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1

Too Few Breast Cancer Patients Getting Radiation After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Too Few Breast Cancer Patients Getting Radiation After Mastectomy: Study More than a third with ' ... 17, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mastectomy Radiation Therapy TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many ...

2

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer Skye H. Cheng) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who Using gene expression profiles to develop prediction tree models effectively identifies breast cancer

West, Mike

3

Vanderbilt study finds more breast cancer patients opting for mastectomy  

Cancer.gov

Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows.

4

Breast cancer: post-mastectomy radiotherapy reduces recurrence and mortality.  

PubMed

The recent results of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Cooperative Group meta-analysis have demonstrated that post-mastectomy radiotherapy reduces breast cancer recurrence and mortality in women with positive axillary lymph nodes—independently from the number of the lymph nodes involved—with no significant effect in patients with node-negative axillary status. PMID:24889766

Orecchia, Roberto

2014-07-01

5

Comparison Of Mastectomy With Tamoxifen For Treating Elderly Patients With Operable Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective—Comparison of tamoxifen and mastectomy in treatment of breast cancer in elderly patients. Design—Randomised trial of treatment of operable breast cancer by wedge mastectomy or tamoxifen, with median follow up 24 and 25 months respectively (range 1-63). Setting—University hospital; most patients from primary catchment area. Patients—135 consecutive patients with breast cancer aged over 70 with operable tumours (<5 cm

J. F. R. Robertson; J. H. Todd; I. O. Ellis; C. W. Elston; R. W. Blamey

1988-01-01

6

Prognostic outcome of local recurrence in breast cancer after conserving surgery and mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. In our retrospective study we analysed local recurrences in breast cancer patients treated with conserving surgery (CS) followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or mastectomy (ME) with or without ra- diotherapy. We analysed the impact of local recurrence on overall survival. Patients and methods. Between 1980-1995, 306 patients underwent conserving surgery and 1,193 pa- tients were done mastectomy in Masaryk

Renata Soumarová; Hana Horová; Ivana Horová; Marie Budíková

2003-01-01

7

Researchers find that Angelina Jolie's preventive mastectomy raised awareness, but not knowledge of breast cancer risk  

Cancer.gov

Angelina Jolie heightened awareness about breast cancer when she announced in May 2013 that she had undergone a preventive double mastectomy, but a new study by the University of Maryland School of Public Health reveals that despite widespread awareness of Jolie's story, most Americans could not correctly answer questions about breast cancer risk.

8

"Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

2011-01-01

9

Penn researchers find contralateral prophylactic mastectomy offers limited gains to life expectancy for breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), a procedure that removes the unaffected breast in patients with cancer in one breast, provides only a modest increase in life expectancy, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

10

Surgical Procedures for Breast Cancer - Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Therapy (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... complications can occur, including bleeding, collection of fluid, wound infection, and arm problems. (See "Patient information: Lymphedema after cancer surgery (Beyond the Basics)" .) Radiation therapy after mastectomy — Radiation ...

11

Univ. of Md. study reports young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival with breast-conservation therapy as mastectomy:  

Cancer.gov

Young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates with a lumpectomy and radiation treatment, known as breast-conservation therapy, as with mastectomy, a new study conducted at the University of Maryland has found.

12

Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available\\u000a studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study\\u000a was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This\\u000a randomized

Xiao-Mei Li; Hong Yan; Kai-Na Zhou; Shao-Nong Dang; Duo-Lao Wang; Yin-Ping Zhang

2011-01-01

13

Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords “contralateral breast cancer” and “contralateral prophylactic mastectomy”. These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

2015-01-01

14

Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: usama.mahmood@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-08-01

15

Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer are removed. This is also called breast conservation therapy or partial mastectomy. Most of your breast ... had the disease, especially at an early age. Genetic tests (such as BRCA1 or BRCA2) may help ...

16

Weekly Paclitaxel Combined with Local Hyperthermia in the Therapy of Breast Cancer Locally Recurrent after Mastectomy – a Pilot Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryBackground: The combination of chemotherapy and hyperthermia (HT) is a promising approach in the treatment of malignant tumors. In the present report we evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of weekly paclitaxel combined with local hyperthermia in breast cancer. Patients and Methods: 7 patients were treated for inoperable local recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy, irradiation, and chemotherapy

Z. Zoul; S. Filip; B. Melichar; J. Petera

2004-01-01

17

Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: 15-year experience.  

PubMed

Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy (SNSM) and primary reconstruction have been popular for breast cancer treatment in the last decade. An advantage of the SNSM technique is the removal of all breast tissue as a radical surgical procedure while preserving native breast integrity, nipple-areola complex (NAC), and submammary fold. This retrospective 15-year clinical study analyzes medical records from our breast surgery database collected at our department between 1997 and 2012. A total number of 3757 patients were treated for breast cancer; 411 (10.9%) patients had a skin-sparing mastectomy with the median (range) length follow-up of 63 months. This is the longest follow-up for SNSM in breast cancer patients; 3.7% of patients who underwent SNSM developed disease local recurrence, whereas occult NAC involvement with cancer occurred in 7.7% and local recurrence in the NAC in 1.2%. Partial necrosis of the NAC developed in 9.4% and total necrosis in 0.7% of operated breasts. All disease recurrences occurred in the first 10 years of the follow-up period. Local recurrence developed as first recurrence event has longer median cancer-specific survival time of 70 months than those with only distant metastases with 50 months and locoregional plus distant metastases with 35.5 months. The "Omega" pattern incision combines an oncological radical procedure with a lower incidence of skin flap necrosis. Patients reconstructed with autologous tissue were the group most satisfied. SNSM is an oncological safe procedure for breast cancer treatment with low recurrence in properly selected patients. PMID:24378808

Stanec, Zdenko; Žic, Rado; Budi, Sre?ko; Stanec, Sanda; Milanovi?, Rudolf; Vlaj?i?, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Rudman, Franjo; Marti?, Krešimir; Held, Rebeka; Božo, Gorjanc

2014-11-01

18

The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

Deutsch, Melvin [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)], E-mail: deutschm@upmc.edu; Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2008-03-15

19

[The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].  

PubMed

In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain. PMID:25275850

López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

2014-01-01

20

Two Cases of Mastectomy after Paclitaxel + Bevacizumab Therapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) deteriorates the quality of life (QOL) of the affected patients. Combination chemotherapy or extended chemotherapy is considered to help to shrink local lesions. Case 1 A 71-year-old female with a history of tympanitis and cystitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) visited our hospital. There was a tumor of 7 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy was started, and after five cycles of therapy, a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Chemotherapy with anthracycline was avoided for fear of activating the MRSA. After the operation, the patient's wound opened. However, it naturally epithelialized. Case 2 A 41-year-old female visited our hospital due to a tumor of 8 cm in diameter in her right breast with skin ulceration. Four cycles of paclitaxel + bevacizumab therapy were started, and her tumor almost disappeared during the first cycle. Then, doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide therapy was performed for four cycles, and a mastectomy with axillary dissection was performed. Her postoperative course was good. Discussion Chemotherapy with bevacizumab or extended chemotherapy is generally not considered to contribute to a survival improvement. However, such therapy contributes in increasing the response to chemotherapy, and should be considered for patients with LABC to shrink the local lesions and improve the QOL. PMID:24932175

Shinoda, Chika; Mori, Ryutaro; Nagao, Yasuko

2014-01-01

21

[A case of chest wall recurrence after mastectomy for breast cancer that showed response to chemotherapy].  

PubMed

We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer( T2N1cM0) 7 years previously. She had been experiencing chest pain for 1 year. Ultrasonography( US) showed a low echoic mass, 1 cm in diameter, near the rib in the right breast (class 5).Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography( PET)-computed tomography( CT) scans revealed an 8-cm wide, segmentally enhancing soft tissue lesion and enhanced lymph nodes at the right edge of the sternum. Under the diagnosis of local recurrence, the patient received chemotherapy consisting of adriamycin and cyclophosphamide( AC) and docetaxel. Definite improvement in chest wall metastasis was observed following this treatment. By changing the treatment to endocrine therapy, the disease has been effectively controlled. PMID:24394118

Hasegawa, Kumi; Matsui, Toshihiro; Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Jun; Maejima, Shizuaki

2013-11-01

22

Five-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing total mastectomy and segmental mastectomy with or without radiation in the treatment of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1976 the authors began a randomized trial to evaluate breast conservation by a segmental mastectomy in the treatment of State I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm in size. The operation removes only sufficient tissue to ensure that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. Women were randomly assigned to total mastectomy, segmental

Bernard Fisher; Madeline Bauer; Richard Margolese; Roger Poisson; Yosef Pilch; Carol Redmond; Edwin Fisher; Norman Wolmark; Melvin Deutsch; Eleanor Montague; Elizabeth Saffer; Lawrence Wickerham; Harvey Lerner; Andrew Glass; Henry Shibata; Peter Deckers; Alfred Ketcham; Robert Oishi; Ian Russell

1985-01-01

23

Hypofractionation in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients: seven-year follow-up.  

PubMed

To compare three fractionation schedules in post-mastectomy patients treated with radiotherapy as regard acute and early late effects as well as local recurrence rates. One hundred and seven breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy±adjuvant systemic treatments between November 2001 and July 2004 were enrolled in this study. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group A (41 patients) received conventional fractionation 50 Gy over 25 fractions. Group B (36 patients) received other fractionation regimen 45 Gy over 17 fractions. Group C (30 patients) received 40 Gy over 15 fractions. The median follow-up period was 23 months. There has been no statistical significant difference in local control (P=0.88), pain (P=0.98), telangectasis (P=0.23), fibrosis (P=0.13), arm oedema (P=0.96) or pigmentation (P=0.80) between the three groups. GII-III Erythema was significantly higher in the two hypofractionation arms compared to the control arm (P=0.001). Although acute skin reactions were higher in the hypofractionated arms, there was no significant difference in the local recurrence rates or late radiation effects. A national randomized multicentre study is recommended to explore this further. PMID:22354766

Eldeeb, Hany; Awad, Iman; Elhanafy, Osman

2012-12-01

24

Breast cancer subpopulation with high risk of internal mammary lymph nodes metastasis: analysis of 2,269 Chinese breast cancer patients treated with extended radical mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The selective treatment of internal mammary lymph nodes (IMNs) in breast cancer is controversial. The purpose of this research\\u000a was to determine the subpopulation patients with high risk of internal mammary lymph nodes metastasis who received extended\\u000a radical mastectomy without any preoperative treatment from 1956 to 2003 in China.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  1,679 Chinese patients were underwent extended radical mastectomy (ERM)

Ou Huang; Liping Wang; Kunwei Shen; Hong Lin; Zhen Hu; Guangyu Liu; Jiong Wu; Jinsong Lu; Zhiming Shao; Qixia Han; Zhenzhou Shen

2008-01-01

25

The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. METHODS: Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis

Farkhondeh Sharif; Narjes Abshorshori; Sedigheh Tahmasebi; Maryam Hazrati; Najaf Zare; Sarah Masoumi

2010-01-01

26

Local Recurrence of Breast Cancer 52 Years after Halsted Mastectomy: Is There a Role for More Aggressive Ipsilateral Surveillance?  

PubMed Central

We present the longest reported case of breast cancer recurrence, 52 years after initial diagnosis, in a patient initially treated with Halsted mastectomy. Observation and palpation of the chest wall resulted in late presentation, and this patient went on to demonstrate metastatic disease. Current surveillance guidelines lack specific recommendations regarding monitoring of the ipsilateral chest wall. In addition, the growing utilization of breast reconstruction poses an additional challenge to surveillance strategies of the ipsilateral breast. However, the emergence of MRI may present a new opportunity to identify ipsilateral recurrence. The changing landscape of breast cancer therapy warrants guidance from groups of national import such as ASCO, in the surveillance of breast cancer patients. PMID:22606439

Agarwal, Shailesh; Nelson, Edward W.; Agarwal, Jayant P.

2011-01-01

27

The evolution of mastectomies in the oncoplastic breast surgery era  

PubMed Central

Over time, surgical techniques have advanced to the point where oncological safety and aesthetic outcomes are the pillars of contemporary breast surgery. Variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nowadays the association between plastic surgical techniques and mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer and also improved overall aesthetic outcomes and favors the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. “Oncoplastic mastectomy” is a feasible term and can be routinely used. PMID:25083466

Manconi, Andrea; da Costa Viera, Rene Aloísio; Michelli, Rodrigo Augusto Depieri; Matthes, Angelo do Carmo Silva

2013-01-01

28

Clinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 3. Mastectomy or lumpectomy? The choice of operation for clinical stages I and II breast cancer (2002 update)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assist women and their physicians in making the most clinically effective and personally acceptable decision regarding the choice of primary surgery for potentially curable breast cancer. Options: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS; also referred to as lumpectomy or wide local excision) or mastectomy. Outcomes: Local recurrence, disease-free survival, overall survival, cosmetic results. Evidence: Systematic computerized search of MEDLINE (1980 to

Hugh Scarth; Jacques Cantin; Mark Levine

2002-01-01

29

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

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30

Long-Term Results of a Randomized Trial Comparing Breast-Conserving Therapy With Mastectomy: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 10801 Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) has been shown to be as effective as mastectomy in the treatment of tumors 2 cm or smaller. However, evidence of its efficacy, over the long term, in patients with tumors larger than 2 cm is limited. From May 1980 to May 1986, the European Or- ganization for Research and Treatment of Cancer carried out a

Joop A. van Dongen; Adri C. Voogd; Ian S. Fentiman; Catherine Legrand; Richard J. Sylvester; David Tong; Emmanuel van der Schueren; Peter A. Helle; Kobus van Zijl; Harry Bartelink

2000-01-01

31

EFFECT OF POSTMASTECTOMY RADIOTHERAPY IN PATIENTS <35 YEARS OLD WITH STAGE II–III BREAST CANCER TREATED WITH DOXORUBICIN-BASED NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY AND MASTECTOMY  

PubMed Central

Purpose Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II–III breast cancer. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA–IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy. PMID:17855016

Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

32

Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

2012-01-01

33

The impact of isolated tumor cells on loco-regional recurrence in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving treatment or mastectomy without post-mastectomy radiation therapy.  

PubMed

To compare the outcome of patients with invasive breast cancer, who had isolated tumor cells (ITC) in sentinel lymph nodes, pN0(i+), to patients with histologically negative nodes, pN0. We retrospectively studied 1,273 patients diagnosed with T1-T3 breast cancer from 1999 to 2009. Patients were divided into 2 populations: 807 patients treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT), 85(10.5 %) with pN0(i+) and 722(89.5 %) with pN0. And the other population had 466 patients treated with mastectomy without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), 80(17.2 %) with pN0(i+),and 386(82.8 %)with pN0. All patients underwent sentinel node biopsy, and the presence of ITC was determined. Patients with axillary dissection only or neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. Among the 1,273 patients studied; 87.3 % received adjuvant systemic therapy. Kaplan-Meier, Cox regression, and log-rank statistical tests were used. Median patient age was 55.7 years. Median follow-up was 69.5 months. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidence of Loco-regional recurrence (LRR) for patients treated with BCS and RT was 1.6 and 3.5 % for 85 pN0(i+) patients, and 2.4 and 5 % for 722 pN0 patients, respectively. For patients treated with mastectomy without PMRT, 5- and 10-year LRR rates were 2.8 and 2.8 % for 80 pN0(i+) patients, and 1.8 and 3 % for 386 pN0 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in LRR (p = 0.9), distant recurrence (p = 0.3) ,and overall survival (p = 0.5) among all groups. On multivariate analysis, ITC were not associated with increased risk of LRR, distant recurrence and overall survival. Grade (p = 0.003) and systemic therapy (p = 0.02) were statistically significantly associated with risk of LRR. Sentinel node ITC have no significant impact on LRR, distant recurrence and overall survival in breast cancer patients. Additional treatments such as axillary dissection, chemotherapy, or regional radiation should not be given solely based on the presence of sentinel node ITC. PMID:24952906

Keruakous, Amany R; Sadek, Betro T; Shenouda, Mina N; Niemierko, Andrzej; Abi Raad, Rita F; Specht, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L; Taghian, Alphonse G

2014-07-01

34

The effect of peer-led education on the life quality of mastectomy patients referred to breast cancer-clinics in Shiraz, Iran 2009  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer among women is a relatively common with a more favorable expected survival rates than other forms of cancers. This study aimed to determine the improved quality of life for post-mastectomy women through peer education. Methods Using pre and post test follow up and control design approach, 99 women with stage I and II of breast cancer diagnosis were followed one year after modified radical mastectomy. To measure the quality of life an instrument designed by the European organization for research and treatment of cancer, known as the Quality of Life Question (QLQ-30) and it's breast cancer supplementary measure (QLQ-BR23) at three points in time (before, immediately and two months after intervention) for both groups were used. The participant selection was a convenient sampling method and women were randomly assigned into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group was randomly assigned to five groups and peer educators conducted weekly educational programs for one month. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi square, t test, and repeated measurement multivariate to compare the quality of life differences over time. Results For the experimental group, the results showed statistically significant improvement in all performance aspects of life quality and symptom reduction (P < 0.001), while the control group had no significant differences in all aspects of life quality. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that peer led education is a useful intervention for post-mastectomy women to improves their quality of life. PMID:20653966

2010-01-01

35

The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series  

SciTech Connect

Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

Yu, Edward, E-mail: edward.yu@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Suzuki, Hiromichi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Younus, Jawaid [Department of Medical Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Elfiki, Tarek [Department of Medical Oncology, Windsor Regional Cancer Centre, Windsor, Ontario (Canada); Stitt, Larry [Epidemiology Biostatistics, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Center, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

2012-02-01

36

Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Perin, Tiziana [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Quitadamo, Daniela [Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Massarut, Samuele [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Carbone, Antonino [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

2012-06-01

37

Value of an intraoperative real time tissue perfusion assessment system following a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy for advanced breast cancer?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Standard surgical approach for advanced breast cancer is a modified radical mastectomy with a periareolar elliptical incision. Here a unique surgical approach is presented utilizing intraoperative real time tissue perfusion technology. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 65-year old African American female was diagnosed with grade 3 papillary carcinoma on biopsy of a palpable 3.7 cm left breast mass at 12 o’clock position. Pathology showed a T2N0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, triple negative disease, with clear margins. Patient opted for naturopathic treatment. Six months later, cancer recurred at the local site; the patient persisted with natural remedies. Nine months later, the mass had progressed to 14.5 cm with smaller adjacent nodules and nodular thickening of breast with no metastatic disease. Patient received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Ten months later, patient underwent a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy given the persistent pectoral muscle involvement of this mass. DISCUSSION An elliptical incision was made in the superior aspect of the breast wall at least 6 cm above the areola. After tumor removal, the skin edges were approximated. It was decided preoperatively to use the SPY Elite™ system to assess perfusion of the flap edges. Angiography with indocyanine green showed poor perfusion of the inferior flap and an additional 2 cm of skin was resected. Final pathology showed that all margins were clear of disease and patient recovered well from surgery. CONCLUSION This case study shows that an individualized approach resulted in an optimal outcome for the patient. The infrequent procedure of a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy was done in coordination with SPY Elite™ to achieve good wound healing. PMID:24394860

Popiel, Brenten; Gupta, Digant; Misra, Subhasis

2013-01-01

38

Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

Nagar, Himanshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mittendorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, Tse-Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-11-01

39

Georgetown researchers examine nipple sparing mastectomy cases and find no recurrent or new cancers:  

Cancer.gov

A new study suggests some women needing a lumpectomy or mastectomy to treat their breast cancer have another potential option that is safe and effective, say researchers at Georgetown. They say the procedure known as a nipple sparing mastectomy is also a viable surgical option for women who choose to have their breasts removed because of their increased risk of developing the disease.

40

Stanford researchers find that breast cancer patients with bilateral mastectomy don’t have better survival rates  

Cancer.gov

The first-ever direct comparison of breast cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy.

41

Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Wang Rui [Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Macdonald, Shannon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Smith, Barbara [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2011-11-01

42

Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

Wang Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2011-07-15

43

The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Lin, Hui-Yi [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chuong, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Acs, Geza [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

2013-03-01

44

Present-Day Locoregional Control in Patients with T1 or T2 Breast Cancer with 0 and 1 to 3 Positive Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy Without Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Background We sought to determine present-day loco-regional recurrence (LRR) rates to better understand the role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in women with 0 to 3 positive lymph nodes. Methods Clinical and pathologic factors were identified for 1019 patients with pT1 or pT2 tumors and 0 (n = 753), 1 (n = 176), 2 (n = 69), or 3 (n = 21) positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy without PMRT during 1997 to 2002. Total LRR rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared between subgroups by the log rank test. Results After a median follow-up of 7.47 years, the overall 10-year LRR rate was 2.7%. The only independent predictor of LRR was younger age (P = 0.004). Patients ?40 years old had a 10-year LRR rate of 11.3 vs. 1.5% for older patients (P < 0.0001). The 10-year rate of LRR in patients with 1 to 3 positive nodes was 4.3% (94.4% had systemic therapy), which was not significantly different from the 10-year risk of contralateral breast cancer development (6.5%; P > 0.5). Compared with the 10-year LRR rate among patients with node-negative disease (2.1%), patients with 1 positive node had a similar 10-year LRR risk (3.3%; P > 0.5), and patients with 2 positive nodes had a 10-year LRR risk of 7.9% (P = 0.0003). Patients with T2 tumors with 1 to 3 positive nodes had a 10-year LRR rate of 9.7%. Conclusions In patients with T1 and T2 breast cancer with 0 to 3 positive nodes, LRR rates after mastectomy are low, with the exception of patients ?40 years old. The indications for PMRT in patients treated in the current era should be reexamined. PMID:20443145

Sharma, Ranjna; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Lucci, Anthony; Hwang, Rosa F.; Rourke, Loren L.; Qiao, Wei; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Babiera, Gildy V.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Kuerer, Henry M.

2015-01-01

45

Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER?/PR?/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER?/PR?/HER 2?, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice.

Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-01-01

46

Improved overall survival after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a history of unilateral breast cancer: a prospective analysis.  

PubMed

Data on survival of BRCA1/2-associated primary breast cancer (PBC) patients who opt for subsequent contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are scarce and inconsistent. We examined the efficacy of CRRM on overall survival in mutation carriers with a history of PBC. From a Dutch multicentre cohort, we selected 583 BRCA-associated PBC patients, being diagnosed between 1980 and 2011. Over time, 242 patients (42%) underwent CRRM and 341 patients (58%) remained under surveillance. Survival analyses were performed using Cox models, with CRRM as a time-dependent covariate. The median follow-up after PBC diagnosis was 11.4 years. In the CRRM group, four patients developed contralateral breast cancer (2%), against 64 patients (19%) in the surveillance group (p?

Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Bernadette A M; Rookus, Matti A; Aalfs, Cora M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Collée, Johanna M; Jansen, Liesbeth; Kets, C Marleen; Keymeulen, Kristien B M I; Koppert, Linetta B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Mooij, Thea M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Vasen, Hans F A; Hooning, Maartje J; Seynaeve, Caroline

2015-02-01

47

Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01

48

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

49

Breast Reconstruction after a Bilateral Mastectomy Using the BRAVA Expansion System and Fat Grafting  

PubMed Central

Summary: Fat graft breast reconstruction following a mastectomy is always limited by the size of the skin envelope, which affects the amount of graft that can be injected in 1 session. Because the fat graft naturally resorbs in all patients, several sessions of fat grafting are necessary. BRAVA’s negative pressure causes a “reverse” expansion of the skin envelope, thus permitting more space for the fat graft. This allows decreasing number of required procedures for an adequate breast reconstruction. We operated on a 38-year-old patient 4 years after bilateral mastectomy without irradiation for breast cancer. Before the procedure, the patient was instructed to wear the BRAVA system for 12 hours daily for 2 months before the first session, at all times between the sessions and for 1 month following the last fat grafting session. We performed 3 fat grafting sessions, as planned. Altogether, we injected 840 cm3 of fat on the right side and 790?cm3 of fat on the left side. Four months after the last operation, the patient was very satisfied with her new breasts. The breasts were soft, with good sensation and a natural feel. Using the BRAVA external expansion system for the enhancement of fat grafting is a suitable technique for breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. This technique produces soft and natural feeling breasts in fewer operative sessions, with a minimal risk of complications. Patient compliance, however, is greatly needed to achieve the desired results. PMID:25289266

Mestak, Jan; Bohac, Martin; Edriss, Ahmed; Sukop, Andrej

2013-01-01

50

Male breast cancer in a young patient treated with nipple-sparing mastectomy: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Male breast carcinoma is an uncommon phenomenon, accounting for less than 1% of all malignancies of the breast. The approximate annual incidence in Europe is 1 in 100,000 cases. The highest incidence occurs 5-10 years later in men than in women, with a peak at 60 to 67 years of age. We here describe a case of male breast carcinoma in a young patient (44 years of age), which is quite unusual in the pattern of breast carcinoma presentation. PMID:17455885

Luini, Alberto; Gatti, Giovanna; Brenelli, Fabricio; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Ivaldi, Giovanni; Vento, Anna Rita; Gentilini, Oreste

2007-01-01

51

Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy.  

PubMed

To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50Gy/25Fx/5W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V30 of the ipsilateral lung and V10, V30, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and V5 of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region. PMID:24503002

Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-Ding; Zhao, Yu-Tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

2014-01-01

52

Do Women with Breast Cancer Overestimate Their Risk for Cancer in the Unaffected Breast?  

MedlinePLUS

... the Unaffected Breast? The full report is titled “Perceptions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction With Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among ... included questions related to decision making, knowledge, risk perception, and breast cancer worry. What did the researchers ...

53

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

54

Extreme Oncoplasty: Breast Conservation for Patients Who Need Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

2015-01-01

55

Extreme oncoplasty: breast conservation for patients who need mastectomy.  

PubMed

Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

2015-01-01

56

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ... liver, or elsewhere. Continue Why Do People Get Breast Cancer? Any woman can get breast cancer, but doctors ...

57

Breast reconstruction after mastectomy among Department of Defense beneficiaries by race  

PubMed Central

Background Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction increased approximately 20% between 1998 and 2008 in the United States and has been found to improve body image, self-esteem and quality of life. These procedures, however, tend to be less common among minority women, which may be due to variations in healthcare access. The Department of Defense (DoD) provides equal healthcare access, thereby affording an exceptional environment to assess whether racial variations persist when access to care is equal. Methods Linked DoD cancer registry and medical claims data were used. The receipt of reconstruction was compared between white (n=2,974) and black women (n=708) who underwent mastectomies to treat incident, histologically-confirmed, breast cancer diagnosed from 1998 to 2007. Results During the study period, post-mastectomy reconstruction increased among both black (27.3% to 40.0%) and white (21.8% to 40.6%) female breast cancer patients. Receipt of reconstruction did not vary significantly by race (odds ratio: 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.76-1.15). Reconstruction decreased significantly with increasing age, tumor stage and receipt of radiotherapy and was significantly more common in more recent years, among active servicewomen, Tricare Prime (HMO) beneficiaries and women whose sponsor was an officer. Conclusion The receipt of reconstruction did not vary by race within this equal access health system, indicating that the racial disparities reported in previous studies may have partially been due to variations in healthcare access. Additional research to determine why a large proportion of breast cancer patients do not undergo reconstruction might be beneficial, particularly because these procedures have been associated with non-cosmetic benefits. PMID:24965236

Enewold, Lindsey; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Zahm, Shelia H.; Poudrier, Jill; Anderson, William; Shriver, Craig D.; Zhu, Kangmin

2014-01-01

58

Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

1985-02-01

59

Aesthetic Design of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy Incisions for Immediate Autologous Tissue Breast Reconstruction in Asian Women  

PubMed Central

Background The advent of skin-sparing mastectomy has allowed for the reconstruction of the breast and nipple with improved cosmesis. However, the nipple-areolar complex (NAC) in Asian patients is more pigmented and scars easily. Therefore, commonly described incisions tend to result in poor aesthetic outcomes in Asian patients with breast cancer. Methods We describe an algorithmic approach to skin-sparing mastectomy incisions in Asian patients on the basis of the location of the biopsy scar and the tumor site and size. Four incision types are described: peri-areolar, a peri-areolar incision with a second distant skin paddle, "racquet handle," and peri-areolar with adjacent skin excision. Results 281 immediate breast reconstructions were performed between May 2001 and February 2012 after skin-sparing mastectomy. The mastectomy incisions used included the peri-areolar design (n=124, 44%), peri-areolar design with a second distant skin paddle (n=39, 14%), "racquet handle" (n=21, 7.5%), and peri-areolar design with adjacent skin excision (n=42, 14%). The traditional elliptical incision and other variants where the NAC outline was not preserved were performed in the remaining 55 patients. The average follow-up was 44.7 months during which there was 1 case of total flap loss and 7 cases of partial flap necrosis; all remaining flaps survived. 24% of the patients (68/281) underwent subsequent nipple reconstruction. Conclusions Our algorithm avoids breast incisions that are randomly placed or excessively long and prevents the unnecessary sacrifice of normal breast skin. This allows skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction to be performed with a consistently achievable aesthetic result in Asian women without neglecting oncological safety. PMID:25075359

Chim, Harvey; Ng, Zhi Yang; Ong, Kong Wee

2014-01-01

60

Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

Yang, P.S., E-mail: psyang@kfsyscc.or [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, C.F. [Department of Research, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, B.L. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y. [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, C.W. [Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-01

61

Salvage mastectomy after failed breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast.  

PubMed Central

The indications, technique and complications of salvage mastectomy in 25 patients with local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast have been reviewed. Two patients required myocutaneous flaps to repair the defect, and six patients (24%) suffered wound infection or breakdown. Subsequent local relapse occurred in a total of five patients, two of whom died with uncontrolled chest wall skin nodules. PMID:2018316

Barr, L. C.; Brunt, A. M.; Phillips, R. H.; Ellis, H.

1991-01-01

62

Breast Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer ...

63

Breast cancer radiotherapy and cardiac risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women in the developed world and its incidence in the developing\\u000a world is on the rise. Management of breast cancer requires a multimodality approach and an integration of the services of\\u000a surgery, radiation, and medical oncology. Radiotherapy after mastectomy or breast conservation leads to reduction in local\\u000a recurrence by

Anusheel Munshi; Kaustav Talapatra; Debanarayan Dutta

2010-01-01

64

Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

Dai Kubicky, Charlotte, E-mail: charlottedai@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)] [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

2013-04-01

65

What Is Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts ... The remainder of this document refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in ...

66

Breast-conserving surgery in breast cancer.  

PubMed

The breast cancer treatment is based nowadays on new surgical options: breast-conserving surgery, which applies at least for the first and second stage cancer, with radical intention. We have been practicing breast-conserving surgery for the last 16 years and we have performed 303 breast conserving operations from a total of 673. We recorded 12 local recurrences (3,96%) and 2 deaths due to cancer progression. Our protocol includes removal of the primary tumor with enough surrounding tissue to ensure negative margins of the resectable specimen, associated with axillary lymph-node dissection and postoperative breast irradiation. Our oncologist indicated chemotherapy on different postoperative conditions: tumor size, axillary lymph node involvement, patient's age, etc. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize our modest experience, nevertheless to draw the attention on important results, obtained by long-term monitoring of the patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, in a two prospective protocols, and demonstrate the importance and applicability of breast conserving therapy. The conclusion of this study is that breast-conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation is reliable, as the results are similar with radical mastectomies; the main objective is to obtain a good cosmetic result, which depends on tumor size / breast size. PMID:23116836

Tenea Cojan, T S; Vidrighin, C D; Ciobanu, M; Paun, I; Teodorescu, M; Mogos, G; Tenovici, M; Florescu, M; Mogos, D

2012-01-01

67

Surgery for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... side effects of breast surgery Aside from pain after the surgery and the change in the shape of the breast(s), the possible side effects of mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery include wound infection, build-up of blood in the wound, and ...

68

The safety parameters of the study on intraductal cytotoxic agent delivery to the breast before mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Background Intraductal administration of cytotoxic agents has been shown to inhibit the development of breast cancer in animal models. The object of this study was to demonstrate the safety of intraductal delivery cytotoxic agents in patients prior to mastectomy. This method is hopeful to be developed as a chemoprevention approach in patients with pre-malignant or non-invasive ductal lesions to prevent breast cancer which will be further developed. Methods Two drugs, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and carboplatin were administered at three dose levels (PLD: 10, 20, 50 mg and carboplatin 60, 120, 300 mg). There were five subjects in each group with 15 subjects treated with each drug once. Venous blood samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. The breast was removed surgically 2-5 days post administration and the treated ducts were marked to enable identification on pathological evaluation. Results Intraductal administration was generally well-tolerated with mild, transient breast discomfort. In the carboplatin arm, three women at the 300 mg dose experienced mild nausea and vomiting. In the PLD arm most women had mild erythema and swelling of the breast over the 72 hours following the drug administration. Patients receiving the 50 mg dose experienced local erythema until the time of surgery. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that carboplatin rapidly entered systemic circulation with an early peak time (Tmax ~30 min) with a corresponding plasma ultrafiltrate area under the curve (AUC) consistent with the Calvert Formula using estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Total plasma doxorubicin had delayed peak concentration times (Tmax >48 hours) with a linear dose response and peak concentrations substantially lower than expected from equivalent intravenous injection dosing. No doxorubicinol metabolite was detected in the plasma. Conclusions This study demonstrates that cytotoxic drugs can be safely administered into breast ducts with minimal toxicity. PMID:25400424

Zhang, Bailin; Love, Susan M.; Chen, Guoji; Wang, Jing; Gao, Jidong; Xu, Xiaozhou; Wang, Zhongzhao

2014-01-01

69

Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

Coulombe, Genevieve [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca; Speers, Caroline B.A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), Vancouver, BC (Canada); Aquino-Parsons, Christina [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bernstein, Vanessa [Systemic Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Truong, Pauline T. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Keyes, Mira [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2007-04-01

70

The role of radiotherapy in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma of the breast.  

PubMed

Several factors, including T stage, nodal involvement, grade, the presence of lymphovascular invasion, and possibly involved or close surgical margins, have been found to affect local recurrence after mastectomy. The majority of recurrences will occur in the first 5 years and 50% of patients will have metastatic disease at the time of recurrence. Early studies on the use of adjuvant radiotherapy are difficult to interpret owing to poor radiotherapy techniques, inadequate dose or a variety of confounding variables within a particular trial. More recent reports have confirmed that adjuvant radiotherapy will reduce the risk of local recurrence and in tumours of <5 cm with involved nodes, produce a reduction in breast cancer deaths. Improvements in breast cancer mortality may however be counterbalanced by increases in cardiac events and deaths caused by second malignancies. This stresses the importance of using megavoltage irradiation and avoiding excess cardiac doses particularly when treating left-sided tumours. Adjuvant radiotherapy combined with tamoxifen has been shown to produce an improvement in both local control and survival in postmenopausal node-positive patients who have undergone mastectomy. Adjuvant radiation combined with systemic chemotherapy has a significant effect on local recurrence and probably on survival in node-positive patients after mastectomy. There is little controversy over its role in patients with tumours >5 cm, with more than four nodes involved or with one to three nodes with extracapsular extension, or in those in whom axillary surgery has been deemed inadequate (i.e. <10 nodes). Debate still exists concerning T1/T2, G1/G2 tumours with only one to three nodes involved when the axillary surgery has been satisfactory (>10 nodes). The ongoing Intergroup trial may answer this question but until then other factors such as tumour grade and the presence of lymphovascular invasion can be included in the equation to determine which of the patients in the latter group should receive postoperative radiotherapy. Controversy still exists about what fields should be irradiated and in particular whether the supraclavicular fossa and internal mammary node chain should be included in adjuvant therapy. The EORTC is presently conducting a randomized trial, which should give us the answer. Treatment at relapse on the chest wall may require a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, depending on previous therapy. If radiotherapy has not previously been used, then wide-field irradiation should be administered, including both chest wall and supraclavicular fossa with or without the axilla, depending on the extent of previous axillary surgery and the risk of lymphoedema. Re-irradiation after radical adjuvant radiotherapy can be considered only for selected patients when an adequate discussion with them has taken place with regard to the relative benefits versus toxicity. PMID:10942332

Fernando, I N

2000-01-01

71

6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

72

Learning about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

73

Doing more: trends in breast cancer surgery, 2005 to 2011.  

PubMed

An increasing number of women may be choosing mastectomy over breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer as well as undergoing more bilateral resection, immediate reconstruction, and prophylactic operations. Women who had breast cancer operations between 2005 and 2011 were selected from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Annual trends were explored using robust Poisson multivariable regression as were predictors for mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery. A total of 85,401 women were identified. Mastectomy increased from 2005 to 2011, starting at 40 per cent in 2005 and peaking at 51 per cent in 2008 (P < 0.001). Bilateral resection, immediate reconstruction, and prophylactic mastectomy also increased (all P < 0.001). Independent predictors of mastectomy included young age, Asian race, invasive cancer (vs carcinoma in situ), bilateral resection, axillary dissection, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class, and lower body mass index (all P < 0.001). There was an increase in mastectomy, bilateral resection, immediate reconstruction, and prophylactic mastectomy from 2005 to 2011. PMID:25569069

Lucas, Donald J; Sabino, Jennifer; Shriver, Craig D; Pawlik, Timothy M; Singh, Devinder P; Vertrees, Amy E

2015-01-01

74

Psychiatric problems in the first year after mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The psychiatric morbidity associated with mastectomy was assessed in 75 women by following them up from the time they presented with suspected breast cancer to one year after the operation. Fifty women with benign breast disease served as controls. Throughout the follow-up period the incidence of psychiatric problems was higher among the women who had undergone mastectomy. One year after

G P Maguire; E G Lee; D J Bevington; C S Küchemann; R J Crabtree; C E Cornell

1978-01-01

75

Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia  

PubMed Central

Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5?kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting. PMID:24381779

Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A.; Krieger, Y.; Shoham, Y.; Silberstein, E.

2013-01-01

76

Rare chondrosarcoma of the breast treated with quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy: A case report  

PubMed Central

Breast chondrosarcoma is a rare sarcoma that mainly occurs in females >50 years old. To the best of our knowledge, only 16 cases were reported in the literature prior to 2013 and all patients were surgically treated by mastectomy, with or without lymphadenectomy, which was occasionally preceded by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, the literature does not report the benefit of mastectomy compared with a more conservative surgery. The present study reports a novel case of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma of the breast. A 63-year-old female patient presented with a neoplasm localized in the upper-outer quadrant of the right breast. The palpable lesion with sharp margins was a firm parenchymatous mass, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and mammography. The patient underwent conservative quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy, followed by post-surgical chemotherapy. A positron emission tomography scan performed five months subsequent to the surgery revealed no remnants of the disease. The patient underwent a strict clinical and instrumental follow-up, and two and half years after surgery, there are no signs of recurrent disease. In conclusion, the present case is currently one of the two cases in which a more conservative quadrantectomy was performed, instead of mastectomy. This surgical approach did not lead to metastasis and resulted in a good follow-up for the patient.

PASTA, VITTORIO; SOTTILE, DANIELA; URCIUOLI, PAOLO; DEL VECCHIO, LUCA; CUSTURERI, FILIPPO; D’ORAZI, VALERIO

2015-01-01

77

International study finds advanced post-mastectomy breast reconstruction improves women's psychosocial and sexual well-being:  

Cancer.gov

After a mastectomy, women who undergo breast reconstruction with tissue from their own abdomen experience significant gains in psychological, social, and sexual well-being as soon as three weeks after surgery.

78

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ... Cancer Treatment Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death from ...

79

Breast Cancer -- Male  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

80

Landmark Trials Affecting the Surgical Management of Invasive Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Significant progress has been made in the surgical management of breast cancer. Historically, women with invasive breast cancer underwent a Halsted radical mastectomy; morbid procedure removing the breast, underlying muscle and regional lymph nodes. In contemporary practice, the majority of women diagnosed with early stage invasive breast cancer can now be managed with breast conserving therapy to include a segmental mastectomy followed by radiation. Axillary lymph nodes are routinely assessed by sentinel lymph node biopsy. Axillary lymph node dissection is reserved for patients with documented nodal metastasis, however, here too progress has been made as a population of low risk patients has been identified in whom a complete dissection is not required even in the setting of a positive sentinel lymph node. This chapter details the landmark clinical trials that have guided the surgical management of breast cancer. PMID:23464699

Black, Dalliah M.

2014-01-01

81

Male Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

82

How breast cancer treatment decisions are made by women in North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although equally effective, women in rural midwestern states choose modified radical mastectomy (MRM) over breast conservation surgery for early stage breast cancer. This study assessed treatment decisions by the women of North Dakota.Methods: Surveys were sent to women treated for early stage breast cancer from 1990 through 1992. Separate surveys were sent out to surgeons in the state. The

Douglas Stafford; Robert Szczys; Ricky Becker; Julie Anderson; Susan Bushfield

1998-01-01

83

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female)  

E-print Network

--22000000 22 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female

Paxton, Anthony T.

84

[Surgical treatment in premalignant lesions of the breast (author's transl)].  

PubMed

Established predisposition to developing of breast cancer is indicative of subcutaneous mastectomy. Subcutaneous mastectomy means a radical biopsy. Histological examination produces the best result by excluding a possible breast cancer in premalignant lesions. When a malignant tumour has been detected the operation can easily be extended to a more radical procedure (Halsted mastectomy). Subcutaneous mastectomy means a radical procedure of treating breast cancer--even with optimal cosmetic results. Early complications are rare, the late results are excellent. PMID:1007672

Raguse, T; Lynen, F K

1976-01-01

85

The influence of race/ethnicity and place of service on breast reconstruction for Medicare beneficiaries with mastectomy.  

PubMed

Racial disparities in breast reconstruction for breast cancer are documented. Place of service has contributed to disparities in cancer care; but the interaction of race/ethnicity and place of service has not been explicitly examined. We examined whether place of service modified the effect of race/ethnicity on receipt of reconstruction. We included women with a mastectomy for incident breast cancer in SEER-Medicare from 2005-2009. Using Medicare claims, we determined breast reconstruction within 6 months. Facility characteristics included: rural/urban location, teaching status, NCI Cancer Center designation, cooperative oncology group membership, Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) status, and breast surgery volume. Using multivariable logistic regression, we analyzed reconstruction in relation to minority status and facility characteristics. Of the 17,958 women, 14.2% were racial/ethnic women of color and a total of 9.3% had reconstruction. Caucasians disproportionately received care at non-teaching hospitals (53% v. 42%) and did not at Disproportionate Share Hospitals (77% v. 86%). Women of color had 55% lower odds of reconstruction than Caucasians (OR?=?0.45; 95% CI 0.37-0.55). Those in lower median income areas had lower odds of receiving reconstruction, regardless of race/ethnicity. Odds of reconstruction reduced at rural, non-teaching and cooperative oncology group hospitals, and lower surgery volume facilities. Facility effects on odds of reconstruction were similar in analyses stratified by race/ethnicity status. Race/ethnicity and facility characteristics have independent effects on utilization of breast reconstruction, with no significant interaction. This suggests that, regardless of a woman's race/ethnicity, the place of service influences the likelihood of reconstruction. PMID:25140292

Onega, Tracy; Weiss, Julie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Wernli, Karen; Buist, Diana Sm; Henderson, Louise M; Goodrich, Martha; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Virnig, Beth; Tosteson, Anna Na; DeMartini, Wendy; Hubbard, Rebecca

2014-01-01

86

Milestones in breast cancer treatment.  

PubMed

Modern treatment started in the 1880s with Halsted's mastectomy. The next milestone-a century later-was breast-conserving surgery, with equivalent survival but better esthetic outcomes than mastectomy. Sentinel node biopsy, introduced in the 1990s, was a milestone that permitted avoidance of axillary dissection if the sentinel node was disease-free. Chemotherapy was established for early breast cancer in the 1980s and its efficacy continues to improve; however side effects remain a concern, particularly since chemotherapy does not benefit most patients. External whole breast irradiation was introduced with conservative surgery, as it reduces recurrences. By the 2000s, 3-week regimens had been shown equivalent to standard 6-week regimens-easing pressure on patients and radiation centers. Intraoperative partial breast irradiation is potentially more beneficial as it permits complete local treatment in a single session; however, trials show that patients must be very carefully selected. From the 1990s irradiation technology was combined with imaging and computer technologies to produce equipment that directs radiation to more precisely defined target volumes, allowing increased dose to the target and markedly reduced dose to nearby tissues. Irradiation systems are evolving rapidly but are being implemented without data on long-term morbidity or efficacy, while costs rise steeply. The first targeted treatment was tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor inhibitor. Since its widespread use starting in the 1980s, tamoxifen has saved the lives or prolonged the survival of millions with estrogen-positive disease; it is cheap and has limited (but not negligible) side effects. The same cannot be said of newer targeted treatments like trastuzumab and pertuzumab, which, although effective against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancer, come with important side effects and huge costs. Breast cancer mortality is declining in rich countries, but treatments have become more demanding and more expensive, so the outlook for the increasing numbers of women worldwide who develop the disease is uncertain. PMID:25494903

Zurrida, Stefano; Veronesi, Umberto

2015-01-01

87

Breast Cancer Knowledge  

MedlinePLUS

... right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer Knowledge HealthDay January 26, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast ... finds many women battling breast cancer may lack knowledge about their specific illness. Researchers surveyed 500 women ...

88

Fluctuating mastectomy rates across time and geography.  

PubMed

In 2009, 2 single-institution studies from the United States reported increasing mastectomy rates during the last decade. We have recently reported unilateral mastectomy trends from a European database and demonstrated a significant trend of decreasing mastectomy rates from 38.1 % in 2005 to 13.1 % in 2010. A recent study from the SEER registry in the United States confirmed a previously reported decrease in mastectomy rates from 40.1 % in year 2000 to 35.6 % in 2005, but showed a statistically significant increase in mastectomy rates up to 38.4 % in 2008. This report provides evidence that mastectomy trends may be in opposite directions in different geographical areas. The sharpest increase in mastectomy rates across all ages in the recent SEER study occurs right after year 2005, which interestingly corresponds with the time of publication of the meta-analysis by the EBCTCG that highlighted the importance of local control in breast cancer. The coincident timing raises the question of whether this evidence may have indirectly triggered an increase in mastectomy rates in the United States that would partially explain the observed trend, and more importantly, of whether an increase would be justified on this basis. Multiple factors influence the proportion between mastectomy and breast conservation, so it may be unreasonable to think of an optimal cutoff. There is not necessarily a right or wrong direction for mastectomy trends, but aiming to determine explanations for these differences may help provide a clearer insight of the decision-making process involved in the surgical management of breast cancer. PMID:23640480

Garcia-Etienne, Carlos A; Tomatis, Mariano; Heil, Joerg; Danaei, Mahmoud; Rageth, Christoph J; Marotti, Lorenza; Rosselli Del Turco, Marco; Ponti, Antonio

2013-07-01

89

Technical Advances in Skin Sparing Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Skin sparing mastectomy has resulted in marked improvement in the aesthetic results of immediate breast reconstruction. Mature data has confirmed its oncological safety in the treatment of breast cancer. The procedure has gained wide acceptance and has undergone numerous technical advances since its introduction over twenty years ago. Careful patient selection and choice of skin incisions are necessary to avoid complications. PMID:22312504

Carlson, Grant W.

2011-01-01

90

Trends in the use of bilateral mastectomy in England from 2002 to 2011: retrospective analysis of hospital episode statistics  

PubMed Central

Objectives For healthy women at high risk of developing breast cancer, a bilateral mastectomy can reduce future risk. For women who already have unilateral breast cancer, removing the contralateral healthy breast is more difficult to justify. We examined trends in the number of women who had a bilateral mastectomy in England between 2002 and 2011. Design Retrospective cohort study using the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Setting NHS hospital trusts in England. Participants Women aged between 18 and 80?years who had a bilateral mastectomy (or a contralateral mastectomy within 24?months of unilateral mastectomy) with or without a diagnosis of breast cancer. Main outcome measures Number and incidence of women without breast cancer who had a bilateral mastectomy; number and proportion who had a bilateral mastectomy as their first breast cancer operation, and the proportion of those undergoing bilateral mastectomy who had immediate breast reconstruction. Results Among women without breast cancer, the number who had a bilateral mastectomy increased from 71 in 2002 to 255 in 2011 (annual incidence rate ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.18). In women with breast cancer, the number rose from 529 to 931, an increase from 2% to 3.1% of first operations (OR for annual increase 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.08). Across both groups, rates of immediate breast reconstruction roughly doubled and reached 90% among women without breast cancer in 2011. Conclusions The number of women who had a bilateral mastectomy nearly doubled over the last decade, and more than tripled among women without breast cancer. This coincided with an increase in the use of immediate breast reconstruction. PMID:23906951

Neuburger, Jenny; MacNeill, Fiona; Jeevan, Ranjeet; van der Meulen, Jan H P; Cromwell, David A

2013-01-01

91

Psychological outcomes of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer outside a clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To assess outside a clinical trial the psychological outcome of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer who underwent either mastectomy or breast conservation surgery depending on the surgeon's opinion or the patient's choice. To determine whether the extent of psychiatric morbidity reported in women who underwent breast conservation surgery was associated with their participation in a randomised

L J Fallowfield; A Hall; G P Maguire; M Baum

1990-01-01

92

Breast Cancer and Bone Loss  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Share: Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

93

Guidelines Aim to Reduce 2nd Surgeries After Breast Cancer Lumpectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... JavaScript. Guidelines Aim to Reduce 2nd Surgeries After Breast Cancer Lumpectomy Currently, 1 in 4 women who undergo ... 2015) Wednesday, November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mastectomy Women's Health WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, 2014 (HealthDay ...

94

Panhypopituitarism as a consequence of metastase of breast cancer in sella turcica.  

PubMed

A 49-year-old female with breast cancer after mastectomy and chemotherapy was found suffering from diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism syndrome. Whole body bone scan showed hyperfixation in sella turcica. This site is extremely rare, especially in breast cancer metastases. PMID:8784867

Ruiz Hernández, G; Chesa-Jiménez, J; San Martín Ciges, E; Castillo Pallarés, F J; de Avila, C R

1996-08-01

95

Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

1985-01-01

96

Coping after Mastectomy: Antecedents and Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychological well-being following mastectomy is a concern of rehabilitation psychologists as the life expectancy of women treated for breast cancer is increasing. Well-being can be threatened by stress that these women may suffer from the diagnosis of cancer and amputation of a significant body part. A study was conducted to examine the…

Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

97

Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient-provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

2014-01-01

98

Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... Used in Breast Cancer Drugs Used to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

99

Complete tissue expander coverage by musculo-fascial flaps in immediate breast mound reconstruction after mastectomy.  

PubMed

Immediate breast reconstruction with tissue expander has become an increasingly popular procedure. Complete coverage of the expander by a musculofascial layer provides an additional well-vascularised layer, reducing the rate of possible complications of skin necrosis, prosthesis displacement, and the late capsular contracture. Complete expander coverage can be achieved by a combination of pectoralis major muscle and adjacent thoracic fascia in selected patients. Seventy-five breast mounds in 59 patients were reconstructed, in the first stage a temporary tissue expander inserted immediately after mastectomy and a musculofascial layer composed of the pectoralis major muscle, the serratus anterior fascia, and the superficial pectoral fascia were created to cover the expander. The first stage was followed months later by implant insertion. Minor and major complications were reported in a period of follow-up ranging from 24-42 months (mean 31 months). Complete musculofascial coverage of the tissue expander was a simple and easy to learn technique providing that the patient has a well-formed and intact superficial pectoral and serratus anterior fascia. From a total of 75 breast mounds reconstructed, major complications rate was 4% (overall rate of 19.8%), including major seroma (n = 4), haematoma (n = 1), partial skin loss (n = 3), wound dehiscence (n = 1), major infection (n = 2), severe capsule contracture (n = 1), and expander displacement (n = 3). The serratus anterior fascia and the superficial pectoral fascia flaps can be effectively used as an autologous tissue layer to cover the lower and the lateral aspect of tissue expanders in immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. PMID:23802185

Alani, Harith A; Balalaa, Nahed

2013-10-01

100

Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

101

Breast Cancer: Early Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

102

Breast Cancer and Depression  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer and Depression HealthDay October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Depression Women's Health Transcript Depression is a disabling ...

103

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer Screening HealthDay December 3, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mammography Women's Health Transcript Mammography screening strategies based ...

104

An osteogenesis imperfecta case with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare connective tissue disease characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen and an increased risk of bone fractures. Several OI cases with malignancies have been reported. Herein, we describe an OI case with breast cancer. A 36-year-old premenopausal woman with OI was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of a right breast lump. We diagnosed right breast cancer with axillary and parasternal lymph node metastasis (T2N3M0 stage IIIC). The tumor had increased in size and tumor markers were elevated after 10 months of hormone therapy. We performed a right mastectomy and axillary dissection. She subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is currently taking trastuzumab and tamoxifen. Anesthesia is challenging in OI patients because of difficulty with airway control and intubation. We performed the mastectomy in this case without difficulty by working in cooperation with experienced anesthesiologists, orthopedists, and other medical personnel. Some OI patients reportedly have severe 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) toxicity related to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD is the main enzyme involved in the catabolism of 5-FU. Our present case also had low DPD activity and we thus chose epirubicin and cyclophosphamide for chemotherapy. Our search of the literature yielded only two OI cases with breast cancer as of April 2011. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Japan. PMID:22038671

Taira, Fumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Saito, Mitsue; Kasumi, Fujio

2014-11-01

105

Partial Breast Reconstruction Using Various Oncoplastic Techniques for Centrally Located Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background As the breast cancer incidence has increased, breast-conserving surgery has replaced total mastectomy as the predominant procedure. However, centrally located breast cancers pose significant challenges to successful breast-conserving surgeries. Therefore, we performed partial mastectomy and oncoplastic procedures on centrally located breast cancer as a means of partial breast reconstruction. The authors examined and evaluated the functional and aesthetic usefulness of this reconstruction method. Methods From January 2007 to June 2011, 35 patients with centrally located breast cancers who underwent various oncoplastic procedures based on the breast size and resection volume. The oncoplastic procedures performed included volume displacement surgical techniques such as purse-string suture, linear suture, and reduction mammaplasty. Other oncoplastic procedures included volume replacement procedures with an adipofascial, thoracoepigastric, intercostal artery perforator, thoracodorsal artery perforator, or latissimus dorsi flap. Results Mean patient age was 49 years, and mean follow-up period was 11 months. In cases of small to moderate-sized breasts and resection volumes <50 g, volume displacement procedures were performed. In cases of resection volumes >50 g, volume replacement procedures were performed. In cases of larger breasts and smaller resection volumes, glandular reshaping was performed. Finally, in cases of larger breasts and larger resection volumes, reduction mammaplasty was performed. This reconstruction method also elicits a high patient satisfaction rate with no significant complications. Conclusions In centrally located breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery considering breast size and resection volume is safe and provides appropriate aesthetic outcomes. Therefore, our method is advisable for breast cancer patients who elect to conserve their breasts and retain a natural breast shape. PMID:25276644

Park, Hyo Chun; Kim, Hong Yeul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Jeong Woo; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Park, Ho Yong

2014-01-01

106

Nutrition and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major risk factors for breast cancer are hormone-related, and the only well-established diet-related risk factors for breast cancer are obesity and alcohol consumption. Obesity increases breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women by around 30%, probably by increasing serum concentrations of bioavailable oestradiol. Moderate alcohol intakes increase breast cancer risk by about 7% per alcoholic drink per day, perhaps also

Timothy J Key; Naomi E Allen; Elizabeth A Spencer; Ruth C Travis

2003-01-01

107

Nutrition and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between nutrition and breast cancer is reviewed. After several decades of study, many aspects of the role of diet in breast cancer etiology are still unclear. Results from large prospective studies do not support the concept developed from animal and ecologic evidence that dietary fat intake in mid-life is associated with breast cancer risk. Thus,

David J. Hunter; Walter C. Willett

1996-01-01

108

The Evolution of the Locoregional Therapy of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy have equal survival outcomes. Rates of local recurrence after BCT have declined steadily, largely as a result of the widespread use of systemic therapy. Sentinel node biopsy has replaced axillary dissection for staging the axilla, and in women undergoing BCT with whole-breast irradiation (WBI), axillary dissection is not needed for local control or survival in those with fewer than three involved sentinel nodes. Alternatives to 6 weeks of WBI have been shown to be safe and effective for subsets of breast cancer patients, and the use of preoperative chemotherapy allows BCT in some women who require mastectomy if surgery is the initial step in treatment. The combination of the smaller cancers detected with screening and the routine use of multimodality therapy has resulted in a decrease in the morbidity of local therapy and improved cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:21964004

Ho, Alice

2011-01-01

109

A survey of general surgeons' attitudes towards breast reconstruction after mastectomy.  

PubMed Central

Within the last 15-20 years there have been many changes in the management of breast cancer. Along with changes in treatment, possibilities for breast reconstruction have become increasingly sophisticated and commonplace. Despite the availability of breast reconstruction, we have noted large variations in referral patterns. Because the surgical treatment of breast cancer is largely undertaken by general surgeons, we investigated general surgeons' attitudes towards reconstruction using a postal questionnaire. In 1995, a questionnaire involving hypothetical criticisms was sent to general surgical members of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. A total of 136 surgeons responded, 79 (58%) of whom had a specialist interest in breast cancer. Each surgeon saw an average of 68 new cases of breast cancer per year (range 0-400). The general surgeons were concerned about three areas: (1) 32.3% felt that breast reconstruction might adversely delay the detection of local recurrence; (2) 16.6% were worried that breast reconstruction has high morbidity; and (3) 17.4% said that patients did not want breast reconstruction despite being advised of its availability. To investigate these concern's further, an extensive literature search was undertaken. There is no evidence that breast reconstruction delays the detection of local recurrence. With appropriate patient selection, the morbidity of reconstructive options appears very acceptable. Finally, immediate breast reconstruction has psychological benefits when compared with delayed reconstruction. PMID:9682639

Spyrou, G. E.; Titley, O. G.; Cerqueiro, J.; Fatah, M. F.

1998-01-01

110

The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2011: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the second most frequent malignancy in Korean women, with a continuously increasing incidence. The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through an online registration program. The aim of the present study was to report the fundamental facts on Korean breast cancer in 2011, and to analyze the changing patterns in clinical characteristics and breast cancer management in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, including the total number of cases, age, stage, and type of surgery, for the year 2011 were collected from 84 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey. Additional data relating to the changing patterns of breast cancer in Korea were collected from the online breast cancer registry database and analyzed. According to nationwide survey data, a total of 16,967 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. The crude incidence of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 67 cases per 100,000 women. Analysis of the survey and registry data gave equivalent results in terms of age distribution, stage, and type of surgery. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women (51.3%) was higher than that of premenopausal women (48.7%) with breast cancer. The incidence of stage 0 and stage I breast cancer increased continuously over the last 10 years (56.3% in 2011), and breast conserving surgery (65.7%) was performed more frequently than total mastectomy (33.8%). The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 8-fold. We conclude that the clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed over the past 10 years in Korea, and surgical management has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:25013429

Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Lee, Hun Jae; Lee, Jung Sun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Park, Heung Kyu; Noh, Dong-Young

2014-01-01

111

Male breast cancer: a review  

PubMed Central

Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

Fentiman, IS

2009-01-01

112

Surgical considerations for invasive breast cancer.  

PubMed

The 1992 NIH Consensus Development Conference reported that "breast conservation treatment is an appropriate method of primary therapy for the majority of women with stage I and II breast cancer and is preferable because it provides survival equivalent to total mastectomy and axillary dissection while preserving the breast." This conclusion has been solidly confirmed by recent updates of all of the prospective clinical trials performed. The uneven utilization of this BCS indicates the personal discomfort of some surgeons in recommending it or in communicating their recommendations to patients. The appropriate candidate for mastectomy is the patient in whom it is evident that BCS will not control the tumor. This conclusion may be drawn after one or even two attempts at revision have shown more extensive microscopic disease. The experience with preoperative chemotherapy programs such as NSABP Protocol B-18 shows that even for larger tumors primary excision or excision after preoperative chemotherapy provides reasonable rates of local control with no evidence of diminished distant control or survival. Very large tumors, often accompanied by other grave signs, are best treated by primary chemotherapy, because they are essentially not stage I or stage II disease. Although recognizing that better long-term cure rates are a function of the treatment of micrometastases with adjuvant chemotherapy, surgeons should remember the need to balance cosmetic factors with techniques required for good local control. Cosmetic factors are always important, but the primary concern is adequate removal of the primary tumor with pathologically negative margins. The best way to prevent the need for a salvage mastectomy following local recurrence is to obtain adequate control at the initial procedure, but this does not mean that aggressive local surgery is needed, and it certainly does not mean that a primary mastectomy is needed except in unusual cases. PMID:10572549

Margolese, R G

1999-10-01

113

MD Anderson Cancer Center study reports many advanced breast cancer patients do not receive recommended treatment:  

Cancer.gov

Radiation after a mastectomy for women with advanced breast cancer saves lives, but almost half of these patients do not receive it. The study's results indicate that treatments that have proven their life-saving potential in clinical trials may not be available to many patients.

114

Impaired primary antibody responses after vaccination against hepatitis B in patients with breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The response to hepatitis B (HBV) vaccination was studied in 32 breast cancer patients who were HBV antigen- and antibody-negative at the time of diagnosis. Ten of the patients included into the study received radical mastectomy without adjuvant therapy, 15 patients underwent breast-conserving surgery with subsequent irradiation with or without tamoxifen treatment, and 7 patients were treated by modified

Harald R. Rosen; Michael Stierer; Hermann M. Wolf; Martha M. Eibl

1992-01-01

115

Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast

Petersen, Jennifer

2004-01-01

116

Breast cancer screening.  

PubMed

Mammography remains the primary technique for breast cancer screening. Women with dense breast tissue may benefit from digital mammography and tomosynthesis, and women at high risk may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging. However, false-positive results are problematic. The North Carolina breast density law necessitates education about screening options for women with dense breasts. PMID:24663133

Freimanis, Rita I; Yacobozzi, Margaret

2014-01-01

117

Rehabilitation of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During 1996, 184,300 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. Although 44,300 women died of breast cancer [1], three fourths\\u000a of those women diagnosed will be cancer survivors. Breast cancer at presentation is a unique disease due to its insidious\\u000a onset. It often presents without warning, on a mammogram, on self-examination, or on physician examination. The disease affects\\u000a more young women

Krystina Kiel; Paula Kopp

118

Challenges in managing breast cancer during pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is defined as breast cancer occurring anytime during gestation, lactation or within one year after delivery. The optimal management of pregnant women with breast cancer is challenging and not well established; the main concern is the effect of the drugs on the developing fetus and long-term complications after in utero exposure to anti-cancer drugs. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for early breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Modified radical mastectomy is standard of care in first trimester, whereas breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy with lymph node dissection) can be performed preferably in the second and third trimester. Of note, breast-conserving surgery is not contraindicated per se during the first trimester, but owing to the potential impact of delaying radiotherapy. Radiation therapy is not favored during pregnancy. Moreover, tamoxifen is contraindicated during pregnancy; the agent has been associated with birth defects in up to 20% of exposures. Chemotherapy is generally contraindicated during the first trimester because of the possible damage to organogenesis. Anthracyclines-based regimens are the most widely used is breast cancer treatment and were been shown to be associated with favourable safety profile when administered during pregnancy. As for taxanes, more limited data is available. The use of trastuzumab is contraindicated during pregnancy, given the apparent risk of oligo- and/or anhydramnios as well as the unknown long-term sequelae on the fetus. It is obvious that, diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy adds complexity to cancer treatment recommendations. In all cases, a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach among obstetricians, gynaecologists, surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, pediatricians and hematologists is clearly warranted. PMID:23819029

Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bartsch, Rupert; Dimopoulos, Meletios-Athanassios

2013-01-01

119

Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy: Review of Risk Factors and Risk-Reducing Strategies  

PubMed Central

Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy have increased substantially over the last decade. Surgical oncologists are often in the frontline, dealing with requests for this procedure. This paper reviews the current evidence base regarding contralateral breast cancer, assesses the various risk-reducing strategies, and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy.

Basu, N. N.; Barr, L.; Ross, G. L.; Evans, D. G.

2015-01-01

120

Counterview: Pre-operative breast MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is not recommended for all patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer.  

PubMed

For the woman with a newly diagnosed early stage breast cancer, the routine use of pre-operative breast MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is not indicated beyond conventional breast imaging (i.e., mammography with correlation ultrasound as indicated). There is no consistent evidence that a pre-operative breast MRI confers a benefit to the patient by improving clinical outcomes or surgical procedures. In a meta-analysis of studies reporting on the use of pre-operative breast MRI for the patient with an established index cancer, multifocal or multicentric disease was found on breast MRI in 16% of the patients, a rate substantially higher than the rate of local recurrence after breast conserving surgery plus definitive radiation treatment. In the largest retrospective study of patients treated with breast conserving surgery plus radiation, no gain was found for adding a breast MRI to conventional breast imaging. No randomized clinical trial has been designed to evaluate long term clinical outcomes associated with adding a pre-operative breast MRI. Adding pre-operative breast MRI can alter clinical management in ways that are potentially harmful to patients, for example, increased ipsilateral mastectomies, increased contralateral prophylactic mastectomies, increased work-ups, and delay to definitive surgery. In summary, the routine use of pre-operative breast MRI is not warranted for the typical patient with a newly diagnosed early stage breast cancer. PMID:20159457

Solin, Lawrence J

2010-02-01

121

Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Breast cancer On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed August 2007 What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a disease in which certain ...

122

Breast Cancer in Young Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Podcasts Health-e-Cards Web Badges Infographics Twitter Breast Cancer in Young Women Share Compartir Most breast cancers ... lower your risk. What Is CDC Doing about Breast Cancer in Young Women? CDC works with public, non- ...

123

Prospective evaluation of immediate reconstruction after mastectomy.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors prospectively studied the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on patients undergoing mastectomy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite the advocation of a breast-conserving approach to the treatment of breast cancer, many women continue to medically require or choose mastectomy for the treatment of breast cancer. In recent years, immediate breast reconstruction has become an alternative to either mastectomy alone or to delayed reconstruction. METHODS: A prospective database of 216 patients who underwent mastectomy with immediate reconstruction was established. In this series, 94 procedures involved implants or tissue expanders, and 124 tissue transfers were performed. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was 15.3%; only 9% of patients who underwent autologous tissue transfers required secondary procedures. When implants were performed, the overall rate of prosthetic loss was 8%. The majority of patients (n = 101) underwent transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flaps. Twenty-six of the 38 (17.5%) patients who required transfusion were from this group. Partial flap losses in this group (7%) were correlated to a history of heavy smoking. With a median follow-up of 33.2 months, only two patients had recurred locally. According to patient opinion, autologous tissue transfers resulted in a statistically better cosmetic result. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate reconstruction can be performed safely and with excellent cosmetic results. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8328826

Eberlein, T J; Crespo, L D; Smith, B L; Hergrueter, C A; Douville, L; Eriksson, E

1993-01-01

124

[Brachytherapy of breast cancer].  

PubMed

For breast cancer, interstitial brachytherapy remains an accurate irradiation technique for delivering a high dose (increasing the local control) in a small volume (decreasing the toxicity). In this article, we present the technical data related to the breast brachytherapy proceeding, from the implantation of the vectors to the treatment itself, including the planning. The different indications of breast brachytherapy include all the breast irradiations focusing on the initial tumour bed (partial irradiation of the breast), such as boost, accelerated and partial breast irradiation (APBI) and second conservative radiosurgical treatment in case of ipsilateral in-breast recurrence. The results in terms of efficacy and toxicity are presented for each indication. Interstitial breast brachytherapy, performed according with the standard rules, remains a major technique for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23453755

Chand, M-È; Rivera, S; Hennequin, C; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Quero, L

2013-04-01

125

University of Michigan study finds most women who have double mastectomy don't need it  

Cancer.gov

About 70 percent of women who have both breasts removed following a breast cancer diagnosis do so despite a very low risk of facing cancer in the healthy breast, new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds. Recent studies have shown an increase in women with breast cancer choosing this more aggressive surgery, called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, which raises the question of potential overtreatment among these patients.

126

An inferolateral approach to nipple-sparing mastectomy: optimizing mastectomy and reconstruction.  

PubMed

An increasing number of women presenting with early stage breast cancer or a strong family history are choosing mastectomy as a therapeutic or prophylactic treatment option. In these selected patients, conservation of the nipple areolar complex is considered to improve cosmesis and body image. Incision placement is an important consideration in breast appearance after surgery. Functionally, the incision must allow adequate access for mastectomy and implant positioning. In addition, preservation of blood supply is critical to maintain a viable nipple. This article describes an inferolateral curvilinear incision on the breast mound, which can be designed de novo or as an extension of a preexisting lateral scar. The incision allows adequate access and hides the scar on anterior view, thus optimizing both the mastectomy and reconstruction. In patients with a preexisting lateral scar, this may be the incision of choice. PMID:20606592

Colwell, Amy S; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L; Austen, William G

2010-08-01

127

Breast cancer in China.  

PubMed

The health burden of cancer is increasing in China, with more than 1·6 million people being diagnosed and 1·2 million people dying of the disease each year. As in most other countries, breast cancer is now the most common cancer in Chinese women; cases in China account for 12·2% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers and 9·6% of all deaths from breast cancer worldwide. China's proportional contribution to global rates is increasing rapidly because of the population's rising socioeconomic status and unique reproductive patterns. In this Review we present an overview of present control measures for breast cancer across China, and emphasise epidemiological and socioeconomic diversities and disparities in access to care for various subpopulations. We describe demographic differences between China and high-income countries, and also within geographical and socioeconomic regions of China. These disparities between China and high-income countries include younger age at onset of breast cancer; the unique one-child policy; lower rates of provision and uptake for screening for breast cancer; delays in diagnosis that result in more advanced stage of disease at presentation; inadequate resources; and a lack of awareness about breast cancer in the Chinese population. Finally, we recommend key measures that could contribute to improved health outcomes for patients with breast cancer in China. PMID:24872111

Fan, Lei; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Li, Jun-Jie; St Louis, Jessica; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Yu, Ke-Da; Chen, Wan-Qing; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Goss, Paul E

2014-06-01

128

Less invasive treatment associated with improved survival in early stage breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Patients with early stage breast cancer who were treated with lumpectomy plus radiation may have a better chance of survival compared with those who underwent mastectomy, according to a study from Duke Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute. The study, which appears online Jan. 28, 2013, in the journal CANCER, raises new questions as to the comparative effectiveness of breast-conserving therapies such as lumpectomy, where only the tumor and surrounding tissue is surgically removed.

129

250 Years of Advances Against Cancer - 1930s  

Cancer.gov

David H. Patey develops the modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. This surgical procedure, which involves removal of the entire breast, the axillary lymph nodes under the adjacent arm, and the pectoralis minor muscle behind the breast, is less disfiguring than the radical mastectomy and would eventually replace it as the standard surgical treatment for breast cancer.

130

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project Breast cancer is  

E-print Network

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project NEED Breast cancer is emerging as a uniquely on molecularly- driven research and to design models that adequately serve the study of breast cancer risk scientists and public health experts is dedicated to research on the primary prevention of breast cancer

Ginzel, Matthew

131

BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

2008-03-19

132

Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

Bantema-Joppe, Enja J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Munck, Linda de [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Visser, Otto [Comprehensive Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willemse, Pax H.B. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Siesling, Sabine [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maduro, John H., E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2011-11-15

133

Benefits versus risks in conservation surgery with irradiation for breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the survival and complications inherent in the conventional treatment of breast cancer, radical mastectomy, and the more conservative procedure, conservation surgery with irradiation. Both procedures have benefits and risks. The benefits as measured by survivorship appear to be approximately the same. The major benefit of conservation surgery with irradiation is that the breast is left intact. The possible complication of irradiation carcinogenesis is addressed, and the literature analyzed. This review indicates that the absolute risk of breast cancer developing in the second breast is not nearly as great as originally thought. It is concluded that if a woman with breast cancer is a candidate for either mastectomy or the conservative procedure, it is the clinician's obligation to objectively present the evidence regarding the benefits and risks of these procedures.

Levitt, S.H.; Mandel, J.

1984-07-01

134

pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women  

PubMed Central

Consider this scenario: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple’s relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman’s diagnosis. Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment? Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program—the first of its kind in Canada—for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

Ali, A.; Warner, E.

2013-01-01

135

Breast Cancer and the Environment  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer and the Environment ?QUESTIONS aNd aNSwErS What does it mean to say 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer? Researchers have been ... to breast cancer. Many people are concerned that environmental factors are increasing the risk of breast cancer. ...

136

Limited-Field Radiation Therapy in the Management of Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several phase III trials have demonstrated equivalent long-term survival between breast conserving surgery plus radiation therapy and mastectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer but have not provided infor- mation on the optimal volume of breast tissue requiring post-lumpectomy radiation therapy. Therefore, we exam- ined the 5-year results of a single institution's experience with radiation therapy limited to the

Frank A. Vicini; Larry Kestin; Peter Chen; Pamela Benitez; Neal S. Goldstein; Alvaro Martinez

2003-01-01

137

Sentinel lymphadenectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer may reliably represent the axilla except for inflammatory breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) undergo a modified radical mastectomy or\\u000a lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and radiotherapy. Sentinel lymphadenectomy (SL) is accepted for axillary\\u000a evaluation in early breast cancer. We assessed the feasibility and predictive value of SL after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Eligible women received neoadjuvant therapy for LABC and were scheduled to

Vered Stearns; C. Alexander Ewing; Rebecca Slack; Marie F. Penannen; Daniel F. Hayes; Theodore N. Tsangaris

2002-01-01

138

Biomarkers in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women in the western world. Due to the aggressive behaviour\\u000a of some specific types and the possibility of an early diagnosis, breast cancer has been constantly studied. Tumour size,\\u000a histological type, cellular and nuclear characteristics, mitotic index, vascular invasion, hormonal receptors and axillary\\u000a lymph node status are biomarkers routinely

Graciela Laguens; Silvia Coronato; Wanda Di Girolamo

2006-01-01

139

Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer Or Other Cancers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-07-01

140

Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... for professional printing [PDF-1.1MB] Cancer Home Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Many things can increase the ...

141

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Edition hoW is Breast cancer treated? Treatment for breast cancer depends on the type and the stage of the cancer. Typical treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, anti-estrogen hormone therapy, or a combination ...

142

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women Key Points Based on current breast cancer incidence rates, experts estimate that ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

143

Breast cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiographic imaging of the breast began in the early years of the twentieth century. Continuous advances in film quality, energy sources, targets, grids, and filters have all contributed to superior image resolution. Federal quality standards now regulate screening mammography, and mass screening for breast cancer has become widely accepted in the United States. Wider application of screening has resulted in

Kathleen M. Harris; Victor G. Vogel

1997-01-01

144

Breast and Gynecologic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials and the evaluation of new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and new technologies to identify premalignant lesions are developed and supported.

145

Laser optoacoustic imaging of breast cancer in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A clinical prototype of the laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS) was employed for breast cancer detection and localization in patients with confirmed breast cancer and scheduled for radical mastectomy. The prototype LOIS used a single optical fiber for delivery of laser pulses, an arc shaped 32-element PVDF transducer array for ultrawide-band piezoelectric detection of optoacoustic signals and a single-channel data acquisition card for signal processing. The resonance ultrasound frequency of the 110 micrometers PVDF film was outside detectable range of ultrasound. Spatial resolution of the transducer array was slightly better than 1mm in radial direction and slightly worse than 1 mm in lateral direction. The system was optimized for contrast and sensitivity. Data acquisition, signal conditioning and image processing were significantly improved and optimized resulting in reduced image frame rate of 2 seconds employing 700 MHz Aphlon processor. The computer code for digital signal processing employed band-pass hyper-Gaussian filtering and denoising. An automatic recognition of the optoacoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the breast surface and improve the accuracy of tumor localization. Radial back- projection algorithm was employed adopting combination of integration along spherical wavefronts and integration along planar wavefronts (as in Radon transform) for image reconstruction. The system performance was evaluated initially in breast tissue-like phantoms with embedded blood vessels. Clinical studies in breast cancer patients scheduled for surgical mastectomy were performed and compared with x-ray radiography, ultrasound and pathology reports.

Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Solomatin, Sergey V.; Savateeva, Elena V.; Andreev, Valeri A.; Gatalica, Zoran; Singh, Harbans; Fleming, R. Declan

2001-06-01

146

Positive effect of tamoxifen as part of adjuvant chemo-endocrine therapy for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective randomised multicentre clinical study was undertaken for 2 years and 3 months from November 1982, with the aim of examining the significance of using a combination of ftorafur (FT) and tamoxifen (TAM) for post-operative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Patients had either stage II or stage IIIa disease, were age 75 or below and had undergone radical mastectomy.

J Uchino; N Samejima; T Tanabe; H Hayasaka; M Mito; Y Hata; K Asaishi

1994-01-01

147

Treatment of Early Breast Cancer: A Report after Ten Years of a Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

A controlled clinical trial has been carried out to compare radical mastectomy with wide excision (extended tylectomy) in the treatment of early breast cancer. Only patients aged 50 and over were included and 370 entered the trial during a period of 10 years. Postoperative radiotherapy was given in each case. In patients with clinically involved axillary nodes there was a

Hedley Atkins; J. L. Hayward; D. J. Klugman; A. B. Wayte

1972-01-01

148

Diet and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clarification of the role of diet in breast cancer pathogenesis is important in order to identify modifiable risk factors\\u000a on which to focus prevention efforts. Excess weight and weight gain in adult life are related to higher risk of postmenopausal\\u000a breast cancer, and weight loss after menopause is associated with substantially reduced risk. Even moderate alcohol consumption\\u000a contributes considerably to

Eleni Linos; Michelle D. Holmes; Walter C. Willett

2007-01-01

149

New innovative techniques in radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is an established treatment for early-stage breast cancer. Long-term follow-up has demonstrated equivalent survival to mastectomy. However, standard WBRT to the conserved breast requires daily radiation treatment, 5 days per week, for 5-7 weeks. This schedule imposes a considerable burden on breast cancer patients and healthcare systems alike. For the last decade, there has been considerable interest in lessening the volume of breast treated with radiotherapy and reducing the number of fractions of radiation treatment. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), including intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), delivers high-dose radiation immediately surrounding the lumpectomy cavity, with relative sparing of the majority of the ipsilateral breast. Hypofractionated WBRT delivers radiation to the entire ipsilateral breast; however, this is achieved using a smaller number of fractions and total dose of radiotherapy. The attraction of less invasive or demanding radiotherapy schedules has led to the widespread introduction of APBI before its long-term results have been established. In the past 5 years, data from prospective trials of hypofractionated WBRT and IORT compared to standard WBRT have become available. Additionally, a large, prospective randomized study of APBI versus WBRT is nearing accrual. In this review article, we will discuss these new innovative techniques in radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will also discuss the recently completed and ongoing prospective studies that will provide a robust evaluation of the safety and efficacy of these techniques. PMID:23612227

Murphy, J O; Sacchini, V S

2013-04-01

150

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

151

Your Body After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber Newlywed Sarah Lien didn’t ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

152

Inflammatory breast cancer with refractory diarrhea: a case report.  

PubMed

Excessive amounts of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) cause a special clinical syndrome characterized by secretory diarrhea, hypokalemia and dehydration. A careful clinical workup of a 62-year-old female admitted for refractory diarrhea revealed a neglected inflammatory right breast ductal carcinoma with VIP hypersecretion without any localized abdominal tumor. Immunohistochemistry of the breast biopsy showed neuroendocrine characteristics with positive staining for VIP, and Octreotide scan showed hyperfixation to the right breast and axilla. Primary therapy of breast cancer with hormones and chemotherapy achieved transitory regression of diarrhea, VIP level decrease, and tumor border reduction. Bilateral modified radical mastectomy and irradiation of the tumor failed to prevent liver and bone dissemination of the disease. Once more, partial response was obtained by octreotide and salvage chemotherapy; however, the patient died from progressive disease 23 months after initial diagnosis. To our best knowledge, this unusual presentation of a breast carcinoma with related VIPoma syndrome is the first reported case in the literature. PMID:22259907

Kattan, Joseph; Chemaly, Albert; Chemaly, Marwan; Jamal, Dani; Karaa, Souheil; Moacdieh, Lina

2011-01-01

153

Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2012-11-14

154

Photodynamic therapy of breast cancer with photosense  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using photosensitizer Photosense (PS) in dose 0.5 mg per kg of body weight have been provided in 24 patients with breast cancer. In 22 patients with T1-T2N0M0 primary tumor was treated as the preoperative treatment, radical mastectomy has been fulfilled 7-10 days after PDT with subsequent histological examination. 2 patients had recurrencies of breast cancer with lymph node metastases after radiotherapy. Fluorescent diagnostics of tumor, accumulation of PS in tumor, adjacent tissue, skin before and during PDT was fulfilled with spectranalyzer LESA-01. We used semiconductive laser for PDT - ? = 672+2nm, P=1,5 W, interstitial irradiation 2-24 hours after PS injection has been done in light dose 150-200 J/cm3, 1-3 irradiations with interval 24-48 hours and total light dose 400-600 J/cm3 depending mostly of size and fluorescent data. Partial regression of tumor with pathomorphosis of 2-4 degrees has been found in 19 cases. Our experience shows pronounced efficacy of PDT for treating breast cancer as preoperative modality and as palliation in cases of recurrencies.

Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Oumnova, Loubov V.; Vorozhcsov, Georgiu N.

2003-06-01

155

MD Anderson study finds majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients benefit from radiation after lumpectomy  

Cancer.gov

For the majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients, radiation therapy following breast conserving surgery may help prevent the need for a later mastectomy, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, are contrary to current national treatment guidelines, which recommend that older women with early stage, estrogen-positive disease be treated with lumpectomy followed by estrogen blocker therapy alone -- and forgo radiation therapy post-surgery.

156

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

2000-01-01

157

Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-12-01

158

The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

2012-01-01

159

Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress  

MedlinePLUS

... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

160

Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... the lower right-hand corner of the player. Breast Cancer, Exercise and Acupuncture HealthDay November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Acupuncture Breast Cancer Exercise and Physical Fitness Transcript Exercise therapy and ...

161

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

162

Adiponectin and breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-derived hormone, has been studied intensively for the past decade because of its anti-inflammatory,\\u000a anti-atherogenic, and anti-diabetic properties. Recent advances suggest that adiponectin also plays an important role in the\\u000a development and progression of various cancers, especially obesity-related cancers. In this review, the authors focus on the\\u000a potential role of adiponectin in breast cancer, an obesity- and

Xiuping Chen; Yitao Wang

163

Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

RADIATION THERAPY FOR BREAST CANCER © ASTRO 2011 Printed on Recycled Paper CARING FOR YOURSELF NOTES/QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTOR Facts to Help Patients Make ... Oncology Group www.rtog.org HELPFUL WEBSITES ON BREAST CANCER Breast Cancer Network of Strength www.networkofstrength.org ...

164

Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-01-27

165

Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-19

166

Screening of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the randomized controlled trials carried out in the late 1970s and the 1980s, mammographic screening was demonstrated to\\u000a have an impact in decreasing mortality from breast cancer. The evaluation of mammographic service screening programmes implemented\\u000a in several Western European countries in the late 1980s and the 1990s demonstrated that these programmes may have an even\\u000a higher effect on breast

Per Skaane

167

Cryosurgery of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

2012-01-01

168

Cryosurgery of breast cancer.  

PubMed

With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

Niu, Lizhi; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

2012-08-01

169

Accelerated partial-breast irradiation: the current state of our knowledge.  

PubMed

Breast-conserving therapy consisting of segmental mastectomy followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) has become widely accepted as an alternative to mastectomy as a treatment for women with early-stage breast cancer. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) is a shorter, alternative radiation technique for select patients with favorable early-stage breast cancer. We review here the different modalities of APBI delivery and discuss the possible benefits and harms associated with these treatments. PMID:23781698

Shaitelman, Simona F; Kim, Leonard H

2013-04-01

170

MRI and Mammography Before Surgery in Patients With Stage I-II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-16

171

Vitamin D and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

2012-01-01

172

Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-12-09

173

Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chen, C.-J. [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Joy [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2007-09-01

174

Sexuality and body image in younger women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer has the potential to be most devastating to the sexual function and self-esteem of premenopausal women. Nevertheless, not one study has systematically compared the impact of breast cancer treatment on sexual issues across age groups. Research shows that younger women with breast cancer have more severe emotional distress than older cohorts. In a group of patients seeking sexual rehabilitation in a cancer center, younger couples were more distressed, but also had the best prognosis with treatment. In theory, loss of a breast or poor breast appearance would be more distressing to women whose youth gives them high expectations for physical beauty. Seeking new dating relationships after breast cancer treatment is a special stressor for single women. Potential infertility also may impact on a woman's self-concept as a sexual person. Systemic treatment disrupts sexual function by causing premature menopause, with estrogen loss leading to vaginal atrophy and androgen loss perhaps decreasing sexual desire and arousability. Research on mastectomy versus breast conservation across all ages of women has demonstrated that general psychological distress, marital satisfaction, and overall sexual frequency and function do not differ between the two treatment groups. Women with breast conservation do rate their body image more highly and are more comfortable with nudity and breast caressing. There is some evidence that breast conservation offers more psychological "protection" for younger women. Research on the impact of breast reconstruction is sparse, but reveals similar patterns. Future studies should use rigorous methodology and focus on the impact of premature menopause and the effectiveness of sexual rehabilitation for younger women. PMID:7999462

Schover, L R

1994-01-01

175

The rationale of surgical treatment of invasive breast cancer and decision making of surgical procedures.  

PubMed

Surgery plays a major role in the primary treatment of breast cancer. There has been a rapid development in breast surgery over the last 20 years. Breast conserving therapy is standard today for tumours up till 4 cm in diameter, and can be used in selected cases for larger tumours after preoperative down staging with chemotherapy. Breast conserving therapy with postoperative radiotherapy gives the same long-term overall survival as mastectomy. Axillary surgery has also developed conservatively, with the introduction of the new technique of sentinel node biopsy, which offers an alternative to axillary clearance for staging of the axilla, with less morbidity. PMID:12449465

Bergkvist, L

2002-01-01

176

human breast cancer cells  

E-print Network

Background: Colloidal silver has been used as an antimicrobial and disinfectant agent. However, there is scarce information on its antitumor potential. The aim of this study was to determine if colloidal silver had cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cells and its mechanism of cell death. Methods: MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with colloidal silver (ranged from 1.75 to 17.5 ng/mL) for 5 h at 37°C and 5 % CO2 atmosphere. Cell Viability was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and the mechanism of cell death through detection of mono-oligonucleosomes using an ELISA kit and TUNEL assay. The production of NO, LDH, and Gpx, SOD, CAT, and Total antioxidant activities were evaluated by colorimetric assays. Results: Colloidal silver had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells through induction of apoptosis, shown an LD50 (3.5 ng/mL) and LD100 (14 ng/mL) (*P colloidal silver. Conclusions: The present results showed that colloidal silver might be a potential alternative agent for human breast cancer therapy. Background

Moisés A Franco-molina; Edgar Mendoza-gamboa; Crystel A Sierra-rivera; Ricardo A Gómez-flores; Pablo Zapata-benavides; Paloma Castillo-tello; Juan Manuel Alcocer-gonzález; Diana F Mir; Reyes S Tamez-guerra; Cristina Rodríguez-padilla

177

Breast Cancer Statistics  

Cancer.gov

The maps show a pattern of elevated mortality rates for female breast cancer extending from the Mid-Atlantic through the Northeastern states has persisted for many years. Established risk factors are believed to be largely responsible, but the remaining reasons are unknown.

178

Better breast cancer detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-rays go digital, computers read film, and chemicals mark tumors, but will these new technologies make it in the clinic? The imaging technologies considered for breast cancer include film-screen mammography, full field digital mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, scintimammography, thermography, electrical impedance imaging, optical imaging, electric potential measurement, positron emission tomography, novel ultrasound techniques, elastography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermoacoustic computed

S. K. Moore

2001-01-01

179

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen ... ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site . Risks of Breast Cancer Screening Screening tests have risks. Decisions about screening tests can be ...

180

Breast Cancer Among Asian Women  

Cancer.gov

A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

181

Thermographic detection of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author outlines the historical attempts made to use infrared thermography for breast cancer detection. He concludes that the technique was a great idea that failed. One can produce good thermal images of the breast, and these images often show features that reflect disease. But the association between skin temperature and breast cancer is too weak to be useful, given

K. R. Foster

1998-01-01

182

Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byeong-Woo, E-mail: bwpark@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-01

183

Women’s Decision Making about Risk-Reducing Strategies in the Context of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women who have a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have up to an 87% lifetime risk of breast cancer and up to a 40% lifetime risk of ovarian cancer. Cancer prevention\\u000a and early detection strategies are often considered by these women to address this heightened risk. Risk-reducing strategies\\u000a include risk-reducing mastectomy and oophorectomy, breast and ovarian cancer screening,

A. Fuchsia Howard; Lynda G. Balneaves; Joan L. Bottorff

2009-01-01

184

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

185

Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

186

Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

2014-11-04

187

Silicone Breast Implants Are Not Linked to Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

In one of the largest studies on the long-term health effects of silicone breast implants, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Md., found no association between breast implants and the subsequent risk of breast cancer.

188

FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mammography/Breast Cancer Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Mammography ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

189

Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... a Researcher Lab Websites Health Library Blog Home Health Library Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Posted in: Risk and Prevention , Treatments and Procedures Cancer types: Breast ...

190

Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... cause normal breast cells to become cancerous. Inherited gene mutations Certain inherited DNA mutations can dramatically increase ... of breast cancer that runs in families. Acquired gene mutations Most DNA mutations related to breast cancer ...

191

Breast cancer stem cells: implications for therapy of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumour-associated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to more meaningful clinical remissions. Here, we review the role of stem cells in the healthy breast, the role of breast cancer stem cells in disease, and the potential to target these cells. PMID:18671830

Morrison, Brian J; Schmidt, Chris W; Lakhani, Sunil R; Reynolds, Brent A; Lopez, J Alejandro

2008-01-01

192

Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2011-12-07

193

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

194

Breast Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

2014-01-01

195

Screening for breast cancer with MRI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast MRI has emerged as an extremely powerful tool in breast imaging. The use of breast MRI for cancer detection has the potential to change our current algorithms in the detection of breast cancer. By being able to detect cancer that is occult on conventional imaging, such as mammography and sonography, MRI can detect early breast cancer that was previously

Elizabeth A Morris

2003-01-01

196

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

197

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

198

Pathology of hereditary breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast\\u000a cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11\\/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high

Petra van der Groep; Elsken van der Wall; Paul J. van Diest

2011-01-01

199

Frontiers in radiotherapy for early-stage invasive breast cancer.  

PubMed

The development of breast-conserving treatment for early-stage breast cancer is one of the most important success stories in radiation oncology in the latter half of the twentieth century. Lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy provides an appealing alternative to mastectomy for many women. In recent years, there has been a shift in clinical investigational focus toward refinements in the methods of delivering adjuvant radiotherapy that provide shorter, more convenient schedules of external-beam radiotherapy and interstitial treatment. Expedited courses of whole-breast treatment have been demonstrated to be equivalent to traditional lengthier courses in terms of tumor control and cosmetic outcome and to provide an opportunity for cost efficiencies. PMID:25113764

Fisher, Christine M; Rabinovitch, Rachel

2014-09-10

200

Does immediate tissue expander placement increase immediate postoperative complications in patients with breast cancer?  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to evaluate 1) the rate of immediate breast reconstruction; 2) the frequency of immediate tissue expander placement; and 3) to compare perioperative outcomes in patients who underwent breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer with immediate tissue expander placement (TE) with those with no reconstruction (NR). Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, we examined the clinical data of patients with breast cancer who underwent mastectomy with or without immediate TE from 2006 to 2010 in the United States. A total of 344,253 patients with breast cancer underwent mastectomy in this period in the United States. Of these patients, 31 per cent had immediate breast reconstruction. We only included patients with mastectomy and no reconstruction (NR: 237,825 patients) and patients who underwent only TE placement with no other reconstruction combination (TE: 61,178 patients) to this study. Patients in the TE group had a lower overall postoperative complication rate (2.6 vs 5.5%; P < 0.01) and lower in-hospital mortality rate (0.01 vs 0.09%; P < 0.01) compared with the NR group. Fifty-three per cent of patients in the NR group were discharged the day of surgery compared with 36 per cent of patients in the TE group. Using multivariate regression analyses and adjusting patient characteristics and comorbidities, patients in the TE group had a significantly lower overall complication rate (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.6) and lower in-hospital mortality (AOR, 0.2) compared with the NR group. The rate of immediate reconstruction is 31 per cent. TE alone is the most common type of immediate reconstruction (57%). There is a lower complication rate for the patients who underwent immediate TE versus the no-reconstruction cohort. PMID:25642875

Masoomi, Hossein; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Evans, Gregory R D; Tan, Emily; Lane, Karen T; Wirth, Garrett A

2015-02-01

201

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

202

Blood Donation by Cancer Survivors  

MedlinePLUS

... Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities WhatNext ACS Events Making Strides Against ...

203

Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-17

204

CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER  

E-print Network

(called "triple negative") breast cancers. Below are the estimated lifetime risks of cancer in peopleCANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

205

Genetics of Hereditary Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The identification and clinical management of patients at inherited risk for breast cancer has become an integral part of\\u000a the practice of preventative medicine and oncology. Although only about 5–10% of all cases of breast cancer are attributable\\u000a to a highly penetrant cancer predisposition gene, individuals who carry a cancer susceptibility gene mutation have a significantly\\u000a higher risk of developing

Paula D. Ryan

206

Galectin-3 as a Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P?=?0.001). Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation. PMID:25254965

Zhang, Hao; Liang, Xi; Duan, Chao; Liu, Caigang; Zhao, Zuowei

2014-01-01

207

Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-05

208

Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Drugs called bisphosphonates may be able to prevent bone metastases in women with early breast cancer. With this trial, researchers are comparing a bisphosphonate called clodronate with two newer, more-potent bisphosphonates--zoledronate and ibandronate--in women with stage I-III breast cancer.

209

Male Breast Cancer Is Different  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Male Breast Cancer Is Different Men's tumor types differ; survival is ... Tuesday, December 9, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Male Breast Cancer Men's Health TUESDAY, Dec. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

210

Landmark Clinical Trials Influencing Surgical Management of Non-invasive and Invasive Breast Cancer.  

PubMed

The surgical management of breast cancer has changed considerably since the use of the Halstedian radical mastectomy early in the 20th century. Over the last 50 years, several landmark clinical trials from the USA and Europe have resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer toward less radical forms of surgery with the combined use of multi-modality treatments including systemic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and radiotherapy. Advances in such research have established a new worldwide standard of care for breast cancer surgical management and treatment, which has become more patient centric and which places a higher emphasis on cosmesis and improved patient quality of life. In this chapter, we review the landmark clinical trials that have influenced surgical management for non-invasive and invasive breast cancer and that serve to guide current clinical practices to date. PMID:25521007

Julian, Thomas B; Venditti, Charis A; Duggal, Shivani

2015-01-01

211

Two cases of male breast cancer at a university hospital in southeast Brazil  

PubMed Central

We report two rare cases of breast cancer in men treated with modified radical mastectomy. The patients were aged 67 and 45 years at the time of diagnosis. Tumor sizes were 2 cm and 8 cm in the older and younger patient, respectively. The histopathologic diagnosis was infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the first patient and infiltrating papillary carcinoma in the second patient. Immunohistochemical tests demonstrated estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and HER2/c-erbB-2 negativity in both cases. The rarity of these cases is noted, in view of their uncommon occurrence at an early age in men and their immunophenotypic positivity, similar to breast cancer in women. PMID:23825930

Rodrigues, Fabiana Resende; da Silva, André Vallejo; de Oliveira Teixeira, Calina Maria Loures; Antunes, Samantha Cunha Gomes; Rochael, Mayra Carrijo

2013-01-01

212

Contributions of radiology to the diagnosis, management, and cure of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

The role of radiology in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of advances in diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology in the overall care of patients with this disease. The author discusses the early history of mammography, the results of large-scale screening studies, improvements in the understanding of the biology of tumors, and the principles underlying the movement away from radical or modified radical mastectomy for tumor control.

Lester, R.G.

1984-04-01

213

'In vivo' Dosimetry in Tangential and Axilosupraclavicular Radiation Fields for Breast Cancer Postmastectomy  

SciTech Connect

This work is an 'in vivo' dosimetry study for breast cancer patients, treated with external radiotherapy. Patients who have suffered a modified radical mastectomy have been included in the study. Measurements will be made with thermoluminescent dosimeters and with radiochromic films. Such dosimetry will let us know the dose distribution in the zone which the applied beams overlap and compare the measureddose with that calculated one using the Eclipse 6.5 (Varian) planning system.

Garcia, Heredia A.; Ruiz, Trejo C. G.; Buenfil, Burgos A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, A.P. 20-364 Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM A.P. 70-543, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Poitevin, Chacon M. A.; Flores, J. M. Castro; Rodriguez, M. Ponce; Angeles, Zaragoza S. O. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando 22, Mexico D.F. 14080 (Mexico)

2008-08-11

214

``In vivo'' Dosimetry in Tangential and Axilosupraclavicular Radiation Fields for Breast Cancer Postmastectomy''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work is an "in vivo" dosimetry study for breast cancer patients, treated with external radiotherapy. Patients who have suffered a modified radical mastectomy have been included in the study. Measurements will be made with thermoluminescent dosimeters and with radiochromic films. Such dosimetry will let us know the dose distribution in the zone which the applied beams overlap and compare the measureddose with that calculated one using the Eclipse 6.5 (Varian) planning system.

García, Heredia A.; Ruiz, Trejo C. G.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Poitevin, Chacón M. A.; Flores, J. M. Castro; Rodríguez, M. Ponce; Ángeles, Zaragoza S. O.; Buenfil, Burgos A. E.

2008-08-01

215

Analysis of the psychological conditions and related factors of breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sufferers of breast cancer are often plagued by various psychological problems. Mastectomy, which has a serious influence\\u000a on the female sex characteristics, can bring about especially serious psychological problems. These problems affect not only\\u000a the patients’ quality of life but also the beginning, development, and end of the disease. This paper reviewed the relationships\\u000a between the patients’ personal factors, the

Guilin Huang; Yiping Wu; Guiqing Zhang; Pinghua Zhang; Jie Gao

2010-01-01

216

Factors Associated With Guideline-Concordant Use of Radiotherapy After Mastectomy in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We examined the rates and determinants of appropriate and inappropriate use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), as defined by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) practice guidelines, among women with Stage I-II breast cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition). Methods and Materials: Using clinical characteristics, 1,620 consecutive patients at eight NCCN institutions who had undergone mastectomy between July 1997 and June 2002 were classified into three cohorts according to whether the guidelines (1) recommended PMRT, (2) recommended against PMRT, or (3) made no definitive PMRT recommendation. We defined the absence of PMRT in the first cohort as underuse and receipt of PMRT in the second cohort as overuse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the association of clinical and sociodemographic factors with PMRT. Results: Overall, 23.8% of patients received PMRT. This included 199 (83.6%) of 238 in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort, 58 (5.6%) of 1,029 in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort, and 127 (38.6%) of 329 in the 'consider PMRT' cohort. The only factor associated with underuse in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort was nonreceipt of chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; p <0.0001). In addition to tumor characteristics, the factors associated with overuse in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort included age <50 years (OR, 2.28; p = 0.048), NCCN institution (OR, 1.04-8.29; p = 0.026), higher education (OR, 3.49; p = 0.001), and no reconstructive surgery (OR, 2.44; p = 0.019). The factors associated with PMRT in the 'consider PMRT' cohort included NCCN institution (OR, 1.1-9.01; p <0.0001), age <50 years (OR, 2.26; p = 0.041), and tumor characteristics. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concordance with definitive treatment guidelines was high. However, when current evidence does not support a definitive recommendation for PMRT, treatment decisions appear to be influenced, not only by patient age and clinical characteristics, but also by institution-specific patterns of care.

Punglia, Rinaa S. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: rpunglia@partners.org; Hughes, Melissa E. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Edge, Stephen B. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Theriault, Richard L. [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bookman, Michael A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wilson, John L. [Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard Solove Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Niland, Joyce C. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Weeks, Jane C. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-12-01

217

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Hong Guo, Qing Zhang and Asoke K. Nandi, Feature Extraction, Classification, Breast Cancer Diagnosis. Abstract: Breast cancer diagnosis have been investigated by different machine learning methods. This paper proposes a new method for breast cancer

Fernandez, Thomas

218

BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 4 Basic/Translational Research Carcinogenesis and Signaling Group 5R) Signaling in Breast Cancer 6 NF-B Family of Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer 7 Transgenic Mouse

Spence, Harlan Ernest

219

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Thomas Buchholz, M.D.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHouston, TX Nancy Davidson, M.D.University of Pittsburgh Cancer InstituteUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer CentersPittsburgh, PA Members William

220

Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI-pathological correlation following bilateral total mastectomy  

E-print Network

Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI-pathological correlation following bilateral total, Radiotherapy, Creteil, F-94010, France Address for correspondence / reprint requests: Alain Luciani MD, PhD AP;53(4):367-75" DOI : 10.1258/ar.2012.110477 #12;2 Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI

Boyer, Edmond

221

Metastatic Breast Cancer Presenting as a Subconjunctival Mass  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common primary source of orbital metastasis. Metastasis occurs through hematogenous spread and predominantly involves the choroid. We present a case of a metastatic subconjunctival mass associated with primary breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of its kind. A 41-year-old woman presented with complaints of conjunctival injection and a foreign body sensation in the left eye. She had a history of breast cancer and had been treated 2 years previously with modified radical mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Slit-lamp examination showed a cystic mass under the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, associated with dilated overlying conjunctival vessels. An excisional biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Positron emission tomography examination for systemic malignancy revealed multiple systemic metastasis. Metastatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subconjunctival lesions, and ophthalmic manifestations can play an important role in the detection of metastatic spread of a known primary breast cancer. PMID:24744803

Park, Young Min; Park, Jong Ho; Lee, Seung Uk

2014-01-01

222

Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-29

223

Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2013-11-21

224

Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-06

225

RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-30

226

Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-09

227

Histone lysine demethylases in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) have been recently discovered in mammals and have been nicknamed "erasers" for their ability to remove methyl groups from histone substrates. In cancer cells, KDMs can activate or repress gene transcription, behaving as oncogenes or tumor suppressors depending upon the cellular context. In order to investigate the potential role of KDMs in Breast Cancer (BC), we queried the Oncomine database and determined that the expression of KDMs correlates with BC prognosis. High expression of KDM3B and KDM5A is associated with a better prognosis (no recurrence after mastectomy p=0.005 and response to docetaxel p=0.005); conversely, KDM6A is overexpressed in BC patients with an unfavorable prognosis (mortality at 1 year, p=8.65E-7). Our findings suggest that KDMs could be potential targets for BC therapy. Further, altering the interactions between KDMs and Polycomb Group genes (PcG) may provide novel avenues for therapy that specifically targets these genes in BC. PMID:23266085

Paolicchi, Elisa; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, William L; Green, Jeffrey E; Danesi, Romano

2013-05-01

228

Stem cell and tissue engineering in breast reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer worldwide is the most common cancer in women with incidence rate varying from geographic areas. Guidelines for management of breast cancer have been largely established and widely used. Mastectomy is one of the surgical procedures used treating breast cancer. Optionally, after mastectomy, appropriately selected patients could undergo breast reconstruction to create their breast contour. Many techniques have been used for breast reconstructive surgery, mainly implant-based and autologous tissue reconstruction. Even with highly-experienced surgeon and good-quality breast and autologous substitute tissue, still there could be unfilled defect after mastectomy with reconstruction. Stem cell, in particular, adipose-derived stem cell residing within fat tissue, could be used to fill the imperfection providing optimal breast shape and natural feeling of fat tissue. However, whether surgical reconstruction alone or in combination with stem cell and tissue engineering approach be used, the ultimate outcomes are patient safety first and satisfaction second. PMID:25083496

Lohsiriwat, Visnu

2014-01-01

229

Sex and Women with Cancer -- Overview  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic How a woman’s body works Sex and Women With Cancer: Overview This is a shorter, easier- ... Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment ...

230

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

231

Pathology of hereditary breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are predisposed to breast cancer. The BRCA1-associated breast cancers have distinct morphology, being more often medullary-like, triple negative and showing a ‘basal’ phenotype. On the other hand, BRCA2 and BRCAX cancers are a heterogeneous group without a specific phenotype. When incorporated into risk assessment models, pathology data improves prediction of carrier

Leonard Da Silva; Sunil R Lakhani

2010-01-01

232

International nursing and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and its incidence is increasing in most countries. Nurses involved in breast cancer care have an impact on early detection of breast cancer, treatment, and symptom management, and they serve as advocates for women with the disease. In many countries nurses are far more numerous than physicians, and nurses are in an ideal position to influence breast cancer care. The International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care (ISNCC) is an organization representing more than 50,000 oncology nurses in 25 countries. The society provides a communication network for national and regional cancer nursing societies and communication on developments in cancer nursing to nurses working in countries where a national cancer nursing group does not exist. The society also acts as a resource for nurses in practice, education, research, and management, and it serves as a link for other international, regional, national, and local organizations in promoting collaboration to achieve ISNCC's goals. In collaboration with the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, the society developed a 2-day "train-the-trainer" workshop for a selected group of cancer nurses from around the world. The workshop includes didactic presentations, skills instruction, and demonstrations that cover the continuum of breast cancer care. Participants have represented the countries of Brazil, Colombia, China, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Pakistan, Australia, Germany, South Africa, Greece, and India. They have subsequently developed educational programs for nurses and the public in their countries, started support groups, published educational materials on breast cancer, and participated in political activities. These advances indicate that despite challenges such as nursing shortages and a lack of resources, cancer nurses are making a difference internationally. PMID:12713505

Yarbro, Connie Henke

2003-01-01

233

Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study  

SciTech Connect

Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

Khanfir, Kaouthar, E-mail: kaouthar.khanfir@rsv-gnw.ch [Hopital de Sion, CHCVs, Sion (Switzerland); Kallel, Adel [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Villette, Sylviane [Centre Rene Huguenin, Paris (France); Belkacemi, Yazid [CHU Henri Mondor, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Vautravers, Claire [Centre George Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Nguyen, TanDat [Institut Jean Gaudinot, Reims (France); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Li Yexiong [Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Boersma, Liesbeth [Maastricht University Medical Center (MAASTRO clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philip [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Goldberg, Hadassah [Western Galilee Hospital-Nahariya, Nahariya (Israel); Vees, Hansjorg [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Senkus, Elzbieta [Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut [Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-04-01

234

The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 ?g/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 ?g/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 ?g Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content in defatted tissue and oil from such tissues and thereby contribute towards our knowledge on aluminium and any role in breast cancer. PMID:23870171

House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

2013-10-01

235

Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24575835

Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

2014-11-01

236

Breast cancer surgery and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs): patient classification and hospital reimbursement in 11 European countries.  

PubMed

Researchers from eleven countries (i.e. Austria, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden) compared how their DRG systems deal with breast cancer surgery patients. DRG algorithms and indicators of resource consumption were assessed for those DRGs that individually contain at least 1% of all breast cancer surgery patients. Six standardised case vignettes were defined and quasi prices according to national DRG-based hospital payment systems were ascertained. European DRG systems classify breast cancer surgery patients according to different sets of classification variables into three to seven DRGs. Quasi prices for an index case treated with partial mastectomy range from €577 in Poland to €5780 in the Netherlands. Countries award their highest payments for very different kinds of patients. Breast cancer specialists and national DRG authorities should consider how other countries' DRG systems classify breast cancer patients in order to identify potential scope for improvement and to ensure fair and appropriate reimbursement. PMID:23218742

Scheller-Kreinsen, David; Quentin, Wilm; Geissler, Alexander; Busse, Reinhard

2013-10-01

237

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

238

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

1998-01-01

239

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

240

Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... the long term. Some people even start during cancer treatment. Making healthier choices For many people, a diagnosis ...

241

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart  

MedlinePLUS

Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , BS ; Kamaneh Montazeri , MD ; Sara Tolaney , MD ; Javid Moslehi , MD ... javid.moslehi{at}vanderbilt.edu Next Section Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

242

Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities  

MedlinePLUS

... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

243

Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

2011-01-01

244

Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use

Dorte Lisbet Nielsen; Michael Andersson; Jon Lykkegaard Andersen; Claus Kamby

2010-01-01

245

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2013-05-07

246

FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-08-04

247

Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

248

Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

249

Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-08

250

Life After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... Support You Need • Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer • Lymphedema • Radiation Therapy and Side Effects Physical effects of ... your arm you may be at risk of lymphedema [lim-fa-DEE-ma]. With lymphedema, lymphatic fluid ...

251

Non-Cancerous Breast Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... Push escape to close share window. Print Share Save Saved this Article Close Push escape to close ... Intraductal papillomas Granular cell tumors Fat necrosis and oil cysts Mastitis Duct ectasia Other non-cancerous breast ...

252

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes hormone therapy (including antiestrogens, LH-RH agonists, aromatase inhibitors, and SERMs) and its role in preventing and treating breast cancer. Includes information about possible side effects.

253

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... used therapy is a female hormone blocker called tamoxifen. A newer therapy uses a pill (anastrozole, letrozole, ... are at high risk for developing breast cancer, tamoxifen or raloxifene can also be taken to prevent ...

254

Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation  

PubMed Central

Purpose Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the ?2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%–5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%–4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%–1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40–0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18–0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%–3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%–1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28–0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast-preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer. PMID:24268788

Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01

255

Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the ?{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions: In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer.

Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ying [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2014-02-01

256

Relationship of variations in tumor cell kinetics induced by primary chemotherapy to tumor regression and prognosis in locally advanced breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of changes in3H-thymidine labelling index (TLI) induced by primary chemotherapy to tumor response and relapse rate in 36 patients with previously untreated locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) was analyzed. All patients received primary chemotherapy (3 cycles FAC), followed by mastectomy and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (3 FAC alternated with 3 CMF). Tumor TLI was evaluated immediately prior to primary

G. Gardin; A. Alama; R. Rosso; E. Campora; L. Repetto; P. Pronzato; L. Merlini; C. Naso; A. Camoriano; R. Meazza; F. Barbieri; E. Baldini; P. G. Giannessi; P. F. Conte

1994-01-01

257

Fusion genes in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth M. Batty Clare College, University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge in candidature for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy November 2010 ii... is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. It has not been submitted whole or in part for any other qualification at any other University. iii Summary Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth Batty...

Batty, Elizabeth

2012-02-07

258

NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas,

Yiannis Drosos; Mirsini Kouloukoussa; Anne Carine Østvold; Kirsten Grundt; Nikos Goutas; Dimitrios Vlachodimitropoulos; Sophia Havaki; Panagoula Kollia; Christos Kittas; Evangelos Marinos; Vassiliki Aleporou-Marinou

2009-01-01

259

Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer.  

PubMed

Brain metastases are less common than bone or visceral metastases in patients with breast cancer. The overall prognosis of breast cancer patients with brain metastases remains poor, and these metastases are less responsive to systemic therapies. Brain metastasis is associated with a reduced quality of life due to progressive neurologic impairments. Recently, a trend of increased incidence of brain metastases in breast cancer has been noted. Reasons for this increased incidence include the more frequent use of sensitive detection methods such as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and increased awareness of brain metastasis among patients and clinicians. Adjuvant and systemic therapy with drugs that have a low blood-brain barrier penetrance can lead to an increased risk of brain metastases in breast cancer patients. Molecular subtype is a predictive factor for overall survival after developing brain metastases. Patients who do not have a poor prognosis based on previously identified prognostic factors should be treated with radiation therapy to control symptoms. Whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and surgery are tools for the local treatment of brain metastases. Novel molecular target therapy, including HER2-targeted therapy, has demonstrated an antitumor effect on brain metastases. In this review, we provide a practical algorithm for the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases. This review provides an overview of the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, prognostic factors and current and potential future management strategies of breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:25320339

Niikura, Naoki; Saji, Shigehira; Tokuda, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji

2014-12-01

260

Personalized therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a complex disease characterized by many morphological, clinical and molecular features. For many years, this disease has been classified according to histopathologic criteria, known as the tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) staging system. Clinical criteria that include immunohistochemical markers, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), provide a classification of breast cancer and dictates the optimal therapeutic approach for treatment. With genomic techniques, such as real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), microarrays, next-generation sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing, breast cancer diagnostics is going through a significant evolution. Genomic and transcriptomic technologies make the analysis of gene expression signatures and mutation status possible so that tumors may now be classified more accurately with respect to diagnosis and prognosis. The -omic era has also made the possible identification of new biomarkers involved in breast cancer development, survival and invasion that can be gradually incorporated either into clinical testing or clinical trials. Together, clinical and molecular criteria can contribute to a more personalized management of the breast cancer patient. This article will present the progress made in the diagnosis and management of breast cancer using molecular information provided by genomic and transcriptomic technologies. PMID:24635704

De Abreu, F B; Schwartz, G N; Wells, W A; Tsongalis, G J

2014-07-01

261

Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (Breast CFR) and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (Colon CFR) were established by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a unique resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

262

Microarray Profiling in Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. It arises from a variety of genetic, epigenetic, and chromosomal alterations.\\u000a The traditional prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer mainly focus on the clinical–pathological parameters, which\\u000a are unable to reveal the diverse molecular alterations of breast cancer and are imprecise in predicting breast cancer progression\\u000a and clinical outcomes. In recent

Yong Qian; Xianglin Shi; Vincent Castranova; Nancy L. Guo

263

Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.  

PubMed

The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery?=?1.76?ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

2015-01-01

264

Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

2003-01-01

265

Strategies for managing breast cancer risk after the menopause.  

PubMed

Postmenopausal women in Western societies are conscious of breast cancer as a potential cause of death and ill health, which they wish to avoid with the advice of their doctors. Yet many factors that predispose women to the development of cancer will have been laid down before the menopause, in their genetic makeup or during their adolescent years. Even in middle age it is important to take account of the intrinsic level of risk, and to give women advice tailored to their own individual risk level. This results from their family history, previous diseases such as benign breast disease, and previous treatment for breast cancer or Hodgkin's disease. For those at the highest level of risk, strategies will include regular screening, prophylactic mastectomy, and the use of chemoprevention agents, such as tamoxifen. These women should avoid hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and control their menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis through the use of other agents now available - venlafaxine for menopausal symptoms and bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. Raloxifene is an agent under trial that may be valuable for breast cancer control as well as for osteoporosis. Women at standard population risk will require less robust preventive strategies, which will include screening and lifestyle modification. Their decisions regarding HRT should now be modified by recent evidence of associated risks. Recent studies show that tibolone causes less mammographic density and has a lower relative risk of breast cancer than combined estrogen/progestogen preparations. There is limited evidence that controlling obesity, participating in exercise and adopting a diet low in fats and high in fruit and vegetables will alter risk at this age. These precautions will, however, reduce the risk of other diseases common in this age group, such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alcohol, even in small amounts, is a risk factor for breast cancer. Given the cardioprotective effect of moderate alcohol intake, advice on alcohol must reflect the individual relative risk of cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Personal risk assessment is relevant for all women. Screening and a healthy lifestyle are worthwhile approaches for all, with the more aggressive approaches such as chemoprevention and prophylactic surgery reserved for those who have substantially elevated levels of risk. Once the menopause has passed, screening is probably the most effective evidence-based tool for breast cancer control by early diagnosis. PMID:15330677

Warren, Ruth; Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

2004-01-01

266

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

267

Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

268

Screening for “early” breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The only means available today to reduce the mortality from breast cancer is by detection of localized disease. So doing involves mass screening of apparently well women. For best results, both the clinician and the radiologist must be involved and develop expertise because early cancers are often detectable on palpation alone or on mammography alone. Cooperation of the clinician and

Philip Strax

1977-01-01

269

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

270

Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... NCI Publications Español RSS Feed Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk Reviewed: January 12, 2010 Introduction A woman’s ... that may influence a woman’s chances of developing breast cancer later in life. As a result, over several ...

271

Tamoxifen lowers breast cancer risk long term.  

PubMed

Investigators for the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study-I reported that tamoxifen reduced the incidence of breast cancer by 29% in women at high risk of the disease after a median follow-up of 16 years. PMID:25656902

2015-02-01

272

Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update  

MedlinePLUS

... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

273

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

274

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

275

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

276

[Breast reconstruction: state of the arts].  

PubMed

Radical mastectomy is still required in many cases, such as inflammatory breast cancer, multicentric breast cancer, large tumour volume and small breast size. In this setting, immediate breast reconstruction is more and more offered for breast cancer patients. But such plastic surgery is still debated, owing to risks of implant complications when postoperative radiotherapy of chest wall is mandatory in locoregional breast cancer management. Here, the review is focused on different type of immediate breast reconstruction and on risk of implants complications with or without postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:22579756

El-Nemr, M; Rimareix, F; Karsenti, G; Acevedo-Henao, C M; El Husseiny, G; Marsiglia, H; Heymann, S; Bourgier, C

2012-01-01

277

Transdermal or Oral Telapristone Acetate in Treating Patients Undergoing Mastectomy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-16

278

Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2013-10-07

279

Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-17

280

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01

281

Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

282

BRCA1 and Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-part animation explains the role of the BRCA1 protein in DNA repair and the development of breast cancer. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene can lead to breast cancer and other forms of cancer. Part 1 of the animation, ÃÂThe function of BRCA1,ÃÂ provides an overview of how the BRCA1 protein functions in healthy cells to detect and repair DNA damage. Part 2, ÃÂMutations in BRCA1 Can Cause Cancer,ÃÂ explains how individuals who inherit a single mutated copy of BRCA1 are at an increased risk of cancer, and how cancer develops when the second copy of BRCA1 becomes mutated. Animation is closed captioned. Run times of each animation part: approximately 1 minute 15 seconds.

2010-11-18

283

Lymphangiosarcoma of the arm presenting with lymphedema in a woman 16 years after mastectomy: a case report.  

PubMed

Lymphangiosarcoma following breast cancer is a relatively rare entity, with around 300 cases so far reported worldwide. Affecting the long term survivors of breast cancer, lymphangiosarcoma (Stewart-Traves Syndrome) has a high mortality rate. Since lympedema following radical mastectomy or axillary clearance and radiotherapy seems to be the main predisposing factor, further research regarding modifications in the surgical technique of axillary nodes dissection as well as the development of new chemotherapeutic agents effective in lymphangiosarcoma are required. PMID:19918554

Sepah, Yasir J; Umer, Masood; Qureshi, Asim; Khan, Shaista

2009-01-01

284

Lymphangiosarcoma of the arm presenting with lymphedema in a woman 16 years after mastectomy: a case report  

PubMed Central

Lymphangiosarcoma following breast cancer is a relatively rare entity, with around 300 cases so far reported worldwide. Affecting the long term survivors of breast cancer, lymphangiosarcoma (Stewart-Traves Syndrome) has a high mortality rate. Since lympedema following radical mastectomy or axillary clearance and radiotherapy seems to be the main predisposing factor, further research regarding modifications in the surgical technique of axillary nodes dissection as well as the development of new chemotherapeutic agents effective in lymphangiosarcoma are required. PMID:19918554

Sepah, Yasir J; Qureshi, Asim; Khan, Shaista

2009-01-01

285

Oestrogen exposure and breast cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiological and experimental evidence implicates oestrogens in the aetiology of breast cancer. Most established risk factors for breast cancer in humans probably act through hormone-related pathways, and increased concentrations of circulating oestrogens have been found to be strongly associated with increased risk for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This article explores the evidence for the hypothesis that oestrogen exposure is

Ruth C Travis; Timothy J Key

2003-01-01

286

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter  

E-print Network

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter Special Interest Articles: ·Hormone receptor negative breast cancer: Improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy by targeting immune cells Page 1, cont. Page 6 (article from Breast Cancer Connections) Page 8 Editor: Karla Kerlikowske, MD Professor of Medicine

Walter, Peter

287

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

Ginzel, Matthew

288

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

289

Does diet affect breast cancer risk?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of specific dietary factors in breast cancer causation is not completely resolved. Results from prospective studies do not support the concept that fat intake in middle life has a major relation to breast cancer risk. However, weight gain in middle life contributes substantially to breast cancer risk. Alcohol is the best established dietary risk factor, probably by increasing

Michelle D Holmes; Walter C Willett

2004-01-01

290

Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

2014-06-16

291

Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

292

Partial breast irradiation as second conservative treatment for local breast cancer recurrence  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Mastectomy is the treatment of reference for local relapse after breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to document the feasibility and the results of associating lumpectomy with partial breast irradiation by interstitial brachytherapy (IB) as local treatment for an isolated ipsilateral BC local recurrence (LR). Methods and materials: Between 1975 and 1996 at Marseille and Nice Cancer Institutes, 4026 patients received lumpectomy and radiotherapy (RT) (50-80 Gy) for a localized breast cancer of which 473 presented a LR. Among these patients, 69 (14.6%) received a second lumpectomy followed by IB, which delivered 30 Gy (Nice, n = 24) or 45-50 Gy (Marseille, n = 45) with 3 to 8 {sup 192}Ir wires in 1 or 2 planes on the 85% isodose. Results: Median age at LR was 58.2 years, median follow-up since primary BC was 10 years, and median follow-up after the second conservative treatment was 50.2 months (range, 2-139 months). Immediate tolerance was good in all cases. Grade 2 to 3 long-term complications (LTC) according to IB dose were 0%, 28%, and 32%, respectively, for 30 Gy, 45 to 46 Gy, and 50 Gy (p 0.01). Grade 2 to 3 LTC according to total dose were 4% and 30%, respectively, for total doses (initial RT plus IB) {<=} 100 Gy or >100 Gy (p = 0.008). Logistic regression showed that the only factor associated with Grade 2 to 3 complications was higher IB doses (p = 0.01). We noted 11 second LRs (LR2), 10 distant metastases (DM), and 5 specific deaths. LR2 occurred either in the tumor bed (50.8%) or close to the tumor bed (34.3%) or in another quadrant (14.9%). Kaplan-Meier 5-year freedom from (FF) LR2 (FFLR2), FFDM, and DFS were 77.4%, 86.7%, and 68.9%, respectively. Overall 5-year survival (OS) was 91.8%. Univariate analysis showed the following factors associated with a higher FFLR2: (1) number of wires used for IB (3-4 vs. 5-8 wires, p = 0.006), (2) IB doses (30-45 Gy vs. 46-60 Gy, p = 0.05), (3) number of planes (1 vs. 2, p = 0.05), (4) interval between primary breast cancer and LR (< 36 months vs. {>=}36 months, p = 0.06). Multivariate analysis showed two factors associated with better local control: (1) number of wires (5-8 wires, p = 0.013) and (2) interval between primary breast cancer and LR {>=}36 months (p = 0.039). The multivariate analysis showed two factors associated with better FFDM: (1) absence of initial axilla involvement (p 0.019) and (2) relapse in a different location (p = 0.04). These two factors were also associated with a higher OS. Conclusion: Our experience showed that second conservative treatments for local relapse were feasible and gave results comparable to standard mastectomy. We recommend delivering IB doses of at least 46 Gy in 2 planes when initial radiotherapy delivered 50 Gy. The study gives enough information to encourage a Phase III trial that compares radical mastectomy to conservative procedures for localized breast cancer recurrences.

Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, A. Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France)]. E-mail: jean-michel.hannoun-levi@fccc.edu; Houvenaeghel, Gilles [Department of Surgery, Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Center, Marseilles (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Center, Marseilles (France); Ellis, Steve [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital La Timone, Marseilles (France); Teissier, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique du Meridien, Cannes (France); Alzieu, Claude [Department of Surgery, Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Center, Marseilles (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Paoli-Calmettes Cancer Center, Marseilles (France); Lallement, Michel [Department of Radiation Oncology and Surgery, A. Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital La Timone, Marseilles (France); Cowen, Didier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital La Timone, Marseilles (France)

2004-12-01

293

Breast Cancer Organization of Screening Programs  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Breast Cancer: Mortality Rates | Screening

294

Synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast: A case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

The current report presents the case of a 41-year-old female exhibiting synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast. Pathological examination of a tissue sample following biopsy identified papillary carcinoma of the thyroid and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast to provide a definitive diagnosis of synchronous primary tumors. The patient underwent a modified radical mastectomy and total thyroidectomy. Following regular adjuvant chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide (800 mg), doxorubicin (100 mg) and paclitaxel (120 mg), once every three weeks for 3.5 months, oral levothyroxine and endocrinotherapy was recommended. Two years after the initial diagnosis, the patient was healthy with no disease recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, no association has been identified between the etiology and diagnoses of the two synchronous primary tumors. Thus, the aim of the current report was to improve the understanding of synchronous primary tumors of the thyroid and breast by presenting a review of the associated literature regarding breast and thyroid cancer. The mechanisms of synchronous neoplasms have only recently been elucidated, however, misdiagnosis is common. Clinicians are, therefore, advised to carefully examine patients with thyroid or breast cancer to avoid an incorrect or misdiagnosis. Furthermore, the present report aims to provide a reference for the cancer database, since the majority of analyses of rare diseases are derived from case reports. To improve the understanding of synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast, an analysis of recent studies regarding the underlying mechanisms of synchronous primary cancers was also undertaken. PMID:25435991

Liu, Li; Shi, Jing; Mao, Fengfeng; Wei, Jinli; Fu, Deyuan; Zhang, Jiaxin

2015-01-01

295

Synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast: A case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

The current report presents the case of a 41-year-old female exhibiting synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast. Pathological examination of a tissue sample following biopsy identified papillary carcinoma of the thyroid and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast to provide a definitive diagnosis of synchronous primary tumors. The patient underwent a modified radical mastectomy and total thyroidectomy. Following regular adjuvant chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide (800 mg), doxorubicin (100 mg) and paclitaxel (120 mg), once every three weeks for 3.5 months, oral levothyroxine and endocrinotherapy was recommended. Two years after the initial diagnosis, the patient was healthy with no disease recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, no association has been identified between the etiology and diagnoses of the two synchronous primary tumors. Thus, the aim of the current report was to improve the understanding of synchronous primary tumors of the thyroid and breast by presenting a review of the associated literature regarding breast and thyroid cancer. The mechanisms of synchronous neoplasms have only recently been elucidated, however, misdiagnosis is common. Clinicians are, therefore, advised to carefully examine patients with thyroid or breast cancer to avoid an incorrect or misdiagnosis. Furthermore, the present report aims to provide a reference for the cancer database, since the majority of analyses of rare diseases are derived from case reports. To improve the understanding of synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and breast, an analysis of recent studies regarding the underlying mechanisms of synchronous primary cancers was also undertaken. PMID:25435991

LIU, LI; SHI, JING; MAO, FENGFENG; WEI, JINLI; FU, DEYUAN; ZHANG, JIAXIN

2015-01-01

296

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

1998-01-01

297

Yoga therapy for breast cancer patients: a prospective cohort study.  

PubMed

We sought to study the impact of yoga therapy on anxiety, depression and physical health in breast cancer patients. Stage I-III post-operative breast cancer patients were recruited with twelve 1-h weekly yoga sessions completed with an experienced yoga instructor. Before and after each module completion, assessments were obtained with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Dallas pain scale and shoulder flexibility measurements. Fourteen patients completed the entire yoga session with 42.8% having a total mastectomy and 15.4% having breast reconstruction. Both right and left shoulder abduction flexibility significantly improved (p = 0.004; p = 0.015 respectively) as well as left shoulder flexion (p = 0.046). An improvement trend in scores for the HADS and Dallas questionnaires pre- and post-intervention was found, although it was not statistically significant. Our data indicates an improvement in physical function in addition to a consistent amelioration in anxiety, depression and pain symptoms after a yoga intervention. PMID:24199978

Sudarshan, Monisha; Petrucci, Andrea; Dumitra, Sinziana; Duplisea, Jodie; Wexler, Sharon; Meterissian, Sarkis

2013-11-01

298

Autonomy and reason: treatment choice in breast cancer.  

PubMed

The practice of offering choice to those women with breast cancer for whom either breast conserving surgery or mastectomy would be equally beneficial has come to be seen as an important aspect of medical care. As well as improving satisfaction with treatment, this is seen as satisfying the ethical principle of respect for autonomy. A number of studies, however, show that women are not always comfortable with such choice, preferring to leave treatment decisions to their surgeons. A question then arises as to the extent that these women can be seen as autonomous or as exercising autonomy. This paper argues, however, that the understanding of autonomy which is applied in current approaches to breast cancer care does not adequately support the exercise of autonomy, and that the clinical context of care means that women are not able to engage in the kind of reasoning that might promote the exercise of autonomy. Where respect for autonomy is limited to informed consent and choice, there is a danger that women's interests are overlooked in those aspects of their care where choice is not appropriate, with very real, long-term consequences for some women. Promoting the exercise of autonomy, it is argued, needs to go beyond the conception of autonomy as rational individuals making their own decisions, and clinicians need to work with an understanding of autonomy as relational in order to better involve women in their care. PMID:22995006

Twomey, Mary

2012-10-01

299

Tamoxifen Therapy for Breast Cancer and Endometrial Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Tamoxifen is effective in treating breast cancer, reduces breast cancer incidence among high-risk women, and is associated with increased endometrial cancer risk. This study was designed to examine the possible modifying effects of endometrial cancer risk factors on the tamoxifen- endometrial cancer association. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of endometrial cancer (324 case patients and 671 individually matched

Leslie Bernstein; Dennis Deapen; James R. Cerhan; Stephen M. Schwartz; Jonathan Liff; Jeffrey A. Perlman; Leslie Ford

1999-01-01

300

Immunohistochemical reactions of primary neuroendocrine breast cancer.  

PubMed

We performed immunohistochemical analysis of neuroendocrine breast cancer. The significance of this approach to differential diagnosis of this cancer form by detection of specific markers is demonstrated. The incidence of diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer has increased 8-fold over 5 years. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is responsible for 3.4% of all breast cancer cases. The disease is significantly more incident in patients over 60. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is characterized by high expression of neuron-specific enolase (100%) and chromagranin A (57%). The data indicate that irrespective of the location, macroscopic picture, and immunohistochemical profile of cytokeratins and steroid hormones, breast cancer is characterized by clear-cut expression of neuroendocrine markers in different combinations. Immunohistochemical detection of these markers makes it possible to detect the hormone-secreting elements and evaluate their role in the tumor pool, which is essential for the differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer, including studies of puncture biopsy specimens. PMID:25567197

Kirillina, M P; Loskutova, K S; Innokent'eva, A S; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

2015-01-01

301

Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-07-07

302

Paclitaxel (Taxol) in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (Taxol) is a diterpine plant compound that was isolated initially from the bark of the western yew tree, Taxus brevifolia, but can now be produced by semisynthesis from a renewable source. Paclitaxel is the first new agent in the past decade to have confirmed single agent activity in breast cancer in excess of 50%. A 28% response rate has been reported in doxorubicin-refractory patients. Ongoing studies include attempts to combine paclitaxel with other drugs used for breast cancer treatment and with radiation. PMID:7908664

Arbuck, S G; Dorr, A; Friedman, M A

1994-02-01

303

Estrogen metabolism and breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

2015-01-28

304

Hormonal prevention of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer prevention can be provided by using SERMs or aromatase inhibitors depending on the ovarian status, with a global risk reduction of 50 to 60%. Prophylactic annexectomy offered to reduce ovarian risk in BRCA mutation carriers also lowers breast cancer risk by 50%. Main side effects include deep vein thrombosis for SERMs, hot flushes and joint pain (although less frequently than initially suspected) with aromatase inhibitors. Other strategies based on progesterone, insulin or prolactin signaling modulation may be offered in the future. Criteria for candidate selection remain to be established. PMID:24997772

Thomin, Anne; Friszer, Stéphanie; Fajac, Anne; Daraï, Émile; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

2014-07-01

305

Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

306

Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2011-07-08

307

Everolimus and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer That Has Progressed or Recurred on Everolimus and Exemestane Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-12-02

308

Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990  

MedlinePLUS

... News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: October ... report from the American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States ...

309

Misdiagnosed male breast cancer with an unknown primary tumor: A case report.  

PubMed

Compared with female breast cancer, male breast cancer (MBC) has an extremely low morbidity, later staging and fewer breast tissues. The lumps are easier to invade in the center and the majority of the cases are positive for metastatic lymph node, with the typical clinical manifestation as a painless mass in partial breast. MBC with an unknown primary tumor is rare and is often prone to misdiagnosis, resulting in a delay in correct treatment. Such a case is extremely significant for clinical reference. The current study presents a 58-year-old male who developed a painless mass in the left armpit and received armpit mass biopsy and pathological examination which showed glandular cancer, with a high possibility of mammary primary tumor. The patient was administered four cycles of paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin chemotherapy. However, three months later, the patient identified novel disseminated lymph nodes in the left armpit. The initial pathological section and paraffin blocks were re-examined and the patient was finally diagnosed with breast invasive ductal carcinoma based on the metastases pathology and immunohistochemical examination. No breast mass was found on physical examination of the patient and the tumor markers, including cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen, were normal. No primary tumors were observed in the mammography and PET-CT and the primary tumor was not found following the left breast modified radical mastectomy. PMID:24959243

Wang, Wen-Wu; Chen, Lang; Ouyang, Xue-Nong

2014-07-01

310

Misdiagnosed male breast cancer with an unknown primary tumor: A case report  

PubMed Central

Compared with female breast cancer, male breast cancer (MBC) has an extremely low morbidity, later staging and fewer breast tissues. The lumps are easier to invade in the center and the majority of the cases are positive for metastatic lymph node, with the typical clinical manifestation as a painless mass in partial breast. MBC with an unknown primary tumor is rare and is often prone to misdiagnosis, resulting in a delay in correct treatment. Such a case is extremely significant for clinical reference. The current study presents a 58-year-old male who developed a painless mass in the left armpit and received armpit mass biopsy and pathological examination which showed glandular cancer, with a high possibility of mammary primary tumor. The patient was administered four cycles of paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin chemotherapy. However, three months later, the patient identified novel disseminated lymph nodes in the left armpit. The initial pathological section and paraffin blocks were re-examined and the patient was finally diagnosed with breast invasive ductal carcinoma based on the metastases pathology and immunohistochemical examination. No breast mass was found on physical examination of the patient and the tumor markers, including cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen, were normal. No primary tumors were observed in the mammography and PET-CT and the primary tumor was not found following the left breast modified radical mastectomy. PMID:24959243

WANG, WEN-WU; CHEN, LANG; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

2014-01-01

311

Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

2014-08-18

312

What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer in men? What are the key statistics about breast cancer in men? The American Cancer ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

313

Neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer refers to the use of different treatment modalities prior to surgical excision of the tumor. It has been accepted as a treatment option for patients with nonmetastatic disease, because it renders inoperable tumors operable and increases the rates of breast-conserving surgery, while achieving similar long-term clinical outcomes as adjuvant treatment. The neoadjuvant setting is being increasingly perceived as a research platform, where the biologic effects of traditional anticancer agents can be delineated, prognostic and predictive biomarkers can be identified, and the development of targeted agents can be expedited. Surrogate endpoints that can predict long-term clinical outcome and are evaluable early on, such as the pathologic complete response, offer valuable opportunities for rapid assessment of anticancer agents. Additionally, efforts for molecular profiling of the post-neoadjuvant residual disease hold the potential to lead to personalized therapy for breast cancer patients with early-stage high-risk disease. PMID:25386936

Zardavas, Dimitrios; Piccart, Martine

2015-01-14

314

Dietary Folate Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: Results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Folate is involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It has been hypothesized that high intake of folate may reduce the risk of human cancers, including cancer of the breast. Using data from a population- based case-control study of breast cancer conducted in urban Shanghai during 1996 -1998, we evaluated the association of dietary folate intake and breast cancer risk

Martha J. Shrubsole; Fan Jin; Qi Dai; Xiao-Ou Shu; John D. Potter; James R. Hebert; Yu-Tang Gao; Wei Zheng

2001-01-01

315

The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

316

Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

2007-04-24

317

Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications  

Cancer.gov

Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

318

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

319

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno  

E-print Network

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000 Cancer: 6 Hallmarks #12;Breast Anatomy and Histology Normal Breast Histology - H&E Stain Ross and Pawlina, Histology: A Text and Atlas Ducts - Simple columnar epithelium Normal ductules with basement membrane #12

Gleeson, Joseph G.

320

Retinoid, Retinoic Acid Receptor ? and Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Retinoids have been reported to inhibit the growth of several breast cancer cell lines in culture and to reduce breast tumor growth in animal models. Furthermore, retinoic acid (RA) can augment the action of other breast cancer cell growth inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, interest has increased in the potential use of retinoids for the prevention and

Qifeng Yang; Takeo Sakurai; Kennichi Kakudo

2002-01-01

321

Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial  

Cancer.gov

The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies.

322

Electromagnetic imaging for breast cancer research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a serious potential health problem for all women. The current screening and imaging techniques such as X-ray mammography, clinical examination, ultrasound, and MRI, even combined in some way, provide only 73% accuracy in detecting breast cancer. This motivates researchers with biomedical background to investigate new techniques to advance the screening techniques aiming for early detection of breast

Magda El-Shenawee

2011-01-01

323

A probable risk factor of female breast cancer: study on benign and malignant breast tissue samples.  

PubMed

The study reports enhanced Fe, Cu, and Zn contents in breast tissues, a probable risk factor of breast cancer in females. Forty-one formalin-fixed breast tissues were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Twenty malignant, six adjacent to malignant and 15 benign tissues samples were investigated. The malignant tissues samples were of grade 11 and type invasive ductal carcinoma. The quantitative comparison between the elemental levels measured in the two types of specimen (benign and malignant) tissues (removed after surgery) suggests significant elevation of these metals (Fe, Cu, and Zn) in the malignant tissue. The specimens were collected just after mastectomy of women aged 19 to 59 years from the hospitals of Islamabad and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Most of the patients belong to urban areas of Pakistan. Findings of study depict that these elements have a promising role in the initiation and development of carcinoma as consistent pattern of elevation for Fe, Cu, and Zn was observed. The results showed the excessive accumulation of Fe (229?±?121 mg/L) in malignant breast tissue samples of patients (p?breast cancer. In order to validate our method of analysis, certified reference material muscle tissue lyophilized (IAEA) MA-M-2/TM was analyzed for metal studied. Determined concentrations were quite in good agreement with certified levels. Asymmetric concentration distribution for Fe, Cu, and Zn was observed in both malignant and benign tissue samples. PMID:24254879

Rehman, Sohaila; Husnain, Syed M

2014-01-01

324

Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.  

PubMed

An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:25489714

Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

2015-01-24

325

Estimation of volumetric breast density for breast cancer risk prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mammographic density (MD) has been shown to be a strong risk predictor for breast cancer. Compared to subjective assessment by a radiologist, computer-aided analysis of digitized mammograms provides a quantitative and more reproducible method for assessing breast density. However, the current methods of estimating breast density based on the area of bright signal in a mammogram do not reflect the

Olga Pawluczyk; Martin J. Yaffe; Norman F. Boyd; Roberta A. Jong

2000-01-01

326

Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2012-12-12

327

Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), a joint effort co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is the next phase of a program that began with the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC) in 2003. The BCERP supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

328

Benign lesions and cancer of the breast.  

PubMed

The retroprospective study of breast cancer in relation to benign breast lesions (BBL) involved an analysis of the breast cancer incidence in a cohort of women with a history of BBL. This cohort was formed on the basis of histological and cytological investigations performed during 1982-1991. A total of 10,776 cases with BBI were recorded, followed-up and analyzed. The total person-years of follow-up was 60,872. A total of 35 women with breast cancer were detected during the study. Cohort members with a BBL history were stratified into six subcohorts with respect to morphological and cytological patterns. Comparison of the observed breast cancer incidence with the expected breast cancer incidence calculated on the basis of the age-adjusted breast cancer incidence in the general population showed no significant rise in breast cancer incidence in the whole BBL cohort. The ratio of observed to expected incidence rates was 1.16. The analysis of subcohorts with diverse BBL patterns demonstrated a marked increase in breast cancer incidence only in the intraductal papilloma and cyst subcohorts. The ratios of observed and expected rates were 5.4 and 1.6, respectively. There was no significant difference from population levies of breast cancer risk in subcohorts with history of fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease, breast nipple discharge and other lesions. Similar results were obtained in the prospective part of the study. PMID:10866034

Levshin, V; Pikhut, P; Yakovleva, I; Lazarev, I

1998-02-01

329

Incidence of anaemia in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy.  

PubMed

Anaemia is frequent in breast cancer patients but often remains undiagnosed and untreated. To determine the incidence of anaemia a prospective survey of primary non-metastatic breast cancer patients who received at least four cycles of adjuvant, non-platinum multi-agent chemotherapy was conducted at 47 centres in Austria. Two hundred and forty seven patients were prospectively included between October 1999 and December 1999. Haemoglobin (Hb) levels were determined after surgery and prior to each cycle of chemotherapy. Treatment of anaemia (blood transfusion or epoetin alfa) during the observation period was at the physician's discretion. For the purpose of this study, patients were considered to be anaemic if their Hb was below 12 g/dl. At baseline (after surgery and before the first cycle of chemotherapy), 28.7% of all patients were anaemic. The only significant differentiating factor was the type of surgery. 37.9% of patients who underwent mastectomy were anaemic, whereas only 22.8% of patients who underwent breast conserving surgery were anaemic. Forty two percent of 176 patients with a Hb level of > or = 12 g/dl at baseline developed anaemia during adjuvant chemotherapy. The only factor that significantly influenced the development of anaemia during chemotherapy was the Hb level at baseline. The total incidence of anaemia in patients with primary breast cancer who underwent surgery followed by adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy was 58.7%. Forty nine patients (20.2%), 48 patients (19.2%) and 48 patients (19.2%) showed a decrease in Hb levels by 1 g/dl, 1-2 g/dl and > 2 g/dl, respectively. Only 18.6% of the patients who were found to be anaemic received anaemia treatment. The two most important factors for developing anaemia are the kind of surgery and the Hb level prior to chemotherapy. PMID:12846419

Denison, Ursula; Baumann, Jose; Peters-Engl, Christian; Samonigg, Hellmut; Krippl, Peter; Lang, Alois; Obermair, Andreas; Wagner, Helga; Sevelda, Paul

2003-06-01

330

Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity  

MedlinePLUS

... Right to Know Campaign Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español (Spanish) Share Compartir ...

331

Are males with early breast cancer treated differently from females with early breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer in males is much rare than in females so in practice, male breast cancer treatment is likely to follow the guidelines developed for female breast cancer patients. The objective of this study is to compare the characteristics and treatment pattern of male breast cancer patients with comparable subgroups of female breast cancer patients using data submitted to the

Jim Wang; James Kollias; Claire Marsh; Guy Maddern

2009-01-01

332

Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and its subtypes and their effect on the development of breast cancer. Methods A Pubmed search for literature on the consumption of dietary fat and risk of breast cancer published from January 1990 through December 2003 was carried out. Results Increased consumption of total fat and saturated fat were found to be positively associated with the development of breast cancer. Even though an equivocal association was observed for the consumption of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the risk of breast cancer, there exists an inverse association in the case of oleic acid, the most abundant MUFA. A moderate inverse association between consumption of n-3 fatty acids and breast cancer risk and a moderate positive association between n-6 fatty acids and breast cancer risk were observed. Conclusion Even though all epidemiological studies do not provide a strong positive association between the consumption of certain types of dietary fat and breast cancer risk, at least a moderate association does seem to exist and this has a number of implications in view of the fact that breast cancer is an increasing public health concern. PMID:16022739

Binukumar, Bhaskarapillai; Mathew, Aleyamma

2005-01-01

333

Unique Presentations of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer: A Case Series  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women. Unlike IDC, which typically metastasizes to the lung, liver or bone, ILC has been found to metastasize to GI tract, peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Nonspecific symptomology may be considered secondary to other diseases and this can delay the definite diagnosis and treatment of metastatic disease. Knowledge of the pattern of disease spread is essential for accurate diagnosis and early initiation of systemic treatment, thus avoiding unnecessary interventions. We are reporting three unique cases of metastatic ILC presenting with wide range of symptoms. Case Presentations: Case A: 69-year-old female presented with recurrent jaundice. Case B: 77-year-old female with the past medical history of right breast ILC seven years ago status post right radical mastectomy with chemotherapy, presented with anemia. Case C: 56-year-old female presented with bright red blood per rectum. Conclusion: A high level of suspicion is needed for metastatic breast cancer in patients with history of ILC, regardless of disease free interval. Since it frequently metastasizes to unusual sites and presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms. PMID:25598762

Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Ayub, Samia; Mohindra, Ramesh; Ayub, Zunaira; Ahad, Abdul

2014-01-01

334

Breast cancer risk factors and second primary malignancies among women with breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To examine the association between breast cancer risk factors and second primary cancers (independent diagnoses occurring\\u000a at least 12 months after the initial breast cancer diagnosis) among breast cancer survivors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In this population-based study, cancer outcomes among breast cancer survivors first diagnosed during 1987–2000 were investigated.\\u000a Invasive breast cancer cases were identified from the statewide tumor registry and interviewed regarding their

Amy Trentham-Dietz; Polly A. Newcomb; Hazel B. Nichols; John M. Hampton

2007-01-01

335

Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background In most developing countries, as in Egypt; postmenopausal breast cancer cases are offered a radical form of surgery relying on their unawareness of the subsequent body image disturbance. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of breast cancer surgical choice; Breast Conservative Therapy (BCT) versus Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM); on body image perception among Egyptian postmenopausal cases. Methods One hundred postmenopausal women with breast cancer were divided into 2 groups, one group underwent BCT and the other underwent MRM. Pre- and post-operative assessments of body image distress were done using four scales; Breast Impact of Treatment Scale (BITS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), Situational Discomfort Scale (SDS), and Body Satisfaction Scale (BSS). Results Preoperative assessment showed no statistical significant difference regarding cognitive, affective, behavioral and evaluative components of body image between both studied groups. While in postoperative assessment, women in MRM group showed higher levels of body image distress among cognitive, affective and behavioral aspects. Conclusion Body image is an important factor for postmenopausal women with breast cancer in developing countries where that concept is widely ignored. We should not deprive those cases from their right of less mutilating option of treatment as BCT. PMID:19678927

Shoma, Ashraf M; Mohamed, Madiha H; Nouman, Nashaat; Amin, Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Ibtihal M; Tobar, Salwa S; Gaffar, Hanan E; Aboelez, Warda F; Ali, Salwa E; William, Soheir G

2009-01-01

336

Conserving surgery - balance between good cosmetic aspect and local disease control in incipient breast cancer.  

PubMed

New acquisitions in the study of breast cancer, based on several retrospective and prospective studies, have led over the past decades to the possibility of applying conserving methods of treatment for breast cancer (breast conserving therapy -BCT) in incipient stages. Starting with 1996, a single surgical team, among others at the Bucharest Oncology Institute,performed BCT in 497 patients out of the total 2,256 cases of breast cancer treated. Work protocol consisted of tumour excision with safety margins, intraoperative histology exam,samples from all the walls of the remaining cavity, with intraoperative histology exam, axillary lymphadenectomy, followed by mandatory irradiation of the entire breast, associated or not with systemic or hormonal adjuvant treatment. 38 patients developed local disease recurrences, 14 of which in the first 5 years. In this paper we present the results obtained through BCT, as a means of supporting this type of treatment adequate for patients with initial stage breast cancer, with cosmetic results visibly superior to those of mastectomy. PMID:25149608

Gogescu, G; Marinescu, S; Br?tucu, E

2014-01-01

337

Progesterone metabolites in breast cancer.  

PubMed

In the 70 years since progesterone (P) was identified in corpus luteum extracts, its metabolism has been examined extensively in many tissues and cell lines from numerous species. In addition to the reproductive tissues and adrenals, every other tissue that has been investigated appears to have one or more P-metabolizing enzyme, each of which is specific for a particular site on the P molecule. In the past, the actions of the P metabolizing enzymes generally have been equated to a means of reducing the P concentration in the tissue microenvironment, and the products have been dismissed as inactive waste metabolites. In human breast tissues and cell lines, the following P-metabolizing enzymes have been identified: 5alpha-reductase, 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase (3alpha-HSO), 3beta-HSO, 20alpha-HSO, and 6alpha-hydroxylase. Rather than providing diverse pathways for inactivating and controlling the concentration of P in breast tissue microenvironments, it is proposed that the enzymes act directly on P to produce two types of autocrines/paracrines with opposing regulatory roles in breast cancer. Evidence is reviewed which shows that P is directly converted to the 4-pregnenes, 3alpha-hydroxy-4-pregnen-20-one (3alpha-dihydroprogesterone; 3alphaHP) and 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20alphaHP), by the actions of 3alpha-HSO and 20alpha-HSO respectively and to the 5alpha-pregnane, 5alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione(5alpha-dihydroprogesterone; 5alphaP), by the irreversible action of 5alpha-reductase. In vitro studies on a number of breast cell lines indicate that 3alphaHP promotes normalcy by downregulating cell proliferation and detachment, whereas 5alphaP promotes mitogenesis and metastasis by stimulating cell proliferation and detachment. The hormones bind to novel, separate, and specific plasma membrane-based receptors and influence opposing actions on mitosis, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal and adhesion plaque molecules via cell signaling pathways. In normal tissue, the ratio of 4-pregnenes:5alpha-pregnanes is high because of high P 3alpha- and 20alpha-HSO activities/expression and low P 5alpha-reductase activity/expression. In breast tumor tissue and tumorigenic cell lines, the ratio is reversed in favor of the 5alpha-pregnanes because of altered P-metabolizing enzyme activities/expression. The evidence suggests that the promotion of breast cancer is related to changes in in situ concentrations of cancer-inhibiting and -promoting P metabolites. Current estrogen-based theories and therapies apply to only a fraction of all breast cancers; the majority (about two-thirds) of breast cancer cases are estrogen-insensitive and have lacked endocrine explanations. As the P metabolites, 5alphaP and 3alphaHP, have been shown to act with equal efficacy on all breast cell lines tested, regardless of their tumorigenicity, estrogen sensitivity, and estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, it is proposed that they offer a new hormonal basis for all forms of breast cancer. New diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for breast cancer progression, control, regression, and prevention are suggested. PMID:16954427

Wiebe, John P

2006-09-01

338

Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Underarm cosmetics and breast cancer. Journal of Applied Toxicology 2003; 23(2):89–95. [PubMed Abstract] Darbre ... parabens) in human breast tumours. Journal of Applied Toxicology 2004; 24(1):1–4. [PubMed Abstract] Darbre ...

339

Anticipation in hereditary breast cancer.  

PubMed

To determine whether familial breast cancer occurs at a younger age in successive generations, we reviewed the clinical records of 435 Ashkenazi women with breast cancer referred to our cancer genetic clinic. Ninety-eight who reported a maternal history of breast cancer were selected for further investigation. All women were genotyped for founder BRCA1/2 mutations (185delAG, 5382insC and 6174delT). Mean age at dignosis was 55.35 +/- 14.21 years in the maternal generation and 48.17 +/- 9.32 years in the daughters (t = - 4.144; p < 0.001). Seventeen women carried a BRCA1 mutation and 12 the 6174delT mutation in BRCA2. Among carriers of the BRCA1 mutation, mean age at diagnosis in the mothers' generation (44 +/- 10.18 years) did not differ from that recorded in the daughters (40.76 +/- 76 years). Among BRCA2 mutation carriers and non-carriers, the mean age at diagnosis in the daughters' generation (41.4 +/- 7.2 and 50.7 +/- 8.8 years, respectively) was younger than in the mothers (61.75 +/- 14.1 and 57.08 +/- 13.7 years, respectively) (t = - 4.29; p < 0.001 for BRCA2 carriers and t = -3.76; p < 0.001 for non-BRCA1/2 carriers). Daughters who were carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations developed breast cancer at a significantly younger age than non-carriers, whilst in the mothers' generation, carriers of BRCA1 mutations developed breast cancer at a significantly younger age than carriers of BRCA2 mutations and non-carriers. BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer at an early age in both mothers and daughters, whereas mutations in BRCA2 were associated with significantly younger age at diagnosis in the second generation. This observation could be related to gene-environmental interactions causing anticipation in BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:12220452

Dagan, E; Gershoni-Baruch, R

2002-08-01

340

Breast Conservation Therapy Utilizing Partial Breast Brachytherapy for Early-stage Cancer of the Breast: A Retrospective Review From the Saint Luke's Cancer Institute.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND:: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a convenient alternative to whole-breast irradiation, as less overall time is needed for completion. The use of APBI outside the framework of large prospective clinical trials has markedly increased. To our knowledge, no high-volume, community-based breast program has published their experience with APBI. METHODS:: The records of 93 consecutive patients who underwent APBI utilizing Mammosite Radiation Therapy System from 2005 to 2010 at Saint Luke's Cancer Institute in Kansas City, MO, were retrospectively reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the ipsilateral breast recurrence rate and recurrence-free survival. RESULTS:: Median age at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 45 to 86 y) and mean follow-up was 29 months. Patient stratification ASTRO consensus classifications for APBI was 37% suitable, 57% cautionary, and 6% unsuitable. The 3-year breast control rate was 98.7%. Three-year overall recurrence-free survival was 94.4%, and 3-year mastectomy-free survival was 97.4%. Using univariate analysis, no tumor or patient factors were associated with ipsilateral breast recurrence. However, tumor grade (P<0.05), stage (P=0.04), estrogen receptor status (P<0.001), progesterone receptor status (P<0.001), tumor size (P<0.001), and ASTRO suitability criteria (P=0.027) were associated with overall recurrence-free survival. No differences were observed when outcomes of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ were compared with those with invasive disease. CONCLUSIONS:: In our high-volume community-based program, APBI outcomes are comparable with those reported from large academic institutions. We also found relationships between tumor stage, grade, negative estrogen receptor status, and ASTRO suitability criteria with overall recurrence rates. The continued careful application of APBI in appropriately selected patients appears warranted until phase III trials comparing this modality to whole-breast irradiation have matured. PMID:23608831

Edwards, Jason M; Herzberg, Susan M; Shook, John W; Beirne, Tammy K N; Schomas, David A

2013-04-19

341

The non-breast-cancer death rate among breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-breast-cancer deaths currently account for almost half of deaths among breast carcinoma patients in the 15 years following\\u000a diagnosis. Understanding the trends of non-breast-cancer death is vital for calibrating treatment and survival expectations,\\u000a and for understanding the consequences of potentially toxic therapies. To observe trends over time in non-breast-cancer relative\\u000a survival—the non-breast-cancer survival rates of breast cancer patients relative to the

Devon Bush; Barbara Smith; Jerry Younger; James S. Michaelson

2011-01-01

342

Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.  

PubMed

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

343

Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies  

PubMed Central

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

344

Should triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype affect local-regional therapy decision making?  

PubMed

The more aggressive biologic characteristics and the current lack of targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) make local-regional management decisions challenging for physicians. TNBC is associated with patients of younger age, black race and BRCA1 mutation carriers. Distinctions between BRCA1-associated and sporadic TNBC include increased lifetime risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer after breast cancer therapy (BCT) for BRCA carriers, which is not shared by sporadic TNBC. However, the presence of a BRCA mutation should not preclude a breast-conservation approach in patients who are otherwise appropriate candidates for BCT. Data suggest that local-regional relapse (LRR) at baseline after BCT appears to be comparable for TNBC and the HER2-positive subgroups, but is about 50% greater than luminal tumors. LRR appears to be similarly increased after mastectomy; thus, TNBC should not be a contra-indication for BCT. Recent hypothesis-generating data suggest less LRR after BCT (where radiation is routinely delivered) than with mastectomy for early-stage TNBC. To date, no specific local-regional guideline recommendations for TNBC exist. Level I outcome data for TNBC using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (hWBRT) are lacking. TNBC should be treated with APBI only on clinical trials. Although hWBRT may be considered in TNBC, its association with younger age, advanced disease and use of systemic chemotherapy often precludes its use for this subtype. Until definitive treatment strategies are validated in large datasets and confirmed in randomized trials, TNBC subtype, in and of itself, should not direct local-regional management treatment decisions. PMID:24857120

Moran, Meena S

2014-01-01

345

Tamoxifen and Breast Density in Women at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although mammographic breast density is as- sociated with the risk of breast cancer and is influenced by hormone levels, the effects of tamoxifen on breast density in healthy women and whether tamoxifen-induced density changes are associated with breast cancer risk are unclear. We investigated mammographic breast density in healthy women with an increased risk of breast cancer at baseline

Jack Cuzick; Jane Warwick; Elizabeth Pinney; Ruth M. L. Warren; Stephen W. Duffy

346

Implanted adipose progenitor cells as physicochemical regulators of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Multipotent adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are increasingly used for regenerative purposes such as soft tissue reconstruction following mastectomy; however, the ability of tumors to commandeer ASC functions to advance tumor progression is not well understood. Through the integration of physical sciences and oncology approaches we investigated the capability of tumor-derived chemical and mechanical cues to enhance ASC-mediated contributions to tumor stroma formation. Our results indicate that soluble factors from breast cancer cells inhibit adipogenic differentiation while increasing proliferation, proangiogenic factor secretion, and myofibroblastic differentiation of ASCs. This altered ASC phenotype led to varied extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and contraction thereby enhancing tissue stiffness, a characteristic feature of breast tumors. Increased stiffness, in turn, facilitated changes in ASC behavior similar to those observed with tumor-derived chemical cues. Orthotopic mouse studies further confirmed the pathological relevance of ASCs in tumor progression and stiffness in vivo. In summary, altered ASC behavior can promote tumorigenesis and, thus, their implementation for regenerative therapy should be carefully considered in patients previously treated for cancer. PMID:22665775

Chandler, Emily M; Seo, Bo Ri; Califano, Joseph P; Andresen Eguiluz, Roberto C; Lee, Jason S; Yoon, Christine J; Tims, David T; Wang, James X; Cheng, Le; Mohanan, Sunish; Buckley, Mark R; Cohen, Itai; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Williams, Rebecca M; Gourdon, Delphine; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Fischbach, Claudia

2012-06-19

347

Breast cancer surgery: an historical narrative. Part I. From prehistoric times to Renaissance.  

PubMed

Cancer was known as a disease since prehistoric times. Management of breast cancer evolved slowly through centuries in the ancient world up to the Renaissance. This period is marked by the absence of any scientifically verifiable understanding of the true nature of cancer and its natural history and consequently by a lack of effective treatment. Breast has been considered as a symbol of femininity, fertility and beauty. Hippocrates proposed that breast cancer, among other neoplasms, was a 'systemic disease' caused by an excess of black bile. The humoral theory was further supported by Galen and dominated for centuries in medicine. Fulguration and breast amputation by using various instruments to achieve a rapid operation were widely used up to the 18th century. The Renaissance was a revolutionary period, since it stimulated medical practice; at that time physicians started to scientifically study medicine. Vesalius greatly contributed in the advancement of surgery, and he vigorously opposed Galen's doctrines. Many great surgeons of that time (including Paré, Cabrol, Servetto, Scultetus, Tulp, Fabry von Hilded, etc.) advanced the science of surgery. Interestingly, Bartoleny Gabrol (1590) in Montpellier advocated radical mastectomy, which was popularised by Halsted, 300 years later. However, the lack of anaesthesia and the problem of wound infections (due to the lack of the aseptic techniques) generated significance and often problems for the surgeons of that time. Surgery was often 'heroic' but primitive and even inhumane by current standards. Therapeutic nihilism was the prevailing altitude regarding breast cancer, at least among the vast majority of surgeons. PMID:19674074

Sakorafas, George H; Safioleas, Michael

2009-11-01

348

Topoisomerase II{alpha} expression correlates with diminished disease-free survival in invasive breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Topoisomerase II{alpha} (Topo II{alpha}) plays a role in DNA replication and is the molecular target for anthracyline-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Topo II{alpha} expression and survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 24 women with invasive breast cancer were stained for Topo II{alpha} expression. All women underwent mastectomy. Radiotherapy was given at University of Utah Department of Radiation Oncology. Of the patients, 23 (96%) received chemotherapy. The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells was compared with clinical factors and overall survival. Results: The median percentage of tumor cells expressing Topo II{alpha} was 70%. Increased Topo II{alpha} tumor expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival. Five-year disease-free survival was 100% for patients with <70% of breast cancer cells expressing Topo II{alpha} compared with 42% for patients with {>=}70% Topo II{alpha} expression (p 0.008). The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells correlated with T stage (p = 0.008) but not with other pathologic factors. Conclusions: Increased Topo II{alpha} expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. These findings may indicate a role for Topo II{alpha} expression as a prognostic factor in breast cancer.

O'Connor, John K. [Radiation Oncology, Tulane Cancer Center, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)]. E-mail: joconno@yahoo.com; Hazard, Lisa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah/Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Avent, James M. [Department of Pathology, Latter Day Saints (LDS) Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Therapy, Latter Day Saints (LDS) Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Fischbach, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Therapy, Latter Day Saints (LDS) Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah/Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

2006-08-01

349

78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proclamation 9028 of September 30, 2013 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of...America stands in solidarity with those battling breast cancer and those at risk for breast cancer. This disease touches every corner of...

2013-10-04

350

76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the...commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously...early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this year,...

2011-10-07

351

77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the...States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans...000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and tens of...

2012-10-04

352

What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... in men? What are the risk factors for breast cancer in men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

353

No Link Between Migraine, Breast Cancer Risk, Study Says  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. No Link Between Migraine, Breast Cancer Risk, Study Says ... raise the risk for breast cancer. "There is no association between migraine and breast cancer risk," said ...

354

Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

355

Fertility after breast cancer treatment.  

PubMed

In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established fertility preservation strategy, providing a 25-35% chance of pregnancy. In addition, oocyte freezing can be considered as an alternative in patients who are single and in those who do not wish a sperm donor. Although ovarian tissue harvesting appears to be safe, experience regarding ovarian transplantation is still limited due to low utilization, so the true value of this procedure remains to be determined. Nevertheless, in clinical situations in which chemotherapy needs to be started in young patients facing premature ovarian failure, ovarian tissue preservation seems to be a promising option for restoring fertility, especially in conjunction with other options like immature oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation of oocytes, oocyte vitrification, or embryo cryopreservation. It seems that in vitro maturation is a useful strategy because it improves oocyte or cryopreservation outcome in breast cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation. PMID:24315568

Kasum, Miro; Beketi?-Oreškovi?, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Oreškovi?, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

2014-02-01

356

Preclinical and Clinical Evaluation of Intraductally Administered Agents in Early Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Most breast cancers originate in the epithelial cells lining the breast ducts. Intraductal administration of cancer therapeutics would lead to high drug exposure to ductal cells and eliminate preinvasive neoplasms while limiting systemic exposure. We performed preclinical studies in N-methyl-N’-nitrosourea–treated rats to compare the effects of 5-fluorouracil, carboplatin, nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel, and methotrexate to the previously reported efficacy of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) on treatment of early and established mammary tumors. Protection from tumor growth was observed with all five agents, with extensive epithelial destruction present only in PLD-treated rats. Concurrently, we initiated a clinical trial to establish the feasibility, safety, and maximum tolerated dose of intraductal PLD. In each eligible woman awaiting mastectomy, we visualized one ductal system and administered dextrose or PLD using a dose-escalation schema (2 to 10 mg). Intraductal administration was successful in 15 of 17 women with no serious adverse events. Our preclinical studies suggest that several agents are candidates for intraductal therapy. Our clinical trial supports the feasibility of intraductal administration of agents in the outpatient setting. If successful, administration of agents directly into the ductal system may allow for “breast-sparing mastectomy” in select women. PMID:22030751

Stearns, Vered; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Khouri, Nagi F.; Gabrielson, Edward; Yoshida, Takahiro; Kominsky, Scott L.; Huso, David L.; Jeter, Stacie; Powers, Penny; Tarpinian, Karineh; Brown, Regina J.; Lange, Julie R.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Zhang, Zhe; Tsangaris, Theodore N.; Sukumar, Saraswati

2013-01-01

357

Triple-negative breast cancer: clinicopathological characteristics and relationship with basal-like breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Triple-negative breast cancer, defined as that with negative expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and cerbB2, accounted for 11% of invasive breast cancers in our study, drawn from an original cohort of 7048 women diagnosed with breast cancer from the files of the Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, over 14 years. Women with triple-negative breast cancer were generally postmenopausal,

Aye Aye Thike; Poh Yian Cheok; Ana Richelia Jara-Lazaro; Benita Tan; Patrick Tan; Puay Hoon Tan

2010-01-01

358

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Bridging Bench to Bedside: Beating Breast Cancer September 18, 2013 2:00 ­ 4:00 PM Reception. Speakers in the symposium will cover: (1) basic research in breast cancer metastasis, (2) drug discovery basic research ideas to drugs and inhibitors as therapeutic interventions for cancer treatment

359

Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)  

Cancer.gov

Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

360

New Molecular Targets of Breast Cancer Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The development of new chemotherapeutic agents and concepts of radiation therapy, administered as primary, adjuvant and palliative therapy, has led to new perspectives in breast cancer therapy. Apart from conventional chemotherapy, recently developed novel agents interfere with molecular mechanisms that are altered in cancer cells. Those targets are not necessarily breast cancer-specific. In this review we will focus on

Georg Sauer; Helmut Deissler; Christian Kurzeder; Rolf Kreienberg

2002-01-01

361

Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

Stevens, R.G.

1987-08-01

362

FDA Approves New Breast Cancer Drug  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. FDA Approves New Breast Cancer Drug Ibrance is targeted for postmenopausal women with ... Preidt Wednesday, February 4, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Cancer Chemotherapy WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ...

363

Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy vs mastectomy for ductal carcinoma in situ: French Survey experience  

PubMed Central

From March 2003 to April 2004, 77 physicians throughout France prospectively recruited 1289 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients and collected data on diagnosis, patient and tumour characteristics, and treatments. Median age was 56 years (range, 30–84). Ductal carcinoma in situ was diagnosed by mammography in 87.6% of patients. Mastectomy, conservative surgery alone (CS) and CS with radiotherapy (CS+RT) were performed in 30.5, 7.8 and 61.7% of patients, respectively. Thus, 89% of patients treated by CS received adjuvant RT. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and axillary dissection (AD) were performed in 21.3 and 10.4% of patients, respectively. Hormone therapy was administered to 13.4% of the patients (80% tamoxifen). Median tumour size was 14.5?mm (6, 11 and 35?mm for CS, CS+RT and mastectomy, respectively, P<0.0001). Nuclear grade was high in 21% of patients, intermediate in 38.5% and low in 40.5%. Excision was considered complete in 92% (CS) and 88.3% (CS+RT) of patients. Oestrogen receptors were positive in 69.8% of assessed cases (31%). Treatment modalities varied widely according to region: mastectomy rate, 20–37%; adjuvant RT, 84–96%; hormone treatment, 6–34%. Our survey on current DCIS management in France has highlighted correlations between pathological features (tumour size, margin and grade) and treatment options, with several similar variations to those observed in recent UK and US studies. PMID:19277037

Cutuli, B; Lemanski, C; Fourquet, A; de Lafontan, B; Giard, S; Meunier, A; Pioud-Martigny, R; Campana, F; Marsiglia, H; Lancrenon, S; Mery, E; Penault-Llorca, F; Fondrinier, E; Tunon de Lara, C

2009-01-01

364

Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

2010-01-01

365

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer Using Near-Infrared Light To Detect Breast Cancer News 25 T he idea of using light to non- invasively detect breast cancer has been revisited in the past of selectively labeling breast tumors may open new opportunities in the optical detection of breast cancer

Fantini, Sergio

366

From the Cover: Prospective identification of tumorigenic breast cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in United States women, accounting for >40,000 deaths each year. These breast tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of breast cancer cells. Using a model in which human breast cancer cells were grown in immunocompromised mice, we found that only a minority of breast cancer cells had the ability to form new

Muhammad Al-Hajj; Max S. Wicha; Adalberto Benito-Hernandez; Sean J. Morrison; Michael F. Clarke

2003-01-01

367

Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-14

368

Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-12-29

369

Clinical proteomics in breast cancer: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer imposes a significant healthcare burden on women worldwide. Early detection is of paramount importance in reducing\\u000a mortality, yet the diagnosis of breast cancer is hampered by the lack of an adequate detection method. In addition, better\\u000a breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients eligible for adjuvant therapy. Hence, new markers for early\\u000a diagnosis, accurate prognosis and prediction

Marie-Christine W. Gast; Jan H. M. Schellens; Jos H. Beijnen

2009-01-01

370

The breast cancer epidemic: 10 facts.  

PubMed

Breast cancer, affecting one in eight American women, is a modern epidemic. The increasing frequency of breast cancer is widely recognized. However, the wealth of compelling epidemiological data on its prevention is generally not available, and as a consequence, is largely unknown to the public. The purpose of this report is to review the epidemiological evidence of preventable causes of breast cancer. [Table: see text]. PMID:25249706

Schneider, A Patrick; Zainer, Christine M; Kubat, Christopher Kevin; Mullen, Nancy K; Windisch, Amberly K

2014-08-01

371

The global breast cancer burden.  

PubMed

Breast cancer now represents the most common female malignancy in both the developing and developed world, and is the primary cause of death among women globally. Despite well-documented reductions in mortality from breast cancer during the past two decades, incidence rates continue to increase and do so more rapidly in countries that historically had low rates. This has emphasized the importance of survivorship issues and optimal management of disease chronicity. This article reviews current trends of incidence and mortality in both a western and global context, and considers pertinent changes in underlying etiological risk factors. The latter not only offer clues regarding changes in incidence patterns, but also provides rationale and guidance for strategies that could potentially reduce the burden of this disease. The relevance of lifestyle adjustments and screening interventions for primary and secondary prevention, respectively, are discussed with reference to different healthcare resource settings. PMID:22764767

Benson, John R; Jatoi, Ismail

2012-06-01

372

Endocrine therapy of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

Cavalli, F.

1986-01-01

373

Implications of Functional Proteomics in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems of the Western world. Recent advances in genomics and gene expression-profiling approaches have enriched our understanding of this heterogeneous disease. However, progress in functional proteomics in breast cancer research has been relatively slow. Allied with genomics, the functional proteomics approach will be important in improving diagnosis through better classification of breast cancer and in predicting prognosis and response to different therapies, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapy. In this review, we will present functional proteomic approaches with a focus on the recent clinical implications of utilizing the reverse-phase protein array platform in breast cancer research. PMID:24664486

Chae, Young Kwang

2014-01-01

374

“Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?” Jordanian men’s perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health  

PubMed Central

Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman’s decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men’s individual and contextual perspectives on women’s breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. Methods An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one’s wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men’s feelings of responsibility for the family’s health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men’s views about other men’s rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men’s perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one’s own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Conclusions Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support. PMID:24160268

2013-01-01

375

Breast Cancer Surgery: Comparing Surgical Groups and Determining Individual Differences in Postoperative Sexuality and Body Change Stress  

PubMed Central

Women diagnosed and surgically treated for regional breast cancer (N = 190) were studied to determine the sexual and body change sequelae for women receiving modified radical mastectomy (MRM) with breast reconstruction in comparison with the sequelae for women receiving breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or MRM without breast reconstruction. The sexuality pattern for women receiving reconstructive surgery was one that was significantly different—with lower rates of activity and fewer signs of sexual responsiveness—than that for women in either of the other groups. Significantly higher levels of traumatic stress and situational distress regarding the breast changes were reported by the women receiving an MRM in contrast to the women treated with BCT. Using a model to predict sexual morbidity, regression analyses revealed that individual differences in sexual self-schema were related to both sexual and body change stress outcomes. PMID:10965644

Yurek, Debora; Farrar, William; Andersen, Barbara L.

2007-01-01

376

Triple-negative breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Perou's molecular classification defines tumors that neither express hormone receptors nor overexpress HER2 as triple-negative (TN) tumors. These tumors account for approximately 15% of breast cancers. The so-called basaloid tumors are not always synonymous with TN tumors; they differ in the fact that they express different molecular markers, have a higher histologic grade, and have a worse prognosis. Clinically

Reinaldo D Chacón; María V Costanzo

2010-01-01

377

Presenting Painless Breast Cancer Detection!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson culminates the unit with the Go Public phase of the legacy cycle. In the associated activity, students depict a tumor amidst healthy body tissue using a Microsoft Excel® graph. In addition, students design a brochure for both patients and doctors advertising a new form of painless yet reliable breast cancer detection. Together, the in-class activity and the take-home assignment function as an assessment of what students have learned throughout the unit.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

378

Organotropism of Breast Cancer Metastasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer causes mortality by metastasizing to a variety of vital organs, such as bone, lung, brain and liver. Effective\\u000a therapeutic intervention of this deadly process relies on a better mechanistic understanding of metastasis organotropism.\\u000a Recent studies have confirmed earlier speculations that metastasis is a non-random process and is dependent on intricate tumor-stroma\\u000a interactions at the target organ. Both the

Xin Lu; Yibin Kang

2007-01-01

379

Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend ?=?0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

2015-04-15

380

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

381

Pilates for breast cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Pilates has been advocated for rehabilitation of breast cancer survivors despite little scientific evidence. The authors of this article have examined the feasibility of a Pilates program in postmastectomy breast cancer survivors and the impact on physical and psychological parameters. Fifteen breast cancer survivors were recruited in a one-arm study of 12 weeks of Pilates exercises. The authors assessed recruitment, adherence, and attrition, and measured changes in shoulder and neck range of motion, posture, height, arm volume, quality of life, mood, and body image from pre- to postintervention. Of 26 eligible patients, 15 enrolled, 13 completed the study, and 10 performed more than 50% of the recommended sessions. Statistically significant improvements emerged for shoulder abduction and internal rotation on the affected side, neck rotation toward the unaffected side, and neck flexion. The affected side arm volume and the interlimb volume discrepancy increased. Significant improvements were reported in quality of life, mood, and body image. The improvements in physical and psychological outcomes are promising and deserve further evaluation in a randomized, controlled study. The increase in affected arm volume also warrants additional investigation. PMID:22459522

Stan, Daniela L; Rausch, Sarah M; Sundt, Kathleen; Cheville, Andrea L; Youdas, James W; Krause, David A; Boughey, Judy C; Walsh, Molly F; Cha, Stephen S; Pruthi, Sandhya

2012-04-01

382

Breast Cancer 2012 – New Aspects  

PubMed Central

Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials. PMID:25324576

Kolberg, H.-C.; Lüftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.

2012-01-01

383

Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

2015-01-08

384

Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

Kim, Michelle M., E-mail: mmkim@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-07-01

385

Detecting Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the unit challenge: To develop a painless means of identifying cancerous tumors. Solving the challenge depends on an understanding of the properties of stress and strain. After learning the challenge question, students generate ideas and consider the knowledge required to solve the challenge. Then they read an expert's opinion on ultrasound imaging and the potentials for detecting cancerous tumors. This interview helps to direct student research and learning towards finding a solution.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

386

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming  

E-print Network

diseases. They grow at different rates and respond to different treatments. That is why people with cancer need treatment that is aimed at their kind of cancer. Therefore, it is important to identify the type of cancer accurately, so that the correct treatment can be started. Breast cancer is a cancer that starts

Ludwig, Simone

387

Anastrozole in Treating Aromatase Inhibitor Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Female Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Musculoskeletal Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-09-16

388

Male breast cancer: is the scenario changing  

PubMed Central

Background The overall incidence of male breast cancer is around 1% of all breast cancers and is on the rise. In this review we aim to present various aspects of male breast cancer with particular emphasis on incidence, risk factors, patho-physiology, treatment, prognostic factors, and outcome. Methods Information on all aspects of male breast cancer was gathered from available relevant literature on male breast cancer from the MEDLINE database over the past 32 years from 1975 to 2007. Various reported studies were scrutinized for emerging evidence. Incidence data were also obtained from the IARC, Cancer Mondial database. Conclusion There is a scenario of rising incidence, particularly in urban US, Canada and UK. Even though more data on risk factors is emerging about this disease, more multi-institutional efforts to pool data with large randomized trials to show treatment and survival benefits are needed to support the existing vast emerging knowledge about the disease. PMID:18558006

Contractor, Kaiyumars B; Kaur, Kanchan; Rodrigues, Gabriel S; Kulkarni, Dhananjay M; Singhal, Hemant

2008-01-01

389

Development of Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model  

Cancer.gov

Development of Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model Mano S. Selvan, Joe Ensor, John Cook, Constance Johnson, Christopher Amos, Melissa Bondy, Therese Bevers, Donald A. Berry. The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd.,

390

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes what is known about the relationship between pregnancy, miscarriage, abortion, and the risk of breast cancer. It also briefly describes what is known about reproductive history and the risk of other cancer types.

391

Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

1992-12-31

392

Donor Immune Cells Attack Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In patients with metastatic breast cancer, immune cells from a genetically matched donor can attack and shrink tumors, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced today at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

393

Breast Cancer Prevention Trial - April 21, 1998  

Cancer.gov

"Breast Cancer Prevention Trial" Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Statement of Richard D. Klausner, M.D. Director, National Cancer Institute Before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human

394

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy  

E-print Network

Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy S irradiation for cases of early stage breast cancer. Delivering higher doses to more localized volumes demands, France Keywords: Finite Element model; breast soft tissues; partial breast irradiation; breast phantom. 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

395

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

1976-01-01

396

Breast tomosynthesis: A new tool for diagnosing breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique. PMID:24598575

Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

2014-03-01

397

Breast pathology after cryotherapy. Histological regression of breast cancer after cryotherapy.  

PubMed

A breast saving treatment is contemporary the preferred method of treatment with comparable results in comparing with mastectomy. In this study were evaluated the effects of cryotherapy by histological verification of changes in post treatment resection specimens. Fifty-three patients in age of 38-81 year with histologically confirmed breast cancer in needle biopsies were managed by cryotherapy between 1999 and 2007. The patients were operated between day 1 and 35 after cryotherapy. The histologic examination of operation materials showed in all cases at least partial tumor destruction. In general in 54.7% of all handled cases (29 patient) there was no residual tumor. In 6 cases (22.2%) from group 1 and in 23 cases (88.5%) of group 2 no tumor rest was found. Cryotherapy can lead to complete destruction of tumoral tissue. In our study all 29 (54.7%) of tumor-free cases after cryotherapy were those with cT1 stage. The experience of operator and the correct selection of appropriate patients (primarily taking the tumor size into account) play the most important role for achieving the best results. PMID:25119005

Gajda, Mieczyslaw R; Mireskandari, Masoud; Baltzer, Pascal A; Pfleiderer, Stefan O; Camara, Oumar; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Kaiser, Werner A; Petersen, Iver

2014-03-01

398

Stages of Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein ... is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation ... therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the ...

399

Breast Total Male Breast Reconstruction with Fat Grafting  

PubMed Central

Summary: Cancer of a male breast represents less than 1% of all breast cancer. As with to female patients, mastectomy in men creates a substantial emotional burden. Breast reconstruction may improve the patient’s psychological well-being, compliance with adjuvant treatments, and overall outcome. However, due to the unique anatomy of the male breast, standard reconstructive strategies using anatomic or prosthetic modalities are not entirely applicable. We describe a case of a 68-year-old male patient who underwent successful unilateral breast reconstruction solely with fat grafting technique. PMID:25506540

Al-Kalla, Tarik

2014-01-01

400

The Reproductive Factors Linked to Breast Cancer Risk  

E-print Network

The Reproductive Factors Linked to Breast Cancer Risk The breast is a reproductive organ, so it makes sense that breast cancer risk would be related to reproductive variables. A woman's own estrogen contributes to the normal development and functioning of the breast, as well as to breast cancer risk. Being

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

401

Risk determination and prevention of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is an increasing public health problem. Substantial advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, but the introduction of methods to predict women at elevated risk and prevent the disease has been less successful. Here, we summarize recent data on newer approaches to risk prediction, available approaches to prevention, how new approaches may be made, and the difficult problem of using what we already know to prevent breast cancer in populations. During 2012, the Breast Cancer Campaign facilitated a series of workshops, each covering a specialty area of breast cancer to identify gaps in our knowledge. The risk-and-prevention panel involved in this exercise was asked to expand and update its report and review recent relevant peer-reviewed literature. The enlarged position paper presented here highlights the key gaps in risk-and-prevention research that were identified, together with recommendations for action. The panel estimated from the relevant literature that potentially 50% of breast cancer could be prevented in the subgroup of women at high and moderate risk of breast cancer by using current chemoprevention (tamoxifen, raloxifene, exemestane, and anastrozole) and that, in all women, lifestyle measures, including weight control, exercise, and moderating alcohol intake, could reduce breast cancer risk by about 30%. Risk may be estimated by standard models potentially with the addition of, for example, mammographic density and appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This review expands on four areas: (a) the prediction of breast cancer risk, (b) the evidence for the effectiveness of preventive therapy and lifestyle approaches to prevention, (c) how understanding the biology of the breast may lead to new targets for prevention, and (d) a summary of published guidelines for preventive approaches and measures required for their implementation. We hope that efforts to fill these and other gaps will lead to considerable advances in our efforts to predict risk and prevent breast cancer over the next 10 years. PMID:25467785

Howell, Anthony; Anderson, Annie S; Clarke, Robert B; Duffy, Stephen W; Evans, D Gareth; Garcia-Closas, Montserat; Gescher, Andy J; Key, Timothy J; Saxton, John M; Harvie, Michelle N

2014-01-01

402

Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.  

PubMed

Background. Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, ?-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer. Results. Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (P < .05) and decreased HER2 expression (P < .05) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 index; NS) among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients when compared with placebo. Uncontrolled and biomarker studies suggest beneficial effects on hot flashes, cell proliferation, atypical cytomorphology, and mammographic density, as well as possible anti-angiogenic activity at doses of 25 g ground flax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients. Conclusions. Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast cancer. PMID:24013641

Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

2013-09-01

403

Survival Outcomes of Different Treatment Methods for the Ipsilateral Breast of Occult Breast Cancer Patients with Axillary Lymph Node Metastasis: A Single Center Experience  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study compared the survival outcomes of different treatment methods for the ipsilateral breast of occult breast cancer (OBC) patients with axillary lymph node metastasis. Methods A retrospective study was conducted in which forty OBC patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were identified out of 15,029 patients who had been diagnosed with a primary breast cancer at between 1992 and 2010. The patients were categorized into three treatment groups based on ipsilateral breast management: breast-conserving surgery (BCS) (n=17), mastectomy (n=12), and nonsurgical intervention with or without radiation therapy (No surgery with or without radiation therapy [No Op±RT]) (n=11). All patients underwent axillary lymph node dissection. Cases were evaluated based on treatment and potential prognostic factors with respect to overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Results During the follow-up period (median follow-up of 71.5 months), the overall OS and DFS were 76.9% and 74.9%, respectively. The 5-year treatment-specific OS was 72.0% for the BCS group, 74.0% for the mastectomy group, and 87.5% for the No Op±RT group (log-rank p=0.49). The 5-year DFS was 70.6% for the BCS group, 66.7% for the mastectomy group, and 90.9% for the No Op±RT group (log-rank p=0.36). Recurrence rates for the BCS and No Op±RT groups were 5.9% and 18.2%, respectively. Histologic grade and lymph node status were inversely correlated with DFS (log-rank p=0.04 and p<0.01, respectively). Conclusion There was no difference in survival outcomes between the three treatment methods for the ipsilateral breast (mastectomy, BCS, and No Op±RT) of OBC patients with axillary lymph node metastasis. A large-scale multicenter study is needed to validate the results from this small retrospective study. PMID:24454463

Woo, Sang Min; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yu, Jong Han; Ko, Beom Seok; Sohn, Guiyun; Lee, Yu Ra; Kim, Hanna; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Baek, Seung Hee

2013-01-01

404

Molecular chemotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Gene therapy for breast cancer initially involves local or systemic delivery. Local delivery may be intrapleural or via direct injection to lesions. However, systemic delivery remains the greatest challenge with targeting, although methods using antibodies or growth factor receptor ligands have been demonstrated in preclinical models. This review focuses on the next step of using tissue-specific promoters such as Muc-1, CEA, PSA, HER-2, Myc, L-plastin and secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor promoters. All of these have demonstrated differential upregulation in breast cancer and additional specificity may be obtained by using physiological stimuli that are more frequently expressed in cancers, such as glucose regulated promoters and hypoxia response elements or radiation inducible elements. Amongst the later are the EGR-1, p21 and tissue type plaminogen activator promoters. Potential therapy genes include the prodrug activation system 5-fluorocytosine and other analogues of antimetabolites, but all of these need gap junctions to transfer the phosphorylated metabolites. Other approaches involving more freely diffusible products include cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and thymidine phosphorylase to activate 5-deoxy-5-fluoruridine to fluorouracil. The bystander effect is important both for cell killing and for immunological and antivascular effects. Breast cancer is one type of tumour where a major clinical research effort is underway using local delivery methods. For prodrug activation systems, the use of human enzymes is desirable to prevent an immunological response that would eventually eliminate cells producing the prodrug activation system. The use of alkylating agents has an advantage over antimetabolites in that they are cytotoxic to cycling and noncycling cells, and the cytotoxic products can diffuse across cell membranes without the need for gap junctions. They also have a much steeper dose response curve than antimetabolites. PMID:10084362

Patterson, A; Harris, A L

1999-02-01

405

The Genomic Signature of Breast Cancer Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early pregnancy imprints in the breast permanent genomic changes or a signature that reduces the susceptibility of this organ to cancer. The breast attains its maximum development during pregnancy and\\u000a lactation. After menopause, the breast regresses in both nulliparous and parous women containing lobular structures designated\\u000a Lob.1. The Lob 1 found in the breast of nulliparous women and of parous

Jose Russo; Gabriela Balogh; Daniel Mailo; Patricia A. Russo; Rebecca Heulings; Irma H. Russo

406

Perinatal factors increase breast cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging evidence suggests that breast cancer may originate during early life. In particular, offspring of mothers who during pregnancy exhibited behaviors that are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer, may be at risk. These behaviors include intake of high fat diet or alcohol, or stressful life style. We have found that neonatal exposure to handling that leads to improved

Leena Hilakivi-Clarke; Robert Clarke; Marc E. Lippman

1994-01-01

407

Melatonin and Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Experimental data from animals suggest a pro- tective role for the pineal hormone melatonin in the etiology of breast cancer, but results from the few retrospective case- control studies that examined the association in hu- mans have been inconsistent. To determine whether low levels of endogenous melatonin are associated with an in- creased risk for developing breast cancer, we

Ruth C. Travis; Diane S. Allen; Ian S. Fentiman; Timothy J. Key

2004-01-01

408

Discovery helps show how breast cancer spreads  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (home of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center) have discovered why breast cancer patients with dense breasts are more likely than others to develop aggressive tumors that spread. The finding opens the door to drug treatments that prevent metastasis.

409

Healthy Lifestyle May Boost Breast Cancer Survival  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Healthy Lifestyle May Boost Breast Cancer Survival Proper diet, exercise, weight control among factors ... Preidt Thursday, October 16, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Healthy Living THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

410

After Breast Cancer, Depression Risk Lingers  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. After Breast Cancer, Depression Risk Lingers Study finds survivors more likely ... 2015) Tuesday, October 28, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Depression TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women ...

411

Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort is an international resource of multi-generational families, data, and biospecimens established in 1995 for interdisciplinary collaborative research on the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer. Questionnaire data, clinical data and (when available) biospecimens have been collected for over 30,000 women and men from nearly 12,000 families.

412

Improving Breast Cancer Care for Older Women  

Cancer.gov

Earlier diagnosis, improved treatment, and the overall increase in average lifespan continue to expand the number of breast cancer survivors who are aged 65 and older. This population is already estimated to be one million of the total 2.3 million breast cancer survivors.

413

THE LONG ISLAND BREAST CANCER STUDY (LIBCSP)  

EPA Science Inventory

The NIEHS and the NCI are collaborating on the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP), which is designed to conduct epidemiologic research on the role of environmental factors in the etiology of breast cancer in women who live in Nassau and Suffolk counties, New York. T...

414

Predicting Posttraumatic Growth in Breast Cancer Survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide variability exists with respect to how breast cancer survivors respond to common psychological and psychosocial challenges of their disease, ranging from posttraumatic stress disorder to posttraumatic growth. This cross-sectional study examined contextual, disease-related, and intraindividual predictors of posttraumatic growth in 224 randomly selected breast cancer survivors. A series of hierarchical regression analyses found that age at diagnosis, marital status,

Keith M. Bellizzi; Thomas O. Blank

2006-01-01

415

GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-12-15

416

Population-Based Analysis of Occult Primary Breast Cancer With Axillary Lymph Node Metastasis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Single-institution data suggest that treatment with radiation and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) may be an appropriate alternative to mastectomy for T0N+ breast cancer. Population-based multi-institutional data supporting this approach are lacking. METHODS The cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) of women with T0N+M0 ductal, lobular, or mixed breast cancer in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1983 to 2006 were analyzed. Groups were defined as: 1) no ALND, mastectomy, or RT (observation); 2) ALND only; 3) mastectomy plus ALND with or without postmastectomy radiation (Mast); and 4) breast-conserving therapy (BCT) with ALND and radiation (BCT). RESULTS In total, 750 of 770,030 patients with breast cancer had T0N+ M0 disease (incidence, 0.10%), and 596 of those patients underwent ALND (79.5%). Patients who underwent Mast or BCT (n = 470) had a 10-year OS rate of 64.9% compared with 58.5% for patients who underwent ALND only (n = 126; P = .02) and 47.5% for patients who underwent observation only (n = 94; P = .04). The 10-year CSS rate was 75.7% for patients who underwent BCT versus 73.9% for patients who underwent Mast (P = .55). In multivariate analysis of CSS for patients who underwent Mast or BCT, the following factors were correlated with an unfavorable outcome: positive estrogen receptor status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24–0.96; P = .04), ?10 positive lymph nodes (HR, 5.7; 95%CI, 2.4–13.4; P ? .01), and <10 resected lymph nodes (HR, 42.9; 95%CI, 1.2–7.1; P = .02). Mast did not improve CSS compared with BCT (HR, 1.09; 95%CI, 0.57–2.1; P = .79). CONCLUSIONS Definitive locoregional treatment with either Mast or BCT improved the outcome of patients with T0N+breast cancer, and no difference in survival was observed between the treatments. PMID:20564117

Walker, Gary V.; Smith, Grace L.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hoffman, Karen; Strom, Eric A.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

417

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective association?  

E-print Network

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192­196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective to breast cancer risk. We have examined the association between mastalgia and breast cancer in the patient breast cancer risk factor information, 1532 (28%) reported breast pain as an incidental complaint

Apkarian, A. Vania

418

Breast Density, Hormone Replacement, and Breast Cancer Risk  

Cancer.gov

Research has shown that women age 45 or older who have at least 75 percent dense tissue on a mammogram are at an elevated risk of developing breast cancer. Reasons for this are not completely understood.

419

Diet and breast cancer: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Abstract Breast cancer occurs as a result between genes-diet interactions. Concerning diet, only alcohol is widely recognized for being most consistently associated with breast cancer risk. The purpose of this review is to report through a systematic way the current scientific evidence relating breast cancer and diet, through original-research studies published in English language during the last decade, assessing the consumption of specific foodstuffs/food-nutrients in relation to the disease. The available literature suggests that soy food intake seems to be inversely associated with the disease, while no association seems to be reported for dietary carbohydrates and dietary fiber intake. The consumption of dietary fat, is probably suggestive of an increase in breast cancer risk, while studies evaluating the role of fruit/vegetable, meat as well as dietary patterns and breast cancer risk, provide inconsistent results. Diet seems to be modestly associated with the disease, highlighting the need for more studies to be conducted. PMID:25198160

Mourouti, Niki; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Papavagelis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

2015-02-01

420

Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Lymphedema: What Every Woman With Breast Cancer Should Know ... for breast cancer may be at risk for lymphedema in the arm, breast, and chest. Here we ...

421

The genetics of breast and ovarian cancer.  

PubMed Central

A number of genes are known to be involved in inherited susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. In the context of high-risk families the most important genes are BRCA1 on chromosome 17q, which is associated with a high penetrance of both breast and ovarian cancer, and BRCA2 on chromosome 13q, which causes a high risk of breast cancer but a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Other high-risk cancer genes that confer increased risks of breast or ovarian cancer in addition to other cancers include the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer genes and the TP53 gene, which causes breast cancer as part of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The predisposing mutations in these genes are relatively rare in the population. More common genes which are associated with an increased, but lower, risk of breast cancer are the ataxiatelangiectasia gene and the HRAS1 gene. This paper reviews recent progress in mapping and cloning of these susceptibility genes, and provides estimates of the cancer risks associated with each gene and the frequency of predisposing mutations. PMID:7547224

Ford, D.; Easton, D. F.

1995-01-01

422

Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous tissue, a portable, inexpensive device was developed as a tool to help physicians visualize expression of surface markers. The system visualizes absorbance from nanoshell aggregates and fluorescence in the visible and near-infrared light spectrum. This study represents the first step in the development of an intraoperative optical imaging device to enhance the visualization of molecular markers overexpressed in cancerous cells.

Langsner, Robert James

423

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

424

Breast cancer detection using automated whole breast ultrasound and mammography in radiographically dense breasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Mammography, the standard method of breast cancer screening, misses many cancers, especially in dense-breasted women. We compared\\u000a the performance and diagnostic yield of mammography alone versus an automated whole breast ultrasound (AWBU) plus mammography\\u000a in women with dense breasts and\\/or at elevated risk of breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  AWBU screening was tested in 4,419 women having routine mammography (Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:

Kevin M. Kelly; Judy Dean; W. Scott Comulada; Sung-Jae Lee

2010-01-01

425

Optical transillumination spectroscopy of breast tissue for cancer risk assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the most commonly occurring cancer in women. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer is approximately 1 in 10 thereby the highest out of all cancers. Breast cancer screening programs have been shown to decrease the mortality rates of women between ages 50-69, since cancers are detected at an earlier, more favourable stage. It is

Lothar Lilge; Kristina Blyschak; Michelle Simick; Roberta A. Jong

2003-01-01

426

Breast Cancer Research and ISSN 0167-6806  

E-print Network

1 23 Breast Cancer Research and Treatment ISSN 0167-6806 Breast Cancer Res Treat DOI 10.1007/s10549-012-2266-3 Cognitive function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia function and breast cancer: promise and potential insights from functional brain imaging Patricia A. Reuter

427

Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative  

E-print Network

Legend Advanced Breast Cancer ER+ HER2+ Triple Negative Brain Metastases / Leptomeningeal dz Non in HER2 Positive Breast Cancer 127511 - Neratinib for HER2 positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases 117526 - Immunotherapy with Globo H-KLH (OPT-822) for Metastatic Breast Cancer No Interventional Clinical

Walter, Peter

428

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer  

E-print Network

Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer Shannon T. Baileya,b,c,1) More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER- breast cancers, which frequently harbor

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

429

The efficacy of surgical treatment of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the analysis was to resolve the two opposing claims regarding the efficacy of surgical treatment of breast cancer, namely the course of the disease is not affected by surgery because breast cancer is an incurable systemic disease, as shown by a previous analysis, results of randomized breast cancer treatment trials and long-term follow-up of breast cancer patients;

D. J. Benjamin

1996-01-01

430

Breast cancer rates in populations of single women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The well known associations of breast cancer with fertility patterns and diet are interdependent and it is difficult to estimate the extent to which breast cancer is related to diet. This was attempted by analysing breast cancer rates in populations of single (never married) women for which the contribution of childbearing would be small. Age specific breast cancer rates for

G Hems; A Stuart

1975-01-01

431

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast  

E-print Network

The HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women healing from breast cancer by providing postFoundation.org We are the only non-profit breast cancer organization to hope Bras for Body & Soul® The program. The program provides a private, understanding environment for breast cancer survivors to be properly fitted

Bejerano, Gill

432

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

Espinosa, Horacio D.

433

Clinicopathological characters of triple negative breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To study the clinicopathological characters of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 629 patients with breast cancer were reviewed, who were treated from 2003 to 2007 in Chongqing Cancer Institute.\\u000a The comparison of clinicopathological features including TNM classification, histological type, tumor location, axillary lymphonodes\\u000a status and neoadjuvant chemotherapy between TNBC and nontriple negative breast cancer (NTNBC) was performed.

Xin Zhou; Qian Liu

2010-01-01

434

Effect of Formalin Fixation on Surgical Margins in Breast Cancer Surgical Specimen  

PubMed Central

Margin analysis in breast surgery is an important predictor of local recurrence and can have vital impact on the postoperative treatment planning. Objective. The aim was to assess the mean reduction in the closest tumor-free surgical margin in millimeters of breast cancer specimens following formalin fixation. Materials and Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study at the Aga Khan University Hospital from March 30, 2010 to January 20, 2011. One hundred consecutive breast tumour surgical specimens which had macroscopically visible tumour were included. The cancer type included both in situ and invasive cancers. Excluded were the patients who had previous surgery or systemic/radiation therapy. The closest tumor-free margin was recorded and compared with the margin after formalin fixation. P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results. The mean age of our 100 patients was 53 years with the majority of the patients having undergone mastectomy for predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma. Following formalin fixation, the mean reduction of the closest tumor-free margin was noted as 2.14?mm which was found statistically significant. Conclusion. Considerable shrinkage of tumor-free surgical margins of breast cancer specimen was noted after formalin fixation. This inference can have implications on the postoperative management plan. PMID:25349738

Zaidi, Masooma; Khan, Shaista; Farooqi, Najiha Bilal; Abbas, Kashif; Idrees, Romana

2014-01-01

435

Autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis co-existing with breast cancer: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare pulmonary disease characterized by excessive alveolar accumulation of surfactant due to defective alveolar clearance by macrophages. There are only a few published case reports of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis occurring in association with solid cancers. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previously reported cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis associated with breast cancer. Case presentation A 48-year-old Asian woman, a nonsmoker, presented to our institution with a right breast mass. Biopsy examination of the lesion revealed scirrhous carcinoma. A chest computed tomography scan for metastases showed abnormal shadows in both upper lung fields. As a result of flexible fiberscopic bronchoscopy, this patient was diagnosed as having pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. This case was categorized as autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to the positive anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibody. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis decreased gradually after mastectomy. Conclusions The present case involved the coincident occurrence of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with breast cancer; breast cancer may be a factor during pulmonary alveolar proteinosis development. PMID:25139636

2014-01-01

436

Bisphosphonate Use After Estrogen Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer and Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background A growing body of evidence suggests that nitrogenous bisphosphonates may reduce the risk of developing a first breast cancer and may prevent metastases among breast cancer survivors. However, their impact on risk of second primary contralateral breast cancer is uncertain. Methods Within a nested case–control study among women diagnosed with a first primary estrogen receptor–positive invasive breast cancer at ages 40–79 years, we assessed the association between post-diagnostic bisphosphonate use and risk of second primary contralateral breast cancer. We used multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) comparing 351 contralateral breast cancer case subjects with 662 control subjects (ie, breast cancer patients not diagnosed with contralateral breast cancer) who were incidence density–matched on county; race/ethnicity; and age at, year of, and stage at first breast cancer diagnosis. We performed sensitivity analyses with respect to bisphosphonate type and confounding by indication. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Current use of any nitrogenous bisphosphonate and use specifically of alendronate were both associated with reduced risks of contralateral breast cancer compared with never use (OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.84 and OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.88, respectively). The risk of contralateral breast cancer further declined with longer durations of bisphosphonate use among current users (Ptrend = .03). Results were similar in analyses restricted to patients with a history of osteoporosis or osteopenia. Conclusions Bisphosphonate use was associated with a substantial reduction in risk of contralateral breast cancer. If this finding is confirmed in additional studies, nitrogenous bisphosphonate therapy may be a feasible approach for contralateral breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:22021667

Malone, Kathleen E.; Tang, Mei-Tzu C.; Newcomb, Polly A.

2011-01-01

437

Esophageal cancer as second primary tumor after breast cancer radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An increased risk of esophageal cancer has been reported in survivors of breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. This study further characterizes this association.Methods: Through hospital databases, 118 patients (109 men, 9 women) treated for esophageal cancer between 1985 and 1993 were identified, of whom 37 had 60 synchronous or metachronous cancers. 5 women had primary esophageal cancer after having

Beatrix Scholl; Ernane D Reis; Abderrahim Zouhair; Igor Chereshnev; Jean-Claude Givel; Michel Gillet

2001-01-01

438

PET-CT in Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Approximately\\u000a one in nine women will suffer from breast cancer during her lifetime, and there are almost 40,000 women per year dying of\\u000a this disease in the USA as reported by Eubank and Mankoff (Semin Nucl Med 35(2):84–99, 2005). The incidence of

Mehmet S. Erturk; Rick Tetrault; Annick D. Van den Abbeele

439

Estimation of volumetric breast density for breast cancer risk prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mammographic density (MD) has been shown to be a strong risk predictor for breast cancer. Compared to subjective assessment by a radiologist, computer-aided analysis of digitized mammograms provides a quantitative and more reproducible method for assessing breast density. However, the current methods of estimating breast density based on the area of bright signal in a mammogram do not reflect the true, volumetric quantity of dense tissue in the breast. A computerized method to estimate the amount of radiographically dense tissue in the overall volume of the breast has been developed to provide an automatic, user-independent tool for breast cancer risk assessment. The procedure for volumetric density estimation consists of first correcting the image for inhomogeneity, then performing a volume density calculation. First, optical sensitometry is used to convert all images to the logarithm of relative exposure (LRE), in order to simplify the image correction operations. The field non-uniformity correction, which takes into account heel effect, inverse square law, path obliquity and intrinsic field and grid non- uniformity is obtained by imaging a spherical section PMMA phantom. The processed LRE image of the phantom is then used as a correction offset for actual mammograms. From information about the thickness and placement of the breast, as well as the parameters of a breast-like calibration step wedge placed in the mammogram, MD of the breast is calculated. Post processing and a simple calibration phantom enable user- independent, reliable and repeatable volumetric estimation of density in breast-equivalent phantoms. Initial results obtained on known density phantoms show the estimation to vary less than 5% in MD from the actual value. This can be compared to estimated mammographic density differences of 30% between the true and non-corrected values. Since a more simplistic breast density measurement based on the projected area has been shown to be a strong indicator of breast cancer risk (RR equals 4), it is believed that the current volumetric technique will provide an even better indicator. Such an indicator can be used in determination of the method and frequency of breast cancer screening, and might prove useful in measuring the effect of intervention measures such as drug therapy or dietary change on breast cancer risk.

Pawluczyk, Olga; Yaffe, Martin J.; Boyd, Norman F.; Jong, Roberta A.

2000-04-01

440

Radioimmunodetection and therapy of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the second most-common cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Although more than 60% of patients can now be cured by initial treatment, the rest, although perhaps receiving palliation with currently available therapy, will die of their disease. Early detection of micrometastasis and improved treatment strategies are needed. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based imaging and tumor targeted therapy holds the potential to impact these problems. The most significant results of systemically administered antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals for detection and targeted therapy (radioimmunotherapy [RIT]) of breast cancer give strong evidence that this potential can be realized. Interest in immunoimaging recently has focused on small mAb modules used with 18F, 64Cu, or 124I to detect minimal disease in breast cancer by positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Reported therapy trials in advanced breast cancer have yielded objective responses and minimal toxicity. These studies have spanned several radionuclides as well as several mAb, fragments and approaches, including dose intensification with bone marrow support; combined therapy with other modalities (ie, CM-RIT); biodegradable peptide linkers; and pretargeting. RIT evaluated in clinical breast cancer trials has delivered as much as 4000 cGy to metastatic breast cancer per therapy dose with marrow stem cell support. Preclinical studies have demonstrated further promising strategies for breast cancer. RIT studies must address the key issue: enhancing the therapeutic index (tumor effect verses most sensitive normal tissue (bone marrow) effect). Approaches now include newly engineered mAb, scFv modular constructs, blood clearance on demand, enhanced pretargeting, applications of both alpha and beta emitting radionuclides, and combination therapy using molecular triggers for therapeutic synergy. These strategies for detection and treatment of metastatic breast cancer should lead to notable clinical impact on management and cure of breast cancer. PMID:15765377

DeNardo, Sally J

2005-04-01

441

Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Info on Their Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... News) -- Many women with breast cancer lack basic knowledge about their disease, such as their cancer stage ... according to a new study. The lack of knowledge was even more pronounced among minority women, the ...

442

Metachronous Double Primary Cancer after Treatment of Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose The pattern of double primary cancer after treatment for breast cancer is important for patient survival. Materials and Methods We analyzed 108 cases of metachronous double primary cancer in breast cancer patients treated from 1999 to 2012. Results Metachronous double primary cancers occurred in 108 of 2,657 patients (4.1%) with breast cancer. The median time to the occurrence of second cancer after diagnosis of the first was 58.4±41.2 months (range, 6.9 to 180.2 months). The most common cancer was thyroid cancer, which occurred in 45 patients (41.7%). This was followed by gastric cancer in 16 patients (14.8%), endometrial cancer in 10 patients (9.3%), and cervical cancer in seven patients (6.5%). The relative risk showed a significant increase in endometrial (4.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 13.79), gastric (2.61; 95% CI, 1.68 to 4.06), and thyroid cancer (1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.79). At 5 years after diagnosis of breast cancer, secondary cancer occurred in 48 patients (44.4%), with 50.0% of the endometrial, 56.3% of the stomach, and 37.8% of the thyroid cancer cases being diagnosed after 5 years. Median survival after diagnosis of the second cancer was 123.9±11.2 months. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the anatomic site. Conclusion The incidence of endometrial, stomach, and thyroid cancer increased significantly after treatment with primary breast cancer, and survival was dependent on early detection and the type of second primary cancer. A prolonged follow-up examination for metachronous double primary cancer is needed to provide early detection and improve survival time in patients with breast cancer. PMID:25544582

Kim, Jin Young; Song, Hong Suk

2015-01-01

443

Main controversies in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

2014-01-01

444

Main controversies in breast cancer.  

PubMed

In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it's integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities of tamoxifen. However, the prevention of bone metastasis with bisphosphonates is still conflicting. Last but not least, in the follow-up of BC survivors, mammography, history and physical examination are the means of an early detection of BC recurrence. ed. PMID:25114851

Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

2014-08-10

445

[Case of a patient with inflammatory breast cancer who responded to preoperative chemotherapy with paclitaxel plus bevacizumab and could subsequently undergo surgery].  

PubMed

A 58-year-old woman observed swelling in her left breast a few weeks prior to presentation. Rigidity in the D area, breast warmth, swelling, and a peau d'orange appearance in the whole left breast was observed. She was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer (luminal A type) T4dN2M0, Stage IIIB. The patient underwent primary systemic therapy with 7 courses of FEC. Following FEC treatment, the disease was stable. We subsequently administered 4 courses of bevacizumab plus paclitaxel combination therapy. The patient exhibited a partial response to FEC chemotherapy. Thereafter, a left mastectomy with level II axillary lymph node dissection was performed. At present, 1 year after surgery, the patient is alive with no recurrence. We conclude that the combination therapy of bevacizumab plus paclitaxel is a useful treatment for inflammatory breast cancer. PMID:24394120

Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Ishihara, Sae; Ishii, Mariko; Asano, Yuka; Watanabe, Mao; Morisaki, Tamami; Aomatsu, Naoki; Noda, Satoru; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Nakano, Taeko; Kawakami, Noriko; Mitsukawa, Yasuko; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuro; Hirakawa, Kosei

2013-11-01

446

Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-02-05

447

Genetic factors and breast cancer laterality  

PubMed Central

Background Women are more likely to develop cancer in the left breast than the right. Such laterality may influence subsequent management, especially in elderly patients with heart disease who may require radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to explore possible factors for such cancer laterality. Methods In this work, clinical data for consecutive patients with histologically confirmed breast cancer were reviewed, with emphasis on clinical presentation and family history. Results Between 2005 and 2012, 687 patients with breast cancer were seen. Two women with incomplete data and eleven men were excluded. In total, 343 (50.9%) patients presented with left breast cancer, 311 (46.1%) with right breast cancer, and 20 (3.0%) with simultaneous bilateral malignancy. There were no significant differences between the three groups, especially in regards to clinical presentation and tumor characteristics. A total of 622 (92.3%) patients had unilateral primary, 20 (3.0%) had simultaneous bilateral, and 32 (4.7%) had metachronous primary breast cancer with subsequent contralateral breast cancer after 7.5–236 months. The worst 10-year survival was for bilateral simultaneous (18%) compared with unilateral (28%) and metachronous primaries (90%). There were no differences in survival in relation to breast cancer laterality, handedness, and presence or absence of a family history of cancer. There were significant similarities between patients and first-degree relatives in regards to breast cancer laterality, namely same breast (30/66, 45.5%), opposite breast (9/66, 13.6%), and bilateral cancer (27/66, 40.9, P=0.01163). This was more evident among patients and their sisters (17/32, 53.1%) or mothers (11/27, 40.7%, P=0.0689). There were also close similarities in relation to age at initial diagnosis of cancer for patients and their first-degree relatives for age differences of ?5 years (48/166, 28.9%), 6–10 years (34/166, 20.5%), and >11 years (84/166, 50.6%, P=0.12065). Conclusion High similarities between patients and their first-degree relatives in regards to cancer laterality and possibly age at initial diagnosis of cancer may suggest an underlying inherited genetic predisposition. PMID:24790468

Amer, Magid H

2014-01-01