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Sample records for breast cancer mastectomy

  1. Mastectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skin sparing mastectomy, Simple mastectomy; Modified radical mastectomy; Breast cancer - mastectomy ... WOMAN DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER The most common reason for a mastectomy is breast cancer. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer, talk to ...

  2. Mastectomy for management of breast cancer in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Modified radical mastectomy remains the standard therapeutic surgical operation for breast cancer in most parts of the world. This retrospective study reviews mastectomy for management of breast cancer in a surgical oncology division over a ten year period. Methods We reviewed the case records of consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy at the Surgical Oncology Division, University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan between November 1999 and October 2009. Results Of the 1226 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients over the study period, 431 (35.2%) patients underwent mastectomy making an average of 43 mastectomies per year. Most patients were young women, premenopausal, had invasive ductal carcinoma and underwent modified radical mastectomy as the definitive surgical treatment. Prior to mastectomy, locally advanced tumors were down staged in about half of the patients that received neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy. Surgical complication rate was low. The most frequent operative complication was seroma collection in six percent of patients. The average hospital stay was ten days and most patients were followed up at the surgical outpatients department for about two years post-surgery. Conclusions There was low rate of mastectomy in this cohort which could partly be attributable to late presentation of many patients with inoperable local or metastatic tumors necessitating only palliative or terminal care. Tumor down-staging with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy enhanced surgical loco-regional tumor control in some patients. The overall morbidity and the rates of postoperative events were minimal. Long-term post-operative out-patients follow-up was not achieved as many patients were lost to follow up after two years of mastectomy. PMID:24354443

  3. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  4. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients’ choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer who were treated by bilateral or unilateral mastectomy (BM or UM) at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between Jan. 2002 and Dec. 2010. In the BM group, only those with unilateral breast cancer who chose CPM were included in the analysis. Results: When compared with the UM group, the following factors were found to be associated with BM: younger age, pre-menopausal, a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, BRCA mutation, more breast biopsies, history of breast augmentation, having MRI study within 6 months before the surgery, more likely to have reconstruction and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and fewer had neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy/radiation. When patients with bilateral breast cancer were excluded, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated younger patients with negative nodes, SLNB as the only nodal surgery and positive family history were significant factors predicting CPM and immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders or implants. Conclusion: Younger age, lower TN stage, requiring only SLNB and high risk family history predict contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Tissue expander/implant-based reconstructions were more frequently chosen by patients with BM. PMID:26097557

  5. [Nursing experience with a schizophrenic breast cancer patient after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Rong; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2014-10-01

    This case study used cognitive therapy to improve the life quality of a 46-year-old woman with chronic schizophrenia who had undergone a mastectomy for breast cancer. This case had suffered from schizophrenia for over 24 years and was hospitalized in the chronic ward of our hospital. Breast cancer was revealed during an annual comprehensive physical checkup. In May 2012, this case received a right mastectomy at a local hospital. After the surgery, she was readmitted to the psychiatric acute ward for further care from May 30th to August 28th, 2012. A holistic nursing assessment was conducted that addressed five major aspects. The major nursing problems found during hospitalization were: acute pain, body image disturbance, and low self-esteem. A decline in pain score from 10 to 4 was achieved by developing rapport with the patient, empathizing with her distress, and providing active care to the wound. Her body image changed because of loosing her breast. Her acceptance of the loss improved through helping her to explore her feelings of change. To improve her self-esteem, we offered cognitive therapy to change her negative thinking process. She became more sanguine and cheerful. Moreover, her dependence in terms of activities of daily living decreased. This individualized intervention contributed to the recovery of a post-mastectomy, schizophrenic patient from low self-esteem. PMID:25271038

  6. Tendency to breast reconstruction after breast mastectomy among Iranian women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh; Najaf Najafi, Mona; Abbasi Shaye, Zahra; Salehi, Mahta; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women with the medical history of breast cancer constitute the biggest group of patients who survived cancer. Despite the high rate of mastectomy after breast cancer in Iran; only limited patients elect reconstruction surgery. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of tendency to breast reconstruction (BR) surgery among women with breast cancer who had mastectomy but not undergone reconstruction. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Mashhad, north east of Iran during 2013. A total of 108 patients with mastectomy due to breast cancer were selected through convenience sampling and completed the questionnaire. Demographic data collected and 21 items of questionnaire were compared between patients with and without tendency to BR. Data were analyzed using Chi square, t tests and logistic regression. Results: In this study 62 (57.4%) patients had a tendency to BR and 46 (42.6%) had not. The mean (±SD) age of patients in first group was 43.3±8.03 and 49.6±9.9 in the second group (p<0.001). Frequency of agreement about impact of BR on appearance and beauty, mood, family living conditions and their opinion (p<0.001), lack of sufficient information (p=0.01), physician's opinion (p<0.001) and priority of cancer breast treatment (p=0.02) were significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: More than half of the patients had a tendency to BR although they did not go under the surgery yet. Identification of factors that can increase the tendency and factors that help to change the intention to action are important and should be investigate in future research. PMID:26478882

  7. Intentions for Bilateral Mastectomy Among Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    King, Lesley; O’Neill, Suzanne; Spellman, Elizabeth; Peshkin, Beth N.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Willey, Shawna; Leventhal, Kara Grace; DeMarco, Tiffani; Nusbaum, Rachel; Feldman, Elizabeth; Jandorf, Lina; Schwartz, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent trends suggest that bilateral mastectomy (BM) is on the rise among women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer. Few studies have investigated the factors associated with the decision to have more aggressive surgery among young, high risk patients. Methods As part of a larger study, 284 women aged 50 and under completed an initial survey within six weeks of a breast cancer diagnosis. We assessed sociodemographics, medical and family history variables, treatment recommendations, preferences and concerns, distress, perceived risk, knowledge and neuroticism. We used multiple regression with backward entry to assess the relationship between these variables and our outcomes of decisional conflict and intentions for BM. Results Higher decisional conflict was associated with being less educated, unmarried, more anxious and less likely to have received a surgical recommendation. Preference for BM was associated with higher neuroticism, perceived risk for contralateral breast cancer, pre-testing risk of carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation, having received either a surgical recommendation (vs. no recommendation), and lower preference for lumpectomy. Conclusions For younger women, a surgical recommendation is associated with lower decisional conflict and stronger intention for BM. Results highlight the importance of effective risk communication and decision support between a woman and her surgeon. PMID:23280632

  8. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) Breast reconstruction is ...

  9. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

  10. The Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients with breast cancer are being offered immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of IBR on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Methods We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed), ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase, and Google Scholar databases for studies reporting the overall recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients after mastectomy only and mastectomy with IBR. With these data, we conducted a meta-analysis of the clinical outcomes. Results Fourteen studies, including 3641 cases and 9462 controls, matched our criteria. Relevant information was extracted from these 14 studies. There was no significant heterogeneity (P for Q-statistic > 0.10 and I2 < 25%). Patients who underwent IBR showed no increased risk of overall recurrence of breast cancer (RR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75, 1.04; P = 0.14). Furthermore, patients receiving IBR had similar DFS (RR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.08); P = 0.10) and OS (RR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.05; P = 0.24)) as those of control patients. Conclusion This meta-analysis provides evidence that IBR does not have an adverse effect on prognosis. These data suggest that IBR is an appropriate and safe choice for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26024490

  11. Depression after surgery for breast cancer. Comparison of mastectomy and lumpectomy.

    PubMed

    van Heeringen, C; Van Moffaert, M; de Cuypere, G

    1989-01-01

    The impact of the loss of the breast in women undergoing surgical treatment for breast cancer is subordinated to the confrontation with the diagnosis of a malignancy in causing depression. The equal distribution of depression in mastectomy and in lumpectomy patients supports the hypothesis that it is the confrontation with the potentially lethal outcome of the diagnosis which is decisive in causing depression. The grief reaction following mastectomy has two components: a depressive reaction to the loss of the breast and an anticipatory grief for anticipation of the potentially lethal outcome. Psychosocial therapeutic support in breast malignancy must give priority to coping with the diagnosis of cancer over the loss of the breast. PMID:2641560

  12. Patient choice significantly affects mastectomy rates in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Robert M; Basit, Abdul; Manimaran, Natarajan

    2008-01-01

    Mastectomy rates may be affected by patient choice. 203 patients who had a Total Mastectomy for breast cancer were invited to complete questionnaires at routine follow up clinics to ascertain if they had been offered a choice of Breast Conserving Surgery (BCS), and to establish the reasons for their preference. Questionnaires were checked against medical and nursing records to confirm the reasons for the patients' choice of mastectomy. 130 patients (64%) chose to have a mastectomy, reporting that they felt safer (n = 119); wanted to decrease the risk of further surgery (n = 87) and/or wished to avoid radiotherapy (n = 34). Some were advised not to have BCS if they had a large tumour size, central or multifocal tumours and/or associated extensive microcalcification on mammography (n = 29). 24 patients had BCS as first operation but had repeat surgery for involved or narrow excision margins. Despite being advised that there is no difference between survival rates of this and breast conserving surgery, many patients still feel safer with mastectomy. PMID:18694514

  13. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  14. Breast implants following mastectomy in women with early-stage breast cancer: prevalence and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Le, Gem M; O'Malley, Cynthia D; Glaser, Sally L; Lynch, Charles F; Stanford, Janet L; Keegan, Theresa HM; West, Dee W

    2005-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the effect of breast implants after mastectomy on long-term survival in breast cancer patients, despite growing public health concern over potential long-term adverse health effects. Methods We analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Breast Implant Surveillance Study conducted in San Francisco–Oakland, in Seattle–Puget Sound, and in Iowa. This population-based, retrospective cohort included women younger than 65 years when diagnosed with early or unstaged first primary breast cancer between 1983 and 1989, treated with mastectomy. The women were followed for a median of 12.4 years (n = 4968). Breast implant usage was validated by medical record review. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard rate ratios for survival time until death due to breast cancer or other causes for women with and without breast implants, adjusted for relevant patient and tumor characteristics. Results Twenty percent of cases received postmastectomy breast implants, with silicone gel-filled implants comprising the most common type. Patients with implants were younger and more likely to have in situ disease than patients not receiving implants. Risks of breast cancer mortality (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.43–0.67) and nonbreast cancer mortality (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.85) were lower in patients with implants than in those patients without implants, following adjustment for age and year of diagnosis, race/ethnicity, stage, tumor grade, histology, and radiation therapy. Implant type did not appear to influence long-term survival. Conclusions In a large, population-representative sample, breast implants following mastectomy do not appear to confer any survival disadvantage following early-stage breast cancer in women younger than 65 years old. PMID:15743498

  15. [A case of local recurrence developing thirty-nine years after mastectomy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tashima, Yuko; Kawano, Katsunori

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a case of breast cancer that recurred after a 39-year latency period. A 73-year-old woman,who had undergone radical mastectomy for left breast cancer 39 years previously,consulted our hospital complaining of lymphedema in the left arm. A computed tomography(CT)scan showed a growth of soft tissue in the left chest wall. A core needle biopsy resulted in the pathological diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinoma,which stained positively for estrogen and progesterone receptors,but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2). Diagnosed with local recurrence of breast cancer, the patient was consequently treated with hormone therapy using anastrozole and achieved a partial response. The patient is currently free from further recurrent disease at 7 months. We report this late recurrence of breast cancer 39 years following mastectomy,suggesting that possible recurrence of this disease with more than a 30-year latency period should be taken into consideration. PMID:24743283

  16. Adjustment issues related to bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Shauna; Anderson, Rebecca Cogwell

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis for North American and Western European women. Increased knowledge in availability of genetic testing has helped to identify those women at high risk of eventually developing breast cancer. This has resulted in more women considering bilateral prophylactic mastectomy as a viable preventative option. Although the efficacy of the procedure has been established, much less is known about the psychological impact of undergoing this procedure. In order to assess these factors, we reviewed what is currently known about the psychological impact of undergoing bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. Searches were conducted and inclusion criteria revealed articles that focused on the psychological components involved with undergoing a bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. The findings are summarized and fell broadly into one or more of the following three areas: (1) satisfaction or regret following the surgery, (2) psychosocial functioning after the surgery, and (3) predictors of quality of life. Plastic surgery nurses have a unique opportunity to impact important psychological considerations, such as expectations of the early postoperative period, body image concerns, and psychological distress. PMID:16783176

  17. Chemoprevention or mastectomy for women at high risk of developing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sismondi, Piero; D'Alonzo, Marta; Pecchio, Silvia; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Robba, Elisabetta; Biglia, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed invasive cancer among women; in developed countries, BC occurs in one out of eight women during her lifetime. Many factors, both genetic and non-genetic, determine a woman's risk of breast cancer and several mathematical models have been proposed that determine the risk. It is important to identify those at high risk, as there are now effective preventive strategies, such as chemoprevention therapy and risk-reduction surgery. Risk-reduction agents are recommended for women aged 35 years or more who are at high risk of breast cancer. Tamoxifen is presently deemed to be the agent of choice. However, raloxifene may be preferable, at least for some postmenopausal women, because of its lack of effect on the endometrium and the reduced incidence of venous thromboembolic events compared with tamoxifen. Prophylactic surgery has been widely investigated. Bilateral mastectomy decreases the risk of developing breast cancer by approximately 90% in women at moderate or high risk and in known BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. This review summarizes the recent advances in the identification of women at high risk of developing breast cancer and reports on the strategies used to prevent breast cancer; the risk-benefit balance of such preventive choices is also briefly analyzed. PMID:26276104

  18. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. Methods A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. Results A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Conclusion Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, without increasing operative time. Harmonic scalpel can be recommended as a preferential surgical instrument in modified radical mastectomy. PMID:26544716

  19. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  20. Risk Factors Associated with Lymphedema among Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors after Radical Mastectomy and Axillary Dissection in China

    PubMed Central

    Hua-Ping, Huang; Jian-Rong, Zhou; Zeng, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Lymphedema is the major complication following breast cancer treatment and can persist long periods of time and affect breast cancer survivors’ quality of life. Accurate estimation of the risk factors for lymphedema is of significant importance. In this article we report the factors for secondary lymphedema among postmenopausal breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy in China. Patients and Methods A total of 126 consecutive postmenopausal breast cancer patients who received radical mastectomy were admitted to the Chongqing Breast Cancer Center between July 2009 and June 2010. Circumferential measurement was used to diagnose lymphedema. Results Among the 126 postmenopausal women with breast cancer, 54 (42.9%) had lymphedema. Body mass index (BMI), lymph nodes status, and radiotherapy were associated with lymphedema. BMI ? 25 kg/m2 (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 7.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8–20.1) and radiotherapy (adjusted OR = 3.0; 95% CI 2.0–9.2) were independent predictors of lymphedema. Conclusion BMI, lymph nodes status, and radiotherapy were the risk factors for lymphedema among Chinese postmenopausal breast cancer patients who underwent radical mastectomy. Clinicians should provide sufficient information for patients and their caregivers to prevent this complication, especially for those who are at high risk of developing lymphedema. PMID:24715827

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer care team right away. Reconstructive or breast implant surgery After having a mastectomy (or certain breast- ... Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To ...

  2. Local Therapy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers with Operable Breast Cancer: Comparison of Breast Conservation and Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Lori J.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Griffith, Kent A.; Buys, Saundra; Gaffney, David K.; Moran, Meena S.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ben-David, Merav; Kaufman, Bella; Garber, Judy E.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Balmaña, Judith; Meirovitz, Amichay; Domchek, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but also of developing second primary breast cancer. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer must choose between breast conservation (BCT) and mastectomy (M) yet data on outcomes are limited. The purpose of this study is to compare BCT to M in BRCA1/2 carriers. Methods 655 women with BRCA1/2 mutations diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with BCT (n=302) or M (n=353) were identified and underwent follow up to assess local, regional and systemic recurrence. Results Local failure as first failure was significantly more likely in those treated with BCT compared to M, with a cumulative estimated risk of 23.5% vs. 5.5%, respectively, at 15 years (p<0.0001); 15-year estimates in carriers treated with BCT and chemotherapy was 11.9% (p=0.08 when compared to M). Most events appeared to be second primary cancers rather than failure to control the primary tumor. The risk of contralateral breast cancer was high in all groups, exceeding 40%, but was not statistically significantly different by use of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or not, suggesting no added risk from scatter RT at 10 and 15 years. There were no differences seen in regional or systemic recurrences between the BCT and M groups, and no difference in overall survival. Conclusions BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer have similar survivals whether treated with M or BCT. However, women undergoing BCT have an elevated risk of a second in-breast event that is significantly reduced in the presence of chemotherapy. Contralateral breast cancer events are very common. PMID:20411323

  3. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... doctor; Breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor; TRAM flap - what to ask your doctor; Latissimus dorsi flap - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about mastectomy and breast reconstruction; Breast cancer - mastectomy - what to ask your doctor

  4. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; HOLZ-SAPRA, EDNA; RADES, DIRK; MOSER, ALEXANDER; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords ‘nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy’, ‘whole skin mastectomy’ and ‘NAC preservation’. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0–28.4% and 0–3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0–100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient. PMID:26137086

  5. Not All Large Breast Tumors Warrant Mastectomy, Study Says

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155221.html Not All Large Breast Tumors Warrant Mastectomy, Study Says Doctors ... Oct. 19, 2015 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2015 HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Breast Cancer ...

  6. Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Na; Dang, Shao-Nong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Surgical Department of Oncology Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from March to November 2009. A total of 120 breast cancer patients who received Personal Controlled Analgesia (PCA) following surgery (mastectomy) were randomly allocated to two groups, an intervention group and a control group (60 patients in each group). The intervention group accepted music therapy from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third admission to hospital for chemotherapy in addition to the routine nursing care, while the control group received only routine nursing care. Pain scores were measured at baseline and three post-tests using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Short-Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the change in the Pain Rating Index (PRI-total) score from baseline. Music therapy was found to reduce the PRI-total score in the intervention group significantly compared with the control group with a mean difference (95% CI) of -2.38 (-2.80, -1.95), -2.41 (-2.85, -1.96), and -1.87 (-2.33, -1.42) for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd post-tests, respectively. Similar results were found for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scores. The findings of the study provide some evidence that music therapy has both short- and long-term positive effects on alleviating pain in breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy. PMID:21537935

  7. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  8. Bilateral breast reconstruction with bipedicle transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap for simultaneous delayed and immediate breast reconstruction after therapeutic modified radical mastectomy and prophylactic nipple sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Sattaratnamai, Ajaree; Lohsiriwat, Visnu

    2014-02-01

    Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rate is increasing worldwide recently due to better understanding of genetic and hereditary breast cancer. The evolution of mastectomy technique from modified radical mastectomy to nipple sparing mastectomy with immediate or delayed breast reconstruction is also a potential cause of increasing mastectomy rate. This case report presents a young woman who had breast cancer at very young age then she decided for CPM due to her sister and mother are also breast cancer victim. We report clinical course and immediate outcome of the oncologic and reconstructive surgery in this case. PMID:25083498

  9. Whose Disease Will Recur After Mastectomy for Early Stage, Node-Negative Breast Cancer? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kent, Collin; Horton, Janet; Blitzblau, Rachel; Koontz, Bridget F

    2015-12-01

    Effective local control is associated with improved overall survival, particularly for women with early-stage cancers. No other local therapy is typically offered to women with T1-2 N0 breast cancer after mastectomy, although in select women the 5-year local recurrence rate can be as high as 20%. Therefore, accurately predicting the women who are at highest risk for recurrence after mastectomy will identify those who might benefit from more aggressive adjuvant treatment. A systematic search was conducted identifying risk factors associated with locoregional recurrence, including age, menopausal status, receptor status, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), margin status, use of systemic therapy, size, grade, and genomic classifer score. Although associations varied among studies, the risk factors most consistently identified were age ? 40 years, LVI, positive/close margin, and larger tumor size. In women with multiple high risk factors, risk of local recurrence was as high as 20% at 10 years. Additional multicenter studies are needed to investigate risk factors for locoregional recurrence after mastectomy without radiotherapy in T1-2N0 breast cancer. Consideration of additional adjuvant local therapy might be warranted in a subset of women at high risk of local recurrence. PMID:26198331

  10. Factors that Affect Patients' Decision-Making about Mastectomy or Breast Conserving Surgery, and the Psychological Effect of this Choice on Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Mahmut; Ustaalioglu, Basak O; Garip, Meral; Kiziltan, Emre; Bilici, Ahmet; Seker, Mesut; Erkol, Burcak; Salepci, Taflan; Mayadagli, Alpaslan; Turhal, Nazim S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Primary treatment is surgery, with breast conserving surgery (BCS) being widely used for early-stage disease. Due to changes in body image, depressive symptoms can occur after surgery. Here, we evaluate factors that affect patients' decision on surgery, and investigate differences in the level of depression after mastectomy or BCS in a population of Turkish patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy or BCS and were followed up at our institution between 2007 and 2008 were included. Patients were questioned about their involvement in surgical decision-making. Depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria via a Structural Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID). Severity of depression was evaluated by using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). RESULTS: Patients who were older than 50 years, had more than 1 child, a history of lactation, and a positive family history of breast cancer mostly preferred mastectomy. However, patients who sought a second opinion and further information on BCS preferred BCS (p < 0.005). There was no statistical correlation between marital status, first childbearing age, and educational status and the decision on surgery type (p > 0.005). Mastectomy patients were prone to depression, but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.099). CONCLUSION: Age, parenthood, lactation, and positive familial history, as well as thorough information about the type of surgery were important factors for the patients' decision. After breast cancer surgery, patients might experience depression affecting treatment and quality of life. Therefore, adequate information and communication are essential. PMID:21048831

  11. Interleukin-2 administration after modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer therapy increases peripheral regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunli; Zhou, Lei; Sun, Bei; Li, Xiaoxiao; Duan, Kaiming; Wu, Yuhui; Ouyang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC) deaths are a major concern worldwide, and modified radical mastectomy (MRM) still represents a primary therapeutic strategy. Post-surgery administration of interleukin (IL)-2 for BC therapy has been implemented in China recently. Although its impact on regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been documented in some cancer types, such as melanoma, the IL-2-mediated changes in the Treg composition after MRM in BC treatment remain unknown. Methods: As registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, 34 newly diagnosed BC patients, aged 20-65 years, were enrolled in this trial. Patients were randomized to the IL-2-treated group (n=15) and the untreated control group (n=19). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated at time points of pre-operation (PreOP) and post-operation Day 1 (POD1), POD3, and POD7. Cells were subjected to flow cytometric assays to identify CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs, as well as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of FOXP3 expression. Results: We found that the surgery caused a significant decrease in the percentage of Tregs on POD1, followed by a significant increase characterized by a peak value on POD7 with a more than 18% increase relative to the Pre-OP levels. We observed that the Treg percentages in the IL-2-treated group were significantly greater than those in the control group on POD3 and POD7, whereas no such statistical difference was observed on POD1. The FOXP3 expression analysis revealed consistent trends as observed by flow cytometry. Conclusions: Post-operative administration of IL-2 amplifies the surgery-induced augmentation of both Tregs and FOXP3 expression in BC therapy. PMID:26221334

  12. Oncological safety of prophylactic breast surgery: skin-sparing and nipple-sparing versus total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Maijers, Marike C.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Koppert, Linetta B.

    2015-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1/2 gene mutation and others with a high breast cancer risk may opt for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. To allow for immediate breast reconstruction the skin envelope is left in situ with or without the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Although possibly leading to a more natural aesthetic outcome than the conventional total mastectomy, so-called skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) may leave some breast glandular tissue in situ. The oncological risk associated with remaining breast glandular tissue is unclear. We present a case of primary breast cancer after prophylactic mastectomy followed by a review of the literature on remaining breast glandular tissue after various mastectomy techniques and oncological safety of prophylactic mastectomies. PMID:26645001

  13. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body can provide flaps for breast reconstruction. TRAM flap : Tissue, including muscle, that comes from the ... that comes from the abdomen as in a TRAM flap, but only contains skin and fat. Latissimus ...

  14. Locoregional Outcomes in Clinical Stage IIB Breast Cancer After Neoadjuvant Therapy and Mastectomy With or Without Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Dayssy A.; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha; Takita, Cristiane; Zhao, Wei; Wright, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Low rates of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with clinical stage IIB breast cancer (cT2N1 or cT3N0) who undergo neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) and mastectomy have been reported. We aimed to quantify the risk of LRR and the relationship between LRR and potential risk factors in this subset of patients. We conducted a retrospective review of 116 patients with clinical IIB breast cancer who underwent NAT followed by mastectomy +/? postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) between 2000 and 2009. We estimated the rate of LRR by cumulative incidence. The effect of prognostic factors was examined by Gray's test and Fine and Gray's test. Median follow-up: 63 months. Median age: 49. 28.4% cT2N1 and 71.6% cT3N0. 62.1% of tumors were ER+, 22.6% HER2+, 19% triple negative (TN). All patients underwent NAT and mastectomy. The majority of patients (87%) received PMRT; 32.3% were treated to chest wall (CW) only, and 67.7% to CW plus supraclavicular (SCV) field. Compared to cT2N1, patients with cT3N0 disease were more likely to be pN0 (60% vs 27%, P?=?0.005). There was no significant relationship between risk of LRR and pathologic complete response (pCR), use of PMRT, RT to SCV field, or TN status, but there was higher risk of LRR in cT2N1 than cT3N0 (HR 6.03, P?=?0.015). LRR was more common in cT2N1 than in cT3N0 disease, emphasizing the negative prognostic implication of clinically node-positive presentation. PMID:25546661

  15. Goldilocks mastectomy for obese Japanese females with breast ptosis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    The Goldilocks mastectomy is a method that uses redundant mastectomy flap tissue alone to create a breast mound in female American patients with macromastia. Goldilocks mastectomy was performed for obese Japanese females with breast ptosis, and its indications were considered for Japanese female patients. This report presents the results of five patients who underwent Goldilocks mastectomy, including one with bilateral breast cancer. The average age of the patients was 72 years (range: 67-76 years). The body mass index (BMI) was more than 25 in all the cases. Four patients had invasive ductal carcinoma, and one patient had noninvasive ductal carcinoma of bilateral breasts. The cosmetic results were found to be good in two cases [a patient with bilateral breast cancer and a severely obese patient (BMI = 39)]. The cosmetic results in the other three cases were poor. Although the reconstructed breast size was small, this procedure resulted in better cosmetic results than what would be achieved with the usual method of mastectomy for Japanese patients with bilateral breast cancer and severely obese Japanese patients. PMID:23972507

  16. Breast conservation versus mastectomy: psychological considerations.

    PubMed

    Maguire, P

    1989-01-01

    From the available evidence it is clear that mastectomy is associated with a substantial psychological and psychiatric morbidity. To date there is no convincing evidence that counseling can prevent this morbidity, but monitoring of women's psychological adjustment can lead to early detection and effective treatment of their problem. The use of immediate or delayed implantation or reconstruction appears to reduce the psychiatric morbidity in those women who are particularly concerned about their appearance at the time of surgery. Psychiatric morbidity is further increased when adjuvant chemotherapy is used and when treatment results in persistent arm pain and swelling. A shorter course of adjuvant chemotherapy and reduction of surgery within the axilla could reduce psychiatric morbidity. The role of radiotherapy is still unclear, but in some studies a link has been found between the amount of radiotherapy given, adverse effects, and psychiatric morbidity. In women undergoing breast conservation the reduction in body image problems is offset by greater anxiety about recurrence and depression caused by radiotherapy. Exploring and allowing choice when a patient has a strong preference for breast conservation or mastectomy appears to reduce morbidity. But attention still needs to be paid to the early recognition and treatment of psychological problems in patients with breast cancer, and guidelines are provided. PMID:2543051

  17. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  18. The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. Methods Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis were followed one year after modified radical mastectomy. To measure the quality of life an instrument designed by the European organization for research and treatment of cancer, known as the Quality of Life Question (QLQ-30) and it's breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time (before, immediately and two months after intervention) for both groups were used. The participant selection was a convenient sampling method and women were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group was randomly assigned to five groups and peer educators conducted weekly educational programs for one month. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi square, t test, and repeated measurement multivariate to compare the quality of life differences over time. Results For the experimental group, the results showed statistically significant improvement in all performance aspects of life quality and symptom reduction (P < 0.001), while the control group had no significant differences in all aspects of life quality. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that peer led education is a useful intervention for post-mastectomy women to improves their quality of life. PMID:20653966

  19. [A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer with Carcinomatous Pleurisy Successfully Treated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab after Radical Mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Nanae; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Tamio; Yamagishi, Youji; Hasegawa, Shou; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old postmenopausal woman with breast cancer and carcinomatous pleurisy was successfully treated with bevacizumab and paclitaxel. In December 2008, after receiving preoperative chemotherapy consisting of q3w 4 cycles of EC (E: 90 mg/m2, C: 600 mg/m2) and 12 cycles of weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m2), the patient underwent modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer. Pathological examination showed residual tumor cells and lymph node metastasis (pT4bN2M0, Stage III b). In July 2012, 3 and a half years later, she complained of a cough and dyspnea. Chest X-ray and computed tomography scans showed a pleural effusion involving the entire left thoracic cavity, indicating carcinomatous pleurisy. Bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy was initiated. Soon thereafter, the pleural fluid disappeared, tumor marker levels decreased, and symptoms were ameliorated. After 6 cycles of bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy, the patient continuously received 3 cycles of weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m2). Two years and 4 months since the diagnosis, she has remained free of carcinomatous pleurisy recurrence. She is currently receiving hormone therapy on an outpatient basis. Bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy is potentially effective for the treatment of patients with carcinomatous pleurisy, providing a chance for long-term survival. PMID:26199251

  20. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  1. Comparison of Modified Radical Mastectomy with Quadrantectomy, Axillary Dissection, and Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer in Japaness Women.

    PubMed

    Sonoo; Kurebayashi; Shimozuma; Ohta; Miyake; Imajo

    1995-10-31

    From January 1987 to December 1993, Stage I (T1N0M0) breast cancers were treated by quadrantectomy with axillary lymph node dissection plus radiation therapy (QUART) in 57 cases and by modified radical mastectomy (MRM) in 57 cases. The results for these two treatment groups were compared retrospectively. Booster irradiation of 10 Gy to the tumor bed was given to 1 of 5 cases with a positive resection margin. The remaining 56 cases received 50 Gy lineac X-ray to the ipsilateral breast. Systemic adjuvant therapy, tamoxifen and /or 5-FU derivatives p.o., were given to the majority of cases in both groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the patient background; ie, age, tumor size, pathological node status, histology and estrogen receptor status. During the follow-up period of 12 to 89 months (median 55 months) in the QUART group, no local recurrence was observed and only 1 case of bone metastasis occurred. In the MRM group, recurrence occurred in 4 cases during the follow-up period of 12 to 95 months (median 52 months). These consisted of 2 cases of regional lymph node recurrence and 2 cases of lung metastases. The differences in the disease-free survival rate and the overall survival rate between the two groups were not significant. In the QUART group, mild radiation pneumonitis and mild telangiectasia in the breast skin were observed in 2 cases(3.5%) and 1 case, respectively. Mild arm edema was observed in 4 cases (7%) in each group. These results demonstrated that QUART was as effective as MRM in treating T1M0M0 breast carcinoma in Japanese women. PMID:11091536

  2. Using Local Flaps in a Chest Wall Reconstruction after Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Seok; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical ablation for locally advanced breast cancer results in large chest wall defects, which can then be managed with local flaps or skin grafts. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the outcomes of three types of local skin flaps. Methods Among 25 local flaps in 24 patients, 6 were bilateral advancement (BA) flaps, 9 were thoracoabdominal (TA) flaps, and 10 were thoracoepigastric (TE) flaps. Clinical outcomes were compared including complications, the need for a secondary surgical intervention, and the timing of adjuvant therapy. Results The mean defect size was 436.2 cm2. Two patients with TA flaps and 6 patients with TE flaps developed distal flap necrosis, and skin grafts were needed to treat 2 patients with TE flaps. Radiation was administered to the BA, TA, and TE patients after average postoperative durations of 28, 30, or 41 days, respectively. The incidence of flap necrosis tended to be higher in TE patients, which lead to significant delays in adjuvant radiation therapy (P=0.02). Conclusions Three types of local skin flaps can be used to treat large chest wall defects after the excision of locally advanced breast cancer. Each flap has its own merits and demerits, and selecting flaps should be based on strict indications based on the dimensions and locations of the defects. PMID:26015883

  3. Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazal, S K; Fallowfield, L; Blamey, R W

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction). Psychosocial morbidity and satisfaction were studied retrospectively using self-evaluation questionnaires. The three different surgical groups were cross-matched into four different age group. Significant statistical differences existed between the three procedures regarding satisfaction and psychosocial morbidity (anxiety, depression, body image, sexuality and self-esteem) in favour of wide local excision followed by breast reconstruction. Greatest morbidity was seen in the mastectomy group. Patient satisfaction of cosmetic outcome and psychosocial aspects was greater with wide local excision than with breast reconstruction or mastectomy. However, since wide local excision is indicated in only a group of patients, breast reconstruction should be an option available to patients requiring mastectomy. PMID:11000574

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V5). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. PMID:25534167

  5. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Roncadin, Mario; Perin, Tiziana; Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica; Quitadamo, Daniela; Massarut, Samuele; Carbone, Antonino; Trovo, Mauro G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

  6. Identification of Risk Factors for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with Nodal Stage N0 and N1: Who Could Benefit from Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Jwa, Eunjin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lim, Hyeon Woo; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, EunSook; Park, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The locoregional recurrence (LRR) rate was reported as high as approximately 20% in stage I-II breast cancer following mastectomy. To investigate the risk factors for LRR in pT1–2N0-1 breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy but not radiation, and to define a subgroup of patients at high risk of LRR who may benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials In total, 390 patients with pT1-2N0M0 (n = 307) and pT1-2N1M0 (n = 83) breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without adjuvant radiotherapy from 2002 to 2011 were enrolled in the study. Results After a median follow-up period of 5.6 years (range, 0.6–11.3 years), 21 patients had 18 systemic relapses and 12 LRRs including six in the chest wall and eight in the regional nodal area. The 5-year LRR-free survival (LRRFS) rates were 97.0% in pN0, 98.8% in pN1, and 97.4% in all patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that age < 50 years (Hazard Ratio, 11.4; p = 0.01) and no adjuvant chemotherapy (Hazard Ratio, 10.2; p = 0.04) were independent risk factors for LRR in pN0 patients. Using these factors, the 5-year LRRFS rates were 100% without any risk factors, 96.4% with one risk factor, and 86.7% with two risk factors. In pN1 patients, multivariate analysis revealed that having a hormone receptor negative tumor (Hazard Ratio, 18.3; p = 0.03) was the only independent risk factor for LRR. The 5-year LRRFS rates were 100.0% for luminal type, and 92.3% for non-luminal type cancer. Conclusion Patients with pT1-2N0-1 breast cancer who underwent total mastectomy without PMRT could be stratified by nodal stage and risk factors for LRR. PMRT may have of value for node negative patients aged less than 50 years and who are not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and for non-luminal type patients with one to three positive nodes. PMID:26691445

  7. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  8. Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Vashi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16?cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

  9. Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors and Residual Nodal Disease following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Shravan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Harari, Saul; Fasola, Carolina; Mister, Donna; Yu, David S.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates are unclear in women with ER+ tumors treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy without postmastectomy radiation (PMRT). To determine if PMRT is needed in these patients, we compared LRR rates of patients with ER+ tumors (treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy) with women who have non-ER+ tumors. 85 consecutive breast cancer patients (87 breast tumors) treated with NAC and mastectomy without PMRT were reviewed. Patients were divided by residual nodal disease (ypN) status (ypN+ versus ypN0) and then stratified by receptor subtype. Among ypN+ patients (n = 35), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 5%, 33%, and 37%, respectively (p = 0.02). Among ypN+/ER+ patients, lymphovascular invasion and grade three disease increased the five-year LRR risk to 13% and 11%, respectively. Among ypN0 patients (n = 52), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 7%, 22%, and 6%, respectively (p = 0.71). In women with ER+ tumors and residual nodal disease, endocrine therapy may be sufficient adjuvant treatment, except in patients with lymphovascular invasion or grade three tumors where PMRT may still be indicated. PMID:26266050

  10. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  11. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  12. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  13. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Li Yexiong; Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

  14. Women with cured breast cancer a study of mastectomy patients in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Woods, N F; Earp, J A

    1978-01-01

    A study of 49 postmastectomy patients in North Carolina, four years following the surgery, revealed that the women did not feel they had been prepared for their postoperative experiences; were not, in general, familiar with Reach to Recovery as a supportive organization, nor perceived it as such; only occasionally examined their remaining breast; and had a number of persisting physical complications. The extent of physical disability was found to be related to the quality of life inasmuch as women with a high number of physical symptoms were much more likely to have a higher number of symptoms of depression than women with fewer complications. Social supports mediated the effects of surgical complications on mental outlook, but only up to a point. Sexual adaptation was found to be associated with the quality of the marital-sexual relationship and its importance to the woman. PMID:249945

  15. Mastectomy - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast cancer, removal of the entire breast is unnecessary. A procedure such as a segmental mastectomy can be performed. ... axilla) that drain the breast, is required. This procedure is called ... surgery for patients with cancer involving the lymph nodes.

  16. Surgery Choices for Women With DCIS or Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Women diagnosed with DCIS or breast cancer may face a decision about which surgery to have. The choices of breast-sparing surgery, mastectomy, or mastectomy with reconstruction are explained and compared.

  17. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Jay P.; Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

  18. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Andrew; Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle; Kuerer, Henry M.; Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul; Strom, Eric A.; Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  19. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER?/PR?/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER?/PR?/HER 2?, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice.

  20. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine; Labib, Alain; Le Scodan, Romuald

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  1. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  2. Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  3. Should Women Younger Than 40 Years of Age With Invasive Breast Cancer Have a Mastectomy?: 15-Year Outcomes in a Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Truong, Pauline T.; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Olson, Robert; Coulombe, Genevieve; Keyes, Mira; Weir, Lorna; Gelmon, Karen; Bernstein, Vanessa; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Optimal local management for young women with early-stage breast cancer remains controversial. This study examined 15-year outcomes among women younger than 40 years treated with breast-conserving surgery plus whole-breast radiation therapy (BCT) compared with those treated with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: Women aged 20 to 39 years with early-stage breast cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2003 were identified in a population-based database. Primary outcomes of breast cancer–specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and secondary outcomes of local relapse–free survival (LRFS), locoregional relapse–free survival (LRRFS), and distant relapse–free survival (DRFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared between BCT and MRM cohorts using log-rank tests. A planned subgroup analysis was performed on patients considered “ideal” for BCT (ie, T1N0, negative margins and no extensive ductal carcinoma in situ) and in whom local therapy may have the largest impact on survival because of low systemic risk. Results: 965 patients were identified; 616 had BCT and 349 had MRM. The median follow-up time was 14.4 years (range, 8.4-23.3 years). Overall, 15-year rates of BCSS (76.0% vs 74.1%, P=.62), OS (74.2% vs 73.0%, P=.75), LRFS (85.4% vs 86.5%, P=.95), LRRFS (82.2% vs 81.6%, P=.61), and DRFS (74.4% vs 71.6%, P=.40) were similar between the BCT and MRM cohorts. In the “ideal” for BCT subgroup, there were 219 BCT and 67 MRM patients with a median follow-up time of 15.5 years. The 15-year BCSS (86.1% vs 82.9%, P=.57), OS (82.6% vs 82.9%, P=.89), LRFS (86.2% vs 84.2%, P=.50), LRRFS (83.1% vs 78.3%, P=.24), and DRFS (84.8% vs 79.1%, P=.17) were similar in the BCT and MRM cohorts. Conclusions: This population-based analysis with long-term follow-up confirmed that women younger than 40 years treated with BCT had similar 15-year outcomes compared with MRM. Young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  4. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn’s-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P??0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p?breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  5. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  6. Survival Comparisons for Breast Conserving Surgery and Mastectomy Revisited: Community Experience and the Role of Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Engel, Jessica M.; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Doi, Suhail A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Evidence suggests superiority of breast conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiation over mastectomy alone for treatment of early stage breast cancer. Whether the superiority of BCS plus radiation is related to the surgical approach itself or to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy following BCS remains unclear. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women with breast cancer diagnosed from 1994–2012. Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics and treatment specifics were captured electronically. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed with inverse probability of treatment weighting to reduce selection bias effects in surgical assignment. Results Data from 5335 women were included, of which two-thirds had BCS and one-third had mastectomy. Surgical decision trends changed over time with more women undergoing mastectomy in recent years. Women who underwent BCS versus mastectomy differed significantly regarding age, cancer stage/grade, adjuvant radiation, chemotherapy, and endocrine treatment. Overall survival was similar for BCS and mastectomy. When BCS plus radiation was compared to mastectomy alone, 3-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival was 96.5% vs 93.4%, 92.9% vs 88.3% and 80.9% vs 67.2%, respectively. Conclusion These analyses suggest that survival benefit is not related only to the surgery itself, but that the prognostic advantage of BCS plus radiation over mastectomy may also be related to the addition of adjuvant radiation therapy. This conclusion requires prospective confirmation in randomized trials. PMID:25487237

  7. Areola Size and Jugulum Nipple Distance After Bilateral Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Mérida, Consuelo; Rioja, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The combination of a single pedicle local flap with tattooing for complete nipple areola complex (NAC) reconstruction is currently the most supported method. Although many technical descriptions of NAC reconstruction exist in the medical literature, there are no data that define the ideal areola size (diameter of the areola) after bilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction considering the previous areola size. Methods: This was a 3-year (2009-2012) observational, analytical, and longitudinal prospective study with 103 patients who had undergone NAC tattooing as the last process of bilateral breast reconstruction after surgery for breast cancer. Statistical differences in the areola size and the jugulum-nipple distance before mastectomy and after reconstruction were analyzed by paired Student t tests with a 95% confidence interval. Results: The jugulum-nipple distance before mastectomy was 4.23 cm larger than after bilateral reconstruction (mean jugulum-nipple distance: 23.89 cm vs 19.66 cm), and for that reason shorter (more cephalad). The areola size before mastectomy was 1.59 cm larger than the one chosen by the patient for reconstruction (mean diameter of the areola: 5.25 cm vs 3.65 cm). Conclusions: We conclude that, after bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, the jugulum-nipple distance is smaller and women prefer smaller areola sizes. PMID:24324847

  8. Double Back Cut in Post-mastectomy Breast Skin (Fish-Shaped Skin Paddle) in Delayed Pedicled TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Alexander Bogdanov; Pagkalos, Vasileios A; Shoham, Yaron; Krieger, Yuval; Silberstein, Eldad

    2015-08-01

    Breast reconstruction has become standard of care for female patients with breast cancer. The transverse rectus abdominis musculo-cutaneous flap (TRAMf) is the most common method of immediate or delayed autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy. We share our experience with modified, double back cut of post-mastectomy skin in delayed pedicled TRAMf breast reconstruction, resulting in fish-shaped skin paddle. This sort of back cut is a simple, reliable way to obtain a natural, esthetically pleasant breast mound with inconspicuous hidden scars. PMID:25990219

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  10. Breast Reconstruction after a Bilateral Mastectomy Using the BRAVA Expansion System and Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Mestak, Jan; Bohac, Martin; Edriss, Ahmed; Sukop, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Fat graft breast reconstruction following a mastectomy is always limited by the size of the skin envelope, which affects the amount of graft that can be injected in 1 session. Because the fat graft naturally resorbs in all patients, several sessions of fat grafting are necessary. BRAVA’s negative pressure causes a “reverse” expansion of the skin envelope, thus permitting more space for the fat graft. This allows decreasing number of required procedures for an adequate breast reconstruction. We operated on a 38-year-old patient 4 years after bilateral mastectomy without irradiation for breast cancer. Before the procedure, the patient was instructed to wear the BRAVA system for 12 hours daily for 2 months before the first session, at all times between the sessions and for 1 month following the last fat grafting session. We performed 3 fat grafting sessions, as planned. Altogether, we injected 840 cm3 of fat on the right side and 790?cm3 of fat on the left side. Four months after the last operation, the patient was very satisfied with her new breasts. The breasts were soft, with good sensation and a natural feel. Using the BRAVA external expansion system for the enhancement of fat grafting is a suitable technique for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. This technique produces soft and natural feeling breasts in fewer operative sessions, with a minimal risk of complications. Patient compliance, however, is greatly needed to achieve the desired results. PMID:25289266

  11. Simultaneous forequarter amputation and radical mastectomy for metastatic breast carcinoma in a male patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yilgor, Caglar; Mermerkaya, Musa Ugur; Konan, Ali; Sonmez, Erhan; Acaroglu, Rifat Emre

    2011-01-01

    Although the majority of forequarter amputations are performed for high-grade bone and soft tissue sarcomas or extensive osteomyelitis of the upper extremity, this radical operation may also be indicated for the curative treatment of recurrent breast cancer and for the palliation of locally advanced breast cancer. We report a male patient with metastatic breast adenocarcinoma who underwent simultaneous mastectomy and forequarter amputation for the management of both his primary and metastatic disease. PMID:22319742

  12. Nipple-Areola Complex Necrosis after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Autologous Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin-Woo; You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Hyon-Surk; Lee, Byung-Il; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy is increasingly preferred worldwide as a breast cancer treatment option. However, postoperative nipple-areola complex (NAC) necrosis is the most significant complication of nipple-sparing mastectomy. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors for NAC necrosis, and to describe the use of our skin-banking technique as a solution. Methods We reviewed cases of immediate autologous breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy at our institution between June 2005 and January 2014. The patients' data were reviewed and the risk of NAC necrosis was analyzed based on correlations between patient variables and NAC necrosis. Moreover, data pertaining to five high-risk patients who underwent the donor skin-banking procedure were included in the analysis. Results Eighty-five patients underwent immediate autologous breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy during the study period. Partial or total NAC necrosis occurred in 36 patients (43.4%). Univariate analysis and binary regression modeling found that body mass index, smoking history, radiation therapy, and mastectomy volume were significantly associated with NAC necrosis. Of the 36 cases of NAC necrosis, 31 were resolved with dressing changes, debridement, or skin grafting. The other five high-risk patients underwent our prophylactic skin-banking technique during breast reconstruction surgery. Conclusions NAC necrosis is common in patients with multiple risk factors. The use of the skin-banking technique in immediate autologous breast reconstruction is an attractive option for high-risk patients. Banked skin can be used in such cases without requiring additional donor tissue, with good results in terms of aesthetic and reconstructive outcomes. PMID:26430632

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  14. Risk reducing mastectomy, breast reconstruction and patient satisfaction in Norwegian BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Anne Irene; Mæhle, Lovise; Vedå, Nina; Vetti, Hildegunn Høberg; Stormorken, Astrid; Ludvigsen, Trond; Guntvedt, Bente; Isern, Anne Elisabeth; Schlichting, Ellen; Kleppe, Geir; Bofin, Anna; Gullestad, Hans Petter; Møller, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Uptake, methods of operation and reconstruction, complications, patient satisfaction and histopathological findings were registered at all five departments of genetics in Norway. Data from 267 affected and unaffected BRCA1/2 mutation carriers were analyzed, including a study-specific questionnaire returned by 178 mutation carriers. There was a steady increase in the uptake of risk-reducing mastectomies during the study period. Complications were observed in 106/266 (39.7%) women. Patient satisfaction was high. The majority of women expressed great relief after risk-reducing mastectomy and would have chosen the same option again. PMID:24210736

  15. Sociodemographic Predictors of Breast Reconstruction Procedure Choice: Analysis of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Tiffany N. S.; Kim, Yeonil; Cohen, Wess A.; Hamill, Jennifer B.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Kim, H. Myra; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To promote patient-centered care, it is important to understand the impact of sociodemographic factors on procedure choice for women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction. In this context, we analyzed the effects of these variables on the reconstructive method chosen. Methods. Women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction were recruited for the prospective Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study. Procedure types were divided into tissue expander-implant/direct-to-implant and abdominally based flap reconstructions. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from logistic regression. Results. The analysis included 2,203 women with current or previous breast cancer and 202 women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. Compared with women <40 years old with current or previous breast cancer, those 40 to 59 were significantly more likely to undergo an abdominally based flap. Women working or attending school full-time were more likely to receive an autologous procedure than those working part-time or volunteering. Women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy who were ?50 years were more likely to undergo an abdominal flap compared to those <40. Conclusions. Our results indicate that sociodemographic factors affect the reconstructive procedure received. As we move forward into a new era of patient-centered care, providing tailored treatment options to reconstruction patients will likely lead to higher satisfaction and better outcomes for those we serve. PMID:26605082

  16. Determining the oncological risk of autologous lipoaspirate grafting for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rigotti, Gino; Marchi, Alessandra; Stringhini, Paolo; Baroni, Guido; Galiè, Mirco; Molino, Anna Maria; Mercanti, Anna; Micciolo, Rocco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2010-08-01

    This study compares the incidence of local and regional recurrence of breast cancer between two contiguous time windows in a homogeneous population of 137 patients who underwent fat tissue transplant after modified radical mastectomy. Median follow-up time was 7.6 years and the follow-up period was divided into two contiguous time windows, the first starting at the date of the radical mastectomy and ending at the first lipoaspirate grafting session and the second beginning at the time of the first lipoaspirate grafting session and ending at the end of the total follow-up time. Although this study did not employ an independent control group, the incidence of local recurrence of breast cancer was found to be comparable between the two periods and in line with data from similar patient populations enrolled in large multicenter clinical trials and who did not undergo postsurgical fat tissue grafting. Statistical comparison of disease-free survival curves revealed no significant differences in relapse rate between the two patient subgroups before fat grafting and after fat grafting. Although further confirmation is needed from multicenter randomized clinical trials, our results support the hypothesis that autologous lipoaspirate transplant combines striking regenerative properties with no or marginal effects on the probability of post-mastectomy locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:20333521

  17. Generation of voxelized breast phantoms from surgical mastectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Michael O’Connor, J.; Das, Mini; Dider, Clay S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In the research and development of dedicated tomographic breast imaging systems, digital breast object models, also known as digital phantoms, are useful tools. While various digital breast phantoms do exist, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic high-resolution model suitable for simulating three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities. The primary goal was to design a model capable of producing simulations with realistic breast tissue structure. Methods: The methodology for generating an ensemble of digital breast phantoms was based on imaging surgical mastectomy specimens using a benchtop, cone-beam computed tomography system. This approach allowed low-noise, high-resolution projection views of the mastectomy specimens at each angular position. Reconstructions of these projection sets were processed using correction techniques and diffusion filtering prior to segmentation into breast tissue types in order to generate phantoms. Results: Eight compressed digital phantoms and 20 uncompressed phantoms from which an additional 96 pseudocompressed digital phantoms with voxel dimensions of 0.2 mm3 were generated. Two distinct tissue classification models were used in forming breast phantoms. The binary model classified each tissue voxel as either adipose or fibroglandular. A multivalue scaled model classified each tissue voxel as percentage of adipose tissue (range 1%–99%). Power spectral analysis was performed to compare simulated reconstructions using the breast phantoms to the original breast specimen reconstruction, and fits were observed to be similar. Conclusions: The digital breast phantoms developed herein provide a high-resolution anthropomorphic model of the 3D uncompressed and compressed breast that are suitable for use in evaluating and optimizing tomographic breast imaging modalities. The authors believe that other research groups might find the phantoms useful, and therefore they offer to make them available for wider use. PMID:23556909

  18. Extreme Oncoplasty: Breast Conservation for Patients Who Need Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

  19. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Breast Cancer KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems of Grown-Ups > Diseases & ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  20. Introduction to conservative mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Gercovich, F. Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy (CM) has become an established alternative in the treatment of breast cancer, offering by different techniques a good cosmetic outcome, as well as oncologic control. The different options to achieve these goals are presented. Oncoplastic treatment of breast cancer needs planning and knowledge of well-established plastic surgery techniques. PMID:26644998

  1. The psychological impact of immediate breast reconstruction for women with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L A; McGrath, M H; Druss, R G; Kister, S J; Gump, F E; Forde, K A

    1984-04-01

    Twenty-five patients were evaluated, 13 who had immediate breast reconstruction and 12 who had delayed breast reconstruction for early breast cancer. Data were elicited about the psychological impact of the cancer, the mastectomy, and the reconstruction. Our results support the conclusion that immediate breast reconstruction is accompanied by a lower incidence of psychological morbidity postoperatively, and we recommend that immediate breast reconstruction be offered as an alternative to women with early breast cancer. PMID:6709743

  2. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PM EST. FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer in Men Do men get breast cancer? Since men have breast tissue, they can get breast cancer. But, breast cancer in men is rare. About one percent of all breast ...

  3. Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

  4. Breast cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that obese women produce more estrogen. This may fuel the development of breast cancer. Radiation -- If you ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ...

  5. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  6. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  7. Salvage mastectomy after failed breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, L. C.; Brunt, A. M.; Phillips, R. H.; Ellis, H.

    1991-01-01

    The indications, technique and complications of salvage mastectomy in 25 patients with local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast have been reviewed. Two patients required myocutaneous flaps to repair the defect, and six patients (24%) suffered wound infection or breakdown. Subsequent local relapse occurred in a total of five patients, two of whom died with uncontrolled chest wall skin nodules. PMID:2018316

  8. [Conservative treatment of breast cancer--indications and surgical technique].

    PubMed

    Murawa, P

    1994-11-01

    Comparison of the results of conservative surgery and radiotherapy with mastectomy in the treatment of the breast cancer are discussed. The indications, contraindications and surgical technique on conservative surgery are presented. PMID:7737545

  9. Better cosmetic results and comparable quality of life after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous breast reconstruction compared to breast conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Cocquyt, Veronique F; Blondeel, Phillip N; Depypere, Herman T; Van De Sijpe, Karlien A; Daems, Kristof K; Monstrey, Stanislas J; Van Belle, Simon J P

    2003-07-01

    Preoperative chemotherapy (PCT) can be used in large primary breast cancer to facilitate breast conservative surgery (BCS). Cosmetic results of BCS are influenced by the size of the residual tumour, relative to the size of the breast. After mastectomy, immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue provides excellent cosmetic outcome and has proven to be safe in breast cancer patients. Besides improving overall and disease free survival, Quality of Life (QoL), body image and cosmetic outcome are also important issues after treatment for breast cancer. In this study, Health-Related-Quality of Life (HRQL) and body image were evaluated, in patients treated with PCT, followed by BCS, or skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and perforator-flap breast reconstruction. Additionally, clinical observers assessed cosmetic outcome. All participants were evaluated by the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-36, 36 items) and a study-specific questionnaire. An external panel evaluated standardised photographs of the breasts. For all patients, norm-based scores of physical and mental health state are comparable with the general population, except for vitality (VT) score, which is somewhat lower. No significant differences can be observed between both groups. The majority of the patients were satisfied with the appearance of their breasts. The cosmetic results, assessed by the clinical team, were significantly better for patients having IBR, compared to BCS. The mean score was 7.5/10 for IBR, versus 6.0/10 for BCS (p<0.0001).Breast conserving treatment or mastectomy with reconstruction may yield comparable results of QoL, but cosmetic outcome is better after SSM and perforator-flap reconstruction. Patients must be offered both options, and clinicians should stress that both are equally effective. PMID:12890459

  10. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index tumours supporting the importance of contralateral breast cancer screening at the time of primary diagnosis and during follow-up. BBC occurs more frequently in old age group and majority of these tumours are estrogen dependent. There is good pathological concordance between the index tumour and the contralateral breast cancer. PMID:26500995

  11. Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Kubicky, Charlotte; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

  12. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy benefits subgroups of breast cancer patients with T1–2 tumor and 1–3 axillary lymph node(s) metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Li; Li, Shan-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Yang; Chen, Hui-Chun; Tang, Yen; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Chou, Fong-Fu; Wu, Shih-Chung; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with T1–2 and N1 disease. Patients and methods. A total of 207 postmastectomy women were enrolled. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of locoregional recurrence rate (LRR), distant recurrence rate (DRR) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by different tumor characteristics. Multivariate analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results With median follow-up 59.5 months, the 5-year LRR, DRR and OS were 9.1%, 20.3% and 84.4%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age < 40 years old (p = 0.003) and Her-2/neu over-expression (p = 0.016) were associated with higher LRR, whereas presence of LVI significantly predicted higher DRR (p = 0.026). Negative estrogen status (p = 0.033), Her-2/neu overexpression (p = 0.001) and LVI (p = 0.01) were significantly correlated with worse OS. PMRT didn’t prove to reduce 5-year LRR (p = 0.107), as well as 5-year OS (p = 0.918). In subgroup analysis, PMRT showed significant benefits of improvement LRR and OS in patients with positive LVI. Conclusions For patients with T1–2 and N1 stage breast cancer, PMRT can decrease locoregional recurrence and increase overall survival only in patients with lymphovascular invasion. PMID:25177247

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  14. Better treatment for breast cancer in older patients.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong; Fentiman, Ian S

    2009-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Elderly patients make up a large part of the breast cancer population and there are important specific considerations for this population. These patients are often excluded from screening programs and, despite many having early disease, may be either undertreated or subjected to mastectomy without consideration of their quality of life. Results of randomized trials in elderly patients with breast cancer have shown that mastectomy can often be avoided by using a combination of breast-conserving surgery and endocrine therapy, and use of the latter for neoadjuvant therapy may enable many with larger tumors to avoid mastectomy. PMID:19671028

  15. Contralateral Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer survivors constitute about 25% of the growing population of cancer survivors in the US. Contralateral breast cancer is the most common second cancer in women with primary breast cancer. With increasing cure rates comes increasing concern

  16. Lifestyle changes for prevention of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Hesam Bani; Karimi, Samieh; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women. Lifestyle changes are shown to be important in the prevention of breast cancer. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and vitamin and mineral use are key factors influencing the risk of breast cancer among women. Because these factors are related to each other, it is difficult to assess their individual roles in breast cancer. Some of these factors are alterable, meaning that women can decrease their risk for breast cancer by changing their behavior. Breast cancer is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity among women. Therefore, it is logical to try to find ways to decrease the risk of developing breast cancer. Lifestyle changes seem to be an easy, effective, and economical way to help prevention breast cancer. In women with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who are under radiotherapy treatment after undergoing a mastectomy, lifestyle changes are still very important. Some factors, such as smoking cessation and prevention of weight gain, may improve the long-term survival chances of these patients. Therefore, ways to increase women’s knowledge about the role of lifestyle changes in the prevention of breast cancer and in the survival of patients with diagnosed breast cancer should be considered and studied. PMID:25763165

  17. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  18. Mastectomy Weight and Tissue Expander Volume Predict Necrosis and Increased Costs Associated with Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yalanis, Georgia C.; Nag, Shayoni; Georgek, Jakob R.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Manahan, Michele A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired vascular perfusion in tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction leads to mastectomy skin necrosis. We investigated factors and costs associated with skin necrosis in postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Methods: Retrospective review of 169 women with immediate TE placement following mastectomy between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013 was performed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected. Logistic regression analysis on individual variables was performed to determine the effects of tissue expander fill volume and mastectomy specimen weight on skin necrosis. Billing data was obtained to determine the financial burden associated with necrosis. Results: This study included 253 breast reconstructions with immediate TE placement from 169 women. Skin necrosis occurred in 20 flaps for 15 patients (8.9%). Patients with hypertension had 8 times higher odds of skin necrosis [odd ratio (OR), 8.10, P < 0.001]. Patients with TE intraoperative fill volumes >300 cm3 had 10 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 10.66, P =0.010). Volumes >400 cm3 had 15 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 15.56, P = 0.002). Mastectomy specimen weight was correlated with skin necrosis. Specimens >500 g had 10 times higher odds of necrosis and specimens >1000 g had 18 times higher odds of necrosis (OR, 10.03 and OR, 18.43; P =0.003 and P <0.001, respectively). Mastectomy skin necrosis was associated with a 50% increased inpatient charge. Conclusion: Mastectomy flap necrosis is associated with HTN, larger TE volumes and mastectomy specimen weights, resulting in increased inpatient charges. Conservative TE volumes should be considered for patients with hypertension and larger mastectomy specimens. PMID:26301139

  19. Oncological safety and quality of life associated with mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Yul; Jung, So-Youn; Kwon, Youngmee; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Yun, Young Ho; Lee, Eun Sook

    2010-01-01

    To determine the quality of life (QoL) of breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (LD), and the oncological safety of the procedure. Between May 2001 and March 2007, 2,566 patients had breast cancer surgery at the National Cancer Center, Korea. Of the 2,566 patients, 1,699 had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 120 had a mastectomy with an immediate LD. We retrospectively compared the oncologic safety of the two techniques. We also assessed the QoL using the EORTC QLQ BR-23 and Zung's self-rating depression scale in 52 LD patients, 104 age- and stage-matched patients who underwent BCS, and 104 age-matched healthy women. The LD group had earlier stage disease than the BCS group at baseline, but following surgery, the groups did not differ in the rates of local recurrence or systemic metastases. Compared with the healthy group, the patient groups had poorer functioning and more depression (p < 0.001). Among the patient groups, the LD group reported lower scores for body image (p = 0.007) and future perspective (p = 0.023) than the BCS group. In the LD group, patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy reported lower scores for future perspective and higher scores for depression than those who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p < 0.001). The BCS and LD groups did not differ in oncological outcome, and the QoL of patients in the LD group was not always good. Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction should be considered carefully and tailored to the patient's needs and characteristics. PMID:20545939

  20. [Indications and techniques of reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Koch, Nathalie; Delaloye, Jean-François; Raffoul, Wassim

    2012-10-24

    Reconstructive surgery takes an important place in breast cancer treatment. Immediate breast reconstruction is performed during the same operation as mastectomy. It is contraindicated following radiotherapy. Reconstruction performed after mastectomy is called differed breast reconstruction. It is completed 6 months after chemotherapy and 1 year after radiotherapy. Prosthetic breast reconstruction is indicated when tissues are of good qualities and breast are small. Autologous reconstruction is performed in case of radiotherapy or large breast. After breast reconstruction, imperfections can be corrected with autologous fat injection. PMID:23167073

  1. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a mastectomy you may think about wearing a prosthesis. Or, you may think about having reconstructive surgery. ... fact sheets in this series: • Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis • Chemotherapy and Side Effects • Follow-up After Breast ...

  2. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico; Giannitelli, Sara M; Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca; Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Cassese, Raffaele; Scuderi, Nicolò; Rainer, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. PMID:26354273

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  4. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  5. Assessment of Pathological Response of Breast Carcinoma in Modified Radical Mastectomy Specimens after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Dhanya; Jayalakshmy, P S; Kumar, Suresh; Mathew, Siji

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Paclitaxel based neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen (NAT) in the setting of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) can render inoperable tumor (T4, N2/N3) resectable. The aim of this study was to assess the status of carcinoma in the breast and lymph nodes after paclitaxel based NAT in order to find out the patient and the tumor characteristics that correspond to the pathological responses which could be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the treatment response. Materials and Methods. Clinical and tumor characteristics of patients with breast carcinoma (n = 48) were assessed preoperatively. These patients were subjected to modified radical mastectomy after 3 courses of paclitaxel based NAT regimen. The pathological responses of the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes were studied by using Chevallier's system which graded the responses into pathological complete response (pCR), pathological partial response (pPR), and pathological no response (pNR). Results. Our studies showed a pCR of 27.1% and a pPR of 70.9% . Clinically small sized tumors (2-5?cms) and Bloom Richardson's grade 1 tumors showed a pCR. Mean age at presentation was 50.58?yrs. 79.2% of cases were invasive ductal carcinoma NOS; only 2.1% were invasive lobular carcinoma, their response to NAT being the same. There was no downgrading of the tumor grades after NAT. Ductal carcinoma in situ and lymphovascular invasion were found to be resistant to chemotherapy. The histopathological changes noted in the lymph nodes were similar to that found in the tumor bed. Discussion and Conclusion. From our study we conclude that histopathological examination of the tumor bed is the gold standard for assessing the chemotherapeutic tumor response. As previous studies have shown pCR can be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the tumor response. PMID:26697228

  6. Assessment of Pathological Response of Breast Carcinoma in Modified Radical Mastectomy Specimens after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Dhanya; Jayalakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Suresh; Mathew, Siji

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Paclitaxel based neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen (NAT) in the setting of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) can render inoperable tumor (T4, N2/N3) resectable. The aim of this study was to assess the status of carcinoma in the breast and lymph nodes after paclitaxel based NAT in order to find out the patient and the tumor characteristics that correspond to the pathological responses which could be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the treatment response. Materials and Methods. Clinical and tumor characteristics of patients with breast carcinoma (n = 48) were assessed preoperatively. These patients were subjected to modified radical mastectomy after 3 courses of paclitaxel based NAT regimen. The pathological responses of the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes were studied by using Chevallier's system which graded the responses into pathological complete response (pCR), pathological partial response (pPR), and pathological no response (pNR). Results. Our studies showed a pCR of 27.1% and a pPR of 70.9% . Clinically small sized tumors (2–5?cms) and Bloom Richardson's grade 1 tumors showed a pCR. Mean age at presentation was 50.58?yrs. 79.2% of cases were invasive ductal carcinoma NOS; only 2.1% were invasive lobular carcinoma, their response to NAT being the same. There was no downgrading of the tumor grades after NAT. Ductal carcinoma in situ and lymphovascular invasion were found to be resistant to chemotherapy. The histopathological changes noted in the lymph nodes were similar to that found in the tumor bed. Discussion and Conclusion. From our study we conclude that histopathological examination of the tumor bed is the gold standard for assessing the chemotherapeutic tumor response. As previous studies have shown pCR can be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the tumor response. PMID:26697228

  7. What is the evidence behind conservative mastectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Besides the diffusion of breast reconstructive techniques, several “conservative” approaches in mastectomy have been developed, in order to perform an immediate reconstruction with better aesthetic results: the skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), the nipple-areola complex (NAC)-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and the skin-reducing mastectomy (SRM). During the last decade, SSMs and NSMs have gained widespread acceptance and are currently considered standard treatment for early breast cancer. We would like to investigate the evidence behind this radical shift towards conservative mastectomies, where there has been a renewed interest worldwide. Methods We reviewed English literature by consulting the following databases: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal and Clinicaltrials.gov. The objective is to include any randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a “conservative mastectomy” technique to breast conservative surgery or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. In the absence of randomized trials, we took into account prospective cohorts and retrospective series for a narrative description of available evidence. Results Our review included 58 studies [19 prospective cohorts (34%) and 39 retrospective series (66%)] considering NSM and immediate reconstruction and ten studies [1 prospective cohort (10%) and 9 (90%) retrospective series] considering SSM and immediate reconstruction. In the NSM group, 29 studies reported data about complication rates and 42 studies presented data on NAC partial or complete necrosis. In the NSM group 45 studies and all the studies in the SSM group presented data on local and NAC recurrence. Conclusions In order to achieve higher levels of evidence, RCTs comparing conservative mastectomies to traditional mastectomy and breast conservative surgery would be desirable. However we can conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmetics and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645005

  8. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  9. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  10. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male; ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  11. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  12. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePLUS

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  13. Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Ptosis: Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction Allows Full Secondary Mastopexy with Complete Nipple Areolar Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Craig A.; Sullivan, Scott K.; Stolier, Alan; Trahan, Chris; Wise, M. Whitten; Duracher, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with moderate to severe ptosis are often considered poor candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. This results from the perceived risk of nipple necrosis and/or the inability of the reconstructive surgeon to reliably and effectively reposition the nipple-areola complex on the breast mound after mastectomy. Methods: A retrospective review identified patients with grade II/III ptosis who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate perforator flap reconstruction and subsequently underwent a mastopexy procedure. The mastopexies included complete, full-thickness periareolar incisions with peripheral undermining around the nipple-areola complex to allow for full transposition of the nipple-areola complex relative to the surrounding skin envelope. Results: Seventy patients with 116 nipple-sparing mastectomies met inclusion criteria. The most common complications were minor incisional dehiscence (7.7 percent) and variable degrees of necrosis in the preserved breast skin (3.4 percent) after the initial mastectomy. There were no cases of nipple-areola complex necrosis following the secondary mastopexy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that full mastopexy, including a complete full-thickness periareolar incision and nipple-areola complex repositioning on the breast mound, can be safely performed after nipple-sparing mastectomy and perforator flap breast reconstruction. The underlying flap provides adequate vascular ingrowth to support the perfusion of the nipple-areola complex despite complete incisional interruption of the surrounding cutaneous blood supply. These findings may allow for inclusion of women with moderate to severe ptosis in the candidate pool for nipple-sparing mastectomy if oncologic criteria are otherwise met. These findings also represent a significant potential advantage of autogenous reconstruction over implant reconstruction in women with breast ptosis who desire nipple-sparing mastectomy. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:26111328

  14. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... happens after treatment for breast cancer? Lymphedema after breast cancer treatment Emotional aspects of breast cancer Body image after breast cancer treatment Sexuality after breast cancer Pregnancy after breast cancer ...

  15. Psychosocial adjustment after treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fallowfield, L J

    1990-04-01

    Psychosocial and sexual disturbances are common sequelae to a diagnosis of breast cancer and its treatment. The hope that the development of breast-conserving techniques would protect women from the psychological distress experienced after mastectomy has not been realized. Studies comparing the psychosocial outcome of mastectomy with lumpectomy and radiotherapy reveal an advantage of the breast-conservation groups in terms of body image, but little difference in terms of psychiatric morbidity. Whatever the primary therapy, women still have to confront the fact that they have had cancer, a life-threatening disease which may recur. It is therefore most important that, irrespective of the treatment offered, we improve our understanding of the premorbid personality characteristics and sociodemographic factors that may predispose certain women to failure of adjustment following a diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:2143933

  16. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  17. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Frank, Simon G; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  18. Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Fact Sheet

    Cancer.gov

    A fact sheet that describes mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, two prophylactic surgeries that may be performed to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at very high risk; the situations in which they may be considered; and nonsurgical options.

  19. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  20. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  1. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information about breast cancer in childhood) A family history of breast cancer and other factors increase the ... with letrozole . Radiation therapy and/or surgery for relief of pain and other symptoms . Bisphosphonate drugs to ...

  2. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information about breast cancer in childhood) A family history of breast cancer and other factors increase the ... with letrozole . Radiation therapy and/or surgery for relief of pain and other symptoms . Bisphosphonate drugs to ...

  3. Breast Cancer Screening Methods

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... medlineplus/videos/news/Screening_Methods_123015.html Breast Cancer Screening Methods HealthDay News Video - December 31, 2015 ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Screening Methods For closed captioning, click the CC ...

  4. Breast Cancer: Early Detection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  5. What Is Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  6. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  7. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kinds of Cancer Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Breast Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) ... Native). Stay Informed Trends for Other Kinds of Cancer Cervical Colorectal ... Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: ...

  8. An osteogenesis imperfecta case with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taira, Fumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Saito, Mitsue; Kasumi, Fujio

    2014-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare connective tissue disease characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen and an increased risk of bone fractures. Several OI cases with malignancies have been reported. Herein, we describe an OI case with breast cancer. A 36-year-old premenopausal woman with OI was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of a right breast lump. We diagnosed right breast cancer with axillary and parasternal lymph node metastasis (T2N3M0 stage IIIC). The tumor had increased in size and tumor markers were elevated after 10 months of hormone therapy. We performed a right mastectomy and axillary dissection. She subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is currently taking trastuzumab and tamoxifen. Anesthesia is challenging in OI patients because of difficulty with airway control and intubation. We performed the mastectomy in this case without difficulty by working in cooperation with experienced anesthesiologists, orthopedists, and other medical personnel. Some OI patients reportedly have severe 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) toxicity related to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD is the main enzyme involved in the catabolism of 5-FU. Our present case also had low DPD activity and we thus chose epirubicin and cyclophosphamide for chemotherapy. Our search of the literature yielded only two OI cases with breast cancer as of April 2011. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Japan. PMID:22038671

  9. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  10. Male breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, IS

    2009-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

  11. Infections in People with Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  12. Nutrition for Children with Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  13. Depression and body image following mastectomy and lumpectomy.

    PubMed

    Lasry, J C; Margolese, R G; Poisson, R; Shibata, H; Fleischer, D; Lafleur, D; Legault, S; Taillefer, S

    1987-01-01

    A twenty year debate about the appropriate surgery for breast cancer has resulted in two clinical trials comparing radical vs more conservative operations. Despite the favorable results of these trials, the majority of breast cancer patients in North America still undergo mastectomy. We investigated the psychological and social adjustment following total and partial mastectomy in a group of patients randomly assigned to one or the other operation (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Protocol--B-06). Total mastectomy patients showed higher levels of depression and less satisfaction with body image. Partial mastectomy patients did not display any measurable increase in fear of recurrence. Patients undergoing radiation therapy showed surprising increase in depressive symptoms. Radiation therapy could well be more frightening to breast surgery patients than had been anticipated. These patients may benefit from some anticipatory counselling. PMID:3597656

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of preemptive analgesia with bupivacaine in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Jacek; Jaworski, Radoslaw; Smietanska, Irmina; Irga, Ninela; Wujtewicz, Maria; Jaskiewicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial we tested the hypothesis that preemptive analgesia with bupivacaine applied in the area of the surgical incision in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer would reduce post-operative acute pain and would reduce the amount of analgesics used during surgery and in the post-operative period. Material/Methods Participants were assigned into 1 of 2 groups – with bupivacaine applied in the area of surgical incision or with placebo. We assessed the intraoperative consumption of fentanyl, the postoperative consumption of morphine delivered using a PCA method, and the subjective pain intensity according to VAS score reported by patients in the early post-operative period. Results Out of 121 consecutive cases qualified for mastectomy, 112 women were allocated randomly to 1 of 2 groups – group A (bupivacaine) and group B (placebo). The final study group comprised 106 breast cancer cases. Between the groups, a statistically significant difference was observed with respect to: lower fentanyl consumption during surgery (p=0.011), lower morphine (delivered by means of a PCA) consumption between the 4–12th postoperative hours (p=0.02) and significantly lower pain intensity assessed according to VAS score at the 4th and 12th hours after surgery (p=0.004 and p=0.02 respectively) for the group A patients. Conclusions Preemptive analgesia application in the form of infiltration of the area of planned surgical incisions with bupivacaine in breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy decreases post-operative pain sensation, limits the amount of fentanyl used during surgery, and reduces the demand for opiates in the hours soon after surgery. PMID:21959614

  15. Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer.Net Editorial Board , which is composed of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer - ...

  16. Breast Cancer -- Inflammatory

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer.Net Editorial Board , which is composed of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer - ...

  17. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer.Net Editorial Board , which is composed of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer ...

  18. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is discussed.

  19. The role of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, M; Sinove, Y; DePypere, H; Van Den Broucke, R; Vakaet, L; Cocquyt, V; Villeirs, G; Lambein, C; Van Maele, G

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the objectives of oncoplastic surgery in breast cancer management. Indications and advantages are summarised. Some surgical techniques are described. The authors report their own experience with oncoplastic surgery (26 patients who had immediate breast reconstruction after tumorectomy, and 126 patients who had lumpectomy alone. Oncoplastic surgery was characterised by a wider excision, with negative margins in all cases. In isolated breast conservative tumorectomy, 20% of the margins were positive, requiring re-excision or radical mastectomy. Oncoplastic surgery is preferred especially in younger patients with smaller breasts, since it is less cosmetically mutulating and allows complete tumor resection with save margins. PMID:19241915

  20. Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget’s disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

  1. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  2. The Nipple-Areola Preserving Mastectomy: A Multistage Procedure Aiming to Improve Reconstructive Outcomes following Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carlos A.; Reis, Scott M.; Sato, Erika A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemia of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) and periareolar tissue is commonly seen following tissue-preserving mastectomies for small invasive and noninvasive cancers. The nipple-areola preserving mastectomy is a multistage procedure in which the NAC and central mastectomy flap tissue is surgically delayed to improve the survivability in patients undergoing mastectomies followed by reconstruction. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 20 patients undergoing the 2-stage nipple-areola preserving mastectomy: the first stage comprised undermining the NAC and raising the breast skin flaps, with placement of a silicone sheet in the dissected pocket. The second stage followed 2–3 weeks after the NAC delay, with patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomies. Results: Mean age was 46.2 years (range, 23–59 years). Indications included breast cancer in 18 patients and BRCA gene mutation prophylaxis in 2 patients. None were actively smoking. Mean time between delay of flaps and breast reconstructions was 16 days (range, 10–35 days). One patient underwent bilateral nipple resection at the time of mastectomies due to a subareolar nipple biopsy positive for ductal carcinoma in situ. One patient underwent left nipple excision after a skin nipple biopsy was positive for metaplasia. No signs of NAC vascular compromise were observed in any of the cases. Conclusions: Our 2-stage approach benefits patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy, especially those at high-risk, by safely increasing survivability of the native breast skin envelope and NAC, while improving oncologic outcomes by identification of subareolar malignancies and sentinel node status before mastectomy and reconstruction. PMID:26579344

  3. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast

  4. Paying for Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... screening coverage in your state. National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program States are making breast cancer ... Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) . The NBCCEDP attempts to ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Breast cancer On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed May 2015 What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a disease in which certain ...

  6. When Someone You Know Has Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  7. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing 'keyhole' mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Peyser, P. M.; Abel, J. A.; Straker, V. F.; Hall, V. L.; Rainsbury, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The popularity of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) which preserves the breast skin envelope is increasing, but the risks and benefits of this approach are only beginning to emerge. A technique involving ultra-conservative SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been evaluated to establish the surgical and oncological sequelae of skin conservation. Between 1994-1998, 67 consecutive patients underwent 71 SSM and expander-assisted immediate latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstructions (follow up, 24.1 months; range, 2-52 months). Breast resection, axillary dissection and reconstruction were performed through a 5-6 cm circular peri-areolar 'keyhole' incision. Patients were discharged 6.5 days (range, 5-15 days) after the 3.9 h (range, 3.0-5.5 h) procedure, and expansion was completed by 4.0 months (range, 0-10 months). Local recurrence occurred in 3% of breasts at risk, skin envelope necrosis occurred in 10%, and contralateral surgery was required to achieve symmetry in 14%. SSM and IBR is an oncologically safe, minimal-scar procedure which can be performed by surgeons trained in 'oncoplastic' techniques. It results in low rates of local recurrence and complication, and reduces the need for contralateral surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10932655

  8. Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6667 Trial: Effect of Breast MR Imaging Assessments and Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Lucy G.; Gatsonis, Constantine; Mahoney, Mary C.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; DeMartini, Wendy B.; Lehman, Constance D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess which patient and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging factors are associated with the likelihood of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Materials and Methods The American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6667 trial was compliant with HIPAA; institutional review board approval was obtained at each site. All patients provided written informed consent. This study was a retrospective review of data from 934 women enrolled in the trial who did not have a known contralateral breast cancer at the time of surgical planning. The authors assessed age, menopausal status, index breast cancer histologic results, contralateral breast histologic results, breast density, family history, race and/or ethnicity, MR imaging Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment, and number of MR imaging lesions for association with CPM by using the Fisher exact test, exact ?2 test, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results Eighty-six of the 934 (9.2%) women underwent CPM and were more likely to be younger (mean age, 48 years [range, 27–78 years] vs mean age, 54 years [range, 25–86 years]; P < .0001), be premenopausal (55 of 86 [64%] vs 349 of 845 [41%], P < .0001), have ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the index breast (31% [27 of 86] vs 19% [164 of 848], P = .02), have greater breast density (71 of 86 [83%] vs 572 of 848 [68%], P = .004), and have a family history of breast cancer (44 of 86 [30%] vs 150 of 488 [18%], P = .01) than those who did not undergo CPM. Distributions of race and/or ethnicity, contralateral lesion pathologic results, and number of MR imaging lesions were similar in both groups. With multivariate modeling, younger age, greater breast density, DCIS index cancer, and family history remained significant, whereas menopausal status did not. Positive MR imaging assessments were not significantly more frequent in the CPM group than in the group of women who did not undergo CPM (14 of 86 [16.3%] vs 113 of 848 [13.3%], P = .43). Conclusion In patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent breast MR imaging at which a contralateral breast cancer was not identified, patient factors and not breast MR imaging BI-RADS scores were chief determinants in decisions regarding CPM. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24937691

  9. Prevention of breast cancer in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Love, R R

    1994-01-01

    While all-inclusive complete models for breast cancer development are not available, four concepts are likely to be critical to creation of well-grounded breast cancer prevention efforts: 1) step-by-step progressive development, 2) involving multiple factors, 3) over several years, and 4) during a long period of which the process may be reversible. Interventions to prevent breast cancer must have a comprehensive biological rationale, an absence of serious toxic effects, and long-term acceptability by women. Prophylactic mastectomy may be beneficial in some women, but identification of individuals at very high risk for breast cancer remains elusive. At present, greater attention to four manipulable risk factors is appropriate: radiation, smoking, alcohol, and lactation. Clinical trials are in the process of studying a synthetic retinoid (4-hydroxyphenylretinamide), tamoxifen, and a low-fat diet. Other breast cancer prevention strategies in various phases of preclinical trial evaluation include: pseudopregnancy, an "ideal" combination oral contraceptive, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist oophorectomy, modification of estrogen metabolism, suppression of ornithine decarboxylase induction, and manipulation of growth factors. PMID:7999471

  10. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2012: Results from a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    PubMed

    Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Kang, Eunyoung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Seokwon; Hur, Min Hee

    2015-06-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through utilization of an online registration program. We have reported the basic facts about breast cancer in Korea in 2012, and analyzed the changing patterns in the clinical characteristics and management of breast cancer in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were collected for the year 2012 from 97 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey, and from the online registry database. A total of 17,792 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 70.7 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 51 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women was higher than that of premenopausal women among those diagnosed with breast cancer. The proportion of cases of early breast cancer increased continuously, and breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in that same year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 3-fold over last 10 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all stages of breast cancer patients was extremely high. The clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed in ways that resulted in high overall survival over the past 10 years in Korea, and the surgical management of the disease has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:26155285

  11. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2012: Results from a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Kang, Eunyoung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Seokwon

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through utilization of an online registration program. We have reported the basic facts about breast cancer in Korea in 2012, and analyzed the changing patterns in the clinical characteristics and management of breast cancer in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were collected for the year 2012 from 97 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey, and from the online registry database. A total of 17,792 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 70.7 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 51 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women was higher than that of premenopausal women among those diagnosed with breast cancer. The proportion of cases of early breast cancer increased continuously, and breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in that same year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 3-fold over last 10 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all stages of breast cancer patients was extremely high. The clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed in ways that resulted in high overall survival over the past 10 years in Korea, and the surgical management of the disease has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:26155285

  12. New Insights into the Surgical Management of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David M

    2016-01-01

    William Halstead is considered by many as the father of modern breast surgery. He popularized the notion that breast cancer progresses in an orderly fashion and that appropriately timed radical surgery can interrupt this progression to save lives. This view dominated for nearly 100 years and still persists to one extent or another in the minds of physicians and patients alike. Rapid advances in breast cancer biology have highlighted the heterogeneity of breast cancer and paradigm-shifting clinical trials have successfully challenged prevailing wisdom to effect a seed change in breast cancer surgery. Advances in radiation and systemic therapies permit more limited surgery for most patients. Recurrence rates of all kinds are on the decline; yet, paradoxically, use of bilateral mastectomy is increasing. PMID:26617207

  13. CISNET: Breast Cancer Modeling

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Group is in its third round of funding. Six groups and a coordinating center are funded to model modern developments in breast prevention, early detection and treatment. A unique aspect of the current round of funding is that the groups will model breast cancer as four separate sub-types (based on molecular subtypes).

  14. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. Breast Cancer Screening Rates

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. Having regular mammograms can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. Source for graph data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Cancer ...

  16. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  20. Breast Density and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... news/Breast_Density_120215.html Breast Density and Cancer Risk HealthDay News Video - December 3, 2015 To ... please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Density and Cancer Risk For closed captioning, click the CC button ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  2. Immediate breast reconstruction and psychological adjustment in women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Holly, P; Kennedy, P; Taylor, A; Beedie, A

    2003-11-01

    Current debate exists regarding the timing of reconstructive surgery following mastectomy for breast cancer, with research pointing in favour of immediate reconstruction. This cross-sectional study sought to compare the psychological outcome of breast cancer treatment in women who had either received mastectomy and immediate reconstruction using autogenous tissue (n?=?30), or mastectomy alone (n?=?34), and also determine adjustment factors in this population as a whole. Participants completed measures of depression, anxiety, body image, self-esteem, coping and perceived social support at a time point 3?-?15 months after initial surgery. No significant differences were revealed between the two groups on any of the outcome measures. Poor body image, low self-esteem, and a tendency to use coping strategies characterized by helpless/hopelessness and anxious preoccupation, rather than fighting spirit, were highly predictive of distress. Reasons for the lack of differences between the two groups are explored. PMID:21974734

  3. Clinical studies on the use of radiation therapy as primary treatment of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.; Beadle, G.F.; Hellman, S.

    1984-02-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer by primary radiation therapy instead of mastectomy is undergoing evaluation in the United States and Europe. Retrospective studies of patients treated by primary radiation therapy show that local control and survival rates are comparable to those obtained by mastectomy. Detailed analysis of local failure following primary radiation therapy indicates the importance of excisional biopsy of the primary tumor, moderate doses of radiation to the breast and draining lymph node areas, and the use of a boost to the primary tumor area in maximizing local control. Further, the judicious use of local excision combined with meticulous radiotherapy technique yields highly satisfactory results for the majority of treated patients. Preliminary results from prospective trials also indicate that primary radiation therapy provides both local control and survival rates equivalent to mastectomy. Primary radiation therapy is becoming an increasingly important alternative to mastectomy where surgical and radiotherapeutic expertise are available to optimize both local tumor control and the final cosmetic outcome.

  4. Why Women Are Choosing Bilateral Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Suplee, Patricia D; D'Emilia, Ian

    2015-12-01

    The rate of women choosing to have a bilateral mastectomy as a treatment for unilateral breast cancer has increased since the 1990s, particularly among younger women. This article describes a qualitative study that was conducted to explore this decision-making process. PMID:26583641

  5. pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women.

    PubMed

    Ali, A; Warner, E

    2013-02-01

    CONSIDER THIS SCENARIO: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple's relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman's diagnosis.Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment?Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program-the first of its kind in Canada-for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

  6. Reasons why women who have mastectomy decide to have or not to have breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Reaby, L L

    1998-06-01

    Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is chosen by approximately 10 percent of Australian women. Younger women are more likely to have this surgical procedure. This suggests that there may be many factors determining this choice. Sixty-four women who wore an external postmastectomy breast prosthesis and 31 women who had postmastectomy breast reconstruction participated in the present study. The purpose was to gain a greater understanding through semi-structured interviews of why women who had breast reconstruction chose this alternative and why women who wore the external postmastectomy breast prosthesis elected not to have reconstruction. The study also ascertained how difficult it was for the women in both groups to decide their particular breast restoration alternative. The most frequently endorsed reasons for not having breast reconstruction in the prosthesis group included: (1) not essential for physical well being, (2) not essential for emotional well being, (3) not having enough information about the procedure, and (4) not wanting anything unnatural in the body. When each member of the group was asked to identify a major reason for not having reconstruction, two predominant issues emerged: (1) fearing complications and (2) perceiving themselves as being too old for the procedure. Twelve percent of the prosthesis group experienced difficulty in making the decision not to have reconstruction. Three factors accounted for this difficulty: (1) the lack of family support, (2) the inability to have a specific type of reconstruction, and (3) the perception that friends and acquaintances saw the surgery as cosmetic. The most frequently reported reasons given by the reconstruction group for having reconstruction included: (1) to get rid of the external breast prosthesis, (2) to be able to wear many different types of clothing, (3) to regain femininity, and (4) to feel whole again. The least influential factors were to improve marital and sexual relations. The major reason cited most often by this group was to feel whole again. None of the women in the reconstruction group experienced any difficulty when deciding their method of breast restoration. What factors are taken into consideration by women when they decide either to have or not to have reconstruction need to be understood by physicians. This knowledge will assist them in conveying appropriate information regarding alternatives and will help them deal with the women's concerns and/or misconceptions. PMID:9623821

  7. CISNET: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    However, there are very limited data on the population effects of these novel cancer control approaches. Population modeling is a unique comparative effectiveness paradigm to fill this gap by translating advances from the laboratory and clinical trials to understanding their net effects on US breast cancer mortality. The CISNET Breast Working Group has collaborated over the past nine years to apply independent population models to evaluate cancer control practices and use results to inform clinical and public health guidelines.

  8. 'Occult' breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, M. S.; Nash, A. G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore current trends in the diagnosis, investigation and treatment of patients presenting with axillary lymph node metastases without a primary in the breast being found and, more rarely, those cases with metastatic breast cancer where the primary remains unknown--the so-called, 'occult' breast cancer. A retrospective study of 25 reported cases were selected from our database at the Royal Marsden and 6 patients were found to have true 'occult' breast cancer. These 6 patients are all still alive with no primary ever having been found in the breast. A literature review was then undertaken exploring the changing trends in this diagnostic enigma. MRI scanning, it is reported, may reveal the primary. Occult cancers in which imaging totally fails to show the primary will become increasingly rare. The prognosis of these, however, may be surprisingly better than one would expect from the nature of their presentation. PMID:11777139

  9. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Munck, Linda de; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siesling, Sabine; Maduro, John H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  10. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  11. Breast Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the United States (other than skin cancer). Women with breast cancer have many treatment options, including surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. A woman diagnosed with breast cancer may receive more than one type of treatment.

  12. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  13. Epigenomics and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

  14. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Cancer of the Esophagus?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events ...

  17. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small number start in other tissues. The lymph (lymphatic) system of the breast The lymph system is important ... fluid and waste products, as well as immune system cells. Breast cancer cells can enter lymphatic vessels and begin to grow in lymph nodes. ...

  19. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital · Early Stage Breast Cancer Support Group · Advanced Stage Cancer Support Group · IMPACT ­ Young Cancer Survivors' Group Contact: Angela Khairallah, LCSW at 203-200-2360 Reach to Recovery ­ American Cancer Society 1-800-227-2345 www.cancer.org Sisters

  20. Shaping the breast in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery: an easy three-step principle. Part II--Breast reconstruction after total mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Blondeel, Phillip N; Hijjawi, John; Depypere, Herman; Roche, Nathalie; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2009-03-01

    This is Part II of four parts describing the three-step principle being applied in reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery. Part I explains how to analyze a problematic breast by understanding the main anatomical features of a breast and how they interact: the footprint, the conus of the breast, and the skin envelope. This part describes how one can optimize results with breast reconstructions after complete mastectomy. For both primary and secondary reconstructions, the authors explain how to analyze the mastectomized breast and the deformed chest wall, before giving step-by-step guidelines for rebuilding the entire breast with either autologous tissue or implants. The differences in shaping unilateral or bilateral breast reconstructions with autologous tissue are clarified. Regardless of timing or method of reconstruction, it is shown that by breaking down the surgical strategy into three easy (anatomical) steps, the reconstructive surgeon will be able to provide more aesthetically pleasing and reproducible results. Throughout these four parts, the three-step principle will be the red line on which to fall back to define the problem and to propose a solution. PMID:19319042

  1. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for most tumors that test positive for either estrogen or progesterone receptors (called ER-positive or PR- ... symptoms. Tamoxifen. Tamoxifen is a drug that blocks estrogen from binding to breast cancer cells. It is ...

  2. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    E-print Network

    Mu, Ping

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and ...

  3. Sexuality After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supplies feeling to the nipple runs through the deep breast tissue, and it gets disconnected during surgery. ... Site Comments Better Business Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © 2015 American Cancer Society, Inc. ...

  4. Breast Cancer and Diet

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... health news that matters to you. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Diets About MedlinePlus Site Map ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  5. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  6. Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Hansma, Paul

    Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

  7. Risk-reducing Surgery in Women at Risk for Familial Breast or Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhiem, K.; Pfeifer, K.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Kiechle, M.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated 5?% of breast cancers and 10?% of ovarian cancers may be due to inherited autosomal dominant breast and ovarian cancer alleles BRCA1 und BRCA2. According to population-based studies 1 or 2 women per 1000 carry such a risk allele. The cumulative cancer risk for healthy women with a BRCA-mutation is between 60 and 85?% for breast cancer and between 20 and 60?% for ovarian cancer. Recent studies have reported an increased risk for contralateral breast cancer in women after unilateral breast cancer. Since 1997 the German Cancer Aid has supported an interdisciplinary approach for high-risk women consisting of genetic testing, counselling and prevention in 12 specialised centres. Since 2005 this concept has received additional support from health insurance companies, and results have been assessed with regard to outcomes (e.g. reduced mortality due to more intensive early diagnosis). The number of centres has increased to 15 at various university hospitals. These interdisciplinary centres offer women the opportunity to participate in a structured screening programme for the early diagnosis of breast cancer and provide non-directive counselling on the options for risk-reducing surgery, e.g., prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after unilateral breast cancer. Such surgical interventions can significantly reduce the risk of disease, the respective disease-specific mortality and – particularly prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy – total mortality in BRCA-mutation carriers. PMID:26640291

  8. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Breast Biopsy (Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer (Arabic) ????? ????? - ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer English (Arabic) ????? ????? - ??????? Multimedia ...

  9. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  10. New innovative techniques in radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J O; Sacchini, V S

    2013-04-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is an established treatment for early-stage breast cancer. Long-term follow-up has demonstrated equivalent survival to mastectomy. However, standard WBRT to the conserved breast requires daily radiation treatment, 5 days per week, for 5-7 weeks. This schedule imposes a considerable burden on breast cancer patients and healthcare systems alike. For the last decade, there has been considerable interest in lessening the volume of breast treated with radiotherapy and reducing the number of fractions of radiation treatment. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), including intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), delivers high-dose radiation immediately surrounding the lumpectomy cavity, with relative sparing of the majority of the ipsilateral breast. Hypofractionated WBRT delivers radiation to the entire ipsilateral breast; however, this is achieved using a smaller number of fractions and total dose of radiotherapy. The attraction of less invasive or demanding radiotherapy schedules has led to the widespread introduction of APBI before its long-term results have been established. In the past 5 years, data from prospective trials of hypofractionated WBRT and IORT compared to standard WBRT have become available. Additionally, a large, prospective randomized study of APBI versus WBRT is nearing accrual. In this review article, we will discuss these new innovative techniques in radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will also discuss the recently completed and ongoing prospective studies that will provide a robust evaluation of the safety and efficacy of these techniques. PMID:23612227

  11. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  12. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  13. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information about breast cancer in childhood) A family history of breast cancer and other factors increase the ... with letrozole . Radiation therapy and/or surgery for relief of pain and other symptoms . Bisphosphonate drugs to ...

  15. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of ... and/or a medical oncologist. Types of breast surgery Most men with breast cancer have some type ...

  16. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  17. BCSC Grants: Breast Cancer Delays

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home   |   Data   |   Statistics   |   Tools   |   Collaborations   |   Work with Us   |   Publications   |   About   |   Links Ongoing Collaborations CISNET ACS FAVOR Comprehensive Cancer Centers Ancillary Studies Breast Cancer

  18. Evaluation of Lipofilling Safety in Elderly Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rietjens, Mario; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Andrea, Manconi; Hamza, Alaa; Petit, Jean-Yves; Garusi, Cristina; Martella, Stefano; Barbieri, Benedetta; Gottardi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lipofilling is widely used in breast reconstruction after mastectomy with reconstruction or breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. The aim of this study is focused on complications associated with lipofilling in elderly breast cancer patients with breast defects after breast conserving surgery or reconstruction. Methods: A total of 137 patients older than 60 years who underwent 153 lipofilling procedures were included. All patients had undergone breast lipofilling using Coleman’s technique. Estimated breast defect volume, lipofilling volume, and complications after lipofilling were obtained for analysis. Results: Most patients (67%) had only 1 lipofilling procedure. The median lipofilling volume to breast defect volume ratio was 1.5. No severe complications were found after treatment. Liponecrosis was detected in 10 of 153 breasts (7%) or 9 of 137 patients within 2 weeks after lipofilling and required surgical drainage in 2. No local recurrences were noted. Conclusions: The incidence of liponecrosis after lipofilling in elderly patients was relatively high, requiring surgical drainage in some cases. As a rough guide, the lipofilling volume should not exceed 1.5 times the defect volume, and close postoperative follow-up within the first 2 weeks is suggested for these patients. PMID:26301130

  19. Clinical outcomes following nipple-areola-sparing mastectomy with immediate implant-based breast reconstruction: a 12-year experience with an analysis of patient and breast-related factors for complications.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Aldrighi, Cláudia Maria; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo Gustavo; Aldrighi, José Mendes; Gemperli, Rolf; Filassi, Jose Roberto; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2013-08-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is increasingly offered to women for therapeutic and prophylactic indications. Although, clinical series have been described, there are few studies describing risk factors for complications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of complications in a series of consecutive patients submitted to NSM and differences between clinical risk factors, breast volume, and different incision types. In a cohort-designed study, 158 reconstructed patients (invasive/in situ cancer and high risk for cancer) were stratified into groups based on different types of incision used (hemi-periareolar, double-circle periareolar, and Wise-pattern). They were matched for age, body mass index, associated clinical diseases, smoking, and weight of specimen. Also included were patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy. Mean follow-up was 65.6 months. In 106 (67 %) patients, NSM was performed for breast cancer treatment and in 52 (32.9 %) for cancer prophylaxis. Thirty-nine (24.6 %) patients were submitted to hemi-periareolar technique, 67 (42.4 %) to double-circle periareolar incision, and 52 (33 %) to Wise-pattern incision. The reconstruction was performed with tissue expander and implant-expander. Local recurrence rate was 3.7 % and the incidence of distant metastases was 1.8 %. Obese patients and higher weight of specimen had a higher risk for complications. After adjusting risk factors (BMI, weight of specimen), the complications were higher for patients submitted to hemi-periareolar and Wise-pattern incisions. This follow-up survey demonstrates that NSM facilitates optimal breast reconstruction by preserving the majority of the breast skin. Selected patients can have safe outcomes and therefore this may be a feasible option for breast cancer management. Success depends on coordinated planning with the oncologic surgeon and careful preoperative and intraoperative management. Surgical risk factors include incision type, obesity, and weight of breast specimen. PMID:23897416

  20. Conservative surgery for multifocal/multicentric breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, Matthijs V; Rutgers, Emiel J Th

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) breast cancer is regularly considered a relative contraindication for breast-conserving therapy (BCT). There are two reasons for this wide spread notion: However, we concur that if optimal 'cytoreductive surgery' is achieved this will result in good local control (i.e. in-breast relapse <10% at 10 years). This can only be achieved on the basis of the right imaging, image guidance for non-palpable foci, and tumor free (invasive as well as ductal carcinoma in situ) margins after adequate pathological assessment. Surgery must then be followed by whole breast irradiation and systemic treatments as indicated by primary cancer biology. Careful planning and adaptive application of oncoplastic techniques will result in an optimal cosmetic results. The meticulous work of Roland Holland and coworkers(1) in the early 1980's on whole breast specimen showed invasive foci at more then 2 cm distance from the invasive primary cancer in more then 40% of specimen. Although multiple tumor foci may occur in up to 60% of mastectomy specimens, equivalent survival outcomes were observed in prospective trials comparing BCT and mastectomy for clinically unifocal lesions, suggesting that the majority of these foci are not, or do not become, biologically relevant or clinically significant with appropriate treatment. As diagnostic tools advance, MF and MC tumors are more commonly diagnosed. Cancers that previously would have been classified as unifocal now can be detected as MF or MC. In addition, locoregional treatment modalities have improved significantly over the past decade. More recent studies reflect these advances in diagnosis and treatment. Studies evaluated staging MRI showed that up to 19% of woman with diagnosed breast cancer harbor a second malignant ipsilateral lesion. These findings should only have consequences when additional lesions are proven cancer. Multiple enhancing lesions on MRI are in itself not an indication for a mastectomy. The Z0011 trial and the AMAROS trial demonstrated a similar phenomenon for axillary treatment; less surgery does not necessarily lead to inferior local control or survival outcomes. Recent studies supplement the growing evidence that treatment of patients with MF/MC breast cancer with BCS, radiotherapy, and adjuvant systemic therapy can result in low rates of in-breast recurrence. PMID:26303986

  1. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jessica; Griffith, Kent A.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Janz, Nancy K.; Sabel, Michael S.; Katz, Steven J.; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

  2. Nummular Eczema of Breast: A Potential Dermatologic Complication after Mastectomy and Subsequent Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iwahira, Yoshiko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Yusuke; Kuwata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Purposes. The present paper reports clinical cases where nummular eczema developed during the course of breast reconstruction by means of implantation and evaluates the occurrence patterns and ratios of this complication. Methods. 1662 patients undergoing breast reconstruction were reviewed. Patients who developed nummular eczema during the treatment were selected, and a survey was conducted on these patients regarding three items: (1) the stage of the treatment at which nummular eczema developed; (2) time required for the lesion to heal; (3) location of the lesion on the reconstructed breast(s). Furthermore, histopathological examination was conducted to elucidate the etiology of the lesion. Results. 48 patients (2.89%) developed nummular eczema. The timing of onset varied among these patients, with lesions developing after the placement of tissue expanders for 22 patients (45.8%); after the tissue expanders were replaced with silicone implants for 12 patients (25%); and after nipple-areola complex reconstruction for 14 patients (29.2%). Nummular eczema developed both in periwound regions (20 cases: 41.7%) and in nonperiwound regions (32 cases: 66.7%). Histopathological examination showed epidermal acanthosis, psoriasiform patterns, and reduction of sebaceous glands. Conclusions. Surgeons should recognize that nummular eczema is a potential complication of breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and silicone implants. PMID:26380109

  3. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  4. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  5. Breast cancer imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Moadel, Renee M

    2011-05-01

    Conventional mammography is a screening procedure constrained by low specificity in the detection of breast cancer. Approximately 40% of women undergoing mammography screening have dense breast tissue, and conventional mammographic imaging has a sensitivity range of only 50%-85% for malignant lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now recommended for breast cancer screening in high-risk patients. However, approximately 15% of patients cannot tolerate MRI. These are the clinical situations in which positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma (BSG) camera systems fulfill a need for primary breast cancer imaging. Because breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among women, many nuclear medicine imaging techniques are essential in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disease. Nuclear medicine surgical techniques consist of sentinel lymph node localization and the use of radiolabeled seeds for intraoperative localization of nonpalpable breast cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the PEM Flex Solo II scanner, which has the capability for stereotactic biopsy, with an array of pixelated lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT), and a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm. Clear PEM is a scanner in development with cerium-doped LYSO (LYSO:Ce) crystals, multipixel avalanche photodiodes, depth of interaction measurement with a resolution of 1.3 mm. The Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera is a BSG device approved by the FDA with stereotactic biopsy guidance capability, a pixelated array of sodium iodide crystals, PS-PMTs, and an extrinsic spatial resolution of 6 mm at 3 cm from the camera. GE has just received clearance from the FDA for a molecular breast imaging camera, the Discovery NM 750 b, with pixelated cadmium zinc telluride crystals, semiconductor photoelements and an extrinsic resolution of 3.5 mm at 3 cm. The Society of Nuclear Medicine has issued guidelines for BSG camera image interpretation recommendations and clinical indications. Different crystals and camera architectures are under investigation to further improve resolution for both PEM and BSG imaging. PMID:21440698

  6. Breast Cancer Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    The maps show a pattern of elevated mortality rates for female breast cancer extending from the Mid-Atlantic through the Northeastern states has persisted for many years. Established risk factors are believed to be largely responsible, but the remaining reasons are unknown.

  7. Talking with the Doctor about Breast Surgery Options

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Elect of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Q: What surgical options do women diagnosed with early- ... used after mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer. Q: What are the advantages and disadvantages for having ...

  8. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-25

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  9. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic What should you ask your doctor about breast cancer? Treatment of breast cancer during pregnancy Breast cancer is diagnosed in about ... and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking ... Treatment What`s New in Breast Cancer Research? Other Resources ...

  10. Prognostic role of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer: A historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Verkooijen, Helena M; Wong, Fuh-Yong; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Kwong, Ava; Tan, Ern-Yu; Aishah Taib, Nur; Nei, Wen-Long; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; Tan, Benita; Chan, Patrick; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har; Dent, Rebecca

    2015-11-15

    The value of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently debated. We assessed the association between adjuvant radiotherapy and survival in a large cohort of Asian women with TNBC. Women diagnosed with TNBC from 2006 to 2011 in five Asian centers (N?=?1,138) were included. Survival between patients receiving mastectomy only, breast-conserving therapy (BCT, lumpectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy) and mastectomy with radiotherapy were compared, and adjusted for demography, tumor characteristics and chemotherapy types. Median age at diagnosis was 53 years (range: 23-96 years). Median tumor size at diagnosis was 2.5 cm and most patients had lymph node-negative disease. The majority of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (n?=?861, 76%) comprising predominantly anthracycline-based regimes. In 775 women with T1-2, N0-1, M0 TNBCs, 5-year relative survival ratio (RSR) was highest in patients undergoing mastectomy only (94.7%, 95% CI: 88.8-98.8%), followed by BCT (90.8%, 95% CI: 85.0-94.7%), and mastectomy with radiotherapy (82.3%, 95% CI: 73.4-88.1%). The adjusted risks of mortality between the three groups were not significantly different. In 363 patients with T3-4, N2-3, M0 TNBCs, BCT was associated with highest 5-year RSR (94.1%, 95% CI: 81.3-99.4%), followed by mastectomy with radiotherapy (62.7%, 95% CI: 54.3-70.1%), and mastectomy only (58.6%, 95% CI: 43.5-71.6%). Following multivariable adjustment, BCT and mastectomy with radiotherapy remained significantly associated with lower mortality risk compared to mastectomy only. Overall, adjuvant radiotherapy was associated with higher survival in women aged <40 years, but not in older women. Adjuvant radiotherapy appears to be independently associated with a survival gain in locally advanced as well as in very young TNBC. PMID:26018878

  11. Breast Cancer Among Asian Women

    Cancer.gov

    A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

  12. [Locoregional surgery for stage IV breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lotersztajn, N; Héquet, D; Mosbah, R; Rouzier, R

    2015-04-01

    Three to 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancers have stage IV disease. Overall survival was improved during the last few years (16-45 months). The treatment of stage IV breast cancer has traditionally been palliative with surgical resection reserved for symptomatic wound complications. Since 2000, several retrospective studies have compared surgery versus no local therapy in women presenting with stage IV breast cancer with an intact primary tumor. All showed a survival advantage for the surgical cohort. However, these studies are limited by the fact that it is not possible to control for biases that led to surgical resection of the primary tumor. Several prospective randomized trials have been undertaken. We have partial results for two of them and they show no survival differences between patients who benefit from local surgery and patients who did not have surgery. However, breast surgery is at low risk of complication, if not considering psychological aspect of mastectomy, and can be proposed to patients with no progression after first chemotherapy. Conservative management can be an option, but surgery must be optimal with negative margins. No benefit of axillary surgery has been shown but this treatment can lead to complications and impact quality of life of patients. Therefore, axillary node resection is not recommended for stage IV breast cancer. Finally, radiotherapy can be an alternative option of local therapy associated or no to surgery in stage IV breast cancer. PMID:25819388

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  14. Role of science in the treatment of breast cancer when tumor multicentricity is present.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    During the past 100 years, there have been two major controversies with regard to the treatment of primary breast cancer. The first controversy, which occurred approximately 35 years ago, questioned the performance of radical mastectomy, as originally proposed by Halsted in the 1890s. That controversy was resolved by the use of laboratory and clinical research, hypothesis formulation, and evaluation of the efficacy of the latter through the conduct of randomized clinical trials. A second major controversy arose when magnetic resonance imaging began to detect the presence of tumor multicentricity in many breast cancer patients, resulting in a resurgence in mastectomy in women who could have been treated with breast-preserving surgery. Because the use of science resolved the first controversy, I investigated whether there was scientific evidence to justify the current reversion to mastectomy. Extensive examination of the vast amount of recent medical literature related to that subject, that is, individual articles, review articles, and reports from the use of clinical trials, demonstrated that many physicians are not familiar with the scientific method, and thus, were unable to present, in those articles, credible evidence to support mastectomy in the presence of tumor cell multicentricity. Aside from the randomized clinical trial conducted by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project begun in 1976, which demonstrated no statistically significant difference in disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, and overall survival between mastectomy and lumpectomy with or without radiation therapy, there has been no information in any of the few recently conducted studies involving multicentricity to justify the current resurgence in mastectomy. PMID:21765010

  15. Evolving role of skin sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2014-01-01

    Skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) can facilitate immediate breast reconstruction and is associated with an excellent aesthetic result. The procedure is safe in selected cases; including invasive tumours < 5 cm, multi-centric tumours, ductal carcinoma in situ and for risk-reduction surgery. Inflammatory breast cancers and tumours with extensive involvement of the skin represent contra-indications to SSM due to an unacceptable risk of local recurrence. Prior breast irradiation or the need for post-mastectomy radiotherapy do not preclude SSM, however the aesthetic outcome may be compromised. Preservation of the nipple areola complex is safe for peripherally located node negative tumours. An intraoperative frozen section protocol for the retro-areolar tissue should be considered in these cases. The advent of acellular tissue matrix systems has enhanced the scope of implant-based immediate reconstruction following SSM. Cell-assisted fat transfer is emerging as a promising technique to optimise the aesthetic outcome. PMID:24829848

  16. A novel, validated method to quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) following bilateral breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, C L; Specht, M C; Horick, N; Skolny, M N; Jammallo, L S; O'Toole, J; Taghian, A G

    2013-06-01

    We sought to develop a formula to quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) after bilateral breast surgery, which functions independently of the contralateral arm and accounts for fluctuations in patient weight. Perometer arm measurements from 265 unilateral breast surgery patients were analyzed. We assessed the relationship between change in patient weight and contralateral arm volume and developed a weight-adjusted volume change formula (WAC). The WAC formula and previously-established RVC formula were compared for classification of BCRL (> or = 10% volume increase) in unilateral breast surgery patients. We then evaluated BCRL incidence using the WAC formula in 225 bilateral mastectomy patients. Change in patient weight and contralateral arm volume demonstrated an approximately linear relationship. Weight-adjusted arm volume change (WAC) was therefore calculated as WAC = (A2*W1)/(W2*A1) - 1 where A1 is pre-operative and A2 is post-operative arm volume, and W1, W2 are the patient's corresponding weights. In the unilateral analysis, there was no significant difference in number of patients classified as having BCRL using the RVC and WAC formulas (p = 0.65). In bilateral mastectomy patients 11.1% (25/225) developed BCRL, defined as > or = 10% WAC. Independent risk factors for lymphedema included axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and higher pre-operative BMI (p<0.05). Use of this weight-adjusted arm volume change formula should be of value for quantification of BCRL after bilateral breast surgery. PMID:24354105

  17. Reliability and validity of the body image after breast cancer questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Nancy N; Goodwin, Pamela J; McLeod, Robin S; Dion, Rene; Devins, Gerald; Bombardier, Claire

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Body Image After Breast Cancer Questionnaire (BIBCQ) in a series of outpatients with breast cancer. One hundred sixty-four breast cancer patients attending outpatient clinics completed questionnaires at baseline. The patients' BIBCQ scores were compared with their scores on related psychological measures including depression, self-esteem, quality of life, and sexual functioning. Scores on the BIBCQ for women after mastectomy and breast conservation were compared. Select items of the BIBCQ were compared between women with and without breast cancer. Patients received a second questionnaire after a 2 week interval to assess test-retest reliability. Good reliability was found for the six scales (ranging from 0.77 to 0.87). The BIBCQ correlated with similar measures as predicted, but not with a measure of social desirability. The BIBCQ distinguished between women treated with lumpectomy and mastectomy, and between women with breast cancer and a control group, supporting the validity of the BIBCQ. The BIBCQ provides a reliable and valid assessment of the long-term impact of breast cancer on body image. It is suitable for use in research focusing on this issue. PMID:16684320

  18. Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy: Challenging Considerations for the Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Angelos, Peter; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Euhus, David M; Herrmann, Virginia M; Katz, Steven J; Pusic, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The use of both bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased significantly during the last decade. Various risk models have been developed to identify patients at increased risk for breast cancer. The indications for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy for patients without a diagnosis of breast cancer include high risk from mutation in BRCA or other breast cancer predisposition gene, very strong family history with no identifiable mutation, and high risk based on breast histology. Additionally, the use of CPM has more than doubled in the last decade, and this increase is noted among all stages of breast cancer, even in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (stage 0). The risk of contralateral breast cancer often is overestimated by both patients and physicians. Nevertheless, specific risk factors are associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, including BRCA or other genetic mutation, young age at diagnosis, lobular histology, family history, and prior chest wall irradiation. Although CPM reduces the incidence of contralateral breast cancer, the effect on disease-free survival and, more importantly, overall survival is questionable and underscored by the fact that the reason most patients choose CPM is to achieve "peace of mind." Newer and effective reconstructive options have made the procedure more attractive. This panel addresses the indications and rationale for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and CPM, the decision-making process by patients, and ethical considerations. Changes in the physician-patient relationship during the past few decades have altered the approach, and ethical considerations are paramount in addressing these issues. PMID:26259752

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh Chen, C.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

  20. Immunohistochemical versus molecular detection of RAK antigens in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, K C; Iacovou, F; Adamou, A; Hadjisavvas, A; Rakowicz-Szulczynska, E M

    2000-08-01

    RAK antigens p120, p42, and p25 exhibit molecular and immunological similarity to the proteins encoded by HIV-1 and are expressed by 95% of breast and gynecological cancer cases in women and prostate cancer cases in men. Binding of the monoclonal antibody (MAb) RAK-BrI to cancer RAK antigens has been found to be inhibited by a peptide derived from the variable loop V3 of HIV-1. Since MAb RAK-BrI has been developed against denatured froms of breast cancer proteins, and it binds to a short epitope, GRAF, this MAb does not recognize the native, three-dimensional structure of proteins. Subsequently Western blot, after electrophoretic separation in gels with SDS, has been used to detect these unique cancer markers. The current studies were focused on the immunohistochemical evaluation of the novel marker RAK. Serial sections, 5 microm thick, were cut from frozen or Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and immunostained with MAb RAK-BrI. All of the 53 cases of breast cancer tested RAK positive and no differences were observed in the immunohistochemical staining of lobular and ductal carcinoma cases. In contrast, MAb RAK-BrI antigens were detected in only 3 of 15 cases of macroscopically normal breast removed during mastectomy for breast cancer. It is noteworthy that Western blots of breast samples from the same series demonstrated a high expression of three RAK antigens in 20/20 of invasive breast carcinomas, while there was only a very weak expression of RAK antigens in 2/7 of the macroscopically "normal" breast samples. Due to the suspected viral origin of RAK markers, immunohistochemical staining with MAb RAK-BrI might be a useful tool in the early detection of malignant changes occurring in breast tissues. PMID:10891290

  1. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-14

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  3. Breast-Feeding May Reduce Risk of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155450.html Breast-Feeding May Reduce Risk of Aggressive Breast Cancer: Study Researchers call for removing obstacles ... feeding and a woman's reduced risk for an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor-negative ...

  4. More Men with Breast Cancer Having Second Breast Removed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154440.html More Men With Breast Cancer Having Second Breast Removed Trend ... been sharp rise in the number of American men with cancer in one breast who have surgery ...

  5. Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J; Schmidt, Chris W; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A; Lopez, J Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to more meaningful clinical remissions. Here, we review the role of stem cells in the healthy breast, the role of breast cancer stem cells in disease, and the potential to target these cells. PMID:18671830

  6. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  7. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone ... be conducted to determine whether having an induced abortion, or a miscarriage (also known as spontaneous abortion), ...

  8. FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mammography and Breast Cancer Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

  9. Breast and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E.; Couchman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression. Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression. PMID:22205677

  10. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  11. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma after Breast Cancer Treatment and TRAM Flap Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Olcina, M; Merck, B; Giménez-Climent, M J; Almenar, S; Sancho-Merle, M F; Llopis, F; Vázquez-Albadalejo, C

    2008-01-01

    The development of a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) in the post mastectomy thoracic treatment volume is an infrequent, but recognized, event. Its frequency is rising in relation with increasing survival of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, and is associated with poor prognosis despite treatment. We present a case of leiomyosarcoma in a patient who underwent mastectomy followed by radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma. A delayed TRAM flap reconstruction was performed 10 years after and a rapid growing mass under the reconstructed flap appeared, on routine follow-up, twenty years later. This report analyzes the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of patients with RIS. PMID:18464918

  12. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma after Breast Cancer Treatment and TRAM Flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olcina, M.; Merck, B.; Giménez-Climent, M. J.; Almenar, S.; Sancho-Merle, M. F.; Llopis, F.; Vázquez-Albadalejo, C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) in the post mastectomy thoracic treatment volume is an infrequent, but recognized, event. Its frequency is rising in relation with increasing survival of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, and is associated with poor prognosis despite treatment. We present a case of leiomyosarcoma in a patient who underwent mastectomy followed by radiotherapy for invasive ductal carcinoma. A delayed TRAM flap reconstruction was performed 10 years after and a rapid growing mass under the reconstructed flap appeared, on routine follow-up, twenty years later. This report analyzes the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of patients with RIS. PMID:18464918

  13. Breast Cancer Distress in Childhood

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Cancer_Distress_101915.html Breast Cancer Distress in Childhood HealthDay News Video - October 20, ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Distress in Childhood For closed captioning, click the ...

  14. Breast Cancer Stage and Survival

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Cancer_Stage_100715.html Breast Cancer Stage and Survival HealthDay News Video - October 8, ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breast Cancer Stage and Survival For closed captioning, click the ...

  15. Cancer statistics: Breast cancer in situ.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth M; DeSantis, Carol E; Lin, Chun Chieh; Kramer, Joan L; Jemal, Ahmedin; Kohler, Betsy; Brawley, Otis W; Gansler, Ted

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 60,290 new cases of breast carcinoma in situ are expected to be diagnosed in 2015, and approximately 1 in 33 women is likely to receive an in situ breast cancer diagnosis in her lifetime. Although in situ breast cancers are relatively common, their clinical significance and optimal treatment are topics of uncertainty and concern for both patients and clinicians. In this article, the American Cancer Society provides information about occurrence and treatment patterns for the 2 major subtypes of in situ breast cancer in the United States-ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ-using data from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and the 13 oldest Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries. The authors also present an overview of in situ breast cancer detection, treatment, risk factors, and prevention and discuss research needs and initiatives. CA Cancer J Clin 2015;65:481-495. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26431342

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  18. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  20. Metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cha, C H; Kennedy, G D; Niederhuber, J E

    1999-10-01

    The unfortunate reality of metastatic breast cancer is that all treatment is palliative in nature. This is a disease that currently has no cure and for which therapy is directed towards accentuating survival and relieving symptoms. Current technology allows the prediction and detection of metastases earlier and with greater accuracy. These achievements need to be consolidated by the discovery of innovative therapies that can alter the inevitable outcome of this disease. PMID:10572554

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; ?opacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miot?a, Pawe?; Staros?awska, El?bieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using ?2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  3. Management of breast cancer in very young women.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M; Partridge, Ann H

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women age 40 and younger in developed countries, and although generally improving, survival rates for young women with breast cancer remain lower than for older women. Young women are more likely to develop more aggressive subtypes of breast cancer (more triple negative and more Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 [HER2]-positive disease) and present with more advanced stage disease. Previous research has demonstrated that young age is an independent risk factor for disease recurrence and death, although recent data suggest this may not be the case in certain tumor molecular subtypes. Recent preliminary evidence suggests potential unique biologic features of breast cancer that occurs in young women although this has yet to have been translated into treatment differences. There are clearly host differences that affect the management of breast cancer for young patients including generally being premenopausal at diagnosis, and fertility, genetics, and social/emotional issues in particular should be considered early in the course of their care. Despite an increased risk of local recurrence, young age alone is not a contraindication to breast conserving therapy given the equivalent survival seen in this population with either mastectomy or breast conservation. However, many young women in recent years are choosing bilateral mastectomy, even without a known hereditary predisposition to the disease. For those who need chemotherapy, multi-agent chemotherapy and biologic therapy targeting the tumor similar to the treatment in older women is the standard approach. Select young women will do well with hormone therapy only. Recent data from the TEXT and SOFT trials evaluating the optimal endocrine therapy for the first 5 years, and the ATTom and ATLAS trials demonstrating benefit from extended duration of tamoxifen (10 vs. 5 years), have further defined options for adjuvant endocrine therapy for young women with early breast cancer. Attention to adherence with endocrine therapy may be particularly important to improve outcomes in this population who are at increased risk of non-adherence compared to older women. PMID:26255745

  4. Fusion genes in breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Batty, Elizabeth

    2012-02-07

    and lung cancer suggests that fusion genes may play an important role in epithelial carcinogenesis, and that they have been previously under-reported due to the difficulties of cytogenetic analysis of solid tumours. In particular, breast cancers often...

  5. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  6. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-17

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Cancer risk of incremental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in electrocautery smoke for mastectomy personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electrocautery applications in surgical operations produce evasive odorous smoke in the cleanest operation rooms. Because of the incomplete combustion of electrical current in the tissues and blood vessels during electrocautery applications, electrocautery smoke (ES) containing significant unknown chemicals and biological forms is released. The potential hazards and cancer risk should be further investigated from the perspective of the occupational health of surgical staff. Methods The particle number concentration and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ES were thoroughly investigated in 10 mastectomies to estimate the cancer risk for surgical staff. The particle number concentration and gaseous/particle PAHs at the surgeons’ and anesthetic technologists’ (AT) breathing heights were measured with a particle counter and filter/adsorbent samplers. PAHs were soxhlet-extracted, cleaned, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Abundant submicron particles and high PAH concentrations were found in ES during regular surgical mastectomies. Most particles in ES were in the size range of 0.3 to 0.5 ?m, which may potentially penetrate through the medical masks into human respiration. The average particle/gaseous phase PAH concentrations at the surgeon’s breathing height were 131 and 1,415 ng/m3, respectively, which is 20 to 30 times higher than those in regular outdoor environments. By using a toxicity equivalency factor, the cancer risk for the surgeons and anesthetic technologists was calculated to be 117?×?10-6 and 270?×?10-6, respectively; the higher cancer risk for anesthetic technologists arises due to the longer working hours in operation rooms. Conclusions The carcinogenic effects of PAHs in ES on the occupational health of surgical staff should not be neglected. The use of an effective ES evacuator or smoke removal apparatus is strongly suggested to diminish the ES hazards to surgical staff. PMID:24499532

  9. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-02

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  11. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  12. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Progesterone in Breast Cancer Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Monica C.; Soares, Raquel; Alves, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of steroid hormones in breast carcinogenesis is well established. Recent evidence suggests that angiogenesis can be regulated by hormones. Both oestrogen and progesterone have been implicated in the angiogenic process of hormone-dependent cancers, such as breast cancer. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a growth factor involved in angiogenesis in breast cancer that is up-regulated by estrogens. In our study we evaluated the role of progesterone in the expression of this angiogenic growth factor commonly up-regulated in breast cancer. Our findings indicate that progesterone activates an angiogenic pathway involving VEGF stimulation. The elucidation of specific angiogenic pathways promoted by progesterone can raise new therapeutic targets at least in a subset of breast cancers responsive to progesterone.

  14. Breast cancer update.

    PubMed

    Kuter, I

    2000-01-01

    The large number of excellent presentations on breast cancer at this year's ASCO meeting reflects the enormous interest in clinical trials of this common disease. In the reports of adjuvant hormonal therapy, the most interesting included Abstract 273 by Boccardo et al., who reported that postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) cancers who had already completed three years of tamoxifen experienced better overall survival if treated with two years of subsequent aminoglutethimide (a first-generation aromatase inhibitor) rather than another two years of tamoxifen. This whets our appetite for studies currently under way to define the role of third-generation aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant setting. A report by FISHER: from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-23 study (Abstract 277) provided confirmation of what is rapidly becoming accepted, that the addition of tamoxifen to chemotherapy does not benefit breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes who have ER(-) cancers. In premenopausal women, another report of the benefit of hormonal therapy, this time by the French Adjuvant Study Group using complete hormonal blockade with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and tamoxifen (Abstract 279) showed that hormonal therapy can be at least as good as, if not better, than six cycles of 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 50 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2) in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival. Among the papers on adjuvant chemotherapy, a controversial paper from the German Adjuvant Breast Cancer Group reported that three cycles of CMF (a dose-intense regimen with all three drugs being given on days 1 and 8) were as good as six cycles (Abstract 283). Another report, from the International Breast Cancer Study Group, raised the controversial question of whether there really is much added benefit from the addition of chemotherapy to tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with negative lymph nodes if their tumors have ERs (Abstract 281). A second study (the first was the CALGB study reported at ASCO in 1998) showing a benefit to the addition of Taxol to an anthracycline-based adjuvant regimen, was reported from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (Abstract 285), giving further impetus to the inclusion of Taxol in standard adjuvant treatment. Finally, there were a number of interesting presentations on HER-2. Reported here are three of these, all addressing the effect of HER-2 overexpression on the response to hormonal therapy. Taken together, they uphold the emerging concern that women with ER(+) cancers may not benefit significantly from endocrine treatment if the tumors also overexpress HER-2. Observations such as these will afford us the ability to predict more accurately which women will benefit from specific treatments. PMID:10964995

  15. [Stages of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Savran, V R; Fetsych, T H; Savran, V V; Tril', O V; Myshakivs'ky?, O M

    2006-01-01

    A comparative analysis of several systems of the assessment of the degree of spreading of malignant process is presented in the article. Stage principles of malignant neoplasms, which are used by the National Cancer Register do not respond current requirements as these principles do not single out preinvasive carcinoma and even more patients with I and II stages malignant neoplasms are brought into one group. Last reduction of the International TNM breast cancer classification (2002, TNM-6) reflects further progress in understanding biology of this localization and possibilities of the diagnostics. This classification differs considerably from previous reductions (TNM-4 and TNM-5) and especially Soviet classification dated 1985. The study carried out by the authors showed importance of differential approach to the assessment of regional lymphatic nodes lesion on depending their quantity (in diapason from 1 to 3; 4-9; 10 and more). The authors stated in the article that there is a certain discrepancy of some clinical and pathohistological parameters (N not equal to pN) in the last reduction of TNM classification of breast cancer and interpretation of some categories of the system is over-complex. PMID:17100177

  16. Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing Mari Suzuki

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing Mari Suzuki BIOCHEM 118Q Professor Doug Brutlag Spring 2005 #12, which is often referred to as the breast cancer gene. My mother had fought off breast cancer and she the mutation means it's almost certain that I will develop breast cancer at some point in my life. It also

  17. Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Breast Cancer Research? Other Resources ...

  18. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community - pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers - to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  19. Loco-regional control after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and conservative treatment for locally advanced breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Borget, Isabelle; Bahri, Manel; Arnedos, Monica; Rivin, Eleonor; Vielh, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne; Rimareix, Françoise; Bourgier, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving treatment (BCT) has been validated for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the difference in loco-regional recurrence (LRR) rates between BCT and mastectomy in patients receiving radiation therapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). A retrospective data base was used to identify all patients with breast cancer undergoing NCT from 2002 to 2007. Patients with initial metastatic disease were excluded from this analysis. LRR was compared between those undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Individual variables associated with LRR were evaluated. Two hundred eighty-four patients were included, 111 (39%) underwent BCT and 173 (61%) mastectomy. Almost all patients (99%) in both groups received postoperative radiation. Pathologic complete response was seen in 37 patients, of which 28 underwent BCT (p < 0.001). Patients receiving mastectomy had more invasive lobular carcinoma (p = 0.007) and a higher American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage (p < 0.001) at diagnosis than those with BCT. At a median follow-up of 6.3 years, the loco-regional control rate was 91% (95% CI: 86-94%). The 10-year LRR rate was similar in the BCT group (9.2% [95% CI: 4.9-16.7%]) and in the mastectomy group (10.7% [95% CI: 5.9-15.2%]; p = 0.8). Ten-year overall survival (OS) rates (63% [95% CI: 46-79%] in the BCT group; 60% [95% CI: 47-73%] in the mastectomy group, p = 0.8) were not statistically different between the two patient populations. Multivariate analysis showed that AJCC stage ? III (HR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2-5.8; p = 0.02), negative PR (HR: 6; 95% CI: 1.2-30.6, p = 0.03), and number of positive lymph nodes ?3 (HR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.1-5.9; p = 0.03) were independent predictors of LRR. Ten-year OS was similar in the BCT and in the mastectomy group (p = 0.1). The rate of LRR was low and did not significantly differ between the BCT and the mastectomy group after NCT. Randomized trials assessing whether mastectomy can be safely omitted in selected breast cancer patients (nonstage III tumors or those which do not require adjuvant hormone suppression) which respond to NCT are required. PMID:24890310

  20. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-06

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  1. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC) is the most common hereditary form of breast and ovarian cancer. About 2% of women

  3. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Worldwide, gallbladder cancer is much more common in India, Pakistan, and Central European and South American countries ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  6. International nursing and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yarbro, Connie Henke

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and its incidence is increasing in most countries. Nurses involved in breast cancer care have an impact on early detection of breast cancer, treatment, and symptom management, and they serve as advocates for women with the disease. In many countries nurses are far more numerous than physicians, and nurses are in an ideal position to influence breast cancer care. The International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care (ISNCC) is an organization representing more than 50,000 oncology nurses in 25 countries. The society provides a communication network for national and regional cancer nursing societies and communication on developments in cancer nursing to nurses working in countries where a national cancer nursing group does not exist. The society also acts as a resource for nurses in practice, education, research, and management, and it serves as a link for other international, regional, national, and local organizations in promoting collaboration to achieve ISNCC's goals. In collaboration with the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the society developed a 2-day "train-the-trainer" workshop for a selected group of cancer nurses from around the world. The workshop includes didactic presentations, skills instruction, and demonstrations that cover the continuum of breast cancer care. Participants have represented the countries of Brazil, Colombia, China, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Pakistan, Australia, Germany, South Africa, Greece, and India. They have subsequently developed educational programs for nurses and the public in their countries, started support groups, published educational materials on breast cancer, and participated in political activities. These advances indicate that despite challenges such as nursing shortages and a lack of resources, cancer nurses are making a difference internationally. PMID:12713505

  7. [Breast cancer: the unspeakable].

    PubMed

    Winaver, D; Slama, L

    1993-04-01

    The drama with the language is that "putting in words" creates an uncrossable chasm between the felt and the expressed. There are moments where the impossibility to communicate cuts the links between doctor and patient. And this often happens in a consultation after the breast cancer has been announced. The unspeakable then, stands between the two protagonists, as the spectral appearance of death. For the patients, the medical revelation then becomes an anathema. The doctor who says the word, becomes the one who overturns a destiny for ever. One knows from greek mythology that confronted to the tragic of his destiny, man hears the ineluctability of the oracle but cannot accepts it. It is the role of the psyche to divert the prophecy so as to have space for hope, for a project of live. To tell, not to tell, how to tell: there is no rule. The misunderstanding is inexorable: it sighs the discordance between the medical reality of the breast cancer, the subject desire and the implication of the doctor who is wedged between the one and the other. PMID:7951637

  8. Twelve years' experience with irradiation as the primary treatment for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nobler, M.P.; Venet, L.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety patients received comprehensive, high-dose, supervoltage teletherapy as the primary treatment for carcinoma of the breast, following a biopsy or a segmental resection. The tumor doses delivered to the breast ranged between 5600 and 7000 rad in six to nine weeks; the draining lymph nodes received tumor doses of 5000 to 7000 rad in six to eight weeks. In five cases, Iridium-192 implants were employed to boost the radiation dose to the breast, and in seven instances a toilette mastectomy was performed for residual cancer. Satisfactory local control and cosmetic results were achieved in 86 patients. The patients were followed for 2 1/2 to 12 1/2 years. The local control rates were: Stage I, 100%, Stage II, 95%; Stage III, 100%; Stave IV (M-0), 89%; Stave IV (M-1), 100%. The overall disease-free survival figures were: Stage I, 85%; Stage II, 48%; Stage III, 50%; and Stage IV (M-0), 29%. We feel that this approach to the initial management of breast cancer is a practical, useful, and successful substitute for mastectomy when medical or surgical contraindications exist, or when the patient refuses a mastectomy.

  9. Contributions of radiology to the diagnosis, management, and cure of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The role of radiology in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of advances in diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology in the overall care of patients with this disease. The author discusses the early history of mammography, the results of large-scale screening studies, improvements in the understanding of the biology of tumors, and the principles underlying the movement away from radical or modified radical mastectomy for tumor control.

  10. Current Status of Breast Reconstruction in Southern China: A 15 Year, Single Institutional Experience of 20,551 Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jia-jian, Chen; Nai-si, Huang; Jing-yan, Xue; Ben-long, Yang; Guang-yu, Liu; Gen-hong, Di; Zhi-min, Shao; Jiong, Wu

    2015-08-01

    The study of this study is to assess the current status and trend of the application of breast reconstruction in China.A retrospective review of all patients who had received surgical treatment for breast cancer in the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between January 1999 and June 2014 was performed. The clinicopathological and epidemiological parameters and the follow-up information of each patient were collected.A total of 20,551 patients with 20,974 surgeries were identified. Of those, the rates of patients received mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, and breast reconstruction were 81.2% (17,040 cases), 15.3% (3216 cases), and 3.4% (718 cases), respectively. Skin-sparing mastectomy with autologous breast reconstruction was algate the dominant option for breast reconstruction although a rapid growth in the application of prosthetic reconstructions was observed in recent years. The rates of complications that required reoperation in patients reconstructed with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, free flaps, and prosthesis were 1.2%, 8.5%, 11.4%, and 10.5%, respectively, while the revision rates were 0.7%, 6.1 %, 5.3%, and 2.3%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that types of surgery did not affect the disease-free survival of breast cancer patients.Skin-sparing mastectomy with breast reconstruction is oncologically safe while achieving satisfactory aesthetic outcomes. Autologous reconstruction remains the most commonly used technique while there is a rapid increase of prosthetic reconstruction in recent years. The low demand for breast aesthetics among Chinese women, defects of healthcare system, and the limited availability of recourses impeded the development of breast reconstruction techniques in China. PMID:26313786

  11. Current Status of Breast Reconstruction in Southern China: A 15 Year, Single Institutional Experience of 20,551 Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia-jian, Chen; Nai-si, Huang; Jing-yan, Xue; Ben-long, Yang; Guang-yu, Liu; Gen-hong, Di; Zhi-min, Shao; Jiong, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study of this study is to assess the current status and trend of the application of breast reconstruction in China. A retrospective review of all patients who had received surgical treatment for breast cancer in the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between January 1999 and June 2014 was performed. The clinicopathological and epidemiological parameters and the follow-up information of each patient were collected. A total of 20,551 patients with 20,974 surgeries were identified. Of those, the rates of patients received mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, and breast reconstruction were 81.2% (17,040 cases), 15.3% (3216 cases), and 3.4% (718 cases), respectively. Skin-sparing mastectomy with autologous breast reconstruction was algate the dominant option for breast reconstruction although a rapid growth in the application of prosthetic reconstructions was observed in recent years. The rates of complications that required reoperation in patients reconstructed with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, free flaps, and prosthesis were 1.2%, 8.5%, 11.4%, and 10.5%, respectively, while the revision rates were 0.7%, 6.1 %, 5.3%, and 2.3%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that types of surgery did not affect the disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Skin-sparing mastectomy with breast reconstruction is oncologically safe while achieving satisfactory aesthetic outcomes. Autologous reconstruction remains the most commonly used technique while there is a rapid increase of prosthetic reconstruction in recent years. The low demand for breast aesthetics among Chinese women, defects of healthcare system, and the limited availability of recourses impeded the development of breast reconstruction techniques in China. PMID:26313786

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  15. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  16. Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2011 January 31â??February 1, 2011 Funding: Increasing Awareness and Support Among Young Women with Breast Cancer ... Combined Cervical Colorectal (Colon) HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity ...

  17. Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

  18. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 ?g/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 ?g/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 ?g Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content in defatted tissue and oil from such tissues and thereby contribute towards our knowledge on aluminium and any role in breast cancer. PMID:23870171

  19. A Longitudinal Study of BDNF Promoter Methylation and Depression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Kim, Hye-Ran; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Myung-Geun; Yoon, Jung-Han; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is investigated in depression related to medical disorders and its secretion is influenced by epigenetic factors. We investigated the association between BDNF promoter methylation and depression following mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods In total, 309 patients with breast cancer were evaluated 1 week after mastectomy, and 244 (79%) were followed up 1 year later. Depression was diagnosed (major or minor depressive disorder) according to DSM-IV criteria and depression severity was estimated by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We assessed BDNF promoter methylation using leukocyte DNA. The effects of BDNF methylation on depression diagnosis and severity were investigated using multivariate logistic and linear regression models, respectively. The two-way interaction between BDNF methylation and the val66met polymorphism on depression was also evaluated using multivariate logistic regression models. Results Higher BDNF methylation was independently associated with depression diagnosis and with more severe symptoms at both 1 week and 1 year after mastectomy. No significant methylation-genotype interactions were found. Conclusion A role for BDNF in depression related to breast cancer was supported. Indeed, the association between depression and BDNF methylation may be useful for identifying patients who are at high risk for depression and for suggesting directions for promising drug research. PMID:26508964

  20. Failure to detect intra-abdominal metastases from breast cancer: a case for staging laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J M; Redding, W H; Coombes, R C; Sloane, J P; Ford, H T; Gazet, J C; Powles, T J

    1978-07-15

    Two studies were performed to assess the accuracy of non-invasive methods in detecting intra-abdominal metastases from breast cancer. Firstly, the sites of spread detected at the time of first presentation with metastases were compared with the sites of spread shown at necropsy in the same patients. Although about two-thirds of the patients with bone and lung metastases at necropsy had had metastases detected at these sites when they first presented with metastases, only a third of the patients with liver metastases and none of those with other intra-abdominal metastases had had evidence of disease at first presentation with metastases. The second study confirmed a poor detection rate of liver and other intra-abdominal metastases in patients with breast cancer undergoing laparotomy and oophorectomy who were staged immediately before operation.Pre-mastectomy staging laparotomy should be considered in those patients with primary breast cancer who are most likely to have disseminated disease beyond the regional nodes. In the presence of occult gross metastases detected by staging laparotomy, mastectomy will not provide additional protection against loca recurrence of disease. Patients with occult gross metastases should also be excluded from studies on adjuvant chemotherapy (designed to treat micrometastases). Aggressive methods of staging are justified to protect the patient as far as possible against unnecessary mastectomy and to identify those patients who should be treated by therapeutic chemotherapy rather than adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:678829

  1. Triple Negative Breast Cancer in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Two Case Reports in Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ruchi; Butt, Qurat-Ul-Ain; Hamaoui, Abraham; Henderson, Cassandra; McCalla, Sydney; Gilak, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Despite studies suggesting that triple negative breast cancer is more often seen in women of African ancestry, we report here two cases of pregnancy associated triple negative breast cancer in Hispanic women. Cases. Case one is a 37-year-old female para 2-0-0-2, who presented with a left breast mass, at 19 weeks of gestation, the biopsy of which reported an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple receptor negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy during the pregnancy and was delivered with a cesarean at 37 weeks for obstetric indication. After delivery, the patient completed her chemotherapy that was followed by radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. Case two is a 28-year-old female para 6-0-1-5, who presented while breast-feeding with signs and symptoms of mastitis, and an engorged and tender right breast, five months postpartum. However, the sonogram revealed a fluid filled cavity. Aspiration and cytology did not reflect an infection and were negative for malignancy. High suspicion and lack of improvement led to biopsy that identified an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy followed by modified radical mastectomy. Conclusions. Triple negative breast cancer, during pregnancy or postpartum, poses a unique challenge and requires a multidisciplinary team to optimize treatment for these women. PMID:26448887

  2. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant predictors of receiving mastectomy after NT. PMID:26691964

  3. BCSC Grants: Breast Cancer, Breast Density & Admixture Among Latinas

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer incidence and mortality vary substantially among different racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Caucasian women have the highest incidence of breast cancer, while Native American women are reported to have the lowest incidence and mortality from breast cancer. Latinas, an admixed population of mixed European Native American and African descent, have an incidence of breast cancer that is higher than Native Americans but lower than Caucasians in the United States.

  4. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

  5. About Breast Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

  6. Improving outcomes in breast cancer for low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Yip, C H; Buccimazza, I; Hartman, M; Deo, S V S; Cheung, P S Y

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women world-wide. Incidence rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are lower than in high income countries; however, the rates are increasing very rapidly in LMICs due to social changes that increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates in LMICs remain high due to late presentation and inadequate access to optimal care. Breast Surgery International brought together a group of breast surgeons from different parts of the world to address strategies for improving outcomes in breast cancer for LMICs at a symposium during International Surgical Week in Helsinki, Finland in August 2013. A key strategy for early detection is public health education and breast awareness. Sociocultural barriers to early detection and treatment need to be addressed. Optimal management of breast cancer requires a multidisciplinary team. Surgical treatment is often the only modality of treatment available in low-resource settings where modified radical mastectomy is the most common operation performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy require more resources. Endocrine therapy is available but requires accurate assessment of estrogen receptors status. Targeted therapy with trastuzumab is generally unavailable due to cost. The Breast Health Global Initiative guidelines for the early detection and appropriate treatment of breast cancer in LMICs have been specifically designed to improve breast cancer outcomes in these regions. Closing the cancer divide between rich and poor countries is a moral imperative and there is an urgent need to prevent breast cancer deaths with early detection and optimal access to treatment. PMID:25398564

  7. Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Khanfir, Kaouthar; Kallel, Adel; Villette, Sylviane; Belkacemi, Yazid; Vautravers, Claire; Nguyen, TanDat; Miller, Robert; Li Yexiong; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Boersma, Liesbeth; Poortmans, Philip; Goldberg, Hadassah; Vees, Hansjorg; Senkus, Elzbieta; Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy

    2012-04-01

    Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

  8. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  9. Stem cell and tissue engineering in breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Visnu

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer worldwide is the most common cancer in women with incidence rate varying from geographic areas. Guidelines for management of breast cancer have been largely established and widely used. Mastectomy is one of the surgical procedures used treating breast cancer. Optionally, after mastectomy, appropriately selected patients could undergo breast reconstruction to create their breast contour. Many techniques have been used for breast reconstructive surgery, mainly implant-based and autologous tissue reconstruction. Even with highly-experienced surgeon and good-quality breast and autologous substitute tissue, still there could be unfilled defect after mastectomy with reconstruction. Stem cell, in particular, adipose-derived stem cell residing within fat tissue, could be used to fill the imperfection providing optimal breast shape and natural feeling of fat tissue. However, whether surgical reconstruction alone or in combination with stem cell and tissue engineering approach be used, the ultimate outcomes are patient safety first and satisfaction second. PMID:25083496

  10. Familial Breast Cancer Julie Saffarian

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    (MRI) Ultrasonic Imagery Genetic Testing (relatively new) Blood Test CT scans Chest X-rays #12;The of the cancerous cells." #12;The Classical Diagnosis Methods Breast Self Examination The Triple Test: - Breast now be used to determine mutations in the gene BRAC-1 Genetic testing Online genetic testing - BRCA1

  11. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

  12. Invasive ductal breast cancer with extensive subcutaneous metastases in trunk: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rao, M-Y; Wu, J-B

    2015-11-01

    The metastases sites of advanced breast cancer contain vast majority of tissues and organs, which most common are bones, lungs, liver, brain and distant lymph nodes. We report a woman with unusual extensive subcutaneous metastases of breast cancer in her abdomen, back and back of the neck. The patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal breast cancer and had been treated 4 months earlier with modified radical mastectomy and three cycles of chemotherapy. Later she presented painless multiple small tubercules on the abdomen wall, back and back of the neck. She sought treatment in our department to perform a 18FDG PET-CT scan, confirming the multiple subcutaneous tubercules. Histopathological studies supported that the tubercules were rare subcutaneous metastatic of breast origin. The patient underwent another two cycles of chemotherapy and evaluation of curative effect was stability. PMID:26592834

  13. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend ?=?2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes ?=?0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes ?=?0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF ?=?1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend ?=?6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes ?=?0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes ?=?1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  14. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  15. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are also shown. Radiation exposure, high levels of estrogen, and a family history of breast cancer can ... Having a disease linked to high levels of estrogen in the body, such as cirrhosis ( liver disease) ...

  16. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. “Most of us have a way we like ... later reconstructed. She also received radiation therapy. Having lost her hair and breasts and having gained weight, ...

  17. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  18. The TAILORx Breast Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for Treatment (Rx), or TAILORx, which will examine whether a molecular test can assign women with early-stage breast cancer to the most appropriate and effective treatment.

  19. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

  20. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  1. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-20

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  2. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  3. Travel time to radiotherapy and uptake of breast-conserving surgery for early stage cancer in Northern England.

    PubMed

    Sauerzapf, V A; Jones, A P; Haynes, R; Crawford, S M; Forman, D

    2008-09-01

    Patients with early stage breast cancer can opt for either mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS), but BCS requires daily radiotherapy for some weeks. The hypothesis that ease of access to radiotherapy might affect choice of surgery was investigated using records of 6014 breast cancer patients in Northern England. Adjusting for the effects of age, deprivation and hospital type, the choice of BCS was not associated with the estimated car journey time to radiotherapy for most women but there was an association for patients living in places without a regular bus service, so transport problems might influence surgery choice for a minority of women. PMID:17951094

  4. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ? 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ? 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ? 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ? 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results. PMID:24507962

  5. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  6. The Angelina Jolie Effect in Jewish Law: Prophylactic Mastectomy and Oophorectomy in BRCA Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Sharon Galper

    2015-01-01

    Background Following the announcement of actress Angelina Jolie’s prophylactic bilateral mastectomies and subsequent prophylactic oophorectomy, there has been a dramatic increase in interest in BRCA testing and prophylactic surgery. Objective To review current medical literature on the benefits of prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy among BRCA-positive women and its permissibility under Jewish law. Results Recent literature suggests that in BRCA-positive women who undergo prophylactic oophorectomy the risk of dying of breast cancer is reduced by 90%, the risk of dying of ovarian cancer is reduced by 95%, and the risk of dying of any cause is reduced by 77%. The risk of breast cancer is further reduced by prophylactic mastectomy. Prophylactic oophorectomy and prophylactic mastectomy pose several challenges within Jewish law that call into question the permissibility of surgery, including mutilation of a healthy organ, termination of fertility, self-wounding, and castration. A growing number of Jewish legal scholars have found grounds to permit prophylactic surgery among BRCA carriers, with some even obligating prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy. Conclusion Current data suggest a significant reduction in mortality from prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy in BRCA carriers. While mutilation of healthy organs is intrinsically forbidden in Jewish law, the ability to preserve human life may contravene and even mandate prophylactic surgery.

  7. Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming

    E-print Network

    Ludwig, Simone

    Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer. In 2004, breast cancer caused 519,000 deaths worldwide. In order to reduce the cancer deaths and thereby

  8. Survivorship Clinic Breast Cancer Following Treatment

    E-print Network

    Brent, Roger

    Survivorship Clinic Breast Cancer Following Treatment You have successfully been treated for cancer breast cancer. It is important to understand that risk, so that you can take steps to protect your health for cancer during childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood have an increased risk of developing breast

  9. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  10. Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lasts. Common short-term side effects could include: Hair loss (hair grows back after treatment) Loss of appetite ... Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment ...

  11. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  12. Breast cancer and the environment.

    PubMed

    Sasco, Annie J

    2003-01-01

    The most recent estimate of the overall worldwide burden of cancer is that in the year 2000 more than 10 million new cancer cases occurred and approximately 6 million cancer deaths. Breast cancer accounts for about 1 in 10 cancers and is the most frequent cancer affecting women. Since 10% of all cancers in the world are breast cancer (only affecting half of the population as breast cancer almost exclusively concerns only women), it is being considered an epidemic. In terms of the absolute number of incident cases, breast cancer now ranks first not only in the industrialized world but also in the developing world. The worldwide mortality figure for the year 2000 was 370,000. However, there are marked geographical differences, with Africa and Asia currently having incidence rates some 10 times lower than those of North America and northern Europe. Studies of migrant populations have long indicated that the genetic background only plays a tiny, if any, role in these differences. Over time, clear increases have been seen in the global number of cases: from 572,000 in 1980 to 1,050,000 in 2000. This corresponds not only to a modest increase in incidence rates in countries with a long history of frequent breast cancer but also to marked increases in countries with previously low rates. The reasons for these increases are currently unexplained and a possible hypothesis relates to environmental factors. By contrast, in a number of countries in the western world mortality rates are stable, and, in the USA and the United Kingdom, even decreasing slightly. The aetiology of breast cancer has been the subject of hundreds of studies since the pioneering investigation of Lane Claypon in 1926. Risk factors belong to different domains: reproductive life, hormonal factors, diet, genetics (BRCA1, BRCA2) and exposure to radiation and selected chemicals. Yet, much breast cancer remains unexplained and new aetiological links must be sought such as occupational factors and exposure to pesticides and other endocrine disrupters. A recent international summit on breast cancer and the environment outlined the need for more research to be conducted into the effects of exposure in the vicinity of nuclear power plants or chemical landfill sites and, more generally, into contaminants in food, air, water and soil. This is particularly relevant in some parts of the world such as Africa. PMID:14671396

  13. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  14. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer.

  15. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the ?{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions: In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer.

  16. Factors Associated With Guideline-Concordant Use of Radiotherapy After Mastectomy in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network

    SciTech Connect

    Punglia, Rinaa S. Hughes, Melissa E.; Edge, Stephen B.; Theriault, Richard L.; Bookman, Michael A.; Wilson, John L.; Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Niland, Joyce C.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rates and determinants of appropriate and inappropriate use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), as defined by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) practice guidelines, among women with Stage I-II breast cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition). Methods and Materials: Using clinical characteristics, 1,620 consecutive patients at eight NCCN institutions who had undergone mastectomy between July 1997 and June 2002 were classified into three cohorts according to whether the guidelines (1) recommended PMRT, (2) recommended against PMRT, or (3) made no definitive PMRT recommendation. We defined the absence of PMRT in the first cohort as underuse and receipt of PMRT in the second cohort as overuse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the association of clinical and sociodemographic factors with PMRT. Results: Overall, 23.8% of patients received PMRT. This included 199 (83.6%) of 238 in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort, 58 (5.6%) of 1,029 in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort, and 127 (38.6%) of 329 in the 'consider PMRT' cohort. The only factor associated with underuse in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort was nonreceipt of chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; p <0.0001). In addition to tumor characteristics, the factors associated with overuse in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort included age <50 years (OR, 2.28; p = 0.048), NCCN institution (OR, 1.04-8.29; p = 0.026), higher education (OR, 3.49; p = 0.001), and no reconstructive surgery (OR, 2.44; p = 0.019). The factors associated with PMRT in the 'consider PMRT' cohort included NCCN institution (OR, 1.1-9.01; p <0.0001), age <50 years (OR, 2.26; p = 0.041), and tumor characteristics. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concordance with definitive treatment guidelines was high. However, when current evidence does not support a definitive recommendation for PMRT, treatment decisions appear to be influenced, not only by patient age and clinical characteristics, but also by institution-specific patterns of care.

  17. Ten-Year Recurrence Rates in Young Women With Breast Cancer by Locoregional Treatment Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A. Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach.

  18. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery?=?1.76?ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  19. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery?=?1.76?ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  20. Breast Cancer Subtype is Associated With Axillary Lymph Node Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhen-Yu; Wu, San-Gang; Yang, Qi; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess whether breast cancer subtype (BCS) as determined by estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 can predict the axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. Patients who received breast conserving surgery or mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection were identified from 2 cancer centers. The associations between clinicopathological variables and axillary lymph node involvement were evaluated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. A total of 3471 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 53.0% had axillary lymph node metastases at diagnosis. Patients with hormone receptor (HR)?/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)? subtype had a higher grade disease and the lowest rate of lymphovascular invasion. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that BCS was significantly associated with lymph node involvement. Patients with the HR?/HER2? subtype had the lowest odds of having nodal positivity than those with other BCSs. HR+/HER2? (odds ratio [OR] 1.651, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.349–2.021, P?Breast cancer subtype can predict the presence of axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. HR?/HER2? is associated with a reduced risk of axillary lymph node metastasis compared to other BCSs. Our findings may play an important role in guiding axillary treatment considerations if further confirmed in larger sample size studies. PMID:26632910

  1. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  2. Deciding between Mastectomy and Lumpectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources View Tools & Resources Breast Cancer Glossary Interactive Learning Komen Educational Materials Questions to Ask Your Doctor Translated Materials Website Resources Breast Cancer Education Toolkits The Breast Cancer Journey View The Breast ...

  3. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

  4. Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Depression, quality of life and breast cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Lesur, A; Perdrizet-Chevallier, C

    2008-07-01

    Depression is misdiagnosed and undertreated among breast cancer population. Risk factors for depression in the 5 years after diagnosis are related more to the patient rather than to the disease or its treatment. The breast cancer stage (early and advanced) is not statistically significant in terms of rates of psychosocial distress except for recurrence. Risk factors of depression might impair quality of life such as fatigue, past history or recent episode of depression after the onset of cancer, cognitive attitudes of helplessness/hopelessness, resignation. Body image impairment from mastectomy and sexuality aftermath generates higher rates of mood disorders. The link between increased risk of breast cancer and depression is controversial among the literature. Some studies suggest a protective factor, others find a relation between stress, immunity and cancer occurrence or even mortality. Breast cancer survivors report a higher prevalence of mild to moderate depression with a lower quality of life in all areas except for family functioning. Treatment of depression in breast cancer women improves their quality of life and may increase longevity. Antidepressant medications remain the cornerstone of depression treatment. The hypothetical link between their prescription and increased breast cancer risk is not supported by literature's data. PMID:17674188

  7. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. )

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  8. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... the Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In ...

  9. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Can breast cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes breast cancer? Many risk factors ... genes—the instructions for how our cells function. We usually look like our parents because they are ...

  10. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

  11. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  12. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  16. Immediate reconstruction using inframammary adipofascial flap of the anterior rectus sheath after partial mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Funasako, Yawara; Aikou, Takashi

    2007-06-01

    Treatment of early breast cancer using breast conservative therapy (BCT) usually ensures local control and acceptable cosmetic results. To repair defects caused by partial mastectomy in the lower region of the breast, some reconstruction should be used. We developed a procedure involving the cranial based adipofascial (anterior rectus sheath) flap from immediately below the inframammary area for the reconstruction of defect due to partial mastectomy for patients with early breast cancer. In this procedure, a skin incision is made at the inframammary line, and the inframammary skin area is undermined. A tongue shaped flap composed of the subcutaneous fat and the anterior sheath of rectus abdominis muscle is pulled up and a C-shaped flap is rotated, gathered, and inserted to reconstruct the breast defect. PMID:17512298

  17. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  18. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-24

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Insurance and Other Financial Issues Related to Breast Cancer Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources View Tools & Resources Breast Cancer Glossary Interactive Learning Komen Educational Materials Questions to Ask Your Doctor Translated Materials Website Resources Breast Cancer Education Toolkits The Breast Cancer Journey View The Breast ...

  1. The Epidemiology of Male Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferzoco, Raina M; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for only 1 % of breast cancer diagnoses in the USA. The current literature suggests that genetic factors including BRCA2 mutations, family history, age, androgen/estrogen imbalance, and environmental exposures may predispose to male breast cancer. In this manuscript, we will review known and possible risk factors for male breast cancer, as well as describe the clinical patterns of the disease. PMID:26694922

  2. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  3. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  4. Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009

    E-print Network

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

  5. Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.

    E-print Network

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

  6. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of Hong Kong Chinese women on screening mammography and early breast cancer management.

    PubMed

    Chua, Margaret S-T; Mok, Tony S K; Kwan, Wing Hong; Yeo, Winnie; Zee, Benny

    2005-01-01

    In most Western countries, screening mammography and breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are now well-established practices and have been well accepted by women over the last two decades. There are limited data on the acceptability of these strategies by Chinese women in an Oriental society where a population-based screening program has not been established and mastectomy is still commonly practiced. A survey was conducted of 1012 Hong Kong Chinese women, ages 18-69 years, to assess the level of knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes on screening mammography and the surgical management of early breast cancer. Most women (58%) had never heard of mammographic screening, and housewives were more likely to have heard of it than nonhousewives (49% versus 37%; p = 0.0001). The majority (82%) of those who had heard of mammographic screening believe that it can detect early breast cancers and reduce mortality, however, only 58% of these women would participate in yearly screening and clinical breast examination despite acknowledging the potential benefits; a lack of time and the cost were the predominant reasons given. Forty-seven percent of women had the misconception that mastectomy was the only curative treatment; when the alternative was explained, the overall rate for choosing BCT rose from 29% to 49%. There was no correlation between age and the choice of surgery. Most women (75%) felt that breast reconstruction after mastectomy was desirable and acceptable. A lack of knowledge on mammographic screening is prevalent and the concept of preventive health care has a low priority in this Chinese population. Mastectomy is still widely perceived as the only curative treatment; BCT with cosmetic reconstruction is seen as an acceptable alternative. Interventions to improve the accuracy of information and to encourage preventive health care behaviors will have a positive impact on establishing cancer screening programs and providing quality cancer care in the future. PMID:15647079

  7. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  8. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

  9. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA2 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? People with BRCA2 alterations have a genetic condition called Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC). HBOC is caused by an error

  10. Psychiatric problems in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Silberfarb, P M

    1984-02-01

    The author discusses the prevalence of psychiatric problems in cancer, and highlights five emotional problems common to all cancer patients: the emotionally charged nature of the word cancer, the patient's perceived lack of control, the uncertainty about outcome, the discordant treatment mode, and the debilitating nature of cancer treatments. The author then divides the problems faced by breast cancer patients into three categories needing clinical intervention: (1) the psychosocial, (2) the somatic, and (3) the psychiatric. Diagnosis and treatment of the two psychiatric problems of depression and delirium is emphasized. PMID:6692281

  11. Experiences of Syrian women with breast cancer regarding chemotherapy: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nizamli, Frial; Anoosheh, Monireh; Mohammadi, Essa

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of Syrian women with breast cancer regarding their chemotherapy. A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used for the data collection and analysis of the perspectives of women with breast cancer in Syria. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 17 women who underwent chemotherapy after mastectomy in a chemotherapy center in Latakia between June and October 2010. Four main themes emerged from the study: psychological discomfort (negative emotion, body image, and depressive symtoms), physical problems (acute consequences of chemotherapy and general aspects of chemotherapy), social dysfunction (social isolation and lack of marriage opportunites), and failure in the family role (mother role and sexual relationship). Understanding the experiences of women with breast cancer regarding chemotherapy enables nurses to devise appropriate strategies to provide better support and care to patients in order to improve their quality of life. PMID:22039884

  12. Interstitial brachytherapy technique for chest wall refractory recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Chen, Qianqian; Zhao, Zhipeng; Zhao, Hongfu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the treatment effect of interstitial brachytherapy for chest wall locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. Material and methods This 44-year-old female presented with chest wall recurrence seven years after modified radical mastectomy for stage II breast cancer. Despite external beam radiation and chemotherapy, the lesion expanded as 5.3 × 5.1 × 3.0 cm3, and 8.0 × 5.1 × 4.0 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with interstitial brachytherapy under ultrasound guidance. The brachytherapy dose was 30 Gy in 6 fractions of 5 Gy each. Results Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound scanning. The refractory tumor in patient healed uneventfully after interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 7 months of follow-up. Conclusions The ultrasound-guided interstitial brachytherapy may be effective for refractory recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26622232

  13. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tatl?, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Ba?sorgun, Cumhur ?brahim; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

  14. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  16. Impact of Age, Obesity and Smoking on Patient Satisfaction with Breast Implant Surgery – A Unicentric Analysis of 318 Implant Reconstructions after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kern, P.; Zarth, F.; Kimmig, R.; Rezai, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Breast reconstruction has become increasingly important for the body image of women with breast cancer. We conducted a study to investigate how patient characteristics correlate with surgical outcome after breast reconstruction with implant after mastectomy and to identify risk factors which could facilitate patient selection for reconstruction. Patients and Methods: For this case cohort analysis (n?=?257 patients with 318 heterologous reconstructions), we analyzed BMI, smoking, pre-existing disease, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one-stage/two-stage reconstruction, immediate/delayed reconstruction, antibiotic therapy and complications, partner interaction and adherence to the decision for reconstruction using a customized questionnaire. Results: 257 patients with 318 implant reconstructions (196 unilateral, 61 bilateral) were eligible for inclusion in the study. Median follow-up time was 3.1 years (range: 1 month to 10 years). Response rate to the questionnaire was 71.8?%. Median age was 49 years (range 24–79 years), median BMI was 22.44 (range 16.33–40.09). A BMI >?30 was inversely correlated with positive self-image (p?=?0.004), and implant loss/rotation was more frequent in this group (p??10 cigarettes/day had a negative impact on surgical outcome. A positive self-image had a positive impact on partner interaction (p??10 cigarettes/day are unfavorable preconditions for implant reconstruction. The use of prophylactic antibiotics was confirmed as beneficial for surgical outcome. A positive self-image after reconstruction strongly influences partner interaction. PMID:26166841

  17. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Castadot, Pierre; MacDermed, Dhara; Vandekerkhove, Christophe; Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  18. Clinical Proteomics of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bask?n, Y.; Yi?itba??, T.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the lifetimes that increased in breast cancers due to the the early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, many cases still are being lost due to the metastatic relapses. For this reason, new approaches such as the proteomic techniques have currently become the prime objectives of breast cancer researches. Various omic-based techniques have been applied with increasing success to the molecular characterisation of breast tumours, which have resulted in a more detailed classification scheme and have produced clinical diagnostic tests that have been applied to both the prognosis and the prediction of outcome to the treatment. Implementation of the proteomics-based techniques is also seen as crucial if we are to develop a systems biology approach in the discovery of biomarkers of the early diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of the outcome of the breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discuss the studies that have been conducted thus far, for the discovery of diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers, and evaluate the potential of the discriminating proteins identified in this research for clinical use as breast cancer biomarkers. PMID:21532837

  19. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  20. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  1. Estrogen metabolism and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-28

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  2. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  3. Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-10

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: October ... report from the American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States ...

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast cancer in men? For many men with breast cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment ... buildup of fluid, can happen any time after breast cancer treatment. Any treatment that removes axillary (underarm) lymph nodes ...

  7. Prophylactic Mastectomy Outcomes Study Survey

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Research Network Prophylactic Mastectomy Outcomes Study Survey Notes for Potential Users The survey on the following pages was used for the study described in the following publications: • Geiger AM, Nekhlyudov L, Herrinton LJ, Rolnick S,

  8. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Yoga therapy for breast cancer patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Monisha; Petrucci, Andrea; Dumitra, Sinziana; Duplisea, Jodie; Wexler, Sharon; Meterissian, Sarkis

    2013-11-01

    We sought to study the impact of yoga therapy on anxiety, depression and physical health in breast cancer patients. Stage I-III post-operative breast cancer patients were recruited with twelve 1-h weekly yoga sessions completed with an experienced yoga instructor. Before and after each module completion, assessments were obtained with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Dallas pain scale and shoulder flexibility measurements. Fourteen patients completed the entire yoga session with 42.8% having a total mastectomy and 15.4% having breast reconstruction. Both right and left shoulder abduction flexibility significantly improved (p = 0.004; p = 0.015 respectively) as well as left shoulder flexion (p = 0.046). An improvement trend in scores for the HADS and Dallas questionnaires pre- and post-intervention was found, although it was not statistically significant. Our data indicates an improvement in physical function in addition to a consistent amelioration in anxiety, depression and pain symptoms after a yoga intervention. PMID:24199978

  10. Risk of contralateral breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a 30-year semi-prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Basu, N N; Ingham, S; Hodson, J; Lalloo, F; Bulman, M; Howell, A; Evans, D G

    2015-12-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer after primary breast cancer. Risk reduction strategies are discussed after assessment of risk factors for developing contralateral breast cancer. We assessed potential risk factors that could be of use in clinical practice, including the novel use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) testing. 506 BRCA1 and 505 BRCA2 mutation carriers with a diagnosis of breast cancer were observed for up to 30 years. The risk of a contralateral breast cancer is approximately 2-3 % per year, remaining constant for at least 20 years. This was similar in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Initial breast cancer before age 40-years was a significant risk factor, which was more pronounced in BRCA1 patients. The effect of risk-reducing oophorectomy on contralateral breast cancer risk may be overestimated because of bias. No significant association was found between overall breast cancer risk SNP score and contralateral breast cancer development. Young mutation carriers, particularly those with BRCA1 mutations, who develop breast cancer have a significantly higher risk of developing contralateral breast cancer, remaining constant for over 20 years. Contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy should be considered in this group, in particular as there is a survival benefit. Caution is advised when counselling women considering risk-reducing oophorectomy as, after accounting for statistical bias, the associated risk reduction was found to be non-significant, and potentially smaller than has been previously reported. SNP testing did not add any further discriminatory information when assessing contralateral breast cancer risk. PMID:26239694

  11. Psychological morbidity associated with local recurrence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P L; May, V E; Hughes, L E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-two individuals who had suffered from local recurrence of breast cancer were interviewed to determine psychosocial morbidity. Psychometric assessment using the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale was conducted prior to clinical evaluation including a structured interview, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Lifetime and current psychiatric diagnoses were established. Ten (45%) of the recurrence group had current psychiatric illness (anxiety and depression) at the time of local recurrence, a similar prevalence to that described by others at mastectomy. Previous psychiatric illness and trait neuroticism are predictive of vulnerability to psychiatric morbidity at local recurrence. These results suggest that a significant proportion of patients with local recurrence suffer from major depressive illness. PMID:1894454

  12. BCSC Grants: Mammographic Breast Density and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home   |   Data   |   Statistics   |   Tools   |   Collaborations   |   Work with Us   |   Publications   |   About   |   Links Ongoing Collaborations CISNET ACS FAVOR Comprehensive Cancer Centers Ancillary Studies Mammographic Breast

  13. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Domain, Delora; Singletary, S. Eva; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age.

  14. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may result. The paper initiates with an introductory overview of breast cancer, its current treatment modalities, and the current role of nanotechnology in the clinic. Our perspectives are then presented on what the greatest opportunities for nanotechnology are; this follows from an analysis of the role of biological barriers that adversely determine the biological distribution of intravascularly injected therapeutic agents. Different generations of nanotechnology tools for drug delivery are reviewed, and our current strategy for addressing the sequential bio-barriers is also presented, and is accompanied by an encouragement to the community to develop even more effective ones. PMID:18663578

  15. [Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tassin, S; Bragard, I; Thommessen, M; Pitchot, W

    2011-01-01

    In occidental countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women. In the last 30 years, the therapeutical progresses have improved the prognosis and the survival rate. However, despite this hope of recovering, women continue to face the fear of death and vulnerability. Moreover, treatments can induce cognitive, emotional and behavioral reactions in patients but also in their relatives. Therefore, the treatments are associated with physical and psychosocial dysfunctioning influencing quality of life. PMID:21826969

  16. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ?50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC, particularly among these subsets of patients.

  17. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  18. Transdermal or Oral Telapristone Acetate in Treating Patients Undergoing Mastectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  19. Mastectomy -- The Surgical Procedure

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Chemotherapy Hormone Therapies Targeted Therapies Neoadjuvant Therapies Precision Medicine Emerging Areas in Treatment Treatments by Breast Cancer ... Chemotherapy Hormone Therapies Targeted Therapies Neoadjuvant Therapies Precision Medicine Emerging Areas in Treatment Treatments by Breast Cancer ...

  20. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications

    Cancer.gov

    Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

  3. CISNET: Breast Cancer Model Profiles

    Cancer.gov

    Model profiles are standardized documents that facilitate the comparison of models and their results. The Joint Profile provided includes profiles for all breast cancer models. Individual profiles for each model are also provided and may be more current than the joint profile document.

  4. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)

    Cancer.gov

    Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

  5. Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000 Cancer: 6 Hallmarks #12;Breast Anatomy and Histology Normal Breast Histology - H&E Stain Ross and Pawlina, Histology: A Text and Atlas Ducts - Simple columnar epithelium Normal ductules with basement membrane #12

  6. The association of body weight with recurrent cancer of the breast.

    PubMed

    Donegan, W L; Hartz, A J; Rimm, A A

    1978-04-01

    Recurrence of carcinoma of the breast after radical mastectomy was associated with preoperative body weight among patients observed for up to 24 years. Patients who had no axillary lymph node metastases and who weighed 130 pounds or less had an accumulative recurrence free survival superior to that of heavier patients. The advantage was unassociated with significant differences in menopausal status, clinical stage, or tumor size. High fat diet and large body mass have been linked epidemiologically with high risk for breast cancer; whatever biologic mechanisms are involved may also promote growth of residual tumor after potentially curative surgery. Diet and weight reduction may represent empirical means for improving the prognosis of heavy individuals with early stages of breast cancer. PMID:639014

  7. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. BCSC - Hormone Therapy & Breast Cancer Incidence Data

    Cancer.gov

    This dataset may be useful to people interested in exploring the relationship between postmenopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer incidence. The dataset includes information from 603,411 screening mammograms performed on women included in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium from January 1997 to December 2003. Results of an analysis of breast cancer incidence were published by Kerlikowske et al. in the September 2007 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  9. Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  10. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  11. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-01

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. Adjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy deprives breast cancer cells of the hormone estrogen , which many breast tumors need to grow. A ... hormonal treatment is the drug tamoxifen , which blocks estrogen's activity in the body. Studies have shown that ...

  13. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is easiest to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. If breast ... women’s health specialist, radiologist, physician’s assistant, or other healthcare professional. Resources CDC's Campaign: "Breast Cancer Screening: The ...

  14. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as: When the breast tumor is causing an open wound in the breast (or chest) To treat a small number of metastases in a certain area To prevent bone fractures When an area of cancer spread is pressing ...

  15. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-25

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  16. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  17. Presence of tumor DNA in plasma of breast cancer patients: clinicopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Silva, J M; Dominguez, G; Garcia, J M; Gonzalez, R; Villanueva, M J; Navarro, F; Provencio, M; San Martin, S; España, P; Bonilla, F

    1999-07-01

    Using different molecular techniques, DNA has been detected in the plasma of cancer patients with various types of tumors. We undertook the present study to investigate the presence of plasma DNA, before mastectomy, in patients with breast cancer at diagnosis and to analyze the clinicopathological spectrum of this subgroup of patients with respect to patients without DNA with tumor characteristics. We studied 62 patients with breast cancer, who were selected sequentially after mastectomy and diagnosis of breast carcinomas. Genomic DNA extracted from tumor and normal tissues, normal blood cells, and plasma was used for molecular studies. Alterations in polymorphic markers selected because they had been found to show a high rate of alterations in breast cancer in previous studies (D17S855, D17S654, D16S421, TH2, D10S197, and D9S161), as well as mutations in the p53 gene and aberrant methylation at the first exon of p16INK4a, were used to identify and characterize tumor and plasma DNA. Thirteen clinicopathological parameters were analyzed in each patient. We identified 56 cases (90%) with at least one molecular event in tumor DNA, and 41 cases (66%) with a similar alteration in plasma DNA. Comparison of the clinicopathological parameters between patients with and without plasma DNA revealed significant differences in the axillary involvement, rate of invasive ductal carcinoma, high proliferative index, and the parameter comprised of lymph node metastases, histological grade II, and peritumoral vessel involvement. A high proportion of breast cancer patients exhibited plasma DNA at diagnosis similar to tumor DNA, and its presence correlated significantly with pathological parameters associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:10397273

  18. Common germline polymorphisms associated with breast cancer specific survival

    E-print Network

    Pirie, A.; Guo, Q.; Kraft, P.; Canisius, S.; Eccles, D. M.; Rahman, N.; Nevanlinna, H.; Chen, C.; Khan, S.; Tyrer, J.; Bolla, M. K.; Wang, Q.; Dennis, J.; Michailidou, K.; Lush, M.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, M.; Czene, K.; Darabi, H.; Eriksson, M.; Lambrechts, D.; Weltens, C.; Leunen, K.; van Ongeval, C.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Nielsen, S. F.; Flyger, H.; Rudolph, A.; Seibold, P.; Flesch-Janysm, D.; Blomqvist, C.; Aittomaki, K.; Fagerholm, R.; Muranen, T. A.; Olsen, J. E.; Hallberg, E.; Vachon, C.; Knight, J. A.; Glendon, G.; Mulligan, A. M.; Broeks, A.; Cornelissen, S.; Haiman, C. A.; Henderson, B. E.; Schumacher, F.; Le Marchand, L.; Hopper, J. L.; Tsimiklis, H.; Apicella, C.; Southey, M. C.; Cross, S. S.; Reed. M. W.; Giles, G. G.; Milne, R. L.; McLean, C.; Winqvist, R.; Pylkas, K.; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A.; Grip, M.; Hooning, M. J.; Hollestelle, A.; Martens, J. W.; van den Ouweland, A. M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Yang, R.; Burwinkel, B.; Figueroa, J.; Chanock, S. J.; Lissowska, J.; Sawyer, E. J.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M. J.; Miller, N.; Brenner, H.; Butterbach, K.; Holleczek, B.; Kataja, V.; Kosma, V. M.; Hartikainen, J. M.; Li, J.; Brand, J. S.; Humphreys, K.; Devilee, P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Seynaeve, C.; Radice, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Manoukian, S.; Ficarazzi, F.; Beckmann, M. W.; Hein, A.; Ekici, A. B.; Balleine, R.; Phillips, K. A.; Benitez, J.; Zamora, M. P.; Perez, J. I.; Menendez, P.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Gronwald, J.; Durda, K.; Hamann, U.; Kabisch, M.; Ulmer, H. U.; Rudiger, T.; Margolin, S.; Kristensen, V.; Nord, S.; Evans, D. G.; Abraham, J.; Earl, H.; Poole, C. J.; Hiller, L.; Dunn, J. A.; Bowden, S.; Yang, R.; Campa, D.; Diver, W. R.; Gapstur, S. M.; Gaudet, M. M.; Hankinson, S.; Hoover, R. N.; Husing, A.; Kaaks, R.; Machiela, M. J.; Willett, W.; Barrdahl, M.; Canzian, F.; Chin, S. F.; Caldas, C.; Hunter, D. J.; Lindstrom, S.; Garcia-Closas, M.; Couch, F. J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Mannermaa, A.; Andrulis, I. L.; Hall, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Bojesen, S. E.; Cox, A.; Fasching, P. A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, M. K.

    2015-04-22

    of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer specific survival using data from a pooled analysis of eight breast cancer survival genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Methods A literature review was conducted...

  19. 77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the...States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans...000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and tens of...

  20. 78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ...Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of...America stands in solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every corner of...

  1. 75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ...8572 of October 1, 2010 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the...been made in the fight against breast cancer, it remains the most frequently...will be claimed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we...

  2. 76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the...commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously...early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this year,...

  3. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  4. Coding Instructions for Breast Cancer Chart Audit (DETECT)

    Cancer.gov

    CODING INSTRUCTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER CHART AUDIT ? DETECT ? I. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS About this study: Study period. Chart audits will be conducted among women diagnosed with breast cancer. The Breast Cancer Audit will capture the clinical experience

  5. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  6. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  7. Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Fantini, Sergio

    Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

  8. 78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By... solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every... with breast cancer, and tens of thousands will die from it. As we observe National Breast...

  9. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. CISNET: Simulating Breast Cancer in Wisconsin

    Cancer.gov

    This project will update and extend a previously developed model simulating breast cancer age- and stage-specific incidence and age-specific mortality in Wisconsin. The model was developed and validated in 1992-93 and was used to explain breast cancer trends in Wisconsin from 1982-1992. We will reprogram the macrosimulation model as a discrete event microsimulation, updating inputs to account for demographic, and breast cancer detection and treatment changes since 1992.

  12. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Osteen, R T; Smith, B L

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. Using histologic findings in the biopsy as a guide, it may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. Radiation therapy can be avoided safely in patients who have pathologically negative axillas by level I and II dissection. There appears to be no advantage to routine dissection of level III lymph nodes. Lymphedema of the arm and breast increases with more extensive dissections and with radiation therapy. PMID:2218816

  13. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-13

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  14. Topoisomerase II{alpha} expression correlates with diminished disease-free survival in invasive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, John K. . E-mail: joconno@yahoo.com; Hazard, Lisa J.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Fischbach, Jennifer; Gaffney, David K.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Topoisomerase II{alpha} (Topo II{alpha}) plays a role in DNA replication and is the molecular target for anthracyline-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Topo II{alpha} expression and survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 24 women with invasive breast cancer were stained for Topo II{alpha} expression. All women underwent mastectomy. Radiotherapy was given at University of Utah Department of Radiation Oncology. Of the patients, 23 (96%) received chemotherapy. The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells was compared with clinical factors and overall survival. Results: The median percentage of tumor cells expressing Topo II{alpha} was 70%. Increased Topo II{alpha} tumor expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival. Five-year disease-free survival was 100% for patients with <70% of breast cancer cells expressing Topo II{alpha} compared with 42% for patients with {>=}70% Topo II{alpha} expression (p 0.008). The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells correlated with T stage (p = 0.008) but not with other pathologic factors. Conclusions: Increased Topo II{alpha} expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. These findings may indicate a role for Topo II{alpha} expression as a prognostic factor in breast cancer.

  15. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  16. Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oktay, J S

    1998-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the psychosocial aspects of breast cancer. Common psychologic reactions during detection, diagnosis, and treatment include anxiety, denial, anger, and depression. Suggestions for primary care provider interventions such as providing education and support, are discussed. Many treatments for the disease seriously challenge a woman's self-image and sexuality. Family issues are equally important including relationships with children and spouses or partners. Social support can be a powerful force which facilitates successful coping with these challenges. The advent of genetic testing poses a whole set of psychologic and social issues which primary care providers will need to be aware of in the future. Primary care providers have an important role in determining the psychological outcome of breast cancer. By being aware of the common psychologic and social problems, they can be prepared to contribute to a successful outcome. PMID:9727111

  17. Breast Cancer, Version 1.2016.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J; Anderson, Benjamin O; Balassanian, Ron; Blair, Sarah L; Burstein, Harold J; Cyr, Amy; Elias, Anthony D; Farrar, William B; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goetz, Matthew; Goldstein, Lori J; Hudis, Clifford A; Isakoff, Steven J; Marcom, P Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A; McCormick, Beryl; Moran, Meena; Patel, Sameer A; Pierce, Lori J; Reed, Elizabeth C; Salerno, Kilian E; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Smith, Karen Lisa; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Telli, Melinda; Ward, John H; Shead, Dottie A; Kumar, Rashmi

    2015-12-01

    These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the important updates to the systemic therapy recommendations in the 2016 NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer. In the most recent version of these guidelines, the NCCN Breast Cancer Panel included a new section on the principles of preoperative systemic therapy. In addition, based on new evidence, the panel updated systemic therapy recommendations for women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the adjuvant and metastatic disease settings and for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. This report summarizes these recent updates and discusses the rationale behind them. PMID:26656517

  18. CISNET: Breast Cancer Landmark Study

    Cancer.gov

    After remaining relatively constant for many years, breast cancer mortality in the United States decreased by a dramatic 24% from 1989 to 2000. CISNET investigators initiated a joint comparative modeling effort among seven groups to determine the contributions of mammography and adjuvant therapy to this decline. While the benefits of adjuvant therapy were more settled, controversy regarding the benefits of mammography screening persisted due to uneven results and continuing criticism of the controlled trials on which the mortality benefits had been based.

  19. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-04-15

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend ?=?0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  20. [Primary lung neoplasm in a patient with breast cancer: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Lopes, I A; da Silva, E A; Meyer, E C; Barbas Filho, J V; Delmonte, V; Barbas, C S; de Carvalho, C R

    1991-01-01

    A pulmonary nodule in a patient with a previous or concomitant diagnosis of extrathoracic malignancy is not always a synonym of metastasis. When dealing with breast cancer this is very important since the pulmonary lesion is usually not related to the primary tumor. We present a white, 69 years old patient, submitted to mastectomy four years earlier, in which a solitary pulmonary nodule was found, and after resection, the histopathologic examination disclosed a intravascular bronchoalveolar tumor. This is a rare lesion, here represented in an unusual way. PMID:1668862

  1. Breast Cancer Marker Link to Aggressive Rarer Cancer Development

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have identified a group of surface markers on cells linked to an aggressive type of breast cancer called estrogen receptor-negative cancer. The research, conducted by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Insti

  2. Iron homeostasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marques, Oriana; da Silva, Berta Martins; Porto, Graça; Lopes, Carlos

    2014-05-28

    Iron is an essential element and a critical component of molecules involved in energy production, cell cycle and intermediate metabolism. However, the same characteristic chemistry that makes it so biologically versatile may lead to iron-associated toxicity as a consequence of increased oxidative stress. The fact that free iron accumulates with age and generates ROS led to the hypothesis that it could be involved in the etiogenesis of several chronic diseases. Iron has been consistently linked to carcinogenesis, either through persistent failure in the redox balance or due to its critical role in cellular proliferation. Several reports have given evidence that alterations in the import, export and storage of cellular iron may contribute to breast cancer development, behavior and recurrence. In this review, we summarize the basic mechanisms of systemic and cellular iron regulation and highlight the findings that link their deregulation with breast cancer. To conclude, progresses in iron chelation therapy in breast cancer, as a tool to fight chemotherapy resistance, are also reviewed. PMID:24486738

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Breast Cancer 2012 – New Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kolberg, H.-C.; Lüftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials. PMID:25324576

  5. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  6. [THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON BREAST CANCER].

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shelly Tartakover; Shochet, Gali Epstein; Drucker, Liat; Lishner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cancer and pregnancy coincide in about one in 1,000 pregnancies. One of the most common malignancies associated with pregnancy is breast cancer. Women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with metastatic disease and estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors than do non-pregnant women. Controversies exist regarding the effect of pregnancy on breast cancer prognosis. Some researchers suggest that pregnancy does not affect breast cancer prognosis, whereas others claim the opposite. Although PABC is usually discovered in an advanced stage, breast cancer metastasis on the placenta is a rare event. During cancer progression, the surrounding microenvironment co-evolves into an activated state through continuous communication with the malignant cells, thereby promoting tumor growth. The effect of pregnancy and placental environment on breast cancer biology is the issue of this review. Placental and cancer cells implantation processes share similar molecular pathways. This suggests that placental factors may affect breast cancer cells biology. Previously, we analyzed the effect of first trimester human placenta on breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells were co-cultured with placental explants during their implantation on matrigel substrate. We found that the placenta reduced ER expression on the cancer cells and induced their migration and invasion abilities. As a result of it, breast cancer cells migrated away from the placental implantation sites. Hormonal pathways were involved in these phenomena. These results may explain the high incidence of metastases during pregnancy in on the one hand and the rarity of metastases on the placenta on the other hand. PMID:26480621

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  8. Breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-MacLean, Roanne; Miedema, Baukje; Tatemichi, Sue R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE One distressing health problem facing breast cancer patients is breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). This incurable condition can occur many years after treatment is completed and often causes pain and disability and interferes with work and activities of daily living. Patients at risk of BCRL are those who have received radiation therapy or axillary node dissection; higher incidence is reported among patients who have had both radiation and dissection. Our objective was to explore New Brunswick women’s experiences of BCRL and its treatment. DESIGN A focus group and 15 individual in-depth interviews. SETTING Province of New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS A diverse sample of 22 women with BCRL was obtained using age, location, time after breast cancer diagnosis, and onset of BCRL symptoms as selection criteria. METHOD The focus group discussion guided development of a semistructured interview guide that was used for 15 individual interviews exploring women’s experiences with BCRL. MAIN FINDINGS Four themes emerged from the interviews. First, participants thought they were poorly informed about the possibility of developing BCRL. Eleven women reported receiving very little or no information about BCRL. Second, triggers and symptoms varied. Participants used words such as numb, heavy, tingling, aching, seeping fluid, hard, tight, limited mobility, and burning to describe symptoms. They reported a variety of both aggravating and alleviating factors for their symptoms. Some actions, such as applying heat, were thought to both exacerbate and reduce symptoms. Third, in New Brunswick, access to treatment is poor, compression garments are costly, and accessing physiotherapists is difficult. Last, the effect of BCRL on daily life is profound: 12 of the 15 women reported that it interfered with work and day-to-day activities. CONCLUSION Participants were unaware of the risk factors and treatment options for BCRL. Family physicians should discuss BCRL with their breast cancer patients routinely. They should be vigilant for the possible onset of BCRL and, if it is diagnosed, should manage it aggressively to minimize the severe effect it has on the lives of breast cancer patients. PMID:16926934

  9. Monocyte-derived macrophage assisted breast cancer cell invasion as a personalized, predictive metric to score metastatic risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keon-Young; Li, Gande; Platt, Manu O.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-to-patient variability in breast cancer progression complicates clinical treatment decisions. Of women undergoing prophylactic mastectomies, many may not have progressed to indolent forms of disease and could have benefited from milder, localized therapy. Tumor associated macrophages contribute significantly to tumor invasion and metastasis, with cysteine cathepsin proteases as important contributors. Here, a method is demonstrated by which variability in macrophage expression of cysteine cathepsins, their inhibitor cystatin C, and kinase activation can be used to train a multivariate model and score patients for invasion risk. These enzymatic profiles were used to predict macrophage-assisted MCF-7 breast cancer cell invasion in the trained computational model. To test these predictions, a priori, signals from monocytes isolated from women undergoing mastectomies were input to score their cancer invasion potential in a patient-specific manner, and successfully predicted that patient monocytes with highest predicted invasion indices matched those with more invasive initial diagnoses of the nine patients tested. Together this establishes proof-of-principle that personalized information acquired from minimally invasive blood draws may provide useful information to inform oncologists and patients of invasive/metastatic risk, helping to make decisions regarding radical mastectomy or milder, conservative treatments to save patients from hardship and surgical recovery. PMID:26349896

  10. Ablation and Other Local Therapy for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... advanced until the end is in the tumor. Placement of the probe is guided by ultrasound or ... Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support ...

  11. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  12. Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - April 30, 1998

    Cancer.gov

    "Breast Cancer Prevention Trial" Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Statement of Leslie Ford, M.D. Associate Director for Early Detection and Community Oncology National Cancer Institute Before the Congressional

  13. Development of Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model

    Cancer.gov

    Development of Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model Mano S. Selvan, Joe Ensor, John Cook, Constance Johnson, Christopher Amos, Melissa Bondy, Therese Bevers, Donald A. Berry. The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd.,

  14. Lgr4 in Breast Cancer Stem Cells 

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Li

    2014-12-11

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) comprise a huge family protein with almost 800 members. GPCRs sense molecules or other stimuli outside the cell, and activate intracellular...

  15. Etiology of breast cancer I. Genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The subject of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on the genetic aspect of its etiology. A number of studies using various approaches gave the same results: the familial form occurs earlier and there is a higher risk in female members of the breast-cancer families. An association between breast cancer and cancer of certain other sites among women is reported. Cytogenetic studies of “cancer families” revealed increased frequency of aneuploidy in some members. However, the role of chromosome abnormalities in carcinogenesis is still not clear. PMID:4577599

  16. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships. PMID:21545207

  17. Lung Cancer with Skin and Breast Metastasis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marie Frances; Ghosh, Meenakshi; Sinha Ray, Abhisekh; Manhas, Saveena; Oke, Vikram; Agu, Chidozie Charles; Basunia, Md. Rawshan; Enriquez, Danilo; Quist, Joseph; Bianchi, Catherine; Hans, Ravi; Kandel, Saroj

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in America. Frequent sites of metastasis include the Hilar lymph nodes, adrenal glands, liver, brain, and bone. The following case report is of a primary lung cancer with metastases to the breast and skin. Case. A 48-year-old African American male with a past medical history of poorly differentiated left breast cancer status after modified radical mastectomy (MRM), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and smoking (20 pack-years) presents to the ER with progressive shortness of breath on exertion, upper back pain, and weight loss for 2 months in duration. On physical examination he is found to have a MRM scar on his left breast and a left periumbilical cutaneous mass. Chest X-ray and chest CT reveal a right upper lobe mass and biopsies from the breast, lung, and the periumbilical mass indicate a poorly differentiated carcinoma of unclear etiology; all tumor markers are negative. The patient is male and a chronic smoker; therefore the diagnosis is made as lung carcinoma with metastases to the breast and skin. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for cutaneous metastases should be cast when investigating cutaneous pathologies in patients at risk for primary lung malignancy. PMID:25861506

  18. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  19. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  20. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56?year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4?months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders. PMID:22873795

  1. Muscle-Sparing TRAM Flap Does Not Protect Breast Reconstruction from Post-Mastectomy Radiation Damage Compared to DIEP Flap

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Patrick B.; Clemens, Mark W.; Hoy, Austin E.; Smith, Benjamin; Zhang, Hong; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Butler, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiation to free flaps following immediate breast reconstruction has been shown to compromise outcomes. We hypothesized that irradiated muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (MS FTRAM) flaps experience less fat necrosis than irradiated deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. METHODS We performed a retrospective study of all consecutive patients undergoing immediate, autologous, abdominal-based free flap breast reconstruction with MS FTRAM or DIEP flaps over a 10-year period at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Irradiated flaps (external-beam radiation therapy) after immediate breast reconstruction were compared to non-irradiated flaps. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential associations between patient, tumor, and reconstructive characteristics and surgical outcomes. RESULTS A total of 625 flaps were included in the analysis: 40 (6.4%) irradiated vs. 585 (93.6%) non-irradiated. Mean follow-up for the irradiated vs. non-irradiated flaps was 60.0 months and 48.5 months, respectively (p=0.02). Overall complication rates were similar for both the irradiated and non-irradiated flaps. Irradiated flaps (i.e., both DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps) developed fat necrosis at a significantly higher rate (22.5%) than the non-irradiated flaps (9.2%; p=0.009). There were no differences in fat necrosis rates between the DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps in both the irradiated and non-irradiated groups. CONCLUSIONS Both DIEP and MS FTRAM flap reconstructions had much higher rates of fat necrosis when irradiated. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that immediate breast reconstruction with an MS FTRAM flap does not result in a lower rate of fat necrosis than reconstruction with a DIEP flap. PMID:24469158

  2. Locoregional therapy of locally advanced breast cancer: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Brackstone, M.; Fletcher, G.G.; Dayes, I.S.; Madarnas, Y.; SenGupta, S.K.; Verma, S.

    2015-01-01

    Questions In female patients with locally advanced breast cancer (labc) and good response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nact), including endocrine therapy, what is the role of breast-conserving surgery (bcs) compared with mastectomy? In female patients with labc, is radiotherapy (rt) indicated for those who have undergone mastectomy?does locoregional rt, compared with breast or chest wall rt alone, result in a higher survival rate and lower recurrence rates?is rt indicated for those achieving a pathologic complete response (pcr) to nact? In female patients with labc who receive nact, is the most appropriate axillary staging procedure sentinel lymph node biopsy (slnb) or axillary dissection? Is slnb indicated before nact rather than at the time of surgery? How should female patients with labc that does not respond to initial nact be treated? Methods This guideline was developed by Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) and the Breast Cancer Disease Site Group (dsg). A systematic review was prepared based on literature searches conducted using the medline and embase databases for the period 1996 to December 11, 2013. Guidelines were located from that search and from the Web sites of major guideline organizations. The working group drafted recommendations based on the systemic review. The systematic review and recommendations were then circulated to the Breast Cancer dsg and the pebc Report Approval Panel for internal review; the revised document underwent external review. The full three-part evidence series can be found on the Cancer Care Ontario Web site. Recommendations For most patients with labc, modified radical mastectomy should be considered the standard of care. For some patients with noninflammatory labc, bcs can be considered on a case-by-case basis when the surgeon deems that the disease can be fully resected and the patient expresses a strong preference for breast preservation. For patients with labc, rt after mastectomy is recommended. It is recommended that, after bcs or mastectomy, patients with labc receive locoregional rt encompassing the breast or chest wall and local node-bearing areas. It is recommended that postoperative rt remain the standard of care for patients with labc who achieve pcr to nact. It is recommended that axillary dissection remain the standard of care for axillary staging in labc, with the judicious use of slnb in patients who are advised of the limitations of the current data. Although slnb either before or after nact is technically feasible, the data are insufficient to make any recommendation about the optimal timing of slnb with respect to nact. Limited data suggest higher sentinel lymph node identification rates and lower false negative identification rates when slnb is conducted before nact; however, those data must be balanced against the requirement for two operations if slnb is not performed at the time of resection of the main tumour. It is recommended that patients receiving neoadjuvant anthracycline–taxane-based therapy (or other sequential regimens) whose tumours do not respond to the initial agent or agents, or who experience disease progression, be expedited to the next agent or agents of the regimen. For patients who, in the opinion of the treating physician, fail to respond or progress on first-line nact, several therapeutic options can be considered, including second-line chemotherapy, hormonal therapy (if appropriate), rt, or immediate surgery (if technically feasible). Treatment should be individualized through discussion at a multidisciplinary case conference, considering tumour characteristics, patient factors and preferences, and risk of adverse effects. It is recommended that prospective randomized clinical trials be designed for patients with labc who fail to respond to nact so that more definitive treatment recommendations can be developed. PMID:25848339

  3. Synchronous primary breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma in a male patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Cui, Xiuzheng; Li, Lin; Lu, Haizhen; Rong, Weiqi; Bi, Chao; Wu, Jianxiong

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare malignant disease characterized by hormonal imbalance. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common neoplasm of the liver, and is generally correlated with hepatitis B or C virus-related cirrhosis. While to our knowledge a case with these two malignant diseases in a same male patient in the concomitant period is an exceptional event, rarely reported in literature. In this report, we present a case in which a Chinese patient with hepatitis B developed a tumor mass that originated from segment V of the liver and presented with right breast nodules at the same time. Synchronous mastectomy and hepatectomy were performed, and standard endocrine therapy and chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment were therefore followed. The diverse histogenesis of the two kinds of cancers highlights the need for us to investigate any common physiopathogenetic elements. PMID:26617917

  4. Physiologic, Metabolic, and Structural Alterations in Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Ramanujam, Nimmi

    to surviving breast cancer Sources: American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute #12;MOTIVATIONPhysiologic, Metabolic, and Structural Alterations in Breast Cancer: Assessment via Optical Society of America Annual Meeting Frontiers in Optics 2006 / Laser Science XXII October 11, 2006 #12

  5. BREAST IMAGING The majority of breast cancers found in the United States today are picked up

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    BREAST IMAGING The majority of breast cancers found in the United States today are picked up different types of radiological studies available to evaluate the breast for the possibility that a cancer history of early breast cancer. The breast tissue is compressed (squeezed) from two different directions

  6. Association between Lymph Node Ratio and Disease Specific Survival in Breast Cancer Patients with One or Two Positive Lymph Nodes Stratified by Different Local Treatment Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenjie; Xu, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Results of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0011 trial indicated that complete axillary node dissection (ALND) may not be warranted in some breast cancer patients with low tumor burden who are undergoing breast-conserving surgery following whole-breast irradiation. However, this study did not address patients undergoing mastectomy or those undergoing breast-conserving surgery without whole-breast radiotherapy. Given that lymph node ratio (LNR; ratio of positive lymph nodes to the total number removed) has been shown to be a prognostic factor in breast cancer, we first sought to determine the prognostic value of LNR in a low risk population comparable to that of the Z0011 trial and further to investigate whether the prognostic significance differs with local treatment modality. Method We used the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify breast cancer patients with T1-T2 tumor and 1–2 positive nodes. Patients were subclassified by the local therapy they underwent for the primary tumor. The prognostic value of LNR in predicting disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined in each treatment group. Results A total of 53,109 patients were included. In the subgroup of 20,602 patients who underwent lumpectomy following radiotherapy, LNR was not found to be significantly associated with DSS in both the univariate and multivariate model. For the 4,664 patients treated with mastectomy following radiotherapy, 6,811 treated with lumpectomy without radiotherapy and 21,031 with mastectomy without radiotherapy, LNR independently predict DSS in each of these subgroups. Conclusions Our results add evidence to the concept that axillary dissection could be omitted in patients with one or two positive nodes following breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation. PMID:26513258

  7. BCSC Grants: Hormone Replacement Therapy & Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The overarching goal of this proposal is to improve women's health through enhanced understanding of the role of prescription and over-the-counter postmenopausal hormone therapy use and obesity on breast cancer screening, breast cancer risk, and health-related quality of life.

  8. Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort is an international resource of multi-generational families, data, and biospecimens established in 1995 for interdisciplinary collaborative research on the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer. Questionnaire data, clinical data and (when available) biospecimens have been collected for over 30,000 women and men from nearly 12,000 families.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  10. THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

  11. Industrialization, electromagnetic fields, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kheifets, L I; Matkin, C C

    1999-01-01

    The disparity between the rates of breast cancer in industrialized and less-industrialized regions has led to many hypotheses, including the theory that exposure to light-at-night and/or electromagnetic fields (EMF) may suppress melatonin and that reduced melatonin may increase the risk of breast cancer. In this comprehensive review we consider strengths and weaknesses of more than 35 residential and occupational epidemiologic studies that investigated the association between EMF and breast cancer. Although most of the epidemiologic data do not provide strong support for an association between EMF and breast cancer, because of the limited statistical power as well as the possibility of misclassification and bias present in much of the existing data, it is not possible to rule out a relationship between EMF and breast cancer. We make several specific recommendations for future studies carefully designed to test the melatonin-breast cancer and EMF-breast cancer hypotheses. Future study designs should have sufficient statistical power to detect small to moderate associations; include comprehensive exposure assessments that estimate residential and occupational exposures, including shift work; focus on a relevant time period; control for known breast cancer risks; and pay careful attention to menopausal and estrogen receptor status. PMID:10229714

  12. DDT, endocrine disruption and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ana M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to endocrine disruptors is suspected to be one of the main factors responsible for the increased incidence of breast cancer in industrialized countries. New data published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism show that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane during fetal life is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. PMID:26239610

  13. Improving Breast Cancer Care for Older Women

    Cancer.gov

    Earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and the overall increase in average lifespan continue to expand the number of breast cancer survivors who are aged 65 and older. This population is already estimated to be one million of the total 2.3 million breast cancer survivors.

  14. CISNET: Comparative Analyses in Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    While the results of the New England Journal of Medicine paper, described as a landmark study, considered the benefits of what might be termed “first generation” chemotherapy and tamoxifen, new chemotherapy regimens, including anthracycline-based regimens and taxanes, aromatase inhibitors for ER positive breast cancers, and trastuzumab for HER-2 positive tumors, have dramatically improved prognosis for breast cancer patients.

  15. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-28

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  16. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-11

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  18. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  19. Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective association?

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    2002-01-01

    Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192­196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective to breast cancer risk. We have examined the association between mastalgia and breast cancer in the patient breast cancer risk factor information, 1532 (28%) reported breast pain as an incidental complaint

  20. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  1. The Effect of Young Age in Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minna K.; Varzi, Leo A.; Chung, Debra U.; Cao, Minh-an; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Apple, Sophia K.; Chang, Helena R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Studies have shown that young breast cancer patients have more advanced disease and worse survival compared to older patients. Our objective was to study disease characteristics and survival in the subset of young women with hormone receptor positive (HR+) and HER2 negative (HER2?) cancer. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed HR+/HER2? breast cancer patients who underwent surgery at our institution between 2002 and 2010. We compared clinical characteristics, pathology, treatment, and recurrence-free survival between younger (?40 years) and older (>40 years) patients. Results. Of 669 HR+/HER2? breast cancer cases, 54 (8.1%) patients were 40 years or younger. Younger patients had more luminal B subtype, high grade, poor differentiation, and increased lymphovascular invasion. Younger women were treated more often with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Although the unadjusted recurrence-free survival at median 55-month follow-up was lower in younger women, adjusting for stage, there was no significant difference (90.7% versus 89.3%, p = 0.74) between groups. Conclusion. Younger patients with HR+/HER2? breast cancer had more advanced disease and more aggressive treatment than older patients. The unfavorable pathologic features suggest a biologically different tumor in young women. After adjusting for these factors, younger patients have a recurrence-free survival similar to older patients. PMID:26351632

  2. Quality of life in patients with breast cancer before and after diagnosis: an eighteen months follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Montazeri, Ali; Vahdaninia, Mariam; Harirchi, Iraj; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Khaleghi, Fatemeh; Jarvandi, Soghra

    2008-01-01

    Background Measuring quality of life in breast cancer patients is of importance in assessing treatment outcomes. This study examined the impact of breast cancer diagnosis and its treatment on quality of life of women with breast cancer. Methods This was a prospective study of quality of life in breast cancer patients. Quality of life was measured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and its breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time: baseline (pre diagnosis), three months after initial treatment and one year after completion of treatment (in all 18 months follow-up). At baseline the questionnaires were administered to all suspected identified patients while both patients and the interviewer were blind to the final diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data included: age, education, marital status, disease stage and initial treatment. Repeated measure analysis was performed to compare quality of life differences over the time. Results In all, 167 patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The mean age of breast cancer patients was 47.2 (SD = 13.5) years and the vast majority (82.6%) underwent mastectomy. At eighteen months follow-up data for 99 patients were available for analysis. The results showed there were significant differences in patients' functioning and global quality of life at three points in time (P < 0.001). Although there were deteriorations in patients' scores for body image and sexual functioning, there were significant improvements for breast symptoms, systematic therapy side effects and patients' future perspective (P < 0.05). Conclusion The findings suggest that overall breast cancer patients perceived benefit from their cancer treatment in long-term. However, patients reported problems with global quality of life, pain, arm symptoms and body image even after 18 months following their treatments. In addition, most of the functional scores did not improve. PMID:19014435

  3. Cancer and fertility preservation: fertility preservation in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Maltaris, Theodoros; Weigel, Michael; Mueller, Andreas; Schmidt, Marcus; Seufert, Rudolf; Fischl, Franz; Koelbl, Heinz; Dittrich, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive chemotherapy has improved the life expectancy for reproductive-age women with breast cancer, but it often causes infertility or premature ovarian failure due to destruction of the ovarian reserve. Many questions concerning fertility preservation in breast cancer patients remain unanswered – for example, whether fertility preservation methods interfere with chemotherapy, and whether subsequent pregnancy has negative effects on the prognosis. Fertility preservation is a critical factor in decision-making for younger breast cancer patients, however, and clinicians should address this. The present article reviews the incidence of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea, and discusses fertility-preservation options and the prognosis for patients who become pregnant after breast cancer. PMID:18492214

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. DDT Exposure in Utero and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Krigbaum, Nickilou Y.; Yeh, Gregory; Park, June-Soo; Zimmermann, Lauren; Cirillo, Piera M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Currently no direct evidence links in utero dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure to human breast cancer. However, in utero exposure to another xenoestrogen, diethylstilbestrol, predicts an increased breast cancer risk. If this finding extends to DDT, it could have far-reaching consequences. Many women were heavily exposed in utero during widespread DDT use in the 1960s. They are now reaching the age of heightened breast cancer risk. DDT exposure persists and use continues in Africa and Asia without clear knowledge of the consequences for the next generation. Hypothesis: In utero exposure to DDT is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Design: This was a case-control study nested in a prospective 54-year follow-up of 9300 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort (n = 118 breast cancer cases, diagnosed by age 52 y and 354 controls matched on birth year). Setting and Participants: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members who received obstetric care in Alameda County, California, from 1959 to 1967, and their adult daughters participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure: Daughters' breast cancer diagnosed by age 52 years as of 2012 was measured. Results: Maternal o,p?-DDT predicted daughters' breast cancer (odds ratio fourth quartile vs first = 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5–9.0). Mothers' lipids, weight, race, age, and breast cancer history did not explain the findings. Conclusions: This prospective human study links measured DDT exposure in utero to risk of breast cancer. Experimental studies are essential to confirm results and discover causal mechanisms. Findings support classification of DDT as an endocrine disruptor, a predictor of breast cancer, and a marker of high risk. PMID:26079774

  6. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Spellman, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    evolution underlying  development of asynchronous metastasis in human breast cancer.  cancer (31,111).  These reconstructions may aid  in understanding tumor evolution and Darwinian evolution (2, 3).  In the case  of cancer, the 

  7. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  8. Breast Cancer Research and ISSN 0167-6806

    E-print Network

    1 23 Breast Cancer Research and Treatment ISSN 0167-6806 Breast Cancer Res Treat DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2266-3 Cognitive function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia A. Reuter

  9. Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer Shannon T. Baileya,b,c,1) More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER- breast cancers, which frequently harbor

  10. BCSC Grants: Risk factors for Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    Recently, gene expression profiling has identified molecular subtypes that classify invasive breast cancers into distinct categories that vary in their clinical behavior and response to treatment. These subtypes highlight the many possible biologically and clinically distinct types of breast cancer. With such heterogeneity within breast cancer, we might expect that risk factors influence specific subtypes of breast cancer through different etiologic pathways.

  11. Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

  12. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  13. Breast Total Male Breast Reconstruction with Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kalla, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Cancer of a male breast represents less than 1% of all breast cancer. As with to female patients, mastectomy in men creates a substantial emotional burden. Breast reconstruction may improve the patient’s psychological well-being, compliance with adjuvant treatments, and overall outcome. However, due to the unique anatomy of the male breast, standard reconstructive strategies using anatomic or prosthetic modalities are not entirely applicable. We describe a case of a 68-year-old male patient who underwent successful unilateral breast reconstruction solely with fat grafting technique. PMID:25506540

  14. Effect of Implant vs. Tissue Reconstruction on Cancer Specific Survival Varies by Axillary Lymph Node Status in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qian; Zhu, Liling; Chen, Kai; Su, Fengxi

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) between patients who underwent tissue or implant reconstruction after mastectomy. Method We used the database from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries and compared the BCSS between patients who underwent tissue and implant reconstruction after mastectomy. Cox-regression models were fitted, adjusting for known clinicopathological features. The interaction between the reconstruction types (tissue/implant) and nodal status (N-stage) was investigated. Results A total of 6,426 patients with a median age of 50 years were included. With a median follow up of 100 months, the 10-year cumulative BCSS and non-BCSS were 85.1% and 95.4%, respectively. Patients who underwent tissue reconstruction had tumors with a higher T-stage, N-stage, and tumor grade and tended to be ER/PR-negative compared to those who received implant reconstruction. In univariate analysis, implant-reconstruction was associated with a 2.4% increase (P = 0.003) in the BCSS compared with tissue-reconstruction. After adjusting for significant risk factors of the BCSS (suggested by univariate analysis) and stratifying based on the N-stage, there was only an association between the reconstruction type and the BCSS for the N2-3 patients (10-year BCSS of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction: 68.7% and 59.0%, P = 0.004). The 10-year BCSS rates of implant vs. tissue-reconstruction were 91.7% and 91.8% in N0 patients (P>0.05) and 84.5% and 84.4% in N1 patients (P>0.05), respectively. Conclusions The implant (vs. tissue) reconstruction after mastectomy was associated with an improved BCSS in N2-3 breast cancer patients but not in N0-1 patients. A well-designed, prospective study is needed to further confirm these findings. PMID:25692294

  15. Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsner, Robert James

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous tissue, a portable, inexpensive device was developed as a tool to help physicians visualize expression of surface markers. The system visualizes absorbance from nanoshell aggregates and fluorescence in the visible and near-infrared light spectrum. This study represents the first step in the development of an intraoperative optical imaging device to enhance the visualization of molecular markers overexpressed in cancerous cells.

  16. Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95 % CI 1.06–1.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality, regardless of type of treatment and duration of diabetes, despite the significant association of diabetes with unfavorable tumor characteristics. Our large prospective cohort study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. The increased total mortality associated with diabetes was mainly driven by increased risk of dying from diseases other than breast cancer. Thus, the continuum of care for breast cancer patients with diabetes should include careful attention to CVD risk factors and other non-cancer conditions. PMID:25261292

  17. Breast cancer version 3.2014.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J; Anderson, Benjamin O; Blair, Sarah L; Burstein, Harold J; Cyr, Amy; Elias, Anthony D; Farrar, William B; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J; Hayes, Daniel F; Hudis, Clifford A; Isakoff, Steven J; Ljung, Britt-Marie E; Marcom, P Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A; McCormick, Beryl; Miller, Robert S; Pegram, Mark; Pierce, Lori J; Reed, Elizabeth C; Salerno, Kilian E; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H; Wolff, Antonio C; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. The overall management of breast cancer includes the treatment of local disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, biologic therapy, or combinations of these. The NCCN Guidelines specific to management of large clinical stage II and III tumors are discussed in this article. These guidelines are the work of the members of the NCCN Breast Cancer Panel. Expert medical clinical judgment is required to apply these guidelines in the context of an individual patient to provide optimal care. Although not stated at every decision point of the guidelines, patient participation in prospective clinical trials is the preferred option of treatment for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:24717572

  18. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Purcell, James W

    2011-01-01

    in patients with breast cancer, support the continuedin breast cancer. Our findings support the ongoing clinicalsupport further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryou-u; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Ono, Makiko; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory is generally acknowledged as an important field of cancer research, not only as an academic matter but also as a crucial aspect of clinical practice. CSCs share a variety of biological properties with normal somatic stem cells in self-renewal, the propagation of differentiated progeny, the expression of specific cell markers and stem cell genes, and the utilization of common signaling pathways and the stem cell niche. However, CSCs differ from normal stem cells in their chemoresistance and their tumorigenic and metastatic activities. In this review, we focus on recent reports regarding the identification of CSC markers and the molecular mechanism of CSC phenotypes to understand the basic properties and molecular target of CSCs. In addition, we especially focus on the CSCs of breast cancer since the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can lead to the enrichment of CSCs in patients with that disease. The identification of CSC markers and an improved understanding of the molecular mechanism of CSC phenotypes should lead to progress in cancer therapy and improved prognoses for patients with cancer. PMID:24212663

  20. Analysis of gene expression of secreted factors associated with breast cancer metastases in breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Elana J.; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, having multiple subtypes with different malignant phenotypes. The triple-negative breast cancer, or basal breast cancer, is highly aggressive, metastatic, and difficult to treat. Previously, we identified that key molecules (IL6, CSF2, CCL5, VEGFA, and VEGFC) secreted by tumor cells and stromal cells in basal breast cancer can promote metastasis. It remains to assess whether these molecules function similarly in other subtypes of breast cancer. Here, we characterize the relative gene expression of the five secreted molecules and their associated receptors (GP130, GMRA, GMRB, CCR5, VEGFR2, NRP1, VEGFR3, NRP2) in the basal, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) positive, luminal A, and luminal B subtypes using high throughput data from tumor samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC). IL6 and CCL5 gene expression are basal breast cancer specific, whereas high gene expression of GP130 was observed in luminal A/B. VEGFA/C and CSF2?mRNA are overexpressed in HER2 positive breast cancer, with VEGFA and CSF2 also overexpressed in basal breast cancer. Further study of the specific protein function of these factors within their associated cancer subtypes may yield personalized biomarkers and treatment modalities. PMID:26173622

  1. Using an external soft tissue expander before autologous fat grafting for non-irradiated breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Chiao; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Teng, Shou-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Autologous fat grafting is a method that has been used for breast augmentation since last century. This case report presents a woman with non-irradiated breast requested autologous fat grafting after modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. An external soft tissue expander was used before fat grafting. This innovative technique showed benefits for the patient, with tight skin after the operation. PMID:23829501

  2. Co-existent breast and renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Üreyen, Orhan; Dadal?, Emrah; Akdeniz, F?rat; ?ahin, Tamer; Tekeli, Mehmet Tahsin; Eliyatk?n, Nuket; Postac?, Hakan; ?lhan, Enver

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant presence of breast cancer with one or more other types of cancer such as colon, vulva, lung, larynx, liver, uterus and kidneys has been presented in the literature. However, synchronous breast and renal cancer is very uncommon. Herein we present a woman with synchronous breast and renal cancer, and review the literature. A 77-year-old post-menopausal woman was admitted to our clinic complaining of left sided breast mass. On physical examination, there was a 3 cm palpable mass in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast along with a conglomerate of lymph nodes in the left axilla. Ultrasonography and mammography showed a 3 cm solid, hypoechoic mass in the upper outer quadrant and left axillary lymphadenopathy. The tru-cut biopsy of the lesion revealed invasive ductal carcinoma. The bone scintigraphy, thoracic and cranial computerized tomographies were normal. The abdominal computerized tomography identified a 3×3 cm solid renal mass with heterogeneous contrast enhancement in the posterior segment of the lower pole, which was suspicious for renal cell carcinoma. Breast conserving surgery and axillary lymph node dissection was performed, and the pathology specimen demonstrated invasive ductal carcinoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Three weeks later partial nephrectomy was performed by urology department for the solid renal mass, and the pathology result showed clear cell-renal carcinoma with Fuhrman grade 3. The patient is being followed-up for renal carcinoma, and underwent radiotherapy for breast cancer. Hormonotherapy for breast cancer is still continuing.

  3. CISNET: Mechanistic Modeling of Breast Cancer Surveillance

    Cancer.gov

    The model will be validated with data on breast cancer from the Utah Population Data Base and the Utah Cancer registry. Using these resources we will obtain initial parameter values for a pertinent estimation algorithm designed for grouped data on breast cancer mortality provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. This two-step estimation procedure will be tested by computer simulations and analyses of epidemiological data.

  4. Main controversies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

  5. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  6. A case of long term survival with skeletal only metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuechle, Joseph B.; McGrath, Brian E.; Khoury, Thaer; Mindell, Eugene R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer is very poor. Because of this, treatment of skeletal metastasis is often palliative with limited goals rather than cure. However, there are those patients, such as presented here, who survive for an extended time. Presentation of case This thirty-six year old female presented with lytic lesions to one ulna and rib five years after mastectomy for breast cancer. Despite radiation and chemotherapy, the ulnar lesion expanded and resulted in an elbow dislocation. The rib lesion was resected and the arm amputated above the elbow. She developed local recurrence in both her above elbow amputation stump and chest wall and a more proximal below shoulder amputation was performed with resection of chest wall lesion. Even though she had locally aggressive disease, she has survived for 31 years after diagnosis without any evidence of disease. Discussion Reports of metastatic breast cancer survival indicate the five year survival to be 15%. There have been few reports indicating that those patients with skeletal only or oligometastatic disease have improved prognosis. It is not clear what biological properties of these tumors results in the improved survival. Conclusion This case highlights the challenges of giving patients the optimal treatment in the light of limited ability to predict prognosis. It also highlights the need to further investigate the phenotypes of breast cancer that can, despite metastatic disease and with modern treatment go on to long survival. In addition this case demonstrates the importance of long term followup. PMID:25556998

  7. Predictors of Health Care Use of Women with Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N N; Sitnikova, Kate; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; de Haes, Hanneke C J M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of health care use among women with breast cancer by conducting a systematic review. Potentially relevant studies were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases. Also, backward and forward citation searches were performed. Studies were selected if they addressed associations between (a) sociodemographic, enabling (e.g., income), clinical and health related, or psychosocial predictors, and (b) medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use of adult women with breast cancer. The health care types of interest were hospital utilization and provider visits. An evaluation of aggregated findings was performed to determine consistency of findings between studies. Sixteen studies were included in the review. Higher age, a more advanced cancer stage, more comorbid disorders, having a mastectomy, a lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction were consistently associated with higher hospital utilization. None of the patient characteristics were consistently associated with medical, psychosocial, or paramedical health care use-but psychosocial or paramedical associations were also less examined. In conclusion, sociodemographic, medical, and treatment-related factors were consistently associated with (higher) health care use of breast cancer patients. Practitioners may use this information to anticipate future use of subgroups of patients. Results may also be used in the development of interventions that target relevant predictors, to reduce patients' health care use and accompanying health care costs. Furthermore, more research is needed to identify predictors of psychosocial and paramedical health care use. PMID:26132228

  8. Reoperation rates after breast conserving surgery for breast cancer among women in England: retrospective study of hospital episode statistics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether rate of reoperation after breast conserving surgery is associated with patients’ characteristics and investigate whether reoperation rates vary among English NHS trusts. Design Cohort study using patient level data from hospital episode statistics. Setting English NHS trusts. Participants Adult women who had breast conserving surgery between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2008. Main outcome measure Reoperation rates after primary breast conserving surgery within 3 months, adjusted using logistic regression for tumour type, age, comorbidity, and socioeconomic deprivation. Tumours were grouped by whether a carcinoma in situ component was coded at the time of the primary breast conserving surgery. Results 55?297 women had primary breast conserving surgery in 156 NHS trusts during the three year period. 11?032 (20.0%, 95% confidence interval 19.6% to 20.3%) women had at least one reoperation. 10?212 (18.5%, 18.2% to 18.8%) had one reoperation only; of these, 5943 (10.7%, 10.5% to 11.0%) had another breast conserving procedure and 4269 (7.7%, 7.5% to 7.9%) had a mastectomy. Of the 45?793 women with isolated invasive disease, 8229 (18.0%) had at least one reoperation. In comparison, 2803 (29.5%) of the 9504 women with carcinoma in situ had at least one reoperation (adjusted odds ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 2.0). Substantial differences were found in the adjusted reoperation rates among the NHS trusts (10th and 90th centiles 12.2% and 30.2%). Conclusion: One in five women who had breast conserving surgery in England had a reoperation. Reoperation was nearly twice as likely when the tumour had a carcinoma in situ component coded. Women should be informed of this reoperation risk when deciding on the type of surgical treatment of their breast cancer. PMID:22791786

  9. Psychooncologic Aspects of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neises, Mechthild

    2008-01-01

    Summary Around one third of all patients reveal signs of stress disorder and adaptation difficulties following breast cancer or during the course of the illness, often manifested clinically as fear and depression. Supportive treatment should be made available to all patients in the form of psycho-educative group sessions introducing information and assistance to help overcome the illness. The indication for extensive treatment, e.g. psychotherapy, can be deduced from the somatopsychic disorders presented. Individual or group therapy will be offered to the patient corresponding to her diagnostics and motivation. The aim of therapy should be discussed openly with the patient, that is, an improvement in the quality of life and the possibility to overcome the situation. In general, the various intervention programmes have proved to be beneficial for patients with cancer. These include relaxation therapy and stress management as well as behavioural therapy and supportive psychotherapy. Patients have high expectations of the therapy offered and this should be taken into careful consideration by all physicians, psychologists and others responsible for administering treatment. The aim of this work is mainly to present the clinical experience gained in a breast centre. PMID:20824031

  10. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Skin Necrosis in a Patient with Factor V Leiden Mutation following Nipple Sparing Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Can

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and immediate breast reconstruction have replaced radical surgical interventions for the treatment of selected patients with breast cancer undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. NSM is technically a difficult procedure. After dissection, the remaining breast skin and nipple-areola complex (NAC) must be thin enough to be free of tumor tissue and thick enough to preserve tissue perfusion. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common cause of hereditary thrombophilia; thrombosis almost always develops in the venous system. The literature includes only a few case series of arterial thrombosis. The present study aimed to describe for the first time a patient with Factor V Leiden mutation that developed nipple-areola complex and skin necrosis, and multiple embolisms in the upper extremity arteries following NSM. PMID:26579335

  12. [Identification of the primary lesion in a patient with concomitant breast and kidney cancer following fracture of the femur].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasufumi; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Ishida, Tomo; Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Kusama, Hiroki; Matsusita, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Tadayoshi; Kimura, Kei; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Nitta, Kanae; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Takeno, Atsushi; Sakisaka, Hideki; Nakahira, Shin; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Egawa, Chiyomi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Oku, Kazuko; Goto, Takayoshi; Nagano, Teruaki; Nakatsuka, Shinichi

    2014-11-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with breast cancer [T3N3cM0: Stage IIIC, estrogen receptor [ER] (+), progesterone receptor [PgR] (+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2[HER2] (-)]at the time of initial presentation. Following diagnosis, combined modality therapy including hormone therapy and chemotherapy were initiated, but hemorrhage from the primary lesion and bone metastases were observed. Priority was given to treatment of the breast cancer, and chemotherapy was administered, after which, right mastectomy and axillary lymph node sampling were performed to assess local disease control. In addition, concurrent right kidney enucleation was performed for a renal lesion. The renal neoplasm was diagnosed as T1aN0M0, Stage I. After this intervention, treatment of the breast cancer was continued, but pain of the right femoral region developed, and bone metastasis was diagnosed on close inspection. The bone metastasis was considered to derive from the breast cancer. During hospitalization, the patient fell and broke her right femur. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed immediately, and bone metastasis of kidney cancer was diagnosed via perioperative cytodiagnosis. Pulmonary metastasis, local recurrence, and metastasis to the shoulder blade have been detected. The metastases are considered to derive from the breast cancer, for which treatment has been continued. In the case of concomitant cancers, biopsy for metastatic foci can be considered essential, whenever it can be performed safely. PMID:25731394

  13. Exercise Interventions in Breast Cancer Survivors - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    Earlier studies have shown that women who are overweight at the time of breast cancer diagnosis are twice as likely to experience recurrence and death as lighter women. Additionally, women who gained weight (approximately 5 lbs.) after breast cancer diagnosis had a 60-percent increased risk of death compared to women who did not gain weight.

  14. ?-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the ?-adrenergic receptor (?-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the ?-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of ?-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of ?-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving ?-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of ?-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of ?-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  15. BCSC Grants: Commonly Used Medications and Breast Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and it is the second most common cause of cancer mortality. Breast cancer incidence rates have continued to rise since 1980, while mortality rates have declined. As a result, more women are at risk for breast cancer recurrences. Recurrences have important negative consequences requiring a variety of palliative treatments and often lead to death.

  16. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01

    K. , Breast cancer: origins and evolution. J Clin Invest,evolution of human premalignant breast disease. Endocr Relat Cancer,cancer involves progression through stages, beginning with ductal hyper-proliferation, subsequent evolution

  17. Factors influencing the surgery intentions and choices of women with early breast cancer: the predictive utility of an extended theory of planned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women diagnosed with early breast cancer (stage I or II) can be offered the choice between mastectomy or breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy due to equivalence in survival rates. A wide variation in the surgical management of breast cancer and a lack of theoretically guided research on this issue highlight the need for further research into the factors influencing women’s choices. An extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) could provide a basis to understand and predict women’s surgery choices. The aims of this study were to understand and predict the surgery intentions and choices of women newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, examining the predictive utility of an extended TPB. Methods Sixty-two women recruited from three UK breast clinics participated in the study; 48 women, newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, completed online questionnaires both before their surgery and after accessing an online decision support intervention (BresDex). Questionnaires assessed views about breast cancer and the available treatment options using items designed to measure constructs of an extended TPB (i.e., attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and anticipated regret), and women’s intentions to choose mastectomy or BCS. Objective data were collected on women’s choice of surgery via the clinical breast teams. Multiple and logistic regression analyses examined predictors of surgery intentions and subsequent choice of surgery. Results The extended TPB accounted for 69.9% of the variance in intentions (p <.001); attitudes and subjective norms were significant predictors. Including additional variables revealed anticipated regret to be a more important predictor than subjective norms. Surgery intentions significantly predicted surgery choices (p <.01). Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of an extended TPB in predicting and understanding women’s surgery intentions and choices for early breast cancer. Understanding these factors should help to identify key components of interventions to support women while considering their surgery options. PMID:23962230

  18. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well docosahexaenoic acid works in preventing recurrence in breast cancer survivors. Docosahexaenoic acid supplement may prevent recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

  19. Surgical Procedures for Breast Cancer - Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... UpToDate, Inc. ("UpToDate"), in consideration of the subscription fee and acceptance of this Agreement, grants you a ... or your Institution have agreed to pay subscription fees. At the end of this period, your license ...

  20. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer. PMID:26218769