% of operated breasts. All disease recurrences occurred in the first 10 years of the follow-up period. Local recurrence developed as first recurrence event has longer median cancer-specific survival time of 70 months than those with only distant metastases with 50 months and locoregional plus distant metastases with 35.5 months. The "Omega" pattern incision combines an oncological radical procedure with a lower incidence of skin flap necrosis. Patients reconstructed with autologous tissue were the group most satisfied. SNSM is an oncological safe procedure for breast cancer treatment with low recurrence in properly selected patients. PMID:24378808

Stanec, Zdenko; Zic, Rado; Budi, Sre?ko; Stanec, Sanda; Milanovi?, Rudolf; Vlaj?i?, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Rudman, Franjo; Marti?, Krešimir; Held, Rebeka; Božo, Gorjanc

2014-11-01

17

[A case of local recurrence developing thirty-nine years after mastectomy for breast cancer].  

PubMed

Here we report a case of breast cancer that recurred after a 39-year latency period. A 73-year-old woman,who had undergone radical mastectomy for left breast cancer 39 years previously,consulted our hospital complaining of lymphedema in the left arm. A computed tomography(CT)scan showed a growth of soft tissue in the left chest wall. A core needle biopsy resulted in the pathological diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinoma,which stained positively for estrogen and progesterone receptors,but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2). Diagnosed with local recurrence of breast cancer, the patient was consequently treated with hormone therapy using anastrozole and achieved a partial response. The patient is currently free from further recurrent disease at 7 months. We report this late recurrence of breast cancer 39 years following mastectomy,suggesting that possible recurrence of this disease with more than a 30-year latency period should be taken into consideration. PMID:24743283

Tashima, Yuko; Kawano, Katsunori

2014-03-01

18

Eicosanoids in breast cancer patients before and after mastectomy.  

PubMed

In 19 patients with a malignant breast tumor, tumor tissue and blood were taken to determine the eicosanoid profile and platelet aggregation. Values were compared with those of patients with benign tumors (n = 4), or undergoing a mammary reduction (n = 7). Postoperatively, blood was taken as well in order to compare pre- and postoperative values. Eicosanoids were measured in peripheral blood monocytes and mammary tissue by means of HPLC; furthermore, TXA2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and PGE2 were determined by RIA. Differences in pre- and postoperative values of cancer patients were seen in plasma RIA values: PGE2 and 6-k-PGF1 alpha were significantly higher preoperatively when compared with postoperatively, however, such differences were seen in the control groups as well. Compared to benign tumor or mammary reduction test material the eicosanoid profile of tissue obtained from malignant mammary tumors showed important differences. Except for PGF2 alpha, HHT and 15-HETE no detectable quantities of eicosanoids were found in the non-tumor material, whereas in the malignant tumor material substantial quantities of a number of eicosanoid metabolites were present. Statistically significant correlations could be established between patient/histopathology data and the results of the platelet aggregation assays, e.g. between menopausal status and ADP aggregation; oestrogen receptor (+/-) and collagen and arachidonic acid aggregation, inflammatory cell infiltration score and arachidonic acid aggregation and fibrosis score and ADP aggregation. The results show that eicosanoid synthesis in material from mammary cancer patients is different from that in benign mammary tissue. The implications, in particular, in relation to future prognosis of the patient, remain obscure. PMID:1603822

Kort, W J; Bijma, A M; van Dam, J J; van der Ham, A C; Hekking, J M; van der Ingh, H F; Meijer, W S; van Wilgenburg, M G; Zijlstra, F J

1992-04-01

19

[The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].  

PubMed

In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain. PMID:25275850

López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

2014-01-01

20

Can Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Make an Informed Decision for Mastectomy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the degree to which informed women chose mastectomy, and to reveal their reasons for this choice. Patients and Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients radiographically and pathologically eligible for either mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS; n 125). Participants completed questionnaires at three time points: baseline, after viewing a

E. Dale Collins; Caroline P. Moore; Kate F. Clay; Stephen A. Kearing; Annette M. O'Connor; Hilary A. Llewellyn-Thomas; Richard J. Barth Jr; Karen R. Sepucha

2010-01-01

21

Two Cases of Mastectomy after Paclitaxel + Bevacizumab Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) deteriorates the quality of life (QOL) of the affected patients. Combination chemotherapy or extended chemotherapy is considered to help to shrink local lesions. Case 1 A 71-year-old female with a history of tympanitis and cystitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) visited our hospital. There was a tumor of 7 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy was started, and after five cycles of therapy, a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Chemotherapy with anthracycline was avoided for fear of activating the MRSA. After the operation, the patient's wound opened. However, it naturally epithelialized. Case 2 A 41-year-old female visited our hospital due to a tumor of 8 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Four cycles of paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy were started, and her tumor almost disappeared during the first cycle. Then, doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide therapy was performed for four cycles, and a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Her postoperative course was good. Discussion Chemotherapy with bevacizumab or extended chemotherapy is generally not considered to contribute to a survival improvement. However, such therapy contributes in increasing the response to chemotherapy, and should be considered for patients with LABC to shrink the local lesions and improve the QOL. PMID:24932175

Shinoda, Chika; Mori, Ryutaro; Nagao, Yasuko

2014-01-01

22

Quality of life over 5 years in women with breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy versus mastectomy: a population-based study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) was developed to improve quality of life (QOL) in early stage breast cancer patients. Except\\u000a for differences in body image, literature comparing the psychosocial sequelae of BCT with mastectomy is ambiguous and shows\\u000a a lack of substantial benefits. However, knowledge regarding long term effects of treatment on QOL in breast cancer is very\\u000a limited as most of

Volker Arndt; Christa Stegmaier; Hartwig Ziegler; Hermann Brenner

2008-01-01

23

Five-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing total mastectomy and segmental mastectomy with or without radiation in the treatment of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1976 the authors began a randomized trial to evaluate breast conservation by a segmental mastectomy in the treatment of State I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm in size. The operation removes only sufficient tissue to ensure that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. Women were randomly assigned to total mastectomy, segmental

Bernard Fisher; Madeline Bauer; Richard Margolese; Roger Poisson; Yosef Pilch; Carol Redmond; Edwin Fisher; Norman Wolmark; Melvin Deutsch; Eleanor Montague; Elizabeth Saffer; Lawrence Wickerham; Harvey Lerner; Andrew Glass; Henry Shibata; Peter Deckers; Alfred Ketcham; Robert Oishi; Ian Russell

1985-01-01

24

Treatment choices in breast cancer: a comparative analysis of mastectomy patients and radiation patients  

SciTech Connect

This descriptive-exploratory study identified factors that distinguished women on the basis of the treatment they chose for breast cancer. A semi-structured interview and questionnaire was administered to 30 respondents who received mastectomy and 31 who received lumpectomy with radiation. The variables investigated as potential predictors of treatment choice were (1) participation in treatment planning, (2) knowledge of illness and treatment alternatives, (3) health locus of control, (4) sex-role identification, (5) body image, (6) social support and (7) age. As perceptions of the outcome of treatment influence attitudes about treatment choice, five variables relating to perceived treatment consequences were also examined. These were (1) social support, (2) body image, (3) satisfaction with medical care, (4) satisfaction with treatment and (5) general well-being. The major findings in regard to the predictor variables included a profile of the characteristics of each group. The radiation group had more knowledge, participated in planning to a greater extent, investigated treatment options more often and typically made their own decisions about treatment. The mastectomy group was older, attributed locus of control to chance and demonstrated nonsignificant trends toward locus of control in powerful others and toward a feminine sex-role identification; 50% cited Surgeon's Advice as the basis of their choice.

Williams, J.

1985-01-01

25

Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy.  

PubMed

The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status.According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

Nikolic, Dejan V; Djordjevic, Miroslav L; Granic, Miroslav; Nikolic, Aleksandra T; Stanimirovic, Violeta V; Zdravkovic, Darko; Jelic, Svetlana

2012-01-01

26

Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status. According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

2012-01-01

27

Perceptions, knowledge, and satisfaction with contralateral prophylactic mastectomy among young women with breast cancer: A cross-sectional survey  

PubMed Central

Background There has been a dramatic increase in rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), particularly among younger women with breast cancer, however little is known about how women approach the decision to undergo CPM. Objective To examine preferences, knowledge, decision-making, and experiences of young women with breast cancer who chose CPM. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Eight academic and community medical centers that enrolled 550 women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 and younger, between November 2006 and November 2010. Patients 123 women without known bilateral breast cancer who reported having a bilateral mastectomy. Measurements A one-time, 23 item survey that included items related to decision-making, knowledge, risk perception, and breast cancer worry. Results Most women (98%) indicated that the desire to lower the chance of developing a contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and to improve survival (94%) were extremely or very important factors in their decision to undergo CPM. However, only 18% indicated that women with breast cancer who undergo CPM live longer than women who do not. BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation carriers more accurately perceived their risk of a CBC while women without a known mutation substantially overestimated this risk. Limitations The survey, administered a median of two years post-surgery, was not validated and some questions might have been misinterpreted by respondents or subject to recall bias. Generalizability of our findings might be limited. Conclusions Despite knowing that CPM does not clearly improve survival, women who have undergone the procedure do so, in part, to extend their lives. Many women overestimate their actual risk of developing breast cancer in the unaffected breast. Interventions aimed at improving risk communication in an effort to promote evidence-based decision-making are warranted. PMID:24042365

Rosenberg, Shoshana M.; Tracy, Michaela S.; Meyer, Meghan E.; Sepucha, Karen; Gelber, Shari; Hirshfield-Bartek, Judi; Troyan, Susan; Morrow, Monica; Schapira, Lidia; Come, Steven E.; Winer, Eric P.; Partridge, Ann H.

2013-01-01

28

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... mastectomy and after the woman has completed adjuvant therapy . A third option is immediate-delayed reconstruction. With this method, a tissue expander is placed under the skin during the mastectomy to preserve space for an implant while the tissue that was ...

29

The influence of patient geometry on the selection of chest wall irradiation techniques in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose: To evaluate three chest wall (CW) irradiation techniques: wide tangential photon beams, direct appositional electron field and electron arc therapy with regards to target coverage and normal tissue tolerance.Materials and methods: Thirty-two post-mastectomy breast cancer patients were planned using three CW irradiation techniques. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was done on all patients and clinical target, heart and

Yee C Ung; Katharina E Sixel; Christine Bell

2000-01-01

30

The evolution of mastectomies in the oncoplastic breast surgery era  

PubMed Central

Over time, surgical techniques have advanced to the point where oncological safety and aesthetic outcomes are the pillars of contemporary breast surgery. Variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nowadays the association between plastic surgical techniques and mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer and also improved overall aesthetic outcomes and favors the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. “Oncoplastic mastectomy” is a feasible term and can be routinely used. PMID:25083466

Manconi, Andrea; da Costa Viera, Rene Aloísio; Michelli, Rodrigo Augusto Depieri; Matthes, Angelo do Carmo Silva

2013-01-01

31

Sexual abuse in childhood and postoperative depression in women with breast cancer who opt for immediate reconstruction after mastectomy  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Breast reconstruction is routinely offered to women who undergo mastectomy for breast cancer. However, patient-reported outcomes are mixed. Child abuse has enduring effects on adults’ well-being and body image. As part of a study into damaging effects of abuse on adjustment to breast cancer, we examined: (i) whether women with history of abuse would be more likely than other women to opt for reconstruction; and (ii) whether mood problems in women opting for reconstruction can be explained by greater prevalence of abuse. PATIENTS AND METHODS We recruited 355 women within 2-4 days after surgery for primary breast cancer; 104 had mastectomy alone and 29 opted for reconstruction. Using standardised questionnaires, women self-reported emotional distress and recollections of childhood sexual abuse. Self-report of distress was repeated 12 months later. RESULTS Women who had reconstruction were younger than those who did not. Controlling for this, they reported greater prevalence of abuse and more distress than those having mastectomy alone. They were also more depressed postoperatively, and this effect remained significant after controlling for abuse. CONCLUSIONS One interpretation of these findings is that history of abuse influences women's decisions about responding to the threat of mastectomy, but it is premature to draw inferences for practice until the findings are replicated. If they are replicated, it will be important to recognise increased vulnerability of some patients who choose reconstruction. Studying the characteristics and needs of women who opt for immediate reconstruction and examining the implications for women's adjustment should be a priority for research. PMID:21054923

Clark, Louise; Holcombe, Christopher; Hill, Jonathan; Krespi-Boothby, Margorit Rita; Fisher, Jean; Seward, Joanna; Salmon, Peter

2010-01-01

32

Quality of life of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with radical mastectomy or breast-conserving procedures: results of EORTC trial 10801  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1980 the EORTC-BCCG initiated a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing modified radical mastectomy (MRM) with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I and II breast cancer. The main endpoint of the trial was survival. A brief quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of two multi-item scales (body image and fear of recurrence) and two single items (satisfaction with treatment and

D Curran; J. P van Dongen; N. K Aaronson; G Kiebert; I. S Fentiman; F Mignolet; H Bartelink

1998-01-01

33

The osteopontin tissue level as a breast cancer biomarker in females after mastectomy measured by the capillary gel electrophoresis technique.  

PubMed

A new diagnostic and prognostic biomarker may be of value in the diagnostic panel, especially among cancer diseases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the osteopontin (OPN) level measurable in the tumour tissue in females with diagnosed breast cancer after mastectomy, and to confirm its suitability to serve as a prognostic biomarker of the cancer.The OPN tissue levels and the classical risk factors were determined in twelve females. Tissue samples were collected and analysed by the capillary gel electrophoresis technique after previous appropriate preparation of the samples. A comparison between the OPN average values in the tissue of healthy versus cancer patients after mastectomy was performed using statistical univariate tests (ANOVA, t-test) and multivariate analysis (principal component analysis, PCA). The results demonstrate that the median values of the OPN in the tumour centre cancer tissue (10.940 ?g/g; within the range of 3.772-23.648) are significantly higher compared to healthy cells (5.173 ?g/g; within the range of 0.838- 17.583). Moreover, the increased tissue OPN level was correlated with the cancer stage.In this study osteopontin is presented as a possible candidate for a breast cancer biomarker. Further research is needed to obtain information on cancer signalling by means of the OPN threshold, and indication of its advanced stage. PMID:23244214

Konieczna, Lucyna; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Oledzka, Ilona; Macur, Katarzyna; Belka, Mariusz; Baczek, Tomasz; Struck, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Micha?

2013-06-01

34

Body image issues after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction in healthy women at risk for hereditary breast cancer.  

PubMed

The outcome of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction (BPM-IBR) in healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers can be potentially burdensome for body image and the intimate relationship. Therefore, in the current analysis the impact on body image, sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was prospectively investigated in women opting for BPM-IBR as well as cancer distress and general quality of life. Healthy women undergoing BPM-IBR completed questionnaires preoperatively (T0, n = 48), at 6 months (T1, n = 44) and after finishing breast reconstruction (median 21 months, range 12-35) (T2, n = 36). With multi-level regression analyses the course of outcome variables was investigated and a statistically significant change in body image and/or sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was predicted by baseline covariates. Body image significantly decreased at T1. At T2 sexual relationship satisfaction and body image tended to be lower compared to baseline. The overall partner relationship satisfaction did not significantly change. At T2, 37 % of the women reported that their breasts felt unpleasantly, 29 % was not satisfied with their breast appearance and 21 % felt embarrassed for their naked body. Most body image issues remained unchanged in 30 % of the women. A negative body image was predicted by high preoperative cancer distress. BPM-IBR was associated with adverse impact on body image in a substantial subgroup, but satisfaction with the overall sexual and partner relationship did not significantly change in time. The psychosocial impact of BPM-IBR in unaffected women should not be underestimated. Psychological support should ideally be integrated both before and after BPM-IBR. PMID:23224779

Gopie, Jessica P; Mureau, Marc A M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B E; Timman, Reinier; Tibben, Aad

2013-09-01

35

Areola and Nipple-Areola-Sparing Mastectomy for Breast Cancer Treatment and Risk Reduction: Report of an Initial Experience in a Community Hospital Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The use of areola-sparing (AS) or nipple-areola-sparing (NAS) mastectomy for the treatment or risk reduction of breast cancer\\u000a has been the subject of increasing dialogue in the surgical literature over the past decade. We report the initial experience\\u000a of a large community hospital with AS and NAS mastectomies for both breast cancer treatment and risk reduction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective chart review

Jay K. Harness; Thomas S. Vetter; Arthur H. Salibian

2011-01-01

36

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... of Use State Fundraising Notices Site Comments Better Business Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © 2014 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

37

Early stage breast cancer: costs and quality of life one year after treatment by mastectomy or conservative surgery and radiation therapy.  

PubMed

This paper reports a descriptive study of the costs and quality of life (QoL) outcome of treatments for early stage breast cancer in a cohort of Australian women, one year after initial surgical treatment. Mastectomy without breast reconstruction is compared to breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy (breast conservation). Of the 397 women eligible for the study, costing data were collected for 81% and quality of life data for 73%. The cost differences between treatment groups were mainly accounted for by adjuvant therapies, the more expensive being radiotherapy. When compared to women treated by mastectomy, those treated by breast conservation reported better body image but worse physical function. The negative impact of breast cancer and its treatment was greater for younger women, across a number of dimensions of quality of life (regardless of treatment type). While this study shows that breast conservation is more expensive than mastectomy, the QoL results reinforce the importance of patient participation in treatment decisions. PMID:14731583

Kenny, P; King, M T; Shiell, A; Seymour, J; Hall, J; Langlands, A; Boyages, J

2000-02-01

38

Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

Garg, Amit K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: joh@mdanderson.org; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meric-Bernstam, Funda [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hahn, Karin [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-12-01

39

Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

2012-01-01

40

The burden of breast cancer in Italy: mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed between 2001 and 2008 based on nationwide hospital discharge records  

PubMed Central

Background Where population coverage is limited, the exclusive use of Cancer Registries might limit ascertainment of incident cancer cases. We explored the potentials of Nationwide hospital discharge records (NHDRs) to capture incident breast cancer cases in Italy. Methods We analyzed NHDRs for mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed between 2001 and 2008. The average annual percentage change (AAPC) and related 95% Confidence Interval (CI) in the actual number of mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed during the study period were computed for the full sample and for subgroups defined by age, surgical procedure, macro-area and singular Region. Re-admissions of the same patients were separately presented. Results The overall number of mastectomies decreased, with an AAPC of ?2.1% (?2.3 -1.8). This result was largely driven by the values observed for women in the 45 to 64 and 65 to 74 age subgroups (?3.0%, -3.4 -3.6 and ?3.3%, -3.8 -2.8, respectively). We observed no significant reduction in mastectomies for women in the remaining age groups. Quadrantectomies showed an overall +4.7 AAPC (95%CI:4.5–4.9), with no substantial differences by age. Analyses by geographical area showed a remarkable decrease in mastectomies, with inter-regional discrepancies possibly depending upon variability in mammography screening coverage and adherence. Quadrantectomies significantly increased, with Southern Regions presenting the highest average rates. Data on repeat admissions within a year revealed a total number of 46,610 major breast surgeries between 2001 and 2008, with an overall +3.2% AAPC (95%CI:2.8-3.6). Conclusions In Italy, NHDRs might represent a valuable supplemental data source to integrate Cancer Registries in cancer surveillance. PMID:23168067

2012-01-01

41

Development of active myofascial trigger points in neck and shoulder musculature is similar after lumpectomy or mastectomy surgery for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Our aim was to describe the differences in the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in neck and shoulder muscles after 2 surgery approaches for breast cancer: mastectomy or lumpectomy. Thirty-two women (mean age: 50 ± 7 years) who received lumpectomy, 16 women (mean age: 48 ± 10 years) who had received mastectomy after breast cancer, and 16 women (mean age: 49 ± 9 years) with breast cancer who had not received either surgical treatment, participated. Myofascial TrPs in the upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, levator scapulae, scalene, infraspinatus and pectoralis major muscles were bilaterally explored by an assessor blinded to the women's condition. TrPs were considered active when palpation reproduced local and referred pain symptoms recognized by the patient as familiar pain symptoms. The number of active TrPs within mastectomy (mean ± SD: 4.6 ± 1) and lumpectomy (mean ± SD: 4.5 ± 1) groups was significantly higher (P < 0.001) as compared to the control group (mean ± SD: 1.1 ± 1.3), but not significantly different between them (P = 0.641). Women who received either lumpectomy or mastectomy showed similar distribution of active TrPs and a higher prevalence of active TrPs as compared to the control group. Active TrPs in the pectoralis major muscle were the most prevalent in both surgery groups The number of active TrPs was weakly correlated with neck (r(s) = 0.385; P = 0.029) and shoulder/axillary (r(s) = 0.397; P = 0.024) pain intensity within the lumpectomy, but not the mastectomy group. This study found active TrPs in neck and shoulder musculature in women who had received lumpectomy or mastectomy. The induced local and referred pain pattern from active TrPs reproduced neck and shoulder/axillary symptoms and pain patterns in women after breast cancer surgery. Few active TrPs were found in a control group of women with breast cancer who had not received any surgical treatment. PMID:22464115

Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Del-Moral-Ávila, Rosario; Menjón-Beltrán, Salomón; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

2012-04-01

42

Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-07-01

43

The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series  

SciTech Connect

Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

Yu, Edward, E-mail: edward.yu@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Suzuki, Hiromichi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Younus, Jawaid [Department of Medical Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Elfiki, Tarek [Department of Medical Oncology, Windsor Regional Cancer Centre, Windsor, Ontario (Canada); Stitt, Larry [Epidemiology Biostatistics, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Center, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

2012-02-01

44

Long-term results of post-operative radiation therapy following mastectomy with or without chemotherapy in Stage I--III breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to determine the risk of local-regional failure following post-mastectomy radiotherapy and the incidence of complications associated with such treatment. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results in 309 patients with Stage I--III invasive breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiation therapy between 1975 and 1985. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2.25 Gy fractions. One hundred forty-seven (48%) of the patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 115 (78%) of these receiving a CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regime. The median follow-up time of surviving patients was 130 months (range, 28 to 191 months) after mastectomy. Seventeen patients (6%) developed a local-regional failure at an interval of 4 to 87 months after radiotherapy. Moderate or severe complications related to radiotherapy and requiring treatment were uncommon. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in four patients (1.3%), arm edema in 18 (5.8%), and brachial plexopathy in 2 (0.6%). The authors conclude that post-operative radiotherapy is a safe and effective means of reducing local-regional failure following mastectomy. The efficacy of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in improving survival should be addressed in new large randomized controlled studies. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Uematsu, Minoru; Bornstein, B.A.; Recht, A.; Abner, A.; Silver, B. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Come, S.E. (Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Shulman, L.N. (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Harris, J.R.

1993-04-02

45

MD Anderson study finds side effects, complications, and mastectomy are more likely after partial breast irradiation:  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

46

Columbia study finds many women do not undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy:  

Cancer.gov

Despite the benefits, only a small minority of women, regardless of age, are opting for immediate reconstructive breast surgery after undergoing mastectomy for treatment of breast cancer, according to data presented at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-10, 2011.

47

High-intensity focused ultrasound compared with irradiation for ovarian castration in premenopausal females with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer after radical mastectomy.  

PubMed

The aim of the current study was to determine the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ovarian castration by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor (ER)(+)/progesterone receptor (PR)(+) breast cancer subsequent to radical mastectomy. A total of 88 premenopausal females with pathologically confirmed ER(+)/PR(+) breast cancer following radical mastectomy were randomly and equally divided into two groups that received HIFU therapy or radiation treatment. HIFU therapy was applied twice at an interval of three days and radiotherapy was administered to a total prescribed dose of D(T) 18 Gy in nine fractions over 11 days. Outcome measures included serum levels of estradiol and estrone, the Kupperman index and the incidence of secondary amenorrhea. Adverse events were monitored and recorded. All patients were followed up for 12 months. Serum levels of estradiol and estrone were comparable prior to treatment between the HIFU and radiation treatment groups. One month following treatment, serum levels of estradiol and estrone were significantly decreased in the two groups, but a greater decline was observed in the HIFU treatment group (P<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). In addition, more patients developed severe menopausal symptoms and amenorrhea in the HIFU therapy group compared with the radiotherapy group (P<0.01 for the two groups). A total of 3 months following treatment, serum levels of estradiol and estrone and the distribution of patients with severe, moderate and mild menopausal symptoms were comparable between the two groups. Following nine menstrual cycles, the incidence of amenorrhea reached 100% in the two groups. HIFU therapy is superior to radiotherapy for ovarian castration in premenopausal females with ER(+)/PR(+) breast cancer subsequent to radical mastectomy in terms of its minimal invasiveness and faster efficacy. HIFU represents a feasible non-surgical approach for ovarian castration. PMID:23162657

Wang, Shu-Wen; He, Xin-Ying; Li, Ming-Zhong

2012-11-01

48

High-intensity focused ultrasound compared with irradiation for ovarian castration in premenopausal females with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer after radical mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The aim of the current study was to determine the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ovarian castration by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ breast cancer subsequent to radical mastectomy. A total of 88 premenopausal females with pathologically confirmed ER+/PR+ breast cancer following radical mastectomy were randomly and equally divided into two groups that received HIFU therapy or radiation treatment. HIFU therapy was applied twice at an interval of three days and radiotherapy was administered to a total prescribed dose of DT 18 Gy in nine fractions over 11 days. Outcome measures included serum levels of estradiol and estrone, the Kupperman index and the incidence of secondary amenorrhea. Adverse events were monitored and recorded. All patients were followed up for 12 months. Serum levels of estradiol and estrone were comparable prior to treatment between the HIFU and radiation treatment groups. One month following treatment, serum levels of estradiol and estrone were significantly decreased in the two groups, but a greater decline was observed in the HIFU treatment group (P<0.01 and 0.05, respectively). In addition, more patients developed severe menopausal symptoms and amenorrhea in the HIFU therapy group compared with the radiotherapy group (P<0.01 for the two groups). A total of 3 months following treatment, serum levels of estradiol and estrone and the distribution of patients with severe, moderate and mild menopausal symptoms were comparable between the two groups. Following nine menstrual cycles, the incidence of amenorrhea reached 100% in the two groups. HIFU therapy is superior to radiotherapy for ovarian castration in premenopausal females with ER+/PR+ breast cancer subsequent to radical mastectomy in terms of its minimal invasiveness and faster efficacy. HIFU represents a feasible non-surgical approach for ovarian castration. PMID:23162657

WANG, SHU-WEN; HE, XIN-YING; LI, MING-ZHONG

2012-01-01

49

Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix  

PubMed Central

Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16?cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

Vashi, Christopher

2014-01-01

50

Georgetown researchers examine nipple sparing mastectomy cases and find no recurrent or new cancers:  

Cancer.gov

A new study suggests some women needing a lumpectomy or mastectomy to treat their breast cancer have another potential option that is safe and effective, say researchers at Georgetown. They say the procedure known as a nipple sparing mastectomy is also a viable surgical option for women who choose to have their breasts removed because of their increased risk of developing the disease.

51

Post-Mastectomy and Phantom Breast Pain: Risk Factors, Natural History, and Impact on Quality of Life.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Post-mastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) and phantom breast pain are poorly understood chronic pain syndromes that occur following surgical procedures for breast cancer. Although these pain syndromes are not well studied, there is appreciable evidence that pa...

R. H. Dworkin

1999-01-01

52

Patients opting for breast reconstruction following mastectomy: an analysis of uptake rates and benefit  

PubMed Central

For women with breast cancer who undergo a mastectomy, breast reconstruction offers improved psychological and cosmetic outcomes. We analyzed the rates of breast reconstruction and potential benefits to these women. The review was based on a PubMed search using the terms “reconstruction,” “mastectomy,” “rates,” “benefits,” and “breast cancer.” Breast-reconstruction rates have continued to rise in recent years; however, there are definite barriers to widespread use of this procedure. These barriers include age, ethnicity, income, tumor characteristics, and the need for adjuvant radiation therapy. There are notable psychological advantages to women who receive breast reconstruction. These women also express an improved quality of life. Breast reconstruction is an acceptable technique for women undergoing mastectomy. It should be offered to all women in an immediate or delayed fashion, with guidance from their physician about the benefits and risks. PMID:24648753

Howard-McNatt, Marissa M

2013-01-01

53

Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

2008-01-01

54

The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fasola, Carolina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin, E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-03-15

55

Better cosmetic results and comparable quality of life after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous breast reconstruction compared to breast conservative treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preoperative chemotherapy (PCT) can be used in large primary breast cancer to facilitate breast conservative surgery (BCS). Cosmetic results of BCS are influenced by the size of the residual tumour, relative to the size of the breast. After mastectomy, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue provides excellent cosmetic outcome and has proven to be safe in breast cancer patients.

Veronique F Cocquyt; Phillip N Blondeel; Herman T Depypere; Karlien A Van De Sijpe; Kristof K Daems; Stanislas J Monstrey; Simon J. P Van Belle

2003-01-01

56

The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Lin, Hui-Yi [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chuong, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Acs, Geza [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

2013-03-01

57

Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

Reddy, Jay P. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-08-01

58

A review of breast imaging following mastectomy with or without reconstruction in an outpatient community center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite developments in surgical technique, radiation treatment, and chemotherapeutic agents, tumor recurrence and distant\\u000a disease have remained a major concern in breast cancer management. Breast imaging after mastectomy in the screening arena\\u000a remains a controversial topic for breast imagers. Many feel the yield of finding a recurrent cancer with imaging in the asymptomatic\\u000a patient is too low to be beneficial;

Stamatia Destounis; Renee Morgan; Andrea Arieno; Posy Seifert; Patricia Somerville; Philip Murphy

59

Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER?/PR?/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER?/PR?/HER 2?, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice.

Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-01-01

60

Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

Selz, Jessica, E-mail: chaumontjessica@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Le Scodan, Romuald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)

2012-12-01

61

Post-mastectomy radiotherapy can improve survival in breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with four or more positive nodes but not in one to three positive nodes  

PubMed Central

Introduction This retrospective study investigated the clinical value of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in female Chinese breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with positive axillary lymph nodes after mastectomy. Methods We performed an analysis of clinical pathological data from 221 female Chinese breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger treated between 1998 and 2007. Patients were diagnosed with positive axillary lymph nodes and underwent mastectomy. PMRT was delivered to 92 patients. Results The median follow-up was 61 months. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were 84.1%, 65.2%, 61.4%, and 77.2%, respectively. Univariate survival analysis (P=0.003) and multivariate analysis (P<0.001) both suggested that PMRT is an independent prognostic factor of LRFS. PMRT positively affected LRFS (P=0.003), but had no significant impact on DMFS (P=0.429), DFS (P=0.146), and OS (P=0.750). PMRT improved LRFS (P=0.001), DFS (P=0.017), and OS (P=0.042) in patients with four or more positive nodes, but no survival benefit was observed in patients with one to three positive nodes (P>0.05). Conclusion PMRT can improve survival in breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with four or more positive nodes but not in those with one to three positive nodes. PMID:25328402

Wu, Sangang; Li, Qun; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayuan; Li, Fengyan; Lin, Qin; He, Zhenyu

2014-01-01

62

Breast Cancer  

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... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

63

Breast Cancer  

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Breast Cancer Introduction Cancer of the breast is the most common form of cancer that affects women but ... arm, as well as muscles involved in breathing. Breast Cancer Breast cancer may originate from either the glands ...

64

Improved overall survival after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a history of unilateral breast cancer: A prospective analysis.  

PubMed

Data on survival of BRCA1/2-associated primary breast cancer (PBC) patients who opt for subsequent contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are scarce and inconsistent. We examined the efficacy of CRRM on overall survival in mutation carriers with a history of PBC. From a Dutch multicentre cohort, we selected 583 BRCA-associated PBC patients, being diagnosed between 1980 and 2011. Over time, 242 patients (42%) underwent CRRM and 341 patients (58%) remained under surveillance. Survival analyses were performed using Cox models, with CRRM as a time-dependent covariate. The median follow-up after PBC diagnosis was 11.4 years. In the CRRM group, four patients developed contralateral breast cancer (2%), against 64 patients (19%) in the surveillance group (p?

A M Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Bernadette; Rookus, Matti A; Aalfs, Cora M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Collée, Johanna M; Jansen, Liesbeth; Kets, C Marleen; Keymeulen, Kristien B M I; Koppert, Linetta B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Mooij, Thea M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Vasen, Hans F A; Hebon; Hooning, Maartje J; Seynaeve, Caroline

2015-02-15

65

Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01

66

A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

2011-01-01

67

Areola Size and Jugulum Nipple Distance After Bilateral Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Objective: The combination of a single pedicle local flap with tattooing for complete nipple areola complex (NAC) reconstruction is currently the most supported method. Although many technical descriptions of NAC reconstruction exist in the medical literature, there are no data that define the ideal areola size (diameter of the areola) after bilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction considering the previous areola size. Methods: This was a 3-year (2009-2012) observational, analytical, and longitudinal prospective study with 103 patients who had undergone NAC tattooing as the last process of bilateral breast reconstruction after surgery for breast cancer. Statistical differences in the areola size and the jugulum-nipple distance before mastectomy and after reconstruction were analyzed by paired Student t tests with a 95% confidence interval. Results: The jugulum-nipple distance before mastectomy was 4.23 cm larger than after bilateral reconstruction (mean jugulum-nipple distance: 23.89 cm vs 19.66 cm), and for that reason shorter (more cephalad). The areola size before mastectomy was 1.59 cm larger than the one chosen by the patient for reconstruction (mean diameter of the areola: 5.25 cm vs 3.65 cm). Conclusions: We conclude that, after bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, the jugulum-nipple distance is smaller and women prefer smaller areola sizes. PMID:24324847

Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Mérida, Consuelo; Rioja, Luis F.

2013-01-01

68

Partial breast irradiation for locally recurrent breast cancer within a second breast conserving treatment: Alternative to mastectomy? Results from a prospective trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo assess the outcome of multi-catheter pulse dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy of re-irradiation for local ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR) in regard to local control, survival, morbidity and quality of life (QoL).

Daniela Kauer-Dorner; Richard Pötter; Alexandra Resch; Leonore Handl-Zeller; Kathrin Kirchheiner Mag; Katja Meyer-Schell; Wolfgang Dörr

69

Breast Reconstruction after a Bilateral Mastectomy Using the BRAVA Expansion System and Fat Grafting  

PubMed Central

Summary: Fat graft breast reconstruction following a mastectomy is always limited by the size of the skin envelope, which affects the amount of graft that can be injected in 1 session. Because the fat graft naturally resorbs in all patients, several sessions of fat grafting are necessary. BRAVA’s negative pressure causes a “reverse” expansion of the skin envelope, thus permitting more space for the fat graft. This allows decreasing number of required procedures for an adequate breast reconstruction. We operated on a 38-year-old patient 4 years after bilateral mastectomy without irradiation for breast cancer. Before the procedure, the patient was instructed to wear the BRAVA system for 12 hours daily for 2 months before the first session, at all times between the sessions and for 1 month following the last fat grafting session. We performed 3 fat grafting sessions, as planned. Altogether, we injected 840 cm3 of fat on the right side and 790?cm3 of fat on the left side. Four months after the last operation, the patient was very satisfied with her new breasts. The breasts were soft, with good sensation and a natural feel. Using the BRAVA external expansion system for the enhancement of fat grafting is a suitable technique for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. This technique produces soft and natural feeling breasts in fewer operative sessions, with a minimal risk of complications. Patient compliance, however, is greatly needed to achieve the desired results.

Mestak, Jan; Bohac, Martin; Edriss, Ahmed; Sukop, Andrej

2013-01-01

70

Is mammography useful in screening for local recurrences in patients with TRAM flap breast reconstruction after mastectomy for multifocal DCIS?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction is being used more often for the treatment of breast cancer. Mammography is not used routinely to evaluate TRAM flaps in women who have undergone mastectomy. We have identified the potential value of its use in selected patients.\\u000aMethods and Results: We report on four women who manifested

A. P. Salas; Mark A. Helvie; Edwin G. Wilkins; Harold A. Oberman; Peter W. Possert; Alan M. Yahanda; Alfred E. Chang

1998-01-01

71

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

72

Breast Cancer  

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... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ... liver, or elsewhere. Continue Why Do People Get Breast Cancer? Any woman can get breast cancer, but doctors ...

73

Nipple Sparing Mastectomy: Does Breast Morphological Factor Related to Necrotic Complications?  

PubMed Central

Background: Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) can be performed for prophylactic mastectomy and the treatment of selected breast cancer with oncologic safety. The risk of skin and nipple necrosis is a frequent complication of NSM procedure, and it is usually related to surgical technique. However, the role of the breast morphology should be also investigated. Method: We prospectively performed an analysis of 124 NSM from September 2012 to January 2013 at the European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy, focusing on necrotic complications. We analyzed the association between the risks of skin necrosis and the breast morphology of the patients. Results: Among 124 NSM in 113 patients, NSM procedures were associated with necrosis in 22 mastectomies (17.7%) among which included partial necrosis of nipple-areolar complex (NAC) in 15 of 124 NSM (12.1%) and total necrosis in 4 cases (3.5%). The NAC was removed in 5 NSM cases (4%). The volume of breast removed was the only significant factor increasing the risk of skin necrosis. The degree of ptosis was not significantly related to the necrosis risk. Conclusions: Large glandular specimen increases the risk of NAC necrosis. The degree of ptosis and the distance between the sternal notch and the NAC have no significant impact on necrotic complications in NSM. To reduce the necrotic complications in large breast after NSM, reconstruction should better be performed with autologous flap or slow skin expansion using the expander technique.

Petit, Jean-Yves; Rietjens, Mario; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Garusi, Cristina; Martella, Stefano; Barbieri, Benedetta; Gottardi, Alessandra; Andrea, Manconi; Giuseppe, Lomeo; Hamza, Alaa; Lohsiriwat, Visnu

2014-01-01

74

Intercostal nerves block for mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy.  

PubMed Central

Regional anesthesia is recognized as an alternative to general anesthesia for modern breast cancer surgery. Various techniques of block have been described. Each has its unique problems. Regional anesthesia was chosen for simple mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy, due to compromised pulmonary status resulting from widespread malignant infiltration of both lungs. We used intercostal nerves block. The block was supplemented with an infraclavicular infiltration to interrupt the branches of the superficial cervical plexus that provide sensation to the upper chest wall and subcutaneous infiltration in the midline to block the nerve supply from the contralateral side. Anesthesia was generally effective and the operations were uneventful. Both patients and surgeons expressed satisfaction. We conclude that where patients have significant comorbidities that make general anesthesia undesirable, the use of intercostal nerves block remains a safe and reliable anesthetic option that allows the patient access to surgery for simple mastectomy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16573313

Kolawole, Israel K.; Adesina, Michael D.; Olaoye, Iyiade O.

2006-01-01

75

Prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.  

PubMed

With increasing public awareness of the risk for breast cancer and modern techniques of reconstruction, the option of surgical prophylaxis for risk reduction is becoming increasingly popular. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy for women at increased risk of developing breast cancer and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy for those with unilateral breast cancer seeking symmetry, risk reduction, and ease of follow-up are acceptable options for many women. However, prophylactic surgery is not an inconsequential decision, and careful consideration should be given to the risks and benefits of such procedures. PMID:24882342

Chagpar, Anees B

2014-07-01

76

Breast reconstruction after mastectomy among Department of Defense beneficiaries by race  

PubMed Central

Background Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction increased approximately 20% between 1998 and 2008 in the United States and has been found to improve body image, self-esteem and quality of life. These procedures, however, tend to be less common among minority women, which may be due to variations in healthcare access. The Department of Defense (DoD) provides equal healthcare access, thereby affording an exceptional environment to assess whether racial variations persist when access to care is equal. Methods Linked DoD cancer registry and medical claims data were used. The receipt of reconstruction was compared between white (n=2,974) and black women (n=708) who underwent mastectomies to treat incident, histologically-confirmed, breast cancer diagnosed from 1998 to 2007. Results During the study period, post-mastectomy reconstruction increased among both black (27.3% to 40.0%) and white (21.8% to 40.6%) female breast cancer patients. Receipt of reconstruction did not vary significantly by race (odds ratio: 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.76-1.15). Reconstruction decreased significantly with increasing age, tumor stage and receipt of radiotherapy and was significantly more common in more recent years, among active servicewomen, Tricare Prime (HMO) beneficiaries and women whose sponsor was an officer. Conclusion The receipt of reconstruction did not vary by race within this equal access health system, indicating that the racial disparities reported in previous studies may have partially been due to variations in healthcare access. Additional research to determine why a large proportion of breast cancer patients do not undergo reconstruction might be beneficial, particularly because these procedures have been associated with non-cosmetic benefits. PMID:24965236

Enewold, Lindsey; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Zahm, Shelia H.; Poudrier, Jill; Anderson, William; Shriver, Craig D.; Zhu, Kangmin

2014-01-01

77

Sexuality After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer treatment Emotional aspects of breast cancer Body image after breast cancer treatment Sexuality after breast cancer ... treatment for breast cancer stops working Previous Topic Body image after breast cancer treatment Next Topic Pregnancy after ...

78

The increasing efficacy of breast cancer treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy in women and although identification of this multi-system disease has increased, the survival rates have not dramatically altered over the past four decades. Optimium treatment of patients with breast cancer is a subject of great debate and traditionally may be divided into surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone manipulation.Halsted's radical mastectomy, although initially superseded by

A. Gordon

1997-01-01

79

BREAST CANCER 4. BREAST CANCER  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER 29 4. BREAST CANCER 4.1. SUMMARY The average number of new cases diagnosed each year was 2,965 in women and 20 in men. Breast cancer was the most common cancer in women in Ireland breast cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 12 for women and 1 in 1,621 for men and was slightly higher

Paxton, Anthony T.

80

Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

1985-02-01

81

Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

Yang, P.S., E-mail: psyang@kfsyscc.or [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, C.F. [Department of Research, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, B.L. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y. [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, C.W. [Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-01

82

Breast Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer ...

83

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death from ...

84

Salvage mastectomy after failed breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast.  

PubMed Central

The indications, technique and complications of salvage mastectomy in 25 patients with local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast have been reviewed. Two patients required myocutaneous flaps to repair the defect, and six patients (24%) suffered wound infection or breakdown. Subsequent local relapse occurred in a total of five patients, two of whom died with uncontrolled chest wall skin nodules. PMID:2018316

Barr, L. C.; Brunt, A. M.; Phillips, R. H.; Ellis, H.

1991-01-01

85

What Is Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts ... and our document Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

86

Types of Breast Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into several types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

87

[A 23-year delayed locoregional recurrence of breast carcinoma following mastectomy].  

PubMed

A 77-year-old woman who underwent a right modified radical mastectomy 23 years ago with no further adjuvant treatment presented with a right chest wall mass (3 x 4 x 2 cm) at the scar. She had no symptoms nor metastasis. The laboratory data were normal including tumor marker. The mass was diagnosed as compatible with a local recurrence tumor from the previous breast cancer on the ultrasonography and chest CT. After obtaining her informed consent for the therapy, we performed 60 Gy/30 fr radiotherapy on the recurrent tumor on her right chest wall with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy. The first regimens were tamoxifen 20 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, followed by toremifene 80 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, and then the tumor disappeared. But three years later, we found tumor regrowth. We changed the regimen, giving 5'-DFUR 1,200 mg/day and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/day for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week drug-free period, then added 10 Gy/5 fr radiotherapy and hyperthermia twice a week. Final regimens were anastrozole 1 mg/day and capecitabine 900 mg/day. The recurrent tumor decreased and the disease stabilized. After these therapies, she had very good quality of life. We recommend radiation and/or hyperthermia with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy as useful for the delayed recurrence of elderly breast cancer after a modified radical mastectomy. PMID:18281775

Ogo, Etsuyo; Etou, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Gen; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Chiyoko; Hattori, Chikayuki; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

2008-02-01

88

Many Women Who Have Mastectomy Don't Get Breast Reconstruction  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Many Women Who Have Mastectomy Don't Get Breast Reconstruction: Study Most were satisfied with ... choose it. "The most common reasons women didn't undergo reconstruction was that they felt it wasn' ...

89

Breast Cancer: Treatment Options  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Download PDF Breast Cancer: Treatment Options This section has been reviewed and ... Cancer - About Clinical Trials › f t g e + Breast Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics ...

90

Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that

R. T. Osteen; B. L. Smith

1990-01-01

91

Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

Dai Kubicky, Charlotte, E-mail: charlottedai@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)] [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

2013-04-01

92

breast cancer  

E-print Network

Summary Among 288 breast cancer patients (118 with bilateral disease and 165 with diagnosis before 40 years of age), we identified 26 families with a history of breast cancer, including a minimum of three first- or second-degree relatives. Complete pedigrees with verified malignancy data from the Finnish cancer registry were constructed for 22 families. The median age at breast cancer diagnosis of the young probands (cancer at a younger age (median age 54 years) than the relatives of the older (bilateral) probands (median age 60 years). Standard life-table methods were used to compare the risk of breast cancer in the family members with that of the general population. Among the relatives of the young probands, the increased breast cancer risk occurred in the early post-menopausal period, whereas the risk estimate for the relatives of the bilateral probands closely followed that of the general population. In both groups, however, those family members reaching the age of 80 years had a cumulative probability of over 50 % of developing breast cancer. The standard life-table method proved useful when assessing the age-specific risk for familial breast cancer, taking into account numerous family members as well as their age at disease onset. This kind of analysis can be performed in populations for which reliable cancer registry data are available. It provides a useful tool for selecting individuals for imaging and mutation screening, counselling and experimental chemoprevention programmes.

unknown authors

93

Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

94

Conservative mastectomies.  

PubMed

Nowadays, oncological breast surgery has to be performed to maximize cosmetic results, and even mastectomies, when unavoidable, should conform to acceptable aesthetics. We investigated surgical approaches to skin-sparing mastectomies. Scar positioning and volume replacement were evaluated. We also discuss nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), probably the most outstanding item in the current debate on breast shape preservation. We give suggestions for safe admission criteria and effective treatment. PMID:19588190

Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Pennati, Angela; Garganese, Giorgia; Spano, Andrea

2009-09-01

95

Conservative Mastectomies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, oncological breast surgery has to be performed to maximize cosmetic results, and even mastectomies, when unavoidable,\\u000a should conform to acceptable aesthetics. We investigated surgical approaches to skin-sparing mastectomies. Scar positioning\\u000a and volume replacement were evaluated. We also discuss nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), probably the most outstanding item\\u000a in the current debate on breast shape preservation. We give suggestions for safe

Maurizio B. Nava; Giuseppe Catanuto; Angela Pennati; Giorgia Garganese; Andrea Spano

2009-01-01

96

From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy  

PubMed Central

Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

2013-01-01

97

From radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy and oncoplastic breast surgery: a narrative review comparing oncological result, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and health economy.  

PubMed

Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

2013-01-01

98

Body image, self?concept, and self?esteem in women who had a mastectomy and either wore an external breast prosthesis or had breast reconstruction and women who had not experienced mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perceptions of three groups of women regarding their body image, self?concept, total self?image, and self?esteem were compared. The groups included 64 women who had mastectomies and wore external breast prostheses, 31 women who had mastectomies and underwent breast reconstruction, and a control group of 78 women who had not experienced mastectomy. The body image, total self?image, and self?esteem mean

Linda L. Reaby; Linda K. Hort; John Vandervord

1994-01-01

99

Immediate or delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy: what do women really want  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast reconstruction, especially immediate reconstruction after mastectomy has increased over the last decades, at present being regularly offered in many centres worldwide. Despite obvious benefits and the evident oncological safety of primary breast reconstruction, the majority of women still receive a delayed procedure or even no reconstructive surgery. The objective of the present study was to determine the preference of

K. Belouli; P. Wyss; S. Vetter; V. E. Meyer; G. M. Beer

2005-01-01

100

6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

101

Learning about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

102

The safety parameters of the study on intraductal cytotoxic agent delivery to the breast before mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Background Intraductal administration of cytotoxic agents has been shown to inhibit the development of breast cancer in animal models. The object of this study was to demonstrate the safety of intraductal delivery cytotoxic agents in patients prior to mastectomy. This method is hopeful to be developed as a chemoprevention approach in patients with pre-malignant or non-invasive ductal lesions to prevent breast cancer which will be further developed. Methods Two drugs, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and carboplatin were administered at three dose levels (PLD: 10, 20, 50 mg and carboplatin 60, 120, 300 mg). There were five subjects in each group with 15 subjects treated with each drug once. Venous blood samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. The breast was removed surgically 2-5 days post administration and the treated ducts were marked to enable identification on pathological evaluation. Results Intraductal administration was generally well-tolerated with mild, transient breast discomfort. In the carboplatin arm, three women at the 300 mg dose experienced mild nausea and vomiting. In the PLD arm most women had mild erythema and swelling of the breast over the 72 hours following the drug administration. Patients receiving the 50 mg dose experienced local erythema until the time of surgery. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that carboplatin rapidly entered systemic circulation with an early peak time (Tmax ~30 min) with a corresponding plasma ultrafiltrate area under the curve (AUC) consistent with the Calvert Formula using estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Total plasma doxorubicin had delayed peak concentration times (Tmax >48 hours) with a linear dose response and peak concentrations substantially lower than expected from equivalent intravenous injection dosing. No doxorubicinol metabolite was detected in the plasma. Conclusions This study demonstrates that cytotoxic drugs can be safely administered into breast ducts with minimal toxicity. PMID:25400424

Zhang, Bailin; Love, Susan M.; Chen, Guoji; Wang, Jing; Gao, Jidong; Xu, Xiaozhou; Wang, Zhongzhao

2014-01-01

103

Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

Coulombe, Genevieve [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca; Speers, Caroline B.A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), Vancouver, BC (Canada); Aquino-Parsons, Christina [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bernstein, Vanessa [Systemic Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Truong, Pauline T. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Keyes, Mira [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2007-04-01

104

Recurrent breast cancer in the subpectoral space after implant reconstruction.  

PubMed

Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is most commonly performed with a prosthetic implant placed beneath the pectoralis major. Recurrence may rarely be identified in the subpectoral space where the implant was placed. We report a case of recurrent breast cancer after implant-based reconstruction with isolated subpectoral recurrence discovered 5 years later during secondary revision of her reconstructed breast. PMID:24258514

Pitcher, Austin A; Chao, Jerry W; Varma, Sonal; Swistel, Alexander J; Otterburn, David M

2014-04-01

105

Surgery Choices for Women With DCIS or Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

For women diagnosed with DCIS or breast cancer that can be removed with surgery. This guide explains types of breast surgery, such as breast-sparing surgery and mastectomy, and helps women decide which surgery is the best choice for them.

106

Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and\\/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the

Gregor Sersa; Tanja Cufer; Snezna Marija Paulin; Maja Cemazar; Marko Snoj

107

Ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence.  

PubMed

The overview by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists Collaborative Group on the impact of loco-regional treatments for breast cancer on long term survival was a milestone publication which partially clarified the significance of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR). In the aftermath of this overview, a conference was convened in London in October 2006 to discuss various aspects of IBTR and in particular whether this represents a marker or determinant of risk for distant metastases. An international panel of speakers covered a range of issues including biological paradigms, the effect of IBTR on survival and whether surgery itself can have a detrimental effect on patient outcome. Other topics included the limits to breast conserving surgery, systemic treatments for IBTR and the role of radiotherapy in minimising IBTR. It was concluded that IBTR is a determinant of distant relapse in approximately 25% of cases and a marker of risk in 75% of cases. However, current surgical practice should not favour increased rates of mastectomy on the basis of the recent meta-analysis of randomised trials. PMID:18249542

Benson, John R; della Rovere, G Querci

2008-02-01

108

Contralateral Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer survivors constitute about 25% of the growing population of cancer survivors in the US. Contralateral breast cancer is the most common second cancer in women with primary breast cancer. With increasing cure rates comes increasing concern

109

Breast reduction and cancer in the gland remnant: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims The main aims of this paper are: (1) to evaluate the impact of partial breast gland removal, for cosmetic or\\u000afunctional reasons on cancer incidence in the long-term post-surgical follow-up; (2) to define the incidental cancer finding during breast reduction; (3) to examine the oncological perspective of contralateral breast reduction in women with post-mastectomy breast reconstruction, (4) to consider

Beniamino Palmieri; Alberto Costa; Giorgia Benuzzi

2005-01-01

110

Breast conserving therapy in stage I & II breast cancer in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

A randomized clinical study of 187 patients with T1, T2 breast cancer was performed, in order to compare the effects of modified radical mastectomy (MRM) and breast conserving therapy (BCT) on breast recurrence, overall survival, and disease-free survival. One hundred eighty seven patients with T1, T2 breast cancer, admitted at Yongdong Severance Hospital from April 1991 to August 1994, were

Hy-De Lee; Dong-Sup Yoon; Ja-Yun Koo; Chang-Ok Suh; Woo-Hee Jung; Ki-Keun Oh

1997-01-01

111

Trends and clinical implications of preoperative breast MRI in Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose While there has been increasing interest in the use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for women with breast cancer, little is known about trends in MRI use, or the association of MRI with surgical approach among older women. Methods Using the SEER–Medicare database, we identified a cohort of women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2000-2009 who underwent surgery. We used Medicare claims to identify preoperative breast MRI and surgical approach. We evaluated temporal trends in MRI use according to age and type of surgery, and identified factors associated with MRI. We assessed the association between MRI and surgical approach: breast conserving surgery (BCS) vs. mastectomy, bilateral vs. unilateral mastectomy, and use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Results Among the 72,461 women in our cohort, 10.1% underwent breast MRI. Preoperative MRI use increased from 0.8% in 2000-2001 to 25.2% in 2008-2009 (p<.001). Overall, 43.3% received mastectomy and 56.7% received BCS. After adjustment for clinical and demographic factors, MRI was associated with an increased likelihood of having a mastectomy compared to BCS (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.21, 95% CI: 1.14-1.28). Among women who underwent mastectomy, MRI was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having bilateral cancer diagnosed (9.7%) and undergoing bilateral mastectomy (12.5%) compared to women without MRI (3.7% and 4.1% respectively, p <.001 for both). Conclusion The use of preoperative breast MRI has increased substantially among older women with breast cancer and is associated with an increased likelihood of being diagnosed with bilateral cancer, and more invasive surgery. PMID:23942872

Killelea, Brigid K.; Long, Jessica B.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Ma, Xiaomei; Soulos, Pamela R.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

2013-01-01

112

Issues of Regret in Women With Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Patients with a history of carcinoma of one breast have an estimated risk of 0.5% to 0.75% per year of developing a contralateral breast cancer. This risk prompts many women to consider contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) as a preventive measure. Virtually nothing is known about patient acceptance following CPM. We have developed a National Prophylactic Mastectomy Registry comprised of

Leslie L. Montgomery; Katherine N. Tran; Melissa C. Heelan; Kimberly J. Van Zee; Mary Jane Massie; David K. Payne; Patrick I. Borgen

1999-01-01

113

Breast Cancer -- Male  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

114

Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

Wang, Wei

2013-01-01

115

Reirradiation of recurrent breast cancer with and without concurrent chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Treatment options for loco-regional recurrent breast cancer after previous irradiation are limited. The efficacy of chemotherapy might be hampered because of impaired tissue perfusion in preirradiated tissue. Thus, mastectomy or local excision and reconstructive surgery are the preferred treatments. However, in recent years evidence accumulates that a second breast conserving approach with reirradiation as part of the treatment might

Florian Würschmidt; Jörg Dahle; Cordula Petersen; Claudia Wenzel; Matthias Kretschmer; Christoph Bastian

2008-01-01

116

Pain and Quality of Life after Surgery for Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. In breast cancer (BC) patients, conservative surgery (CS) followed by irradiation or immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM) has been proposed in the attempt to avoid the negative impact of MRM on feminine body image. Regardless of the type of operation, BC patients may feel pain even without recurrent disease with poor adjustment in terms of

Orazio Caffo; Maurizio Amichetti; Antonella Ferro; Antonio Lucenti; Francesco Valduga; Enzo Galligioni

2003-01-01

117

Optimal Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-scale, controlled trials in the 1970s and 1980s demonstrated that wide resection (for example, quad- rantectomy) was as effective as mastectomy for the treat- ment of breast cancer up to 3 cm in maximum diameter. Conservative treatment may also be extended to larger cancers following pre-operative chemotherapy to reduce tumor mass and leave sufficiently wide resection mar- gins to ensure

UMBERTO VERONESI; STEFANO ZURRIDA

118

Male Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

119

Breast Cancer Trends  

MedlinePLUS

... How Is Breast Cancer Treated? Breast Cancer in Young Women Who Has a Higher Risk? What Can I ... Infographic Partners Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women Members Meetings March 27–28, 2014 January 9, ...

120

Early Results Using Sterilized Acellular Human Dermis (Neoform) in Post-Mastectomy Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT: Acellular dermal products play a beneficial role in immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction. They provide improved coverage and support in the lower pole, allowing the pectoralis muscle to drape over most of the expander and maximize lower pole expansion. Tissue incorporation is desired without any adverse affects on recovery. The purpose of this series is to evaluate the early safety and morbidity of preserved human allograft dermis sterilized using the Tutoplast(R) process.All patients who underwent tissue expander reconstruction with NeoForm(R) at Emory University Hospital between 6/07 and 4/08 were included in the series. Patient demographics, risk factors, surgical technique, early complications and outcomes were evaluated.Twenty-two consecutive patients were included, with a total of 31 breasts (bilateral n=9, left n=9, right n=4). The average age was 48 years (range: 31-71), with an average body mass index of 26.7 (range: 19-35). Fifteen patients had a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and 7 patients had DCIS. Risk factors included hypertension n=5, history of smoking n=2, diabetes n=1, and post operative radiation therapy n=8. All reconstructions were immediate with lower pole tissue expanders. NeoForm was rehydrated for appropriately 3-5 minutes. It was sutured superiorly to the lower border of the pectoralis muscle and inferiorly to the inframammary fold. The 4x16 size was used in 18 breasts, and 6x16 cm in 13 breasts. Early post operative complications occurred in one patient with native mastectomy skin necrosis. All drains were removed by the third post-operative week. There were no cases with infection, foreign body reaction, rejection, seromas, or skin erythema. Tissue expansion was performed without any difficult. Expander removal and secondary implant insertion demonstrated adequate incorporation of the NeoForm in 16 patients. Encapsulation of the Neoform, infection or extrusion was not observed.Acellular dermal products have become a useful addition to tissue expander breast reconstruction. NeoForm was successfully used for lower pole coverage of the tissue expander in 31 immediate expander breast reconstructions. Good tissue incorporation was observed clinically and there were no post operative complications that could be related to the NeoForm. PMID:19342990

Losken, Albert

2009-03-23

121

Anxiety and body satisfaction before and six months after mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery.  

PubMed

As breast reconstruction is an important adjunct after mastectomy to regain physical integrity and also to improve affect, the present aim was to evaluate patients' subjective perceptions of body image during the whole breast reconstruction period and to assess the importance of their psychological reaction in terms of negative affectivity. Participants were 62 women, 43 women (M age = 46.4, SD = 9.8) who had had mastectomies and 19 healthy women (M age = 39.9, SD = 13.99). Patients were admitted for surgery at the Hospital S. Orsola in Bologna. Healthy subjects were relatives of the women and students, all with no history of breast pathology. The Body Satisfaction Scale and the State Anxiety Inventory-Y were administered to the two groups before, post, and 6 mo. after surgery. Analysis of scores indicated that during the period of the study, the women with mastectomies reported higher anxiety and also greater dissatisfaction with their body image than the healthy group, even when the breast had been reconstructed. This unexpected finding suggests patients' unrealistic expectations of the breast reconstruction and the surgical outcome. PMID:17958113

Montebarocci, Ornella; Lo Dato, Federica; Baldaro, Bruno; Morselli, Paolo; Rossi, Nicolino C F

2007-08-01

122

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female)  

E-print Network

--22000000 22 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female

Paxton, Anthony T.

123

International study finds advanced post-mastectomy breast reconstruction improves women's psychosocial and sexual well-being:  

Cancer.gov

After a mastectomy, women who undergo breast reconstruction with tissue from their own abdomen experience significant gains in psychological, social, and sexual well-being as soon as three weeks after surgery.

124

Dosimetric comparison of conventional and forward-planned intensity-modulated techniques for comprehensive locoregional irradiation of post-mastectomy left breast cancers  

SciTech Connect

Three recently published randomized trials have shown a survival benefit to postoperative radiation therapy when the internal mammary chain (IMC), supraclavicular (SCV), and axillary lymphatics are treated. When treating the IMC, techniques that minimize dose to the heart and lungs may be utilized to prevent excess morbidity and mortality and achieve the survival benefit reported. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (fIMRT) with conventional techniques for comprehensive irradiation of the chest wall and regional lymphatics. For irradiation of the chest wall and IMC, 3 treatment plans, (1) fIMRT, (2) partially-wide tangent (PWT) fields, and (3) a photon-electron (PE) technique, were compared for 12 patients previously treated at our institution with fIMRT to the left chest wall and regional lymphatics. Additionally, the SCV and infraclavicular lymphatics were irradiated and 4 methods were compared: 2 with anterior fields only (dose prescribed to 3 and 5 cm [SC3cm, SC5cm]) and 2 with anterior and posterior fields (fIMRT, 3DCRT). Each patient was planned to receive 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Regions of interest (ROIs) created for each patient included chest wall (CW) planning target volume (PTV), IMC PTV, and SCV PTV. Additionally, the following organs at risk (OAR) volumes were created: contralateral breast, heart, and lungs. For each plan and ROI, target volume coverage (V{sub 95-107}) and dose homogeneity (D{sub 95-5}) were evaluated. Additionally, the mean OAR dose and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were computed. For irradiation of the CW, target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were improved for the fIMRT technique as compared to PE (p < 0.001, p = 0.023, respectively). Similar improvements were seen with respect to IMC PTV (p = 0.012, p = 0.064). These dosimetric parameters were also improved as compared to PWT, but not to the same extent (p = 0.011, p = 0.095 for CW PTV, and p = 0.164, p > 0.2 for IMC PTV). The PE technique resulted in the lowest heart V{sub 30}, although this difference was not significant (p > 0.2). The NTCP values for excess cardiac mortality for fIMRT and PE were equivalent (1.9%) and lower than with PWT (2.8%, p > 0.2). The fIMRT technique was able to reduce heart dose and NTCP for each patient as compared to PWT. When comparing the anterior field techniques of treating SCV PTV, prescribing dose to 5 cm resulted in a improved V50 (p = 0.089). However, when compared to fIMRT, the SC3cm and SC5cm had inferior target volume coverage (p = 0.055, p = 0.014) and significantly greater dose heterogeneity (p = 0.031, p = 0.043). The addition of a posterior field increased the volume of lung receiving 40 and 50 Gy, but not significantly (p > 0.2). For complex breast treatments that irradiate the chest wall, IMC, and SCV, fIMRT resulted in improved dose homogeneity and target volume coverage as compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the dosimetric gains in target volume coverage with fIMRT came at no significant increase in dose to OAR. The fIMRT technique demonstrated the ability to maintain the advantage of each of the other 2 techniques: reducing the dose to OARs, as with PE, and providing superior target volume coverage, as with PWT.

Cavey, Matthew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: mlcavey@utmb.edu; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Endres, Eugene J. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Pena, John M. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Colman, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Hatch, Sandra [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

2005-06-30

125

Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In most developing countries, as in Egypt; postmenopausal breast cancer cases are offered a radical form of surgery relying on their unawareness of the subsequent body image disturbance. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of breast cancer surgical choice; Breast Conservative Therapy (BCT) versus Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM); on body image perception among Egyptian postmenopausal cases. METHODS: One

Ashraf M Shoma; Madiha H Mohamed; Nashaat Nouman; Mahmoud Amin; Ibtihal M Ibrahim; Salwa S Tobar; Hanan E Gaffar; Warda F Aboelez; Salwa E Ali; Soheir G William

2009-01-01

126

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense Melissa Etheridge promotes breast cancer awareness CSI Breast Cancer Blogroll Being Cancer Debbie's Cancer Women with Cancer Breast Cancer Resources Breast Cancer Alltop Breast Cancer Sisterhood Europa Donna

Espinosa, Horacio D.

127

Breast Cancer and Sexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer among women today. With early detection and advanced treatment options, survival rates are continuing to improve, but not without some long-term physical and emotional side effects. This article reviews the effects of breast cancer in general and breast cancer treatment specifically on sexuality in cancer survivors. How the cancer and its

Helene K. Henson

2002-01-01

128

Reconstructive surgery in young women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Recovery of body image after mastectomy is essential for physical and mental quality of life. Partial or total mastectomy deformities can be reversed by reconstructive surgical procedures. Young women with breast cancer have specific characteristics related to the age of onset of the disease, prognosis and reconstructive expectations. Patient individualization is the key to a successful breast reconstruction. Autologous and prosthetic reconstruction are the two main techniques used for breast reconstruction. Each reconstructive technique has its own indications, advantages and limitations. Timing of the surgery is primarily determined by the requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy, so an immediate or a delayed approach can be recommended. In patients in whom the need for adjuvant radiotherapy is in doubt, a delayed-immediate approach is the best to optimize aesthetic and oncologic outcomes. Prophylactic mastectomy is also being indicated in a growing number of patients. In these patients it is important to choose a similar reconstructive procedure on both sides to achieve breast symmetry. PMID:20721689

Marín-Gutzke, Martina; Sánchez-Olaso, Alberto

2010-09-01

129

Postmastectomy locoregional recurrence and recurrence-free survival in breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: One essential outcome after breast cancer treatment is recurrence of the disease. Treatment decision is based on assessment of prognostic factors of breast cancer recurrence. This study was to investigate the prognostic factors for postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival in those patients. METHODS: 114 patients undergoing mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy in Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical

Ali Arab Kheradmand; Neda Ranjbarnovin; Zahra Khazaeipour

2010-01-01

130

Breast reconstruction - implants  

MedlinePLUS

After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to recreate their breast. This surgery can be ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

131

Choosing a Breast Prosthesis  

MedlinePLUS

... examines the option of using a breast prosthesis after surgery. Although many women who choose a mastectomy (removal ... issues a woman faces and the options available after surgery for breast cancer . What is a breast prosthesis? ...

132

Inflammatory Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and very aggressive disease in which cancer cells block lymph vessels ... difficult. Also, because inflammatory breast cancer is so aggressive, it can arise between scheduled screening mammograms and ...

133

Double Mastectomy Doesn't Improve Survival, Study Finds  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Double Mastectomy Doesn't Improve Survival, Study Finds But many more women ... early cancer in one breast. The registry didn't include genetic information that might have indicated raised ...

134

Breast Cancer Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Intergroup (TBCI) began its transition to the NCI Breast Cancer Steering Committee (BCSC) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Breast Cancer Symposium in September 2008 in Washington DC. The TBCI and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) came together along with the Correlative Science Committee chair of the TBCI to form the BCSC.

135

'Imbricated dermal flap': a novel technique for autologous augmentation in immediate breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy.  

PubMed

This case demonstrates use of a de-epithelialised inferior pole skin flap for a more aesthetic result in immediate autologous breast reconstruction. For women with medium to large ptotic breasts, utilising the excess tissue following skin-sparing mastectomy as an auto-prosthesis, adds volume to the breast and improves inferior pole aesthetics. This 'imbricated dermal flap' offers an excellent addendum to aesthetic breast reconstruction. PMID:24685335

Haydon, N; Southwell-Keely, J; Moisidis, E

2014-06-01

136

Recurrences and second primary breast cancers in older women with initial early-stage disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The association between common breast cancer therapies and recurrences and second primary breast cancers in older women is unclear, although older women are less likely to receive common therapies.\\u000aMETHODS: Women aged >or=65 years who were diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer and who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) from 1990 to 1994 were identified from

Ann M. Geiger; Soe Soe Thwin; Timothy L. Lash; Diana S. M. Buist; Marianne N. Prout; Feifei Wei; Terry S. Field; Marianne Ulcickas Yood; Floyd J. Frost; Shelley M. Enger; Rebecca A. Silliman

2007-01-01

137

Breast Cancer and Bone Loss  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Share: Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

138

Psychological outcomes of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer outside a clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To assess outside a clinical trial the psychological outcome of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer who underwent either mastectomy or breast conservation surgery depending on the surgeon's opinion or the patient's choice. To determine whether the extent of psychiatric morbidity reported in women who underwent breast conservation surgery was associated with their participation in a randomised

L J Fallowfield; A Hall; G P Maguire; M Baum

1990-01-01

139

Trends in the use of bilateral mastectomy in England from 2002 to 2011: retrospective analysis of hospital episode statistics  

PubMed Central

Objectives For healthy women at high risk of developing breast cancer, a bilateral mastectomy can reduce future risk. For women who already have unilateral breast cancer, removing the contralateral healthy breast is more difficult to justify. We examined trends in the number of women who had a bilateral mastectomy in England between 2002 and 2011. Design Retrospective cohort study using the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Setting NHS hospital trusts in England. Participants Women aged between 18 and 80?years who had a bilateral mastectomy (or a contralateral mastectomy within 24?months of unilateral mastectomy) with or without a diagnosis of breast cancer. Main outcome measures Number and incidence of women without breast cancer who had a bilateral mastectomy; number and proportion who had a bilateral mastectomy as their first breast cancer operation, and the proportion of those undergoing bilateral mastectomy who had immediate breast reconstruction. Results Among women without breast cancer, the number who had a bilateral mastectomy increased from 71 in 2002 to 255 in 2011 (annual incidence rate ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.18). In women with breast cancer, the number rose from 529 to 931, an increase from 2% to 3.1% of first operations (OR for annual increase 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.08). Across both groups, rates of immediate breast reconstruction roughly doubled and reached 90% among women without breast cancer in 2011. Conclusions The number of women who had a bilateral mastectomy nearly doubled over the last decade, and more than tripled among women without breast cancer. This coincided with an increase in the use of immediate breast reconstruction. PMID:23906951

Neuburger, Jenny; MacNeill, Fiona; Jeevan, Ranjeet; van der Meulen, Jan H P; Cromwell, David A

2013-01-01

140

Smoking and breast cancer recurrence after breast conservation therapy.  

PubMed

Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P < 0.001). With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P = 0.039). In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0-22.4). Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:24693439

Bishop, Jennifer D; Killelea, Brigid K; Chagpar, Anees B; Horowitz, Nina R; Lannin, Donald R

2014-01-01

141

Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35

Lee K. McNeely; Geraldine M. Jacobson; Dennis D. Leavitt; J. Robert Stewart

1988-01-01

142

Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, two prophylactic surgeries that may be performed to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at very high risk; the situations in which they may be considered; and nonsurgical options.

143

Guidelines Aim to Reduce 2nd Surgeries After Breast Cancer Lumpectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript. Guidelines Aim to Reduce 2nd Surgeries After Breast Cancer Lumpectomy Currently, 1 in 4 women who undergo ... 2015) Wednesday, November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mastectomy Women's Health WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay ...

144

Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... Used in Breast Cancer Drugs Used to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

145

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... the risk of dying from breast cancer. Tissue sampling Breast tissue sampling is taking cells from breast tissue to check ... some studies. Scientists are studying whether breast tissue sampling can be used to find breast cancer at ...

146

Breast Cancer and Depression  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer and Depression HealthDay October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Depression Women's Health Transcript Depression is a disabling ...

147

Breast Cancer: Early Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

148

Living Beyond Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... more Upcoming Events #LBBCchat: Healthy Eating After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis 12/03/2014 Join us at 8 ... Read more Annual Update from the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 12/19/2014 Learn about new research ...

149

Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

150

Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

2014-01-01

151

Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA adduct formation and breast cancer risk  

E-print Network

breast tissue from women undergoing mastectomy or reduction mammoplasty surgery.breast tissue from cases undergoing mastectomy and controls undergoing reduction mammoplasty surgerybreast tissue was obtained from female patients undergoing either mastectomy or reduction mammoplasty surgery

Goth-Goldstein, Regine

2010-01-01

152

Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer.  

PubMed

Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3 years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

2013-01-01

153

Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... risk Known factors that increase the risk of male breast cancer include: • Klinefelter’s syndrome (a genetic condition related to ... This will depend on the stage of their breast cancer. Since most male breast cancers are hormone receptorpositive, hormone therapy (with ...

154

An osteogenesis imperfecta case with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare connective tissue disease characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen and an increased risk of bone fractures. Several OI cases with malignancies have been reported. Herein, we describe an OI case with breast cancer. A 36-year-old premenopausal woman with OI was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of a right breast lump. We diagnosed right breast cancer with axillary and parasternal lymph node metastasis (T2N3M0 stage IIIC). The tumor had increased in size and tumor markers were elevated after 10 months of hormone therapy. We performed a right mastectomy and axillary dissection. She subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is currently taking trastuzumab and tamoxifen. Anesthesia is challenging in OI patients because of difficulty with airway control and intubation. We performed the mastectomy in this case without difficulty by working in cooperation with experienced anesthesiologists, orthopedists, and other medical personnel. Some OI patients reportedly have severe 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) toxicity related to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD is the main enzyme involved in the catabolism of 5-FU. Our present case also had low DPD activity and we thus chose epirubicin and cyclophosphamide for chemotherapy. Our search of the literature yielded only two OI cases with breast cancer as of April 2011. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Japan. PMID:22038671

Taira, Fumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Saito, Mitsue; Kasumi, Fujio

2014-11-01

155

Prophylactic mastectomy: the Rotterdam experience.  

PubMed

The efficacy of prophylactic mastectomy (PM) depends on the ability to remove all breast tissue and a regular mastectomy is recommended. In our study population (n=112), 103 women (94%) have chosen for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with a silicone prosthesis placed in a subpectoral pocket. The median follow-up after IBR was 3.5 (range 1-7) years. These 103 patients underwent 193 PM with IBR: 90 bilateral and 13 unilateral. The median follow-up after IBR was 3.5 (range 1-7) years. In 163 IBRs (82%) no complications were observed. The most common late complication was capsular contracture, significantly more around prostheses placed in a previously irradiated area. No cases of breast cancer were found after PM at a mean follow-up of 2.9 years. After breast cancer a delayed ipsilateral PM and/or contralateral PM can be considered after a disease-free interval of 2 years, also taking into account the age of onset of the first breast cancer. The prognosis of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation patients seems to be similar to that in sporadic cancer. The most striking result of PM is the decrease of anxiety of developing breast cancer and a negative impact on their sexual life. Therefore a time delay is necessary to allow women to fully address the issues involved in PM and IBR. PMID:14659105

van Geel, A N

2003-12-01

156

Partial Breast Reconstruction Using Various Oncoplastic Techniques for Centrally Located Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background As the breast cancer incidence has increased, breast-conserving surgery has replaced total mastectomy as the predominant procedure. However, centrally located breast cancers pose significant challenges to successful breast-conserving surgeries. Therefore, we performed partial mastectomy and oncoplastic procedures on centrally located breast cancer as a means of partial breast reconstruction. The authors examined and evaluated the functional and aesthetic usefulness of this reconstruction method. Methods From January 2007 to June 2011, 35 patients with centrally located breast cancers who underwent various oncoplastic procedures based on the breast size and resection volume. The oncoplastic procedures performed included volume displacement surgical techniques such as purse-string suture, linear suture, and reduction mammaplasty. Other oncoplastic procedures included volume replacement procedures with an adipofascial, thoracoepigastric, intercostal artery perforator, thoracodorsal artery perforator, or latissimus dorsi flap. Results Mean patient age was 49 years, and mean follow-up period was 11 months. In cases of small to moderate-sized breasts and resection volumes <50 g, volume displacement procedures were performed. In cases of resection volumes >50 g, volume replacement procedures were performed. In cases of larger breasts and smaller resection volumes, glandular reshaping was performed. Finally, in cases of larger breasts and larger resection volumes, reduction mammaplasty was performed. This reconstruction method also elicits a high patient satisfaction rate with no significant complications. Conclusions In centrally located breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery considering breast size and resection volume is safe and provides appropriate aesthetic outcomes. Therefore, our method is advisable for breast cancer patients who elect to conserve their breasts and retain a natural breast shape.

Park, Hyo Chun; Kim, Hong Yeul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Jeong Woo; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Park, Ho Yong

2014-01-01

157

The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2011: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the second most frequent malignancy in Korean women, with a continuously increasing incidence. The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through an online registration program. The aim of the present study was to report the fundamental facts on Korean breast cancer in 2011, and to analyze the changing patterns in clinical characteristics and breast cancer management in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, including the total number of cases, age, stage, and type of surgery, for the year 2011 were collected from 84 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey. Additional data relating to the changing patterns of breast cancer in Korea were collected from the online breast cancer registry database and analyzed. According to nationwide survey data, a total of 16,967 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. The crude incidence of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 67 cases per 100,000 women. Analysis of the survey and registry data gave equivalent results in terms of age distribution, stage, and type of surgery. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women (51.3%) was higher than that of premenopausal women (48.7%) with breast cancer. The incidence of stage 0 and stage I breast cancer increased continuously over the last 10 years (56.3% in 2011), and breast conserving surgery (65.7%) was performed more frequently than total mastectomy (33.8%). The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 8-fold. We conclude that the clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed over the past 10 years in Korea, and surgical management has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:25013429

Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Lee, Hun Jae; Lee, Jung Sun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Park, Heung Kyu; Noh, Dong-Young

2014-01-01

158

Breast Cancer Rates by State  

MedlinePLUS

... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Share ... died from breast cancer each year. Incidence of Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

159

Mastectomy -- The Surgical Procedure  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

X Search About Breast Cancer View About Breast Cancer Facts & Statistics View Facts & Statistics What is Breast Cancer View What is Breast Cancer Breast Anatomy Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Invasive Breast Cancers ...

160

Oncological and aesthetic considerations of skin-sparing mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To review the oncological safety and aesthetic value of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) for invasive breast cancer (IBC) and\\u000a ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS). Controversies including the impact of radiotherapy (RT) on immediate breast reconstruction\\u000a (IBR), preservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) and the role of endoscopic mastectomy are also considered. Methods Literature review facilitated by Medline and PubMed databases. Results

Neill Patani; Kefah Mokbel

2008-01-01

161

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives

unknown authors

162

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives ? Drinking alcohol ? Being physically inactive

unknown authors

163

Comfort, Control, or Conformity: Women Who Choose Breast Reconstruction Following Mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following breast amputation women commonly are presented with two choices: to wear a prosthesis or undergo reconstruction. Breast restoration is assumed to allow a full emotional and physical recovery from a breast cancer crisis. Surgical reconstruction is offered to women as the final step in regaining a sense of complete womanhood, enabling a sense of optimism that both body and

Samantha Crompvoets

2006-01-01

164

Complete tissue expander coverage by musculo-fascial flaps in immediate breast mound reconstruction after mastectomy.  

PubMed

Immediate breast reconstruction with tissue expander has become an increasingly popular procedure. Complete coverage of the expander by a musculofascial layer provides an additional well-vascularised layer, reducing the rate of possible complications of skin necrosis, prosthesis displacement, and the late capsular contracture. Complete expander coverage can be achieved by a combination of pectoralis major muscle and adjacent thoracic fascia in selected patients. Seventy-five breast mounds in 59 patients were reconstructed, in the first stage a temporary tissue expander inserted immediately after mastectomy and a musculofascial layer composed of the pectoralis major muscle, the serratus anterior fascia, and the superficial pectoral fascia were created to cover the expander. The first stage was followed months later by implant insertion. Minor and major complications were reported in a period of follow-up ranging from 24-42 months (mean 31 months). Complete musculofascial coverage of the tissue expander was a simple and easy to learn technique providing that the patient has a well-formed and intact superficial pectoral and serratus anterior fascia. From a total of 75 breast mounds reconstructed, major complications rate was 4% (overall rate of 19.8%), including major seroma (n = 4), haematoma (n = 1), partial skin loss (n = 3), wound dehiscence (n = 1), major infection (n = 2), severe capsule contracture (n = 1), and expander displacement (n = 3). The serratus anterior fascia and the superficial pectoral fascia flaps can be effectively used as an autologous tissue layer to cover the lower and the lateral aspect of tissue expanders in immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. PMID:23802185

Alani, Harith A; Balalaa, Nahed

2013-10-01

165

Breast cancer screening.  

PubMed

Mammography remains the primary technique for breast cancer screening. Women with dense breast tissue may benefit from digital mammography and tomosynthesis, and women at high risk may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging. However, false-positive results are problematic. The North Carolina breast density law necessitates education about screening options for women with dense breasts. PMID:24663133

Freimanis, Rita I; Yacobozzi, Margaret

2014-01-01

166

Telomerase and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current therapies for breast cancer include treatments that are toxic and often result in drug resistance. Telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres), is activated in the vast majority of breast cancers (over 90% of breast carcinomas) but not in normal adjacent tissues. Telomerase is thus an attractive target for both diagnosis and therapy because

Brittney-Shea Herbert; Woodring E Wright; Jerry W Shay

2001-01-01

167

Ultra-conservative skin-sparing 'keyhole' mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction.  

PubMed Central

The popularity of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) which preserves the breast skin envelope is increasing, but the risks and benefits of this approach are only beginning to emerge. A technique involving ultra-conservative SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been evaluated to establish the surgical and oncological sequelae of skin conservation. Between 1994-1998, 67 consecutive patients underwent 71 SSM and expander-assisted immediate latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstructions (follow up, 24.1 months; range, 2-52 months). Breast resection, axillary dissection and reconstruction were performed through a 5-6 cm circular peri-areolar 'keyhole' incision. Patients were discharged 6.5 days (range, 5-15 days) after the 3.9 h (range, 3.0-5.5 h) procedure, and expansion was completed by 4.0 months (range, 0-10 months). Local recurrence occurred in 3% of breasts at risk, skin envelope necrosis occurred in 10%, and contralateral surgery was required to achieve symmetry in 14%. SSM and IBR is an oncologically safe, minimal-scar procedure which can be performed by surgeons trained in 'oncoplastic' techniques. It results in low rates of local recurrence and complication, and reduces the need for contralateral surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10932655

Peyser, P. M.; Abel, J. A.; Straker, V. F.; Hall, V. L.; Rainsbury, R. M.

2000-01-01

168

Progressive Wound Necrosis Associated With Postoperative Thrombocytosis in Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction Surgery: Report of a Case  

PubMed Central

A 37-year-old who underwent splenectomy for motor vehicle accident-related injuries was diagnosed with stage IIA carcinoma of left breast 12 years later. She underwent bilateral mastectomy and bilateral immediate unipedicle TRAM flap reconstruction. Her preoperative platelet counts ranged from 332 to 424 K/cmm. Intraoperative fluorescein confirmed mastectomy flap viability. On postoperative day 1, platelet count was 374 K/cmm and all suture lines appeared benign. The patient was discharged 3 days later with healthy appearing tram flaps and slight epidermolysis in the abdominal region. Over the next 2 weeks, both the mastectomy flaps and the abdominal region underwent progressive necrosis as the platelet count increased to 1390 K/cmm. Aspirin therapy was instituted at this time. The TRAM flaps remained completely viable. Eighteen days later, the patient required wound debridement with secondary closure of the breast wounds. Platelet count peaked at 1689 K/cmm 2 days later (postoperative day 38). The wounds deteriorated again and were managed conservatively. Two months after mastectomy, the first area of spontaneous healing was documented (platelet count 758 K/cmm). Ultimately, wounds healed as platelet count reached its preoperative baseline. We hypothesize that an abnormal secondary thrombocytosis at subdermal plexus level caused problematic healing in this patient's mastectomy and abdominal flaps. PMID:19768118

Murphy, Robert X.; Holko, Ginger A.; Khoury, Afifi A.; Bleznak, Aaron D.

2009-01-01

169

MD Anderson Cancer Center study reports many advanced breast cancer patients do not receive recommended treatment:  

Cancer.gov

Radiation after a mastectomy for women with advanced breast cancer saves lives, but almost half of these patients do not receive it. The study's results indicate that treatments that have proven their life-saving potential in clinical trials may not be available to many patients.

170

Breast cancer in young women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast surgery in young women is associated with a significant impact on the patient’s health-related quality of life due\\u000a to changes in body image and sexuality. These perceptions are being increasingly considered as integral to understanding health\\u000a outcomes. Of the available surgical techniques, mastectomy is associated with the highest psychosocial morbidity, and breast-conserving\\u000a surgery with the least. If breast-conserving surgery

Agustí Barnadas; Carlos Vázquez

2010-01-01

171

Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series  

PubMed Central

Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget’s disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

2014-01-01

172

Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast

Petersen, Jennifer

2004-01-01

173

Challenges in managing breast cancer during pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer occurring anytime during gestation, lactation or within one year after delivery. The optimal management of pregnant women with breast cancer is challenging and not well established; the main concern is the effect of the drugs on the developing fetus and long-term complications after in utero exposure to anti-cancer drugs. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for early breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Modified radical mastectomy is standard of care in first trimester, whereas breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy with lymph node dissection) can be performed preferably in the second and third trimester. Of note, breast-conserving surgery is not contraindicated per se during the first trimester, but owing to the potential impact of delaying radiotherapy. Radiation therapy is not favored during pregnancy. Moreover, tamoxifen is contraindicated during pregnancy; the agent has been associated with birth defects in up to 20% of exposures. Chemotherapy is generally contraindicated during the first trimester because of the possible damage to organogenesis. Anthracyclines-based regimens are the most widely used is breast cancer treatment and were been shown to be associated with favourable safety profile when administered during pregnancy. As for taxanes, more limited data is available. The use of trastuzumab is contraindicated during pregnancy, given the apparent risk of oligo- and/or anhydramnios as well as the unknown long-term sequelae on the fetus. It is obvious that, diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy adds complexity to cancer treatment recommendations. In all cases, a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach among obstetricians, gynaecologists, surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, pediatricians and hematologists is clearly warranted. PMID:23819029

Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bartsch, Rupert; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios

2013-01-01

174

Oncologic Safety of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skin-sparing mastectomy consists of a standard mastectomy that preserves as much of the patient’s skin as is safe in preparation for immediate breast reconstruction. Aside from this preserving the skin, the mastectomy technique is the same as that for a standard total mastectomy with removal of all breast tissue. In this issue of the Annals of Surgical Oncology , two

S. Eva Singletary; Geoffrey L. Robb

2003-01-01

175

Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Breast cancer On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed August 2007 What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a disease in which certain ...

176

Breast Cancer in Young Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Podcasts Health-e-Cards Web Badges Infographics Twitter Breast Cancer in Young Women Share Compartir Most breast cancers ... lower your risk. What Is CDC Doing about Breast Cancer in Young Women? CDC works with public, non- ...

177

Breast cancer in China.  

PubMed

The health burden of cancer is increasing in China, with more than 1·6 million people being diagnosed and 1·2 million people dying of the disease each year. As in most other countries, breast cancer is now the most common cancer in Chinese women; cases in China account for 12·2% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers and 9·6% of all deaths from breast cancer worldwide. China's proportional contribution to global rates is increasing rapidly because of the population's rising socioeconomic status and unique reproductive patterns. In this Review we present an overview of present control measures for breast cancer across China, and emphasise epidemiological and socioeconomic diversities and disparities in access to care for various subpopulations. We describe demographic differences between China and high-income countries, and also within geographical and socioeconomic regions of China. These disparities between China and high-income countries include younger age at onset of breast cancer; the unique one-child policy; lower rates of provision and uptake for screening for breast cancer; delays in diagnosis that result in more advanced stage of disease at presentation; inadequate resources; and a lack of awareness about breast cancer in the Chinese population. Finally, we recommend key measures that could contribute to improved health outcomes for patients with breast cancer in China. PMID:24872111

Fan, Lei; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Li, Jun-Jie; St Louis, Jessica; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Yu, Ke-Da; Chen, Wan-Qing; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Goss, Paul E

2014-06-01

178

A comparison of body image, self-esteem and social support in total mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy in Turkish women  

Microsoft Academic Search

As weil as the medical outcomes of two distinct operations, namely total mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy, their impact on the psychic structureing of the patient may differ. A group of 40 woman with who had undergone mastectomy were therefore compared with another 40 with who had received breast-conserving therapy, with regard to the variables of body image, self-esteem and social

Nlhifer Yiimazer; Adnan Aydincr; Sedar Ozkau; Isik Aslay; Nijad Blige

1994-01-01

179

TCGA Proteomics: Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

180

Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-03

181

DECISION ANALYSIS — EFFECTS OF PROPHYLACTIC MASTECTOMY AND OOPHORECTOMY ON LIFE EXPECTANCY AMONG WOMEN WITH BRCA1 OR BRCA2 MUTATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 muta- tions have an increased risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Prophylactic mastectomy and oopho- rectomy are often considered as ways of reducing these risks, but the effect of the procedures on life expectancy has not been established. Methods In a decision analysis, we compared pro- phylactic mastectomy and prophylactic oophorec- tomy with

DEBORAH SCHRAG; KAREN M. KUNTZ; JUDY E. GARBER

2010-01-01

182

Locoregional first recurrence after mastectomy: prospective cohort studies with and without immediate chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the impact of combination chemotherapy in the combined modality treatment of isolated first locoregional recurrence (LRR) following mastectomy for breast cancer.Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1989, 120 chemotherapy-naive women with isolated LRR as first failure after mastectomy were prospectively identified, uniformly staged, and systematically followed. Treatment consisted of excision if feasible, radical locoregional radiotherapy, and

Brian J Haylock; Chris M. L Coppin; Jeremy Jackson; Vivien E Basco; Kenneth S Wilson

2000-01-01

183

[Risk of breast cancer].  

PubMed

The factors that influence the risk of breast cancer are vitally important when collecting information on woman particularly at risk from cancer for screening and for advisory care in breast clinics. On the basis of the experience gathered over the last 150 years (since Rigoni-Stern in 1842), these should be divided up into I. confirmed (carcinoma of the breast, mastopathy with cytological atypia, women whose mother and sisters already had breast cancer), II. probable (childlessness, late first birth, miscarriage, early menarche and late menopause, overweight, elevated socio-economic status), and III. improbable risk factors (paranchyma samples according to Wolfe, the contraceptive pill, nicotine, coffee, alcohol and drugs). PMID:2699136

Thür, L

1989-12-01

184

A nationwide epidemiologic study of breast cancer incidence followingbreast reduction surgery in a large cohort of Swedish women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  While it has been demonstrated that prophylactic mastectomy reduces breast cancer incidence among women at high risk, many\\u000a women often consider this disfiguring surgery unacceptable. One alternative approach may be breast reduction surgery. In order\\u000a to evaluate the long-term incidence of breast cancer following surgical removal of breast tissue, we have extended by 9 years\\u000a the follow-up period of our earlier

Jon P. Fryzek; Weimin Ye; Olof Nyrén; Robert E. Tarone; Loren Lipworth; Joseph K. McLaughlin

2006-01-01

185

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project Breast cancer is  

E-print Network

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project NEED Breast cancer is emerging as a uniquely on molecularly- driven research and to design models that adequately serve the study of breast cancer risk scientists and public health experts is dedicated to research on the primary prevention of breast cancer

Ginzel, Matthew

186

Less invasive treatment associated with improved survival in early stage breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Patients with early stage breast cancer who were treated with lumpectomy plus radiation may have a better chance of survival compared with those who underwent mastectomy, according to a study from Duke Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute. The study, which appears online Jan. 28, 2013, in the journal CANCER, raises new questions as to the comparative effectiveness of breast-conserving therapies such as lumpectomy, where only the tumor and surrounding tissue is surgically removed.

187

University of Michigan study finds most women who have double mastectomy don't need it  

Cancer.gov

About 70 percent of women who have both breasts removed following a breast cancer diagnosis do so despite a very low risk of facing cancer in the healthy breast, new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds. Recent studies have shown an increase in women with breast cancer choosing this more aggressive surgery, called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, which raises the question of potential overtreatment among these patients.

188

250 Years of Advances Against Cancer - 1930s  

Cancer.gov

David H. Patey develops the modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. This surgical procedure, which involves removal of the entire breast, the axillary lymph nodes under the adjacent arm, and the pectoralis minor muscle behind the breast, is less disfiguring than the radical mastectomy and would eventually replace it as the standard surgical treatment for breast cancer.

189

pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women  

PubMed Central

Consider this scenario: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple’s relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman’s diagnosis. Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment? Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program—the first of its kind in Canada—for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

Ali, A.; Warner, E.

2013-01-01

190

Long-term Follow-up of Breast-conserving Therapy in Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.  

PubMed

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. Currently, multimodality treatment is recommended, but the optimal surgical management has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the long-term outcomes of using breast-conserving therapy in patients with IBC undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Twenty-four patients with IBC were treated from 2002 to 2006. NAC was initiated with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel. In addition, HER2/neu-positive patients received trastuzumab, whereas HER2/neu-negative patients received bevacizumab. Clinical response was assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging before surgery and pathologic response after surgery. A partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and/or axillary lymph node dissection or a modified radical mastectomy was performed based on the surgeon's recommendations and patient's preference. All patients received adjuvant radiation. Of the 24 patients, seven (29%) underwent a partial mastectomy and 17 (71%) underwent a mastectomy. The overall survival rate for partial mastectomy and for mastectomy patients was 59 and 57 per cent (P = 0.49), respectively, at a median follow-up of 60 months (range, 48 to 92 months). Breast-conserving therapy can be considered in a selected group of patients who demonstrate a good response to NAC. PMID:25264634

Bonev, Valentina; Evangelista, Maristella; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Su, Min-Ying; Lane, Karen; Mehta, Rita; Butler, John; Hsiang, David

2014-10-01

191

Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

Bantema-Joppe, Enja J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Munck, Linda de [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Visser, Otto [Comprehensive Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willemse, Pax H.B. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Siesling, Sabine [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maduro, John H., E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2011-11-15

192

Mastectomy or conservation: the patient's choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--To determine whether, if given the choice, patients with breast cancer would prefer mastectomy or conservation treatment, neither treatment having been shown to be preferable. DESIGN--Non-randomised case series with 28 patients interviewed after two years and all followed up. SETTING--Secondary care referral centre. PATIENTS--153 women, aged less than 65, with T1, T2, N1, and N0 tumours of the breast

R. G. Wilson; A. Hart; P. J. Dawes

1988-01-01

193

Limited-Field Radiation Therapy in the Management of Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several phase III trials have demonstrated equivalent long-term survival between breast conserving surgery plus radiation therapy and mastectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer but have not provided infor- mation on the optimal volume of breast tissue requiring post-lumpectomy radiation therapy. Therefore, we exam- ined the 5-year results of a single institution's experience with radiation therapy limited to the

Frank A. Vicini; Larry Kestin; Peter Chen; Pamela Benitez; Neal S. Goldstein; Alvaro Martinez

2003-01-01

194

Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer Or Other Cancers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-07-01

195

Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... for professional printing [PDF-1.1MB] Cancer Home Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Many things can increase the ...

196

Body image after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy: an integrative literature review.  

PubMed

Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM) can reduce a woman's risk for breast cancer by 80%. Thus, women who are at high risk for familial breast cancer are increasingly opting for BPM as a preventative option. Research indicates that there are psychological benefits to BPM, including a reduction in anxiety about developing breast cancer. The purpose of this integrative review is to summarize the research that has examined the effect of prophylactic mastectomy on women's subsequent body image. Thirteen studies were reviewed. The majority of women were satisfied with their decision. However, the majority of studies indicate that up to one-half of the women suffer a negative effect on body image and changes in sexuality. Knowledge of these findings can improve the practitioner's ability to counsel women regarding this radical decision. Further research, particularly prospective studies, are needed to examine women's body image prior to BPM so that the impact of prophylactic mastectomy can be examined more thoroughly. PMID:17081926

McGaughey, Amy

2006-01-01

197

Epigenomics and breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

Lo, Pang-Kuo

2009-01-01

198

Breast cancer and protein biomarkers  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

Gam, Lay-Harn

2012-01-01

199

Conservative treatment of breast cancer: mammography in patient selection and follow-up  

SciTech Connect

Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer with favorable prognosis results in a low recurrence rate similar to that after mastectomy but with the added benefit of preserving the breast. The mammographic characteristics of the malignant disease before biopsy and the presence of residual disease on the mammogram after biopsy strongly influence the choice of treatment. After radiotherapy, follow-up mammography can accurately monitor postirradiation changes and the occasional development of recurrent cancer.

Paulus, D.D.

1984-09-01

200

Breast Cancer Patient Protection Act of 2013 (HR 1531; 113th Congress)  

Cancer.gov

In addition, the bill would prohibit insurers from restricting benefits for any hospital length of stay in connection with a lymph node dissection for the treatment of breast cancer to less than 24 hours; and from providing incentives to a physician to reduce the length of inpatient stays following a mastectomy, lumpectomy, or a lymph node dissection for the treatment of breast cancer below certain limits or to limit referrals for secondary consultations.

201

Breast cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiographic imaging of the breast began in the early years of the twentieth century. Continuous advances in film quality, energy sources, targets, grids, and filters have all contributed to superior image resolution. Federal quality standards now regulate screening mammography, and mass screening for breast cancer has become widely accepted in the United States. Wider application of screening has resulted in

Kathleen M. Harris; Victor G. Vogel

1997-01-01

202

Breast and Gynecologic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials and the evaluation of new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and new technologies to identify premalignant

203

What Is Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

204

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women Key Points Based on current breast cancer incidence rates, experts estimate that ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

205

Pain after Quadrantectomy and Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Incidence, Characteristics and Influence on Quality of Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Conservative breast surgery (CBS) is viewed as a surgical technique able to improve the psychophysical outcome of women who underwent surgery for breast cancer (BC). CBS has clearly improved the impact of local treatment on postoperative body image adjustment, but the effect on patients’ quality of life (QL) is similar to that observed after mastectomy. This insufficient adjustment may

Maurizio Amichetti; Orazio Caffo

2003-01-01

206

Effects of breast cancer surgery and surgical side effects on body image over time  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the impact of surgical treatments (breast-conserving surgery [BCS], mastectomy alone, mastectomy with reconstruction)\\u000a and surgical side-effects severity on early stage (0–IIA) breast cancer patients’ body image over time. We interviewed patients\\u000a at 4–6 weeks (T1), six (T2), 12 (T3), and 24 months (T4) following definitive surgical treatment. We examined longitudinal\\u000a relationships among body image problems, surgery type, and surgical side-effects

Karen Kadela Collins; Ying Liu; Mario Schootman; Rebecca Aft; Yan Yan; Grace Dean; Mark Eilers; Donna B. Jeffe

2011-01-01

207

Quality of life in breast cancer patients aged over 70 years, participating in the EORTC 10850 randomised clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mastectomy and breast-conserving treatment have proven equally effective in terms of survival in early breast cancer, but studies continue to provide evidence that patients undergoing breast-conserving procedures have a better quality of life (QOL). Age is not considered to be a contraindication for breast-conserving treatment, but retrospective studies have indicated that elderly patients are less likely to be treated conservatively.

J. C. J. M de Haes; D. Curran; N. K. Aaronson; I. S. Fentiman

2003-01-01

208

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

209

Your Body After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber Newlywed Sarah Lien didn’t ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

210

Laser optoacoustic imaging of breast cancer in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A clinical prototype of the laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS) was employed for breast cancer detection and localization in patients with confirmed breast cancer and scheduled for radical mastectomy. The prototype LOIS used a single optical fiber for delivery of laser pulses, an arc shaped 32-element PVDF transducer array for ultrawide-band piezoelectric detection of optoacoustic signals and a single-channel data acquisition card for signal processing. The resonance ultrasound frequency of the 110 micrometers PVDF film was outside detectable range of ultrasound. Spatial resolution of the transducer array was slightly better than 1mm in radial direction and slightly worse than 1 mm in lateral direction. The system was optimized for contrast and sensitivity. Data acquisition, signal conditioning and image processing were significantly improved and optimized resulting in reduced image frame rate of 2 seconds employing 700 MHz Aphlon processor. The computer code for digital signal processing employed band-pass hyper-Gaussian filtering and denoising. An automatic recognition of the optoacoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the breast surface and improve the accuracy of tumor localization. Radial back- projection algorithm was employed adopting combination of integration along spherical wavefronts and integration along planar wavefronts (as in Radon transform) for image reconstruction. The system performance was evaluated initially in breast tissue-like phantoms with embedded blood vessels. Clinical studies in breast cancer patients scheduled for surgical mastectomy were performed and compared with x-ray radiography, ultrasound and pathology reports.

Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Solomatin, Sergey V.; Savateeva, Elena V.; Andreev, Valeri A.; Gatalica, Zoran; Singh, Harbans; Fleming, R. Declan

2001-06-01

211

Treatment of Early Breast Cancer: A Report after Ten Years of a Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

A controlled clinical trial has been carried out to compare radical mastectomy with wide excision (extended tylectomy) in the treatment of early breast cancer. Only patients aged 50 and over were included and 370 entered the trial during a period of 10 years. Postoperative radiotherapy was given in each case. In patients with clinically involved axillary nodes there was a

Hedley Atkins; J. L. Hayward; D. J. Klugman; A. B. Wayte

1972-01-01

212

Electrode Structure Optimum for Impedance Measurement of Intraoperative Breast Cancer Focus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impedance measuring method may be used to assess the margin of breast cancer focus in the process of operation. This rapid measurement can shorten the waiting time and lighten patients' pain in partial mastectomy. In order to satisfy the requirements of margin assessment, the design of electrodes structure is studied in this paper. Through simulation analyses on three types

WANG Chao CHEN; Hong-bin Chen; Da-li Du; Ya-su Xiao; Hong-jun Sun

2008-01-01

213

Axillary metastases from occult breast cancer. Our experience.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with occult breast cancer who presented with a hard metastatic nodule in the left axilla. Although histology identified a metastatic carcinoma in the lymph nodes, numerous tests failed to detect the primary tumor. Resected lymph node was positive for both estrogen and progesterone receptors, suggesting the breast as the site of the primary tumor. Left modified radical mastectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an invasive lobular carcinoma (2.5 x 2 mm in size) with extensive lymphatic involvement, which strongly expressed both vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D. PMID:24576904

Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Polistena, Andrea; D'Ermo, Giuseppe; Lucchini, Roberta; Triola, Roberta; Conti, Claudia; Avenia, Stefano; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; De Toma, Giorgio; Avenia, Nicola

2014-02-01

214

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

2000-01-01

215

Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2012-11-14

216

Cas Signaling in Breast Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Antiestrogens have proven to be effective in the treatment of hormone-responsive breast cancer. In metastatic breast cancer, antiestrogens lead to a response in nearly one half of patients. Resistance to antiestrogens, however, is a serious clinical probl...

K. Vuori

2007-01-01

217

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

218

Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

219

Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture HealthDay November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Acupuncture Breast Cancer Exercise and Physical Fitness Transcript Exercise therapy and ...

220

Extent of Primary Breast Cancer Surgery: Standards and Individualized Concepts  

PubMed Central

Surgery is still a main therapeutic option in breast cancer treatment. Nowadays, methods of resection and reconstruction vary according to different tumors and patients. This review presents and discusses standards of care and arising questions on how radical primary breast cancer surgery should be according to different clinical situations. In most early breast cancer patients, breast conservation is the method of choice. The discussion on resection margins is still controversial as different studies show conflicting results. Modified radical mastectomy is the standard in locally advanced breast cancer patients, although there are different promising approaches to spare skin or even the nipple-areola complex. A sentinel node biopsy is the standard of care in clinically node-negative invasive breast cancer patients, whereas the significance of axillary lymphonodectomy seems to be questioned through a number of different findings. Although there are interesting findings to modify surgical approaches in very young or elderly breast cancer patients, it will always be an individualized approach if we do not adhere to current guidelines. Up to date, there are no special surgical procedures in BRCA mutation carriers or patients of high-risk families. PMID:24647774

Heil, Joerg; Fuchs, Valerie; Golatta, Michael; Schott, Sarah; Wallwiener, Markus; Domschke, Christoph; Sinn, Peter; Lux, Michael P.; Sohn, Christof; Schutz, Florian

2012-01-01

221

Extent of primary breast cancer surgery: standards and individualized concepts.  

PubMed

Surgery is still a main therapeutic option in breast cancer treatment. Nowadays, methods of resection and reconstruction vary according to different tumors and patients. This review presents and discusses standards of care and arising questions on how radical primary breast cancer surgery should be according to different clinical situations. In most early breast cancer patients, breast conservation is the method of choice. The discussion on resection margins is still controversial as different studies show conflicting results. Modified radical mastectomy is the standard in locally advanced breast cancer patients, although there are different promising approaches to spare skin or even the nipple-areola complex. A sentinel node biopsy is the standard of care in clinically node-negative invasive breast cancer patients, whereas the significance of axillary lymphonodectomy seems to be questioned through a number of different findings. Although there are interesting findings to modify surgical approaches in very young or elderly breast cancer patients, it will always be an individualized approach if we do not adhere to current guidelines. Up to date, there are no special surgical procedures in BRCA mutation carriers or patients of high-risk families. PMID:24647774

Heil, Joerg; Fuchs, Valerie; Golatta, Michael; Schott, Sarah; Wallwiener, Markus; Domschke, Christoph; Sinn, Peter; Lux, Michael P; Sohn, Christof; Schütz, Florian

2012-10-01

222

Octogenarians: noncompliance with breast cancer treatment recommendations.  

PubMed

Recent research suggests that women older than 70 years of age with early breast cancer who choose lumpectomy may forgo radiation if they take antihormonal medication. However, many elderly patients choose to forgo both radiation and hormonal therapy. This study assessed treatment compliance in elderly patients with breast cancer. A retrospective review was conducted of patients with new-onset breast cancer older than 70 years of age. Patients were stratified by age (70 to 79 vs 80 years or older) and surgical procedure (lumpectomy vs mastectomy). Ninety-seven patients were included; 47 were aged 70 to 79 years, whereas 50 were aged 80 years or older. Treatment recommendations were similar between age groups; however, patients aged 80 years or older were more often noncompliant with recommendations for surgery (14.9 vs 0.0%, P = 0.012), radiation therapy (64.0 vs 16.0%, P = 0.001), and hormonal therapy (53.3 vs 22.6%, P = 0.013). When stratified according to surgical procedure, women aged 80 years or older receiving lumpectomy were overall more noncompliant (50.0 vs 14.8%, P = 0.014) than younger women. Women older than 80 years of age who elected for lumpectomy treatment were significantly less likely to receive standard recommendations of adjuvant hormonal or radiation therapy. The reasons for this vary and it is unknown whether this impacts their local recurrence or survival rate. PMID:25347502

Strader, Lindsay A; Helmer, Stephen D; Yates, Christine L; Tenofsky, Patty L

2014-11-01

223

Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

224

The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

2012-01-01

225

Breast cancer in young women  

PubMed Central

Although uncommon, breast cancer in young women is worthy of special attention due to the unique and complex issues that are raised. This article reviews specific challenges associated with the care of younger breast cancer patients, which include fertility preservation, management of inherited breast cancer syndromes, maintenance of bone health, secondary prevention, and attention to psychosocial issues. PMID:21067532

2010-01-01

226

Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

RADIATION THERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER © ASTRO 2011 Printed on Recycled Paper CARING FOR YOURSELF NOTES/QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTOR Facts to Help Patients Make ... Oncology Group www.rtog.org HELPFUL WEBSITES ON BREAST CANCER Breast Cancer Network of Strength www.networkofstrength.org ...

227

MD Anderson study finds majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients benefit from radiation after lumpectomy  

Cancer.gov

For the majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients, radiation therapy following breast conserving surgery may help prevent the need for a later mastectomy, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, are contrary to current national treatment guidelines, which recommend that older women with early stage, estrogen-positive disease be treated with lumpectomy followed by estrogen blocker therapy alone -- and forgo radiation therapy post-surgery.

228

Screening of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the randomized controlled trials carried out in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mammographic screening was demonstrated to\\u000a have an impact in decreasing mortality from breast cancer. The evaluation of mammographic service screening programmes implemented\\u000a in several Western European countries in the late 1980s and the 1990s demonstrated that these programmes may have an even\\u000a higher effect on breast

Per Skaane

229

CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... date with mammography screening. Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer 22M 22 million adults aged 50–75 need ... of people who get screened for colon or breast cancer is very different from state to state. The ...

230

Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-12-01

231

Lower extremity anterior compartment syndrome complicating bilateral mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

‘Well leg compartment syndrome’ refers to compartment syndrome occurring in a nontraumatic setting. This occurs most commonly in the lower limb during surgery performed with the patient in an anatomically vulnerable position. While this complication is well documented in the setting of orthopedic, urological and gynecological surgeries, it is an exceptionally rare complication in plastic surgery; only seven cases have been published on compartment syndrome complicating an operation performed on a supine patient. A case involving a 56-year-old woman who developed an anterior compartment syndrome of her right lower leg following a bilateral mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is presented. A detailed literature review is also included. PMID:23730157

Tashakkor, A Yashar; Macadam, Sheina A

2012-01-01

232

Breast size, breast reduction, and cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

reduction surgery does suggest some increased surveillance around surgery. Seven of them had breast cancers (including five in situ carcinomas) identified from routine histopathology evaluation of tissue removed during surgery. Some or all such tumors would have emerged within a few years. Their early removal may explain the especially marked deficit of breast cancer in the first 10 years after

Silvia Franceschi; Epidemiology Unit; Thurfjell E; Hsieh C-c; Lipworth L; Ekbom A; Adami HO

1997-01-01

233

Understanding process-of-care delays in surgical treatment of breast cancer at a comprehensive cancer center.  

PubMed

Few studies have examined care processes within providers' and institutions' control that expedite or delay care. The authors investigated the timeliness of breast cancer care at a comprehensive cancer center, focusing on factors influencing the time from initial consultation to first definitive surgery (FDS). The care of 1,461 women with breast cancer who underwent surgery at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center from 2011 to 2013 was studied. The interval between consultation and FDS was calculated to identify variation in timeliness of care based on procedure, provider, and patients' sociodemographic characteristics. Targets of 14 days for lumpectomy and mastectomy and 28 days from mastectomy with immediate reconstruction were set and used to define delay. Mean days between consultation and FDS was 21.6 (range 1-175, sd 15.8) for lumpectomy, 36.7 (5-230, 29.1) for mastectomy, and 37.5 (7-111, 16) for mastectomy with reconstruction. Patients under 40 were less likely to be delayed (OR = 0.56, 95 % CI = 0.33-0.94, p = 0.03). Patients undergoing mastectomy alone (OR = 2.64, 95 % CI = 1.80-3.89, p < 0.0001) and mastectomy with immediate reconstruction (OR = 1.34 95 % CI = 1.00-1.79, p = 0.05) were more likely to be delayed when compared to lumpectomy. Substantial variation in surgical timeliness was identified. This study provides insight into targets for improvement including better coordination with plastic surgery and streamlining pre-operative testing. Cancer centers may consider investing in efforts to measure and improve the timeliness of cancer care. PMID:25270121

Golshan, Mehra; Losk, Katya; Kadish, Sarah; Lin, Nancy U; Hirshfield-Bartek, Judith; Cutone, Linda; Sagara, Yasuaki; Aydogan, Fatih; Camuso, Kristen; Weingart, Saul N; Bunnell, Craig

2014-11-01

234

Vitamin D and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

2012-01-01

235

Cyclophosphamide With or Without Veliparib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

236

Local Recurrence After Skin-Sparing Mastectomy: Tumor Biology or Surgical Conservatism?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Long-term follow-up of the use of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in the treatment of breast cancer is presented to determine the impact of local recurrence (LR) on survival. Methods:A total of 539 patients were treated for 565 cases of breast cancer by SSM and immediate breast reconstruction from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1998. The American Joint Committee on Cancer

Grant W. Carlson; Toncred M. Styblo; Robert H. Lyles; John Bostwick; Douglas R. Murray; Charles A. Staley; William C. Wood

2003-01-01

237

Sexuality after breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer (BC) may affect three main domains of women's sexuality: sexual identity, sexual function and sexual relationship. Age, lymphedema, side-effects of surgery, radio-, chemo- and hormonotherapy, pregnancy-related problems, infertility, iatrogenic premature menopause, with its cohort of symptoms secondary to the chronic loss of estrogens on the brain, on the sensory organs, on the pathophysiology of sexual response and on

A. Graziottin; V. Rovei

2007-01-01

238

Breast Cancer Among Asian Women  

Cancer.gov

A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

239

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

240

MD Anderson researchers find that APBI is associated with more mastectomies, toxicities, complications, compared to traditional radiation  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation.

241

Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chen, C.-J. [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Joy [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2007-09-01

242

Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-17

243

Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer

2014-08-06

244

Inflammatory breast cancer: high risk of contralateral breast cancer compared to comparably staged non-inflammatory breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the most lethal form of breast cancer, has characteristics linked to higher risk of contralateral\\u000a breast cancer. However, no large studies have examined risk of contralateral breast cancer following IBC. We calculated absolute\\u000a risk of invasive contralateral breast cancer among 5,631 IBC and 174,634 comparably staged non-IBC first breast cancer cases\\u000a who survived at least 2 months

Catherine SchairerLinda; Linda M. Brown; Phuong L. Mai

2011-01-01

245

Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

2014-11-04

246

Breast Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

2014-01-01

247

Technique of subcutaneous mastectomy and immediate reconstruction in hypertrophic or ptotic breasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for subcutaneous mastectomy approaching from an incision directly below the mamilla is described. It allows complete resection of the gland under full vision. By preparing two dermis flaps, one from above carrying the mamilla and one from below, based at the submammary fold, a double-layered cover for the silicone implant, which replaces the gland, can be secured. —

H. Reichert

1977-01-01

248

Diet, Stem Cells, and Breast Cancer Prevention.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy of women in the Western world. Many risk factors are associated with the development and progression of breast cancer; however, diet/nutrition constitutes a highly modifiable risk. Breast cancer is considered to...

R. C. Simmen

2011-01-01

249

Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story  

MedlinePLUS

... Library Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Posted in: Risk and Prevention , ... Share Text Highlight Glossary Terms Join Our Male Breast Cancer Online Community If you are a man living ...

250

Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... cause normal breast cells to become cancerous. Inherited gene mutations Certain inherited DNA mutations can dramatically increase ... of breast cancer that runs in families. Acquired gene mutations Most DNA mutations related to breast cancer ...

251

Waist Size and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... about their health, including details about fertility, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, use of hormone ... were diagnosed with breast cancer. Infertility treatment, family history of breast and ovarian cancer and use of ...

252

Adiponectin and Breast Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone, is closely and inversely associated with insulin resistance and was recently found to be inversely and independently associated with en- dometrial cancer. Because insulin resistance in the setting of obesity has also been associated with the development of breast cancer, we have hypothesized that decreased adi- ponectin levels might underlie the association between breast cancer and

CHRISTOS MANTZOROS; ELENI PETRIDOU; NICK DESSYPRIS; CHARILAOS CHAVELAS; MARIA DALAMAGA; DELIA MARINA ALEXE; YANNIS PAPADIAMANTIS; CHRISTOS MARKOPOULOS; EVANGELOS SPANOS; GEORGE CHROUSOS; DIMITRIOS TRICHOPOULOS

253

Multiple bone metastases detected 10 years after mastectomy with silicone reconstruction for DCIS and contralateral augmentation  

PubMed Central

Key Clinical Message The patient developed multiple bone metastases following mastectomy with silicone reconstruction and contralateral augmentation for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. She was diagnosed with contralateral invasive cancer. Distant metastasis of DCIS is rare, and other metastatic origins must be screened. However, screening of augmented breasts is difficult. PMID:25356204

Mori, Ryutaro; Nagao, Yasuko

2013-01-01

254

Silicone Breast Implants Are Not Linked to Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

In one of the largest studies on the long-term health effects of silicone breast implants, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Md., found no association between breast implants and the subsequent risk of breast cancer.

255

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

256

Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence.  

PubMed

Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the remaining life of a patient. When surgical excision of chest wall recurrence is not possible, other local treatments such as radiotherapy, radiotherapy with hyperthermia, topical chemotherapy and electrochemotherapy might be taken into account. Electrochemotherapy provides safe, efficient and non-invasive locoregional treatment approach for chest wall breast cancer recurrence. Several clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy and a good safety profile of electrochemotherapy applied in single or multiple consecutive sessions, till clinical response was reached. Electrochemotherapy can be performed either with cisplatin injected intratumorally or with bleomycin given intratumorally or intravenously. Furthermore, it can be effectively used in heavily pre-treated areas, after surgery, radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. These are the advantages that might demand its use especially in patients with pre-treated extensive disease and in frail elderly patients. With development of the technology electrochemotherapy could even be suggested as a primary local therapy in patients not suitable for surgical removal of the primary tumor. PMID:21856080

Sersa, Gregor; Cufer, Tanja; Paulin, Snezna Marija; Cemazar, Maja; Snoj, Marko

2012-08-01

257

Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2011-12-07

258

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

259

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

260

Secondary cancer rates following breast cancer diagnosis.  

PubMed

Life table analysis and other mortality methods apply well to end points other than mortality. This paper demonstrates the application of mortality experience methodology to the recurrence of breast cancer and/or new primaries in women previously diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Specific recurrence rates are broken out by duration as well as attributes available at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis: stage, histology, age band, and year of diagnosis. Use of attained age is demonstrated to control for the effect of aging over long durations. Breast cancer recurrence is shown to drop to a relatively low rate compared with the rate of new primary occurrence. PMID:17941334

Wesley, David

2007-01-01

261

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

262

Immediate breast reconstruction: results and satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delayed breast reconstruction following mastectomy for cancer is widely accepted because of a high satisfaction rate. Immediate\\u000a breast reconstruction offers an even more satisfactory solution, especially related to recovery and self-esteem. In our study,\\u000a immediate breast reconstruction was performed for three indications: breast cancer, high risk for development of breast cancer\\u000a and chronic cystic breast disease. Forty-eight consecutive patients with

P. H. M. Spauwen; T. Wobbes; R. F. van der Sluis

2000-01-01

263

[Accepting a mastectomy thanks to socio-aesthetics].  

PubMed

For women of all ages, a mastectomy can affect their body image and femininity. Poor management, both physical and emotional, of a breast removal, can have major consequences on a patient's intimate, family and social life. In the framework of the multi-disciplinary treatment of breast cancer, a team in Lyon carried out a study on the impact of including socio-aesthetic practices in the overall care. PMID:23316588

Arquillière, Agnès; Blanc, Nathalie

2012-12-01

264

Menopause after breast cancer: a survey on breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the younger age and the ever wider use of adjuvant chemotherapy and antiestrogens, menopausal symptoms are a frequent cause of concern for breast cancer patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of menopausal symptoms, and to explore the attitudes toward Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or other treatments and the willingness to take oestrogen in breast cancer patients. Methods: A

Nicoletta Biglia; Marilena Cozzarella; Franca Cacciari; Riccardo Ponzone; Riccardo Roagna; Furio Maggiorotto; Piero Sismondi

265

Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation  

MedlinePLUS

... Near You About the Program The NBCCEDP Conceptual Framework Social Ecological Model Screening Program Data Screening Program ... and Resources Related Links Contact a Local Program Web Badges Cancer Home Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation ...

266

Breast cancer statistics and markers.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25313729

Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

2014-01-01

267

Benign Breast Disease and the Risk of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Benign breast disease is an important risk factor for breast cancer. We studied a large group of women with benign breast disease to obtain reliable estimates of this risk. methods We identified all women who received a diagnosis of benign breast disease at the Mayo Clinic between 1967 and 1991. Breast-cancer events were obtained from medical records and questionnaires.

Lynn C. Hartmann; Thomas A. Sellers; Marlene H. Frost; Wilma L. Lingle; Amy C. Degnim; Karthik Ghosh; Robert A. Vierkant; Shaun D. Maloney; V. Shane Pankratz; David W. Hillman; Vera J. Suman; Jo Johnson; Cassann Blake; Thea Tlsty; Celine M. Vachon; L. Joseph Melton III; Daniel W. Visscher

2005-01-01

268

Mammographic screening for breast cancer: A review  

PubMed Central

In 2011, BreastScreen Australia celebrated 20 years of mammographic screening for breast cancer in Australia. There has been a reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the last two decades, coincident with mammographic screening. However, there are concerns that mammographic screening may result in overdiagnosis of breast cancer and that the reduction in mortality from breast cancer is the result of better treatment rather than screening. This article reviews the evidence on which mammographic screening for breast cancer is based, considers the issue of overdiagnosis of breast cancer by screening mammography, and assesses the role of screening mammography in the reduction in breast cancer mortality seen over the last two decades.

Lee, Warwick; Peters, Gudrun

2013-01-01

269

If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the Other Breast  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... PhD, Université de Montréal) VIDEO: If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the ... Back to Home Page VIDEO: If I Had - Breast Cancer in One Breast and Had Concerns About the ...

270

Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-25

271

Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-17

272

Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-15

273

Communication with Breast Cancer Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer survivors must manage chronic side effects of original treatment. To manage these symptoms, communication must include both biomedical and contextual lifestyle factors. Sixty breast cancer survivors and 6 providers were recruited to test a conceptual model developed from uncertainty in illness theory and the dimensions of a patient-centered relationship. Visits were audio-taped, then coded using the Measure of

Margaret F. Clayton; William N. Dudley; Adrian Musters

2008-01-01

274

Sexual Life After Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The trauma of being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer can impact greatly on womens? psychosexual functioning and intimate relationships. Survivors of breast cancer report that issues of body image, sexuality and partner communication rarely are addressed by traditional health care providers (Ganz, Rowland, Desmond, Meyerowitz, & Wyatt, 1998). Psychotherapy can help women cope with difficult changes in body image

Lisa M. Anllo

2000-01-01

275

Imaging inflammatory breast cancer.  

PubMed

Carcinomatous mastitis is a severe form of breast cancer and its diagnosis is essentially clinical and histological. The first examination to perform is still mammography, not only to provide evidence supporting this diagnosis but also to search for a primary intramammary lesion and assess local/regional spread. It is essential to study the contralateral breast for bilaterality. Ultrasound also provides evidence supporting inflammation, but appears to be better for detecting masses and analysing lymph node areas. The role of MRI is debatable, both from a diagnostic point of view and for monitoring during treatment, and should be reserved for selected cases. An optimal, initial radiological assessment will enable the patient to be monitored during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:22305593

Alunni, J-P

2012-02-01

276

Green Tea and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

2014-01-01

277

Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-05

278

Galectin-3 as a Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P?=?0.001). Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation. PMID:25254965

Zhang, Hao; Liang, Xi; Duan, Chao; Liu, Caigang; Zhao, Zuowei

2014-01-01

279

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Thomas Buchholz, M.D.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHouston, TX Nancy Davidson, M.D.University of Pittsburgh Cancer InstituteUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer CentersPittsburgh, PA Members William

280

BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 4 Basic/Translational Research Carcinogenesis and Signaling Group 5R) Signaling in Breast Cancer 6 NF-B Family of Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer 7 Transgenic Mouse

Spence, Harlan Ernest

281

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Hong Guo, Qing Zhang and Asoke K. Nandi, Feature Extraction, Classification, Breast Cancer Diagnosis. Abstract: Breast cancer diagnosis have been investigated by different machine learning methods. This paper proposes a new method for breast cancer

Fernandez, Thomas

282

Socio-demographic and clinical profile of immuno-histochemically confirmed breast cancer in a resource limited country  

PubMed Central

Introduction Breast cancer is the most common cancer in females. It is the most common cause of cancer-related death among women with fatality rates highest in low-income countries. The aim of this study is to determine the socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients with immunohistochemically confirmed breast cancer in a Nigerian tertiary health institution. Methods Patients with immunohistochemically confirmed breast cancer were reviewed. The information retrieved was entered into a proforma designed for the purpose of the study. Data was analysed using SPSS version 18.0. Results The peak incidence of age at presentation was in the 5th decade. More than 50% of the patients were premenopausal and perimenopausal at presentation. Only 11% of the patients presented with breast lumps less than 2 cm in size. Women in the age group 50-59 years are more likely to present with larger breast lumps than women in other groups. More than 50% had clinically palpable lymph node at presentation. Mastectomy (simple mastectomy and modified radical mastectomy) and adjuvant chemotherapy were the main form of treatment. Most of the cases were estrogen receptor negative with majority of them having basal-like subtype. Conclusion Most of the patients in this study were not only young but presented with locally advanced disease. Population screening, adequate health education, improved accessibility and availability of heath care will go a long way to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:25392728

Rahman, Ganiyu Adebisi; Olatoke, Samuel Adegboyega; Agodirin, Suleiman Olayide; Adeniji, Kayode Adebanji

283

Nipple Discharge: An Early Warning Sign of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Nipple discharge (ND) can be the earliest presenting symptom of breast cancer. We hereby present two cases of breast cancer with no palpable mass manifesting as isolated ND, which was whitish in color. In both cases, cytology of the discharge revealed highly pleomorphic cells indicating a high grade malignancy. Mammography showed diffuse, extensive microcalcifications. Simple mastectomy with axillary clearance was done. Histology in both cases revealed diffusely spreading intraductal carcinoma, with focus of microinvasion in one case. ND if scanty or not blood stained is often ignored by the patients and at times, the clinicians. This article highlights that ND can be an early warning sign of intraductal carcinomas that are non-invasive in early stage. Irrespective of the color or nature of the discharge, unilateral ND needs to be evaluated. Proper clinical assessment, cytological evaluation of the ND, and mammography ought to be performed in all such cases. Considering the low level of awareness in women regarding the warning signs of breast cancer, the current focus is to create “breast awareness.” Women should be sensitized to recognize any unusual changes in their breasts and report to their health care providers at the earliest. PMID:23189234

Parthasarathy, Veda; Rathnam, Usharani

2012-01-01

284

Integrating surgery and radiotherapy to reduce toxicity while maintaining local control for breast cancer: A fine balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of breast-conserving therapy was conceived as a careful integration of surgery and radiotherapy to maximize cosmetic outcomes without sacrificing survival relative to mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer. 1-8 Therefore, risks of untoward side effects must be minimized while maintaining adequate levels of local control. Over time, surgical and radiation oncologists have made refinements in the techniques of both

Rinaa S. Punglia; Jay R. Harris

2002-01-01

285

Knowledge, attitude and practice of prophylactic mastectomy among patients and relations attending a surgical outpatient clinic  

PubMed Central

Introduction Prophylactic mastectomy (PM) is uncommon in our practice. This study documents the knowledge and attitude of patients and relation to prophylactic mastectomy. Methods Adults attending surgical outpatient unit were interviewed. Biodata, awareness of breast cancer, and attitude towards prophylactic mastectomy were inquired about and documented. Results Two hundred and forty eight (99 men and 149 women) were involved. Most, 75.6%, were age bracket 20-29 years and 77.2% had tertiary education. Only 26 (10.4%) of the respondents had previous history of breast diseases. 96.4% were aware of cancer of the breast while 113 (45.2%) of them were aware that breast cancer gene can be inherited from parents and 60 (24.2%) believe cancer of the breast can affect women with strong positive family history. Only 64 (25.6%) of them would agree to prophylactic mastectomy if found necessary. Reasons given for possible refusal to consent to PM include effect on beauty, (40%), psychological effect, (22.8%), non-curing of disease, (18%), possible surgical complications, (7.2%), and financial cost, (1.2%). Presence of unilateral breast cancer and high risk status constituted about 71% of suggested possible indications for PM while presence of any breast disease was suggested by only 7.3% of respondents. The profession or education of respondents did not have significance on their acceptance or rejection of PM. Conclusion Awareness of prophylactic mastectomy is low among patients in this study. Education about breast cancer and methods of prevention need to be improved. PMID:23308325

Oguntola, Adetunji Saliu; Olaitan, Peter Babatunde; Omotoso, Olutayo; Oseni, Ganiyu Oyediran

2012-01-01

286

Simultaneous osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis in a patient with cancer of the breast.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is generally managed surgically with adjuvant agents which include hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and bisphosphonate therapy. However, some of these adjuvant therapies may cause adverse events, including wound infection, neutropenia, bone marrow suppression and fever. The simultaneous presentation of osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis has not previously been described in patients with breast cancer undergoing hormone therapy and chemotherapy. We report a patient with breast cancer who developed bone infarcts in both legs as well as osteomyelitis in the right distal tibia after treatment which included a modified radical mastectomy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy. Simultaneous osteonecrosis and osteomyelitis should be considered in patients with breast cancer who are receiving chemotherapy and hormone therapy who present with severe bone pain, especially if there have been infective episodes during treatment. PMID:19721056

Huang, K-Y; Yang, R-S; Hsieh, C-C

2009-09-01

287

The side effects of docetaxel with cyclophosphamide as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for elderly breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The aim of this study was to investigate the side effects of docetaxel with cyclophosphamide as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy\\u000a for elderly breast cancer patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Thirty-six operable elderly breast cancer patients at intermediate risk based on the St Gallen risk classification underwent\\u000a modified radical mastectomy and then were given four cycles of TC regimen (docetaxel 75 mg\\/m2 i.v. on day 1;

Lingqin Song; Yinbin Zhang; Jianjun He; Xijing Wang; Hongbing Ma; Wentao Xi; Liang Liang

2011-01-01

288

Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-29

289

Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2013-11-21

290

RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-30

291

Adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in Western Europe and the U.S. Adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the rate\\u000a of cancer recurrence, thereby contributing to the recent decline of breast cancer mortality. Notably, a number of important\\u000a developments occurred over the past decades. Starting with first generation regimens like CMF, the next step was the introduction\\u000a of anthracyclines into

R. Bartsch; G. G. Steger

2008-01-01

292

Pathology of hereditary breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are predisposed to breast cancer. The BRCA1-associated breast cancers have distinct morphology, being more often medullary-like, triple negative and showing a ‘basal’ phenotype. On the other hand, BRCA2 and BRCAX cancers are a heterogeneous group without a specific phenotype. When incorporated into risk assessment models, pathology data improves prediction of carrier

Leonard Da Silva; Sunil R Lakhani

2010-01-01

293

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

294

Relaxin and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Relaxin is a peptide hormone of luteal origin with a broad range of biological activities on tissues and organs of the female reproductive system as well as on other targets not directly related to the reproductive function. The mammary gland is one of the major targets for relaxin, which has been shown to promote growth and differentiation of mammary parenchyma and stroma. Based on the recognition of the mammotrophic action of relaxin, further research could show that this peptide also influences the behaviour of breast cancer cells in vitro. In fact, when relaxin was added to the culture medium of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells for short exposure times it had a biphasic effect on their growth, stimulating cell proliferation at low, nanomolar concentrations and inhibiting it at high, micromolar concentrations. In the longer times, relaxin had a marked growth-inhibitory effect on MCF-7 cells at any concentration assayed, and concurrently promoted cell differentiation and expression of adhesion molecules which are known to binder the spreading ability of cancer cells. The positive effect of relaxin on MCF-7 cell differentiation was even enhanced when these cells were cocultured with myoepithelial cells, thus recreating a microenvironment reminiscent of the tissue architecture of the mammary ducts in vivo. Concerning the mechanisms of action of relaxin on MCF-7 cells, it seems that the growth-inhibiting and differentiation-promoting effects of the peptide are mediated through the activation of the synthetic pathway of nitric oxide. PMID:9180842

Bani, D

1997-02-01

295

Epigenetics and Breast Cancers  

PubMed Central

Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Er?) dimers wherein the ligand ER? dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-?-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5?-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ER? dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ER? dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

2012-01-01

296

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

297

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

298

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

1998-01-01

299

Targeted therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases that are clinically subdivided as hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2(+)), and triple-negative breast cancer, to guide therapeutic interventions. Agents that target estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 are among the most successful cancer therapeutics. However, de novo or acquired resistance is common, despite the development of newer agents against these pathways. As our understanding of tumor biology improves, novel targets are being identified. Notably, inhibitors against several pathways [including, among others, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR), cell-cycle regulation, heat shock protein, and epigenetic pathways] have demonstrated promising activity in clinical trials, and the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus has been approved for advanced or metastatic aromatase inhibitor-resistant ER(+) breast cancer. At present, there are no established targeted agents for triple-negative breast cancer (negative ER, progesterone receptor, and HER2). Although poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors have shown promising activity in BRCA-related cancers, its value in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancers remains to be demonstrated. In this Review, we present a basic understanding of the major targeted agents in current practice and under development for the treatment of breast cancer in the context of the three clinical subgroups. PMID:23988612

Mohamed, Ali; Krajewski, Kenneth; Cakar, Burcu; Ma, Cynthia X

2013-10-01

300

Cancer following breast reduction surgery in Denmark  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intuitively, breast tissue mass should be directly related to a woman'srisk of breast cancer, simply because having more cells at risk would seem toincrease the potential for malignant transformation. However, studiesattempting to link breast size with breast cancer risk have beeninconsistent. Limitations include crude measures of breast size, theinability to distinguish glandular from adipose tissue, and the confoundinginfluence of co-factors

John D. Jr. Boice; Søren Friis; Joseph K. McLaughlin; Lene Mellemkjaer; William J. Blot; Joseph F. Jr. Fraumeni; Jørgen H. Olsen

1997-01-01

301

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , BS ; Kamaneh Montazeri , MD ; Sara Tolaney , MD ; Javid Moslehi , MD ... javid.moslehi{at}vanderbilt.edu Next Section Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

302

Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

303

Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

2013-01-01

304

Veliparib and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-16

305

Factors Associated With Guideline-Concordant Use of Radiotherapy After Mastectomy in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We examined the rates and determinants of appropriate and inappropriate use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), as defined by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) practice guidelines, among women with Stage I-II breast cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition). Methods and Materials: Using clinical characteristics, 1,620 consecutive patients at eight NCCN institutions who had undergone mastectomy between July 1997 and June 2002 were classified into three cohorts according to whether the guidelines (1) recommended PMRT, (2) recommended against PMRT, or (3) made no definitive PMRT recommendation. We defined the absence of PMRT in the first cohort as underuse and receipt of PMRT in the second cohort as overuse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the association of clinical and sociodemographic factors with PMRT. Results: Overall, 23.8% of patients received PMRT. This included 199 (83.6%) of 238 in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort, 58 (5.6%) of 1,029 in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort, and 127 (38.6%) of 329 in the 'consider PMRT' cohort. The only factor associated with underuse in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort was nonreceipt of chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; p <0.0001). In addition to tumor characteristics, the factors associated with overuse in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort included age <50 years (OR, 2.28; p = 0.048), NCCN institution (OR, 1.04-8.29; p = 0.026), higher education (OR, 3.49; p = 0.001), and no reconstructive surgery (OR, 2.44; p = 0.019). The factors associated with PMRT in the 'consider PMRT' cohort included NCCN institution (OR, 1.1-9.01; p <0.0001), age <50 years (OR, 2.26; p = 0.041), and tumor characteristics. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concordance with definitive treatment guidelines was high. However, when current evidence does not support a definitive recommendation for PMRT, treatment decisions appear to be influenced, not only by patient age and clinical characteristics, but also by institution-specific patterns of care.

Punglia, Rinaa S. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: rpunglia@partners.org; Hughes, Melissa E. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Edge, Stephen B. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Theriault, Richard L. [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bookman, Michael A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wilson, John L. [Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard Solove Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Niland, Joyce C. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Weeks, Jane C. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-12-01

306

Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study  

SciTech Connect

Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

Khanfir, Kaouthar, E-mail: kaouthar.khanfir@rsv-gnw.ch [Hopital de Sion, CHCVs, Sion (Switzerland); Kallel, Adel [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Villette, Sylviane [Centre Rene Huguenin, Paris (France); Belkacemi, Yazid [CHU Henri Mondor, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Vautravers, Claire [Centre George Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Nguyen, TanDat [Institut Jean Gaudinot, Reims (France); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Li Yexiong [Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Boersma, Liesbeth [Maastricht University Medical Center (MAASTRO clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philip [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Goldberg, Hadassah [Western Galilee Hospital-Nahariya, Nahariya (Israel); Vees, Hansjorg [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Senkus, Elzbieta [Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut [Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-04-01

307

Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

2011-01-01

308

Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act  

MedlinePLUS

Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act The Federal law The Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act (WHCRA) ... let insurance plans give doctors incentives to discourage women from having breast reconstruction after mastectomy? No. The ...

309

About Breast Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

310

Stem cell and tissue engineering in breast reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer worldwide is the most common cancer in women with incidence rate varying from geographic areas. Guidelines for management of breast cancer have been largely established and widely used. Mastectomy is one of the surgical procedures used treating breast cancer. Optionally, after mastectomy, appropriately selected patients could undergo breast reconstruction to create their breast contour. Many techniques have been used for breast reconstructive surgery, mainly implant-based and autologous tissue reconstruction. Even with highly-experienced surgeon and good-quality breast and autologous substitute tissue, still there could be unfilled defect after mastectomy with reconstruction. Stem cell, in particular, adipose-derived stem cell residing within fat tissue, could be used to fill the imperfection providing optimal breast shape and natural feeling of fat tissue. However, whether surgical reconstruction alone or in combination with stem cell and tissue engineering approach be used, the ultimate outcomes are patient safety first and satisfaction second. PMID:25083496

Lohsiriwat, Visnu

2014-01-01

311

Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

1990-05-01

312

Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

313

Tailored Treatment for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, doctors will use a test called the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay, which measures the activity of a set of genes in breast tumor tissue, to determine which women will receive adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to hormone therapy.

314

Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-26

315

How Is Breast Cancer Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... has not been shown to detect cancer early. Biopsy A biopsy is done when mammograms, other imaging ... the breast can be removed. Fine needle aspiration biopsy In a fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, the ...

316

Fostering early breast cancer detection.  

PubMed

This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

2014-12-01

317

Breast Cancer and the Environment  

MedlinePLUS

... paying more attention to how experiences as a baby, a child, or an adolescent may influence the risk for breast cancer when women reach middle and older ages. But this gap of many decades between environmental exposures at younger ...

318

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes hormone therapy (including antiestrogens, LH-RH agonists, aromatase inhibitors, and SERMs) and its role in preventing and treating breast cancer. Includes information about possible side effects.

319

Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

320

Ascertaining invasive breast cancer cases; the validity of administrative and self-reported data sources in Australia  

PubMed Central

Background Statutory State-based cancer registries are considered the ‘gold standard’ for researchers identifying cancer cases in Australia, but research using self-report or administrative health datasets (e.g. hospital records) may not have linkage to a Cancer Registry and need to identify cases. This study investigated the validity of administrative and self-reported data compared with records in a State-wide Cancer Registry in identifying invasive breast cancer cases. Methods Cases of invasive breast cancer recorded on the New South Wales (NSW) Cancer Registry between July 2004 and December 2008 (the study period) were identified for women in the 45 and Up Study. Registry cases were separately compared with suspected cases ascertained from: i) administrative hospital separations records; ii) outpatient medical service claims; iii) prescription medicines claims; and iv) the 45 and Up Study baseline survey. Ascertainment flags included diagnosis codes, surgeries (e.g. lumpectomy), services (e.g. radiotherapy), and medicines used for breast cancer, as well as self-reported diagnosis. Positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity and specificity were calculated for flags within individual datasets, and for combinations of flags across multiple datasets. Results Of 143,010 women in the 45 and Up Study, 2039 (1.4%) had an invasive breast tumour recorded on the NSW Cancer Registry during the study period. All of the breast cancer flags examined had high specificity (>97.5%). Of the flags from individual datasets, hospital-derived ‘lumpectomy and diagnosis of invasive breast cancer’ and ‘(lumpectomy or mastectomy) and diagnosis of invasive breast cancer’ had the greatest PPV (89% and 88%, respectively); the later having greater sensitivity (59% and 82%, respectively). The flag with the highest sensitivity and PPV ? 85% was 'diagnosis of invasive breast cancer' (both 86%). Self-reported breast cancer diagnosis had a PPV of 50% and sensitivity of 85%, and breast radiotherapy had a PPV of 73% and a sensitivity of 58% compared with Cancer Registry records. The combination of flags with the greatest PPV and sensitivity was ‘(lumpectomy or mastectomy) and (diagnosis of invasive breast cancer or breast radiotherapy)’ (PPV and sensitivity 83%). Conclusions In the absence of Cancer Registry data, administrative and self-reported data can be used to accurately identify cases of invasive breast cancer for sample identification, removing cases from a sample, or risk adjustment. Invasive breast cancer can be accurately identified using hospital-derived diagnosis alone or in combination with surgeries and breast radiotherapy. PMID:23399047

2013-01-01

321

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2013-05-07

322

Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Advanced or Metastatic  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hormone-resistant Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-09-30

323

FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-04

324

Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention.\\u000a Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet,

Angela R. Bradbury; Olufunmilayo I. Olopade

2007-01-01

325

Fusion genes in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth M. Batty Clare College, University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge in candidature for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy November 2010 ii... is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. It has not been submitted whole or in part for any other qualification at any other University. iii Summary Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth Batty...

Batty, Elizabeth

2012-02-07

326

Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

327

"Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?" Jordanian men's perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman’s decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men’s individual and contextual perspectives on women’s breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. Methods An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one’s wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men’s feelings of responsibility for the family’s health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men’s views about other men’s rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men’s perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one’s own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Conclusions Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support. PMID:24160268

2013-01-01

328

Personalized therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a complex disease characterized by many morphological, clinical and molecular features. For many years, this disease has been classified according to histopathologic criteria, known as the tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) staging system. Clinical criteria that include immunohistochemical markers, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), provide a classification of breast cancer and dictates the optimal therapeutic approach for treatment. With genomic techniques, such as real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing, breast cancer diagnostics is going through a significant evolution. Genomic and transcriptomic technologies make the analysis of gene expression signatures and mutation status possible so that tumors may now be classified more accurately with respect to diagnosis and prognosis. The -omic era has also made the possible identification of new biomarkers involved in breast cancer development, survival and invasion that can be gradually incorporated either into clinical testing or clinical trials. Together, clinical and molecular criteria can contribute to a more personalized management of the breast cancer patient. This article will present the progress made in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer using molecular information provided by genomic and transcriptomic technologies. PMID:24635704

De Abreu, F B; Schwartz, G N; Wells, W A; Tsongalis, G J

2014-07-01

329

The Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 1990s, breast cancer advocates petitioned the United States Congress to investigate the high rates of breast cancer on Long Island in the state of New York. The resulting law led to the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP) — more than ten research projects designed to study the possible causes of this increased incidence of cancer.

Deborah M. Winn

2005-01-01

330

Surgical and financial implications of genetic counseling and requests for concurrent prophylactic mastectomy.  

PubMed

Risk assessment evaluation and breast cancer (BRCA) testing can occur in situations where a woman considers herself to be at increased risk for developing breast cancer or her physicians, either during routine evaluation or after diagnosis of unilateral breast cancer, consider her to be at risk for harboring a genetic predisposition to breast malignancy. This study examined the impact of risk assessment counseling on trends in breast surgery and cost of care. A retrospective chart review was performed from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008 for women older than 18 years who underwent breast surgery for malignancy or prophylaxis, had at least 1-year follow-up, and underwent genetic counseling. From the total number of women treated at our institution who underwent unilateral or bilateral mastectomy, we identified 102 women who underwent genetic counseling and selected 199 patients who did not undergo counseling to create a 4:1 retrospective case-control study. Patients who underwent BRCA gene testing and/or counseling were compared with patients who did not (controls). The study was powered at 70%, and alpha was set at 0.05. Counseled patients were >9 times more likely to undergo bilateral mastectomies (odds ratio = 9.18). They were younger (46.4 vs. 61.8) and incurred higher total costs ($10,810 vs. $7,266) (P < 0.002). The same trend was observed in each group. In counseled and control groups, younger women chose bilateral mastectomies (mean 44.4; 55.5), whereas older women chose unilateral procedures (mean 49.8; 63.02) (P < 0.014). Total cost for bilateral mastectomies was greater than unilateral mastectomies for both groups. Of 55 counseled patients undergoing mastectomies (85 breasts), 78 (92%) breasts were reconstructed, whereas 113 (49%) of 230 breasts were reconstructed in the control group. There was a statistically significant association between counseling with BRCA testing and decision to undergo bilateral as opposed to unilateral mastectomies. Younger women were also more likely to choose bilateral mastectomies whether or not they underwent counseling. Furthermore, a greater proportion of counseled women who underwent reconstruction opted to have bilateral implants. At our institution, younger women tend to choose costlier options. PMID:20395792

Murphy, Robert X; Adkinson, Joshua M; Namey, Tara; Eid, Sherrine; Bleznak, Aaron

2010-05-01

331

Assisted reproduction and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in reproductive age women. Although well known causal link between estrogen and breast cancer, the impact of ovulation induction on the risk of breast cancer still remains to be clarified. One of the recently recognized long term adverse effects of adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy given for breast cancer is premature ovarian failure and infertility, both of which significantly compromise the quality of life of a cancer survivor. Thanks to significant developments in assisted reproductive technologies these patients may benefit from a wide range of fertility preservation options. The most established technique is embryo cryopreservation; oocyte cryopreservation can be considered in single women; both of which require at least 2 weeks of ovarian stimulation beginning with the onset of the patient's menstrual cycle. Novel ovarian stimulation protocols using tamoxifen and letrozole can be used to increase the margin of safety in estrogen sensitive breast tumors. When there is no time available for ovulation induction, ovarian tissue can be cryopreserved for future transplantation without delay in cancer therapy. The benefit of ovarian protection by gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues is unproven and unlikely, and thus this treatment should not be recommended as the sole method of fertility preservation. PMID:17923831

Sonmezer, M; Atabekoglu, C

2007-08-01

332

Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

2003-01-01

333

Evaluation of predictive factors for local tumour control after electron-beam-rotation irradiation of the chest wall in locally advanced breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose: Different radiotherapy techniques are being used for chest wall irradiation after mastectomy. We review our results with the electron-beam-rotation technique in a series of 130 high risk breast cancer patients. The main end point of the study was local tumour control; secondary end points were disease free survival, and overall survival, as well as acute and late

Thomas Hehr; Wilfried Budach; Frank Paulsen; Christian Gromoll; Gunther Christ; Michael Bamberg

1999-01-01

334

Clinicopathological features of gastric metastasis from breast cancer in three cases.  

PubMed

The common sites for metastases from breast cancer are lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver, and brain. Gastrointestinal (GI) metastasis is rarely found or diagnosed in patients with breast cancer. This report presents three cases of gastric metastasis from breast cancer. Case 1 was a 42-year-old female diagnosed with gastric metastasis after mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for invasive lobular carcinoma of the left breast. Case 2 was a 54-year-old female who was diagnosed to have invasive lobular carcinoma of the left breast with systemic bone and gastric metastasis. Case 3 was a 54-year-old female who was diagnosed to have bilateral invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast with simultaneous bone and gastric metastasis. The immunohistochemical statuses for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, mammaglobin, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15) between the primary and gastric metastatic lesions were all well matched. All three cases were treated with systemic chemotherapy, hormone therapy or both, without surgical intervention for gastric lesions. Two patients with disseminated disease died 27 and 58 months after diagnosis of gastric metastasis, while one patient without organ metastasis is still alive at 56 months after diagnosis. It is important to make a correct diagnosis by distinguishing gastric metastasis from breast cancer in order to select the optimal initial treatment for systemic disease of breast cancer. PMID:21779814

Koike, Kenta; Kitahara, Kenji; Higaki, Mayumi; Urata, Masako; Yamazaki, Fumio; Noshiro, Hirokazu

2014-09-01

335

Does multicentric\\/multifocal breast cancer differ from unifocal breast cancer? An analysis of survival and contralateral breast cancer incidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose we evaluated whether patients with multifocal\\/multicentric (M\\/M) breast cancer have different outcomes compared to unifocal\\u000a (U) disease in terms of survival and the development of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) disease. Methods women diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer were classified as having U or M\\/M disease. Prognostic factors were prospectively\\u000a collected and obtained from the breast cancer outcome unit

Rinat Yerushalmi; Hagen Kennecke; Ryan Woods; Ivo A. Olivotto; Caroline Speers; Karen A. Gelmon

2009-01-01

336

Hormone therapy and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Use or nonuse of hormone therapy (HT) is a controversial decision for menopausal women that has taken on increasing significance as the large number of baby boomers enter this life stage. Studies suggest benefits of HT for prevention of osteoporosis and coronary artery disease, as well as a possible increased risk for cancer, particularly breast cancer. Because of this risk for breast cancer, women with a family history may feel differently about HT. However, differences have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in attitudes toward HT of menopausal women with and without a family history of breast cancer. A nonexperimental, cross-sectional design was used. The setting included various sites located in a rural community in northwestern Pennsylvania. A convenience sample of 110 was obtained. A Health Belief Model attitudinal scale was completed by the participants. Although there were no significant differences in attitudes toward HT between the groups, ancillary analysis revealed a significant difference (P = .04) in frequency of reported fear of breast cancer regarding HT in those women with a family history of breast cancer and those without such a history. The findings of this study point to a need for further research on attitudes of women regarding HT and how they may affect postmenopausal healthcare management. PMID:11858293

Zimmerman, V L; Smeltzer, S C

2000-01-01

337

Metabolomics in noninvasive breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer remains the most leading cause of death among women worldwide. Common methods for diagnosis and surveillance include mammography, histopathology and blood tests. The major drawback of mammography is the high rate of false reports, aside from the risk from repeated exposure to harmful ionizing radiations; histopathology is time consuming and often prone to subjective interpretations; blood-based tests are attractive, but lack the sensitivity and specificity. Obviously, more sensitive biomarkers for early detection and molecular targets for better treating breast cancer are urgently needed. Fortunately, molecular level 'omics' diagnosis is becoming increasingly popular; metabolomics, diagnosis based on 'metabolic fingerprinting' may provide clinically useful biomarkers applied toward identifying metabolic alterations and has introduced new insights into the pathology of breast cancer. By applying advanced analytical and statistical tools, metabolomics involves the comprehensive profiling of the full complement of low molecular weight compounds in a biological system and could classify the basis of tumor biology of breast cancer, to identify new prognostic and predictive markers and discover new targets for future therapeutic interventions. This advanced bioanalytic methods may now open new avenues for diagnostics in cancer via discovery of biomarkers. In this review we take a closer look at the metabolomics used within the field of breast cancer diagnosis. Further, we highlight the most interesting metabolomics publications and discuss these in detail; additional studies are mentioned as a reference for the interested reader. A general trend is an increased focus on biological interpretation rather than merely the ability to classify samples. PMID:23669185

Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Xi-jun

2013-09-23

338

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

339

Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

340

Breast cancer following augmentation mammoplasty (United States)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:Although clinical reports have raised concern that breast implants may either increase the risk of breast cancer or delay its diagnosis, epidemiologic studies have generally shown implant recipients to be at a reduced risk of subsequent breast cancer. A large retrospective cohort study was undertaken to clarify effects of cosmetic breast implantation.

Louise A. Brinton; Jay H. Lubin; Mary Cay Burich; Theodore Colton; S. Lori Brown; Robert N. Hoover

2000-01-01

341

[Primitive neuroendocrine cancer of the breast. Post-traumatic discovery of a man].  

PubMed

We report a primitive neuroendocrine breast tumor (NET) in a male. This situation is uncommon by its mode of discovery. We have treated a 74-year-old man with a lesion in the left areola initially considered as an organized hematoma due to a severe trauma. The ablation was performed by direct access under local anesthesia. The analysis of the piece has showed a NET of the breast due to the positivity of the neuroendocrine, cytokeratin and hormone markers. No other NET lesion was found, excluding the secondary origin of the breast tumor. Complementary therapies associated mastectomy, lymphadenectomy, hormonotherapy. Male breast cancer is rare. NET are exceptional, only a dozen of male NET is reported. These tumors affect a specific population and have a better prognosis than infiltrating ductal carcinoma. In our case, no causal link can be demonstrated between trauma and tumor microenvironment necessary for the growth of quiescent cancer cells. PMID:20952117

Potier, B; Arnaud, D; Paillocher, N; Darsonval, V; Rousseau, P

2012-12-01

342

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

343

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

344

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

345

Breast Reconstruction  

MedlinePLUS

... requires group health plans, insurance companies and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that pay for mastectomy to also pay for [ 124 ]: Reconstruction of the breast removed with mastectomy Surgery and reconstruction of the opposite breast to get ...

346

Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the breast cancer research-training program is to recruit and train potential future researchers in breast cancer research. We recruited 15 individuals, interviewed eight, and chose five for the program. During the 12-week program, trainees...

G. P. Zaloga

2004-01-01

347

Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Breast Cancer Research Training Program is to recruit and train potential future researchers in breast cancer research. During the 3-year grant, we recruited 75 applicants to the program, interviewed 22 candidates, and hired 15 students...

G. P. Zaloga, K. L. Spear

2006-01-01

348

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

349

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

350

Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk Introduction A woman’s hormone levels normally change ... that may influence a woman’s chances of developing breast cancer later in life. As a result, over several ...

351

Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer Key Points There is no conclusive research linking ... antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer. Research studies of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and ...

352

If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... PhD, Newcastle University) VIDEO: If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer - Dr. Susan Love, MD, David Geffen School of ... to Home Page VIDEO: If I Had - Metastatic Breast Cancer - Dr. Susan Love, MD, David Geffen School of ...

353

Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... Policy Makers CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Share Compartir ... for breast cancer live long and healthy lives. Women with Disabilities Are Less Likely to Have Received ...

354

Glycolytic Enzymes in Breast Cancer, Benign Breast Disease and Normal Breast Tissue  

Microsoft Academic Search

The activities of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, enolase and pyru-vate kinase were studied in breast cancer tissues, in comparison to benign breast disease and normal breast tissues. The enzyme activities in breast cancer were significantly increased compared to normal and benign breast tissues (p < 0.001). Also the increase in activity in benign disease compared to normal was statistically significant (p

A. Hennipman; J. Smits; B. van Oirschot; J. C. van Houwelingen; G. Rijksen; J. P. Neyt; J. A. M. van Unnik; G. E. J. Staal

1987-01-01

355

Novel iontophoretic administration method for local therapy of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Ductal drug therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for primary breast cancers, particularly those involving ductal carcinoma in situ lesions. Total or partial mastectomy with or without radiotherapy is the standard local therapy for primary breast cancer. Here, we propose a novel drug administration method for ductal drug therapy based on a drug delivery system (DDS) for primary breast cancer. This DDS was designed to deliver miproxifen phosphate (TAT-59), an antiestrogen drug, to ductal lesions via the milk duct, where carcinomas originate, more efficiently than systemic administration, using an iontophoretic technique applied to the nipple (IP administration). Autoradiography imaging confirmed that TAT-59 was directly delivered to the milk duct using IP administration. The plasma concentrations of TAT-59 and its active metabolite DP-TAT-59 were quite low with IP administration. The area under the curve value of DP-TAT-59 in the mammary tissue was approximately 3 times higher with IP administration than with oral administration, at a 6-fold lower dose, indicating higher availability of the drug delivered via DDS than via systemic administration. The low plasma concentrations would limit adverse effects to minor ones. These characteristics show that this DDS is suitable for the delivery of active DP-TAT-59 to ductal lesions. PMID:23562634

Komuro, Masahito; Suzuki, Kenichi; Kanebako, Makoto; Kawahara, Takashi; Otoi, Takeshige; Kitazato, Kenji; Inagi, Toshio; Makino, Kimiko; Toi, Masakazu; Terada, Hiroshi

2013-06-28

356

BRCA1 and Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-part animation explains the role of the BRCA1 protein in DNA repair and the development of breast cancer. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene can lead to breast cancer and other forms of cancer. Part 1 of the animation, ÃÂThe function of BRCA1,ÃÂ provides an overview of how the BRCA1 protein functions in healthy cells to detect and repair DNA damage. Part 2, ÃÂMutations in BRCA1 Can Cause Cancer,ÃÂ explains how individuals who inherit a single mutated copy of BRCA1 are at an increased risk of cancer, and how cancer develops when the second copy of BRCA1 becomes mutated. Animation is closed captioned. Run times of each animation part: approximately 1 minute 15 seconds.

2010-11-18

357

Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

358

Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.  

PubMed

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

359

Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

360

Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-05-15

361

Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2013-10-07

362

Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-17

363

Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-18

364

Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-04-02

365

Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

366

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

367

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

Ginzel, Matthew

368

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter  

E-print Network

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter Special Interest Articles: ·Hormone receptor negative breast cancer: Improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy by targeting immune cells Page 1, cont. Page 6 (article from Breast Cancer Connections) Page 8 Editor: Karla Kerlikowske, MD Professor of Medicine

Walter, Peter

369

FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... and Territorial Data NCHS Home FastStats Home Mammography/Breast Cancer Data are for the U.S. Mammography use Percent ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

370

National Patterns of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Neoplastic Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In the United States, one in eight women will suffer from breast cancer in her lifetime and 40,000 will die from the disease each year. The overall US mortality from breast cancer is approximately 20%. The current modified radical mastectomy approach, with various adjuvant options provides 35-40% twenty-year survival. Following mastectomy, women have the option of no reconstruction, immediate

Jaisa Olasky

2006-01-01

371

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming  

E-print Network

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer after lung cancer and the fifth most common cause of cancer death

Ludwig, Simone

372

Subsequent Pregnancy After Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 213,000 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in the US during 2006. Of these, 25% and 10% occurred in women\\u000a younger than 50 and 40 years, respectively (Howe et al. 2006). As women are delaying childbearing for personal reasons, including\\u000a cultural, educational, and professional reasons (Ventura 1989), there has been an increasing number of patients in whom breast

Fedro Peccatori; Saverio Cinieri; Laura Orlando; Giulia Bellettini

373

Skin Lesions after Prophylactic Mastectomy and Immediate Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Summary: Metastatic breast carcinoma can mimic benign cutaneous lesions. Breast surgeons should be aware of skin manifestations to be able to distinguish them and set a proper therapeutic strategy. A clinical case of cutaneous lesion after breast cancer is presented. A 41-year-old woman with a history of left breast cancer underwent a prophylactic right nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast implant reconstruction. After surgery, she attended our service due to a right periareolar rash resistant to medical treatment, accompanied by cutaneous induration and fixed axillary adenopathy. A differential diagnosis of skin metastases was considered. Cutaneous metastases should be the first diagnosis of skin lesions in oncological patients due to the implications in terms of treatment and prognosis. However, differential diagnoses have to be discussed.

Melonio, Isabelle; Freneaux, Paul; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred; Rouzier, Roman; Malhaire, Caroline; Mallon, Peter; Reyal, Fabien

2013-01-01

374

Veliparib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

375

Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

2014-06-16

376

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer · UCSF's second highest ethnic group of breast cancer patients is Asian American compared to African Americans nationally. · The breast cancer rate for Asian

Mullins, Dyche

377

Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention  

SciTech Connect

The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

Jordan, V.C. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01

378

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

1998-01-01

379

Estrogen metabolism and breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

2015-01-28

380

Paclitaxel (Taxol) in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a diterpine plant compound that was isolated initially from the bark of the western yew tree, Taxus brevifolia, but can now be produced by semisynthesis from a renewable source. Paclitaxel is the first new agent in the past decade to have confirmed single agent activity in breast cancer in excess of 50%. A 28% response rate has been reported in doxorubicin-refractory patients. Ongoing studies include attempts to combine paclitaxel with other drugs used for breast cancer treatment and with radiation. PMID:7908664

Arbuck, S G; Dorr, A; Friedman, M A

1994-02-01

381

Breast cancer in women at high risk: the role of rapid genetic testing for BRCA1 and -2 mutations and the consequences for treatment strategies.  

PubMed

Specific clinical questions rise when patients, who are diagnosed with breast cancer, are at risk of carrying a mutation in BRCA1 and -2 gene due to a strong family history or young age at diagnosis. These questions concern topics such as 1. Timing of genetic counseling and testing, 2. Choices to be made for BRCA1 or -2 mutation carriers in local treatment, contralateral treatment, (neo)adjuvant systemic therapy, and 3. The psychological effects of rapid testing. The knowledge of the genetic status might have several advantages for the patient in treatment planning, such as the choice whether or not to undergo mastectomy and/or prophylactic contralateral mastectomy. The increased risk of developing a second breast cancer in the ipsilateral breast in mutation carriers, is only slightly higher after primary cancer treatment, than in the general population. Prophylactic contralateral mastectomy provides a substantial reduction of contralateral breast cancer, although only a small breast cancer specific survival benefit. Patients should be enrolled in clinical trials to investigate (neo)-adjuvant drug regimens, that based on preclinical and early clinical evidence might be targeting the homologous recombination defect, such as platinum compounds and PARP inhibitors. If rapid testing is performed, the patient can make a well-balanced decision. Although rapid genetic counseling and testing might cause some distress, most women reported this approach to be worthwhile. In this review the literature regarding these topics is evaluated. Answers and suggestions, useful in clinical practice are discussed. PMID:23972475

Francken, Anne Brecht; Schouten, Philip C; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Linn, Sabine C; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

2013-10-01

382

Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

2014-10-28

383

Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Multidrug Resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer encountered in women and the second leading cause of death after lung cancer.\\u000a Thus, breast cancer is a serious health concern for all women. Fortunately, a high proportion of breast cancer patients are\\u000a diagnosed at an early stage due to an increase in the screening programs and the awareness of the

Can Atalay

384

A comparative study of canine and human breast cancer.  

PubMed

The incidence of mammary tumours in the bitch is probably three times as great as in women. While many of these tumours are mixed mammary tumours about one-third are carcinomas which resemble human breast carcinomas. Allowing for differences in life span, the age at onset is similar in both species. The World Health Organization classification of tumours and dysplasias of the canine mammary gland follows as far as possible the WHO classification for human breast tumours. Clinical staging of canine mammary tumours has now been completed. Some prognostic factors are similar in both species but regional lymph node metastasis does not seem to be of major importance in the bitch; mitotic activity may also not be as important as in women. Metastatic spread is broadly similar in both species except that involvement of the liver and skeleton is not as common in the bitch as in women. In older normal Beagles hyperplastic and neoplastic nodules commonly appear in the mammary gland, and they occur earlier in animals receiving large doses of progestogens. This has produced problems for the drug industry when conducting long-term carcinogenicity tests on progestogens present in the human contraceptive pill. Despite considerable endocrinological differences between the two species, oophorectomy is sparing for breast cancer in both. As in women, oestrogen and progesterone receptors have been detected in mammary carcinomas in bitches. Canine tumours can be grown in tissue culture but cloned cell lines have not yet been obtained. Transplantation can be made into nude mice and immunosuppressed neonatal dogs. The prognosis following mastectomy for invasive tubular adenocarcinoma and invasive solid carcinoma in the bitch is poor and these histological types make the best models for breast cancer in women. International trials are planned using chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy following mastectomy and, as results can be obtained within 3 years of commencement, it is expected that canine mammary tumours will play an increasingly important role in research which may lead to improved methods of treatment in human breast cancer. PMID:396282

Owen, L N

1979-01-01

385

Improved Prognosis of Women Aged 75 and Older with Mammography-detected Breast Cancer.  

PubMed

Purpose To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of women aged 75 years and older with mammography-detected breast cancer, an age group not represented in mammography screening effectiveness studies. Materials and Methods We conducted a HIPAA-compliant, prospective cohort study with waiver of informed consent in patients with primary breast cancer, aged 75 years and older, with stage 0-IV disease from 1990 to 2011, identified and tracked with our registry database (n = 1162). Details including stage, treatment, outcomes, and method of detection (by patient, physician, or mammography) were noted from the chart at the time of diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier estimation was used to compare invasive disease-specific survival rates. Results Among patients with breast cancer aged 75 years and older, mammography detection of cancers increased over time, from 49% to 70% (P < .001). Mammography-detected cases were more often stage I (62%), whereas patient- and physician-detected cases were more likely stage II and III (59%). Over time, from 1990 to 2011, the incidence of stage II cancers decreased by 8%, the incidence of stage III cancers decreased by 8%, and the incidence of stage 0 cancers increased by 15% (P < .001). Patients with mammography-detected invasive breast cancer were more often treated with lumpectomy and radiation and underwent fewer mastectomies and less chemotherapy than patients with cancer detected by patients and physicians (P < .001). Mammography detection was associated with significantly better 5-year disease-specific survival for invasive breast cancer (97% vs 87% for patient- and physician-detected cancer [P < .001], respectively). Conclusion Mammography-detected breast cancer in women 75 years and older was diagnosed at an earlier stage, required less treatment, and had better disease-specific survival than patient- or physician-detected breast cancer. These findings indicate that the same benefits of mammography detection observed in younger women extend to older women. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25093690

Malmgren, Judith A; Parikh, Jay; Atwood, Mary K; Kaplan, Henry G

2014-12-01

386

Skeletal manifestations of treatment of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M; Van Poznak, Catherine

2013-12-01

387

[Systemic sclerosis in a patient suffering from breast cancer].  

PubMed

Scleroderma is the general disease of the connective tissue, which can be characterized by the proliferation of the connective tissue and fibrosis. According to the results of international studies scleroderma is frequently accompanied by neoplastic diseases, among which the most often occurring is the neoplastic pathology of the breast and the lungs. In May 2007, in the case of our 40-year-old woman patient the histological examination of the tumor we noticed in the left breast verified invasive carcinoma. In December 2007, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy she had a left mastectomy and then she was given postoperative irradiation, hormone therapy and trastuzumab (Herceptin) treatment, which was suspended in December 2008 due to oedema and fibrosis all over the body. In May 2009 she first visited the immunology outpatient department of our clinic, where we started her examination because of our suspicion of scleroderma and her cutaneous fibrosis symptoms, which was established on the basis of the examinations (immunoserology, body plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, capillary microscopy, barium swallow) and her symptoms. She was given a conservative therapy (pentoxyphylline, amlodipine, nitroglycerin). Scleroderma arising after the neoplastic process of the breast is usually much more progressive than the primary disease. International reports also show a close correlation between breast cancer and the development of scleroderma, but its exact mechanism is not yet clear. PMID:22403762

Szabolcsi, Orsolya; Nagy-Toldi, Annamária; Zeher, Margit; Végh, Judit

2012-03-01

388

Oncoplastic surgery in the treatment of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Advances in reconstructive breast surgery with new materials and techniques now allow us to offer our patients the best possible cosmetic results without the risks associated with oncological control of the disease. These advances, in both oncological and plastic surgery, have led to a new specialisation, namely oncoplastic breast surgery, which enables us to undertake large resections and, with advance planning, to prevent subsequent deformities. This is particularly important when more than 30% of the breast volume is removed, as it allows us to obtain precise information for conservative surgery according to the site of the lesion, and also allows us to set the boundary between conservative surgery and mastectomy. Given the existence of new alloplastic materials and new reconstructive techniques, it is essential for our patients that surgeons involved in breast cancer treatment are trained in both the oncological as well as the reconstructive and aesthetic fields, to enable them to provide the best loco-regional treatment with the best cosmetic results. PMID:23441139

Rancati, Alberto; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Dorr, Julio; Angrigiani, Claudio

2013-01-01

389

Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-07-07

390

Yoga therapy for breast cancer patients: a prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

We sought to study the impact of yoga therapy on anxiety, depression and physical health in breast cancer patients. Stage I-III post-operative breast cancer patients were recruited with twelve 1-h weekly yoga sessions completed with an experienced yoga instructor. Before and after each module completion, assessments were obtained with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Dallas pain scale and shoulder flexibility measurements. Fourteen patients completed the entire yoga session with 42.8% having a total mastectomy and 15.4% having breast reconstruction. Both right and left shoulder abduction flexibility significantly improved (p = 0.004; p = 0.015 respectively) as well as left shoulder flexion (p = 0.046). An improvement trend in scores for the HADS and Dallas questionnaires pre- and post-intervention was found, although it was not statistically significant. Our data indicates an improvement in physical function in addition to a consistent amelioration in anxiety, depression and pain symptoms after a yoga intervention. PMID:24199978

Sudarshan, Monisha; Petrucci, Andrea; Dumitra, Sinziana; Duplisea, Jodie; Wexler, Sharon; Meterissian, Sarkis

2013-11-01

391

Postmastectomy locoregional recurrence and recurrence-free survival in breast cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background One essential outcome after breast cancer treatment is recurrence of the disease. Treatment decision is based on assessment of prognostic factors of breast cancer recurrence. This study was to investigate the prognostic factors for postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival in those patients. Methods 114 patients undergoing mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy in Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were retrospectively reviewed between 1996 and 2008. All cases were followed up after initial treatment of patients with breast cancer via regular visit (annually) for discovering the LRR. Cumulative recurrence free survival (RFS) was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method, with univariate comparisons between groups through the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. Result The median follow up time was 84 months (range 2-140). Twenty-three (20.2%) patients developed LRR. Cumulative RFS rate at 2.5 years and 5 years were 86% (95%CI, 81-91) and 82.5% (95%CI, 77-87) respectively. Mean RFS was 116.50 ± 4.43 months (range, 107.82 - 125.12 months, 95%CI). At univariate and multivariate analysis, factors had not any influence on the LRR. Conclusion Despite use of adjuvant therapies during the study, we found a LRR rate after mastectomy of 20.2%. Therefore, for patients with LRR without evidence of distant disease, aggressive multimodality therapy is warranted. PMID:20398406

2010-01-01

392

MRI Detects Cancers in the Opposite Breast of Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of women who were diagnosed with cancer in one breast detected over 90 percent of cancers in the other breast that were missed by mammography and clinical breast exam at initial diagnosis, according to a new study. Given the established rates of mammography and clinical breast exams for detecting cancer in the opposite, or contralateral breast, adding an MRI scan to the diagnostic evaluation effectively doubled the number of cancers immediately found in these women.

393

Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 and Anastrozole With or Without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-09-23

394

Hormone Therapy With or Without Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Women Who Have Undergone Surgery for Node-Negative Breast Cancer (The TAILORx Trial)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2014-10-16

395

Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2011-07-08

396

Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

397

Local recurrence of breast cancer: Treatment of nine patients with a recurrence in the skin flap of the chest wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1975 through 1985, nine patients with a local recurrent lesion (LRL) of breast cancer to the skin flap of the chest wall\\u000a were treated. Four had undergone primary mastectomies in our clinic and the other five were referred from other surgeons,\\u000a following signs of recurrence. Aggressive topical therapy, such as resection or irradiation, proved effective in eradicating\\u000a the LRL

Takayoshi Naruse; Akihiko Koike; Akira Miyashita; Kohzoh Matsumoto; Kazuyoshi Suzumura; Taiseki Kanemitsu; Kenichi Kato; Sadahiro Yamamoto

1987-01-01

398

The short-term effects of low-level laser therapy in the management of breast-cancer-related lymphedema  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Breast-cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a chronic disease, and currently there is no definitive treatment for it. There\\u000a are some therapeutic interventions targeted to decrease the limb swelling and the associated problems. Low-level laser therapy\\u000a (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of post-mastectomy lymphedema since 2007 in the US. The aim of this study is to review\\u000a our short-term experience

Abuzer Dirican; Oya Andacoglu; Ronald Johnson; Kandace McGuire; Lisa Mager; Atilla Soran

2011-01-01

399

Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-06-02

400

Par(-4)oxysm in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion that leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

2013-01-01

401

Breast cancer risk assessments to barrier contraception exposure. A new approach.  

PubMed

(Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). The risk prediction models for breast cancer remain unsatisfactory. The existing models of breast cancer risk assessment have failed to consider (calculate) the exposure to condom use, defined as the major risk factor of breast cancer. All the models, including the NCI-Gail model, are based on the so-called "known" breast cancer risk factors, such as, menarche, age at first birth, parity, OC pills, diet, physical activity, age at menopause, number of breast biopsies, family history, ethnicity (race), age and other. The commonest predictions of the models has been that "All women are at risk of breast cancer," which is deemed as a patently incorrect assessment. The risk assessments have served for identification and recruitment of women at "elevated risk" of breast cancer both for therapeutic randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and for implementing a possible clinical policy of "prophylactic" mastectomy and other prior surgical interventions. However, the models have raised questions lately about their adequacy and practical usefulness, because of the use of "weak" and inadequate risk factors. This study presents the results of a new approach and alternative model and results to the risk assessment of breast cancer, by calculating the exposure to barrier contraceptive practice (condom use and withdrawal practice) along with the factors of parity, age and other (non-barrier) birth-control methods, within a 5-year time period and the life span 20-54 years of age, by employing the Bayes' Probability Theorem. Key words: Breast cancer, Risk Assessment, New Approach, Bayes' Theorem, Parity, Condom Risk Factor, Primary prevention. PMID:19736543

Gjorgov, N A

2009-07-01

402

Case report of small bowel obstruction caused by small intestinal metastasis of bilateral breast cancer  

PubMed Central

A 41-year-old female was admitted into hospital due to recurrent abdominal pain with bloating. An enteroscopy was carried out and stenosis in the lower jejunal lumen was identified. This led to a diagnosis of small bowel obstruction caused by inflammation. During the laparotomy, the resection and anastomosis of a narrow segment of small intestine was performed. In combination with the results of immunohistochemical analysis, the postoperative pathology indicated the presence of a poorly differentiated/undifferentiated carcinoma of the small intestine, which was considered to have arisen from breast cancer. Postoperative examination showed bilateral breast masses, and the pathology of the right breast tumor biopsy prompted the diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma. A breast MRI was reviewed following five cycles of XT chemotherapy and the evaluation was stable disease (SD). Since the mass was not sensitive to chemotherapy, a bilateral modified radical mastectomy was performed, and postoperative pathology confirmed the mass to be primary bilateral invasive lobular carcinoma. PMID:24137245

LV, LIQIONG; ZHAO, YUN; LIU, HUI; PENG, ZHONGYI

2013-01-01

403

Personalized Therapy in Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Systemic treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer is based on endocrine therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and molecular targeted therapy – with the major problems of immense overtreatment of patients who would not relapse without systemic therapy and the failure of treatment in others whose disease still recurs. These deficits can only be overcome by the identification of new and better prognostic

Frederik Marmé; Andreas Schneeweiss

2012-01-01

404

Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications  

Cancer.gov

Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

405

The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

406

Management of metastatic breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systemic treatment almost certainly prolongs the median survival of women with metastatic breast cancer, and it may prolong the survival of a small number of patients substantially. Even with conventional therapy, 10% or more patients may live into the second decade after recurrence. However, the disease cannot be eradicated, and the primary goal of treatment remains palliation and improvement of

Karmen Wong; I. Craig Henderson

1994-01-01

407

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

408

Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

2007-04-24

409

Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)  

Cancer.gov

Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

410

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... their periods early (before age 12) or reached menopause late (after age 55). Breast cancer is more common among women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy until after age 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have ...

411

Dominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families  

E-print Network

cancer fami- lies containing members with ovarian cancer or male breast cancer (1). However, mutations of female breast cancer but no cases of male breast cancer or ovarian cancer (1). It is, therefore, likelyDominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Amanda B

Nyholt, Dale R.

412

Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial  

Cancer.gov

The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies.

413

Breast density and breast cancer risk: a practical review.  

PubMed

New legislation in several states requiring breast density notification in all mammogram reports has increased awareness of breast density. Estimates indicate that up to 50% of women undergoing mammography will have high breast density; thus, with increased attention and high prevalence of increased breast density, it is crucial that primary care clinicians understand the implications of dense breasts and are able to provide appropriate counseling. This review provides an overview of breast density, specifically by defining breast density, exploring the association between breast density and breast cancer risk, both from masking and as an independent risk factor, and reviewing supplemental screening options as part of a larger framework for counseling patients with dense breasts. PMID:24684876

Wang, Amy T; Vachon, Celine M; Brandt, Kathleen R; Ghosh, Karthik

2014-04-01

414

Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), a joint effort co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is the next phase of a program that began with the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC) in 2003. The BCERP supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

415

Risk Factors Associated with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema in the WHEL Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lymphedema is a significant health problem faced by a large percentage of breast cancer survivors. The Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study has a unique data set collected after the completion of breast cancer treatment, which allowed a focused analysis of risk factors for breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods Participant characteristics, treatment modalities, and health behaviors were examined as potential predictors of lymphedema among breast cancer survivors with univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Results Lymphedema status was assessed for 83% of the study cohort (2431 of the 2917 WHEL participants). Among these respondents, 692 (28.5%) women reported yes to either a physician’s diagnosis of lymphedema or a question on arm/hand swelling. When compared to other participants, women with lymphedema were diagnosed at a younger age, more likely to have a higher body mass index, had a larger tumor size, had more lymph nodes removed, more likely to have a mastectomy with radiation therapy, and more likely to have chemotherapy. In the final multivariate-adjusted model, body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 (p<0.01), the removal of 11 or more lymph nodes (p<0.01), and breast cancer surgery plus radiation therapy (p<0.01) showed a strong independent association with developing breast cancer-related lymphedema. Conclusions The results of this study highlight the importance of educating breast cancer survivors about the modifiable risk factors (e.g., body mass index) associated with the development of lymphedema. Implications for Cancer Survivors Breast cancer survivors at risk for lymphedema may benefit from interventions aimed at achieving or maintaining a healthy body weight. PMID:23212606

Dominick, Sally A.; Madlensky, Lisa; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P.

2012-01-01

416

Cancer stem cells in breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a critical role in breast cancer initiation, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. It is thought that they are either generated from normal mammary stem/progenitor cells or from mammary epithelial cells by epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Breast CSCs are characterized by the activation of stemness-related pathways, such as the Notch and Wnt pathways, and by the expression of certain stem cell markers, such as CD44, EpCAM and ALDH1. CSCs form a minor population, whose proportion depends on various factors, including environmental conditions. Since CSCs are highly resistant to chemotherapy, additional treatment of breast cancer patients with CSC-specific drugs, such as salinomycin and gamma-secretase inhibitors which target the Wnt or Notch pathway, respectively, will be required. Interestingly, an equilibrium seems to exist between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells, and there are indications that CSCs can be recruited from non-stem cancer cells. As a consequence, it may be necessary to combine a therapy targeting CSCs with common chemotherapy that targets the bulk tumor to avoid the regeneration of CSCs. PMID:23468411

Dittmer, Jürgen; Rody, Achim

2013-07-01

417

Development of an Inverse Technique to Estimate the Ultrasound Field during Chest Wall and Breast Hyperthermia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is the goal of this research to provide improved numerical modeling of ultrasound propagation through breast tissue and the post-mastectomy chest wall for use in patient treatment planning of hypethermia cancer treatments. With this improved model the ...

C. L. Thomas

1996-01-01

418

Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2012-12-12

419

Breast Cancer Patients Might Prefer 'Invisible Tattoo'  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Breast Cancer Patients Might Prefer 'Invisible Tattoo' Dark ink used to mark treatment area is ... TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Using "invisible" tattoos instead of permanent dark ink ones when breast ...

420

Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... breast carcinoma in situ : Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive condition in which abnormal cells ... other tissues in the breast. In some cases, DCIS may become invasive cancer and spread to other ...

421

Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.  

PubMed

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

422

Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies  

PubMed Central

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

423

Factors associated with long-term adherence to annual surveillance mammography among breast cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Clinical practice guidelines recommend yearly surveillance mammography for breast cancer survivors, yet many women do not receive this service. The objective of this study was to evaluate factors related to long-term surveillance mammography adherence among breast cancer survivors. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among women ? 18 years, diagnosed with incident stage I or II breast cancer between 1990 and 2008. We used medical record and administrative health plan data to ascertain covariates and receipt of surveillance mammography for up to 10 years after completing breast cancer treatment. Surveillance included post-diagnosis screening exams among asymptomatic women. We used multivariable repeated measures generalized estimating equation regression models to estimate odds ratios and robust 95 % confidence intervals to examine factors related to the annual receipt of surveillance mammography. The analysis included 3,965 women followed for a median of six surveillance years; 79 % received surveillance mammograms in year 1 but decreased to 63 % in year 10. In multivariable analyses, women, who were < 40 years or 80+ years of age (compared to 50-59 years), current smokers, had greater comorbidity, were diagnosed more recently, had stage II cancer, or were treated with mastectomy or breast conserving surgery without radiation, were less likely than other women to receive surveillance mammography. Women with outpatient visits during the year to primary care providers, oncologists, or both were more likely to undergo surveillance. In this large cohort study of women diagnosed with early-stage invasive breast cancer, we found that important subgroups of women are at high risk for non-adherence to surveillance recommendations, even among younger breast cancer survivors. Efforts should be undertaken to actively engage breast cancer survivors in managing long-term surveillance care. PMID:24407530

Wirtz, Heidi S; Boudreau, Denise M; Gralow, Julie R; Barlow, William E; Gray, Shelly; Bowles, Erin J A; Buist, Diana S M

2014-02-01

424

Relevance and efficacy of breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers above 60 years: a national cohort study.  

PubMed

Annual MRI and mammography is recommended for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers to reduce breast cancer mortality. Less intensive screening is advised ?60 years, although effectiveness is unknown. We identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without bilateral mastectomy before age 60 to determine for whom screening ?60 is relevant, in the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic and HEBON: a nationwide prospective cohort study. Furthermore, we compared tumour stage at breast cancer diagnosis between different screening strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60. Tumours >2 cm, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases at detection were defined as "unfavourable." Of 548 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60 years in 2012, 395 (72%) did not have bilateral mastectomy before the age of 60. Of these 395, 224 (57%) had a history of breast or other invasive carcinoma. In 136 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we compared 148 breast cancers (including interval cancers) detected ?60, of which 84 (57%) were first breast cancers. With biennial mammography 53% (30/57) of carcinomas were detected in unfavourable stage, compared to 21% (12/56) with annual mammography (adjusted odds ratio: 4·07, 95% confidence interval [1.79-9.28], p?=?0.001). With biennial screening 40% of breast cancers were interval cancers, compared to 20% with annual screening (p?=?0.016). Results remained significant for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and first breast cancers separately. Over 70% of 60-year old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remain at risk for breast cancer, of which half has prior cancers. When life expectancy is good, continuation of annual breast cancer screening of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60 is worthwhile. PMID:24789418

Saadatmand, Sepideh; Vos, Janet R; Hooning, Maartje J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Koppert, Linetta B; de Bock, Geertruida H; Ausems, Margreet G; van Asperen, Christi J; Aalfs, Cora M; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Piek, Marianne; Seynaeve, Caroline; Verhoef, Cornelis; Rookus, Matti; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M

2014-12-15

425

Fertility after breast cancer treatment.  

PubMed

In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established fertility preservation strategy, providing a 25-35% chance of pregnancy. In addition, oocyte freezing can be considered as an alternative in patients who are single and in those who do not wish a sperm donor. Although ovarian tissue harvesting appears to be safe, experience regarding ovarian transplantation is still limited due to low utilization, so the true value of this procedure remains to be determined. Nevertheless, in clinical situations in which chemotherapy needs to be started in young patients facing premature ovarian failure, ovarian tissue preservation seems to be a promising option for restoring fertility, especially in conjunction with other options like immature oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation of oocytes, oocyte vitrification, or embryo cryopreservation. It seems that in vitro maturation is a useful strategy because it improves oocyte or cryopreservation outcome in breast cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation. PMID:24315568

Kasum, Miro; Beketi?-Oreškovi?, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Oreškovi?, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

2014-02-01

426

77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the...States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans...000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and tens of...

2012-10-04

427

NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

428

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

429

76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the...commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously...early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this year,...

2011-10-07

430

What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Additional resources for breast cancer What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Research into the causes, prevention, ... many medical centers throughout the world. Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits ...

431

78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of...America stands in solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every corner of...

2013-10-04

432

75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...8572 of October 1, 2010 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the...been made in the fight against breast cancer, it remains the most frequently...will be claimed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we...

2010-10-08

433

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno  

E-print Network

the stroma. #12;Common secondary sites of breast cancer metastasis: 1. Bone 2. Lungs 3. Liver 4. Brain cancer metastasis can cause an increase in either osteoclasts or osteoblasts. #12;Metastasis to the BrainHistology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000

Gleeson, Joseph G.

434

Does breast cancer change patients’ dietary habits?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The results of epidemiological studies on diet and cancer are often difficult to interpret on an individual level and may influence patients’ beliefs, attitudes and behaviour. This study investigated the behaviour of breast cancer patients and their attitudes to dietary changes and the need of dietary advice during their disease.Patients and methods: The study population consisted of breast cancer

EK Salminen; HK Lagström; SP Heikkilä; SJ Salminen

2000-01-01

435

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer September 18, 2013 2:00 ­ 4:00 PM Reception. Speakers in the symposium will cover: (1) basic research in breast cancer metastasis, (2) drug discovery basic research ideas to drugs and inhibitors as therapeutic interventions for cancer treatment

436

Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and ovarian cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

437

Unilateral Psoriasis in a Woman with Ipsilateral Post-Mastectomy Lymphedema  

PubMed Central

Psoriasis is a multi-factorial disease with various clinical manifestations. We present a case of unilateral psoriasis associated with ipsilateral lymphedema that developed after mastectomy for breast cancer. A 42-year-old Korean woman was referred to our clinic with a 1-month history of multiple erythematous scaly patches on the right arm, back, and breast and was diagnosed with psoriasis by a skin biopsy. Three years previously, she had been diagnosed with breast cancer (T1N2), underwent a right quadrantectomy and axillary lymph node dissection, and completed adjuvant chemotherapy followed by high-dose adjuvant radiotherapy. She had started rehabilitation therapy on the right arm for secondary lymphedema 30 months previously. Because of the long interval between radiation and psoriasis, we speculated that changes in the local milieu caused by the lymphedema might be a causative factor. We hereby report a rare case of unilateral psoriasis following post-mastectomy lymphedema. PMID:22346263

Kim, Minji; Jung, Jae Yoon; Na, Se Young; Na, Sun Jae; Lee, Jong Hee

2011-01-01

438

[Mammographic detection of early breast cancer].  

PubMed

For the discovery of minimal breast cancer with mammography, photos under appropriate conditions are required, and for the abnormal shadows in the breast, detailed readings of the shadows and photos on the spot under the sufficient pressure over the breast enable us to draw clearer pictures. It is desirable to examine micro-calcification to perform accurate biopsy and histopathology; with serial section of the specimen. Furthermore, it has become important for the diagnosis of lesion with galactography for nipple discharge to detect early breast cancer. Henceforth, the role of mammography among all graphic diagnosis will become greater for the discovery of early breast cancer. PMID:3172495

Watanabe, S

1988-08-01

439

Digital dermal patterns in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Fingerprints of 570 breast cancer cases and the same number of matched controls were obtained from the population-based finger print file in Hawaii for studying the association between breast cancer and digital dermal patterns and ridge counts. The results showed that breast cancer patients had a significant excess of radial loops on the left hand. It was also found that the frequency of ulnar loops on the left hand was significantly elevated for premenopausal women with breast cancer, whereas an excess of radial loops on the left hand was observed for the postmenopausal women with breast cancer. No significant difference for the total and absolute ridge counts was found between breast cancer patients and controls. PMID:3615667

Huang, C M; Mi, M P

1987-04-01

440

Implanted adipose progenitor cells as physicochemical regulators of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Multipotent adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are increasingly used for regenerative purposes such as soft tissue reconstruction following mastectomy; however, the ability of tumors to commandeer ASC functions to advance tumor progression is not well understood. Through the integration of physical sciences and oncology approaches we investigated the capability of tumor-derived chemical and mechanical cues to enhance ASC-mediated contributions to tumor stroma formation. Our results indicate that soluble factors from breast cancer cells inhibit adipogenic differentiation while increasing proliferation, proangiogenic factor secretion, and myofibroblastic differentiation of ASCs. This altered ASC phenotype led to varied extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and contraction thereby enhancing tissue stiffness, a characteristic feature of breast tumors. Increased stiffness, in turn, facilitated changes in ASC behavior similar to those observed with tumor-derived chemical cues. Orthotopic mouse studies further confirmed the pathological relevance of ASCs in tumor progression and stiffness in vivo. In summary, altered ASC behavior can promote tumorigenesis and, thus, their implementation for regenerative therapy should be carefully considered in patients previously treated for cancer. PMID:22665775

Chandler, Emily M.; Seo, Bo Ri; Califano, Joseph P.; Andresen Eguiluz, Roberto C.; Lee, Jason S.; Yoon, Christine J.; Tims, David T.; Wang, James X.; Cheng, Le; Mohanan, Sunish; Buckley, Mark R.; Cohen, Itai; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Williams, Rebecca M.; Gourdon, Delphine; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Fischbach, Claudia

2012-01-01

441

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

Fantini, Sergio

442

From the Cover: Prospective identification of tumorigenic breast cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in United States women, accounting for >40,000 deaths each year. These breast tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of breast cancer cells. Using a model in which human breast cancer cell