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Sample records for breast cancer mastectomy

  1. Evolution of radical mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plesca, M; Bordea, C; El Houcheimi, B; Ichim, E; Blidaru, A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of breast cancer has been marked by a constant evolution since the Halsted radical mastectomy described in the late 19th century has become the current standard Madden radical mastectomy, a breast surgery that involves the ablation of tissue with the axillary lymphatic preserving both pectoral muscles. The purpose of this paper was to present the stages that have marked the evolution of this intervention and to provide an overview of the way breast cancer has been understood and treated in the last century. PMID:27453752

  2. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Total mastectomy; Skin sparing mastectomy, Simple mastectomy; Modified radical mastectomy; Breast cancer - mastectomy ... or simple mastectomy: The surgeon cuts breast tissue free from ... radical mastectomy: The surgeon removes the entire breast along ...

  3. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  4. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  5. Tendency to breast reconstruction after breast mastectomy among Iranian women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh; Najaf Najafi, Mona; Abbasi Shaye, Zahra; Salehi, Mahta; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women with the medical history of breast cancer constitute the biggest group of patients who survived cancer. Despite the high rate of mastectomy after breast cancer in Iran; only limited patients elect reconstruction surgery. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of tendency to breast reconstruction (BR) surgery among women with breast cancer who had mastectomy but not undergone reconstruction. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Mashhad, north east of Iran during 2013. A total of 108 patients with mastectomy due to breast cancer were selected through convenience sampling and completed the questionnaire. Demographic data collected and 21 items of questionnaire were compared between patients with and without tendency to BR. Data were analyzed using Chi square, t tests and logistic regression. Results: In this study 62 (57.4%) patients had a tendency to BR and 46 (42.6%) had not. The mean (±SD) age of patients in first group was 43.3±8.03 and 49.6±9.9 in the second group (p<0.001). Frequency of agreement about impact of BR on appearance and beauty, mood, family living conditions and their opinion (p<0.001), lack of sufficient information (p=0.01), physician's opinion (p<0.001) and priority of cancer breast treatment (p=0.02) were significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: More than half of the patients had a tendency to BR although they did not go under the surgery yet. Identification of factors that can increase the tendency and factors that help to change the intention to action are important and should be investigate in future research. PMID:26478882

  6. [The experience of women after breast cancer mastectomy: objectification theory perspective].

    PubMed

    Fang, Su-Ying; Chiu, Shing-Charn; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2011-08-01

    The female breast is intimately tied to social values that define the ideal body standard for women. As such, women's bodies are regarded as objects to be evaluated and judged. This paper analyzed the experience of women with breast cancer after mastectomy from the perspective of objectification theory. The authors found that not only medical technology but women themselves objectified the female body. The process of patient-physician communication also strengthened the objectification phenomenon for post-mastectomy women. We found that women with breast cancer worried about facing critical evaluation from the public after losing their breasts and needed to cope with the stress of losing a part of their physical self. Social and cultural antecedents that regard breasts as "objects" strongly influence the perspectives of women facing breast cancer. We hope this analysis may assist healthcare professionals to understand how women's bodies are objectified after mastectomy and consider how to care for this population more appropriately. PMID:21809290

  7. The Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients with breast cancer are being offered immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of IBR on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Methods We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed), ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase, and Google Scholar databases for studies reporting the overall recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients after mastectomy only and mastectomy with IBR. With these data, we conducted a meta-analysis of the clinical outcomes. Results Fourteen studies, including 3641 cases and 9462 controls, matched our criteria. Relevant information was extracted from these 14 studies. There was no significant heterogeneity (P for Q-statistic > 0.10 and I2 < 25%). Patients who underwent IBR showed no increased risk of overall recurrence of breast cancer (RR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75, 1.04; P = 0.14). Furthermore, patients receiving IBR had similar DFS (RR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.08); P = 0.10) and OS (RR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.05; P = 0.24)) as those of control patients. Conclusion This meta-analysis provides evidence that IBR does not have an adverse effect on prognosis. These data suggest that IBR is an appropriate and safe choice for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26024490

  8. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast…

  9. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer are removed. This is also called breast conservation therapy or partial mastectomy. Most of your breast ... Medical history that may exclude you from breast conservation (this may include prior breast radiation and certain ...

  10. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with breast cancer: Trends, predictors, and areas for future research

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Michaela S.; Rosenberg, Shoshana M.; Dominici, Laura; Partridge, Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed increasing rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with unilateral early stage breast cancer. This trend has raised concerns, given the lack of evidence for a survival benefit from CPM and the relatively low risk of contralateral breast cancer for most women in this setting. In this article, we review available data regarding the value of CPM, predictors and outcomes related to CPM, and areas for future research and potential intervention. PMID:23893127

  11. Predictors and Outcomes of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Kristi D.; Peshkin, Beth N.; Halbert, Chanita H.; DeMarco, Tiffani A.; Isaacs, Claudine; Schwartz, Marc D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Women affected with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation are at risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. To reduce the risk of contralateral breast cancer, some patients opt for prophylactic surgery of the unaffected breast (contralateral prophylactic mastectomy; CPM) in addition to mastectomy of the affected breast. Methods We conducted the present study to determine the predictors and outcomes of CPM in the year following BRCA1/2 genetic counseling and testing. 435 women affected with unilateral breast cancer who received positive or uninformative BRCA1/2 genetic test results completed assessments prior to genetic counseling and testing and 1, 6, and 12 months after receipt of results. Results Prior to testing, 16% had undergone CPM (in conjunction with mastectomy of the affected breast). In the year following testing, 18% with positive test results and 3% with uninformative test results opted for CPM. CPM following testing was associated with a positive genetic test result, younger age at cancer diagnosis (OR = .94), and higher cancer-specific distress at baseline (OR = 3.28). CPM was not associated with distress outcomes at 12-months. Conclusions Following a positive test result, 18% of women previously affected with unilateral breast cancer had a CPM. Women affected with breast cancer at a younger age, particularly those with positive genetic test results and higher cancer-specific distress, are more likely to choose CPM than women who receive uninformative test results and who are less distressed and older at diagnosis. CPM does not appear to impact distress outcomes. PMID:17066320

  12. Evaluation of body esteem and mental health in patients with breast cancer after mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Sara; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mastectomy in patients with breast cancer can severely affect their body esteem. It also changes the emotions and attitudes of patients toward their body and causes psychological reactions such as depression, anxiety, and stress. Aims: This study was conducted with the aim of assessing correlation between body esteem and mental health in patients with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive study. One hundred patients with breast cancer after mastectomy were selected by convenience sampling from Seyed Al Shohada Hospital in Isfahan. Data gathering tools were questionnaires of body esteem and SCL-25 mental health and were analyzed by SPSS-PC (v.17). Results: According to the score of body esteem (2.80) and the overall average score for body esteem (36.46), patients had low body esteem. About dimensions of the mental health, the highest average was associated with depressive disorders. According to the results of the Spearman correlation coefficient, there was a direct linear relationship between body esteem and mental health. Conclusion: Considering the impact of mastectomy on body esteem and mental health and the relationship between the variables, nurses take steps for identifying and referring patients to the counseling centers to prevent psychological disorder aspects. PMID:26903758

  13. Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords "contralateral breast cancer" and "contralateral prophylactic mastectomy". These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

  14. Comparison of satisfactions from mastectomy and Lump Ectome in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tazhibi, Mehdi; Sarrafzadeh, Sheida; Mokarian, Fariborz; Babazade, Shady; Tabatabaeian, Maryam; Rezaei, Parisa; Faghihi, Mehri; Taleghani, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of breast cancer among women in compare to other types of cancers in all over the world and in Iran is high. Mastectomy surgery is one of the common treatments for these patients. Another method, which is less invasive, is Lumpectomy. This study comprised the satisfaction of patients under two types of surgery; Mastectomy and Lumpectomy. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, two types of patients which had either, Mastectomy or Lumpectomy, were studied. Results: From 119 patients which studied here, 80 patients (66.7%) were treated by mastectomy and 39 patients (32.5%) were treated under lumpectomy. Two groups had not significant differences in duration between diagnostic and surgery, the number of lymph nodes involved and the number of lymph nodes removed. Lumpectomy patients had higher pain and numbness in 24 h, 1 week after surgery and at the time of study than the other group. The observed difference was significant (P = 0.043). Discussion: It is implied in previous studies that patients under lumpectomy had more satisfaction than patients under mastectomy. However, no differences were observed in quality-of-life between the two groups in some other studies. The differences between various studies might be for the sake of cultural variety and time interval between surgery and filling questionnaire. PMID:24741662

  15. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  16. The Relationship between Body Esteem and Hope and Mental Health in Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer and its treatment, including mastectomy, can cause feelings of mutilation, depreciation in the value of the body, reduction in attractiveness, and lead to mental disorders and hopelessness. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the relationship between appreciating the body, hope and mental health in women with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive study of 100 breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy and referred to the Sayed Al-Shohada Medical Center in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were selected by convenient sampling. Data gathering tools were the Body Esteem Scale (BES), Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25) mental health questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: Most of the patients had low body esteem. There was a significant direct linear relationship between body esteem and hope and mental health. This relationship was stronger between valuing the body and hope. Conclusion: Body esteem has a significant linear relationship with hope and mental health. PMID:26009674

  17. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the cancer removed (lumpectomy or breast-conserving surgery) might not need reconstruction, but sometimes they do. Breast reconstruction is done by a plastic surgeon. Should I have breast reconstruction? Breast reconstruction ...

  18. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  19. Contralateral risk reducing mastectomy in patients with sporadic breast cancer. Benefits and hazards.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, C; Gentilini, O

    2016-07-01

    During the last years an improving outcome of breast conserving surgery was observed along with the availability of diagnostic procedures allowing early diagnosis. Nevertheless, women with breast cancer are more frequently requesting a radical approach comprising contralateral mastectomy even if they do not have a demonstrated increased genetic risk. In this paper we reviewed the main reasons patients ask for aggressive preventive surgery, the perceived and the real risks of developing contralateral breast cancer, and the potential, if any, survival benefits along with the hazards associated to contralateral risk reducing mastectomy. A respectful management should be given to these women within a multi-disciplinary team. Psychological support is highly encouraged cope fears and uncertainties but treating physicians should provide patients with comprehensive and unbiased data to take the best decision for the single person. Physicians should also give clear information on the benefits of adjuvant therapies which are reducing the incidence of contralateral breast cancer and also of the possible influences of healthy lifestyle (weight control, physical activity, diet) as effective preventive methods. PMID:27189832

  20. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy rate stable at major Canadian breast cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amanda; Sandhu, Lakhbir; Cil, Tulin D; Hofer, Stefan O P; Zhong, Toni

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine trends of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rates at a Canadian academic breast cancer center. METHODS: A single-institution retrospective cohort study was completed. Women of any age who underwent at least a unilateral mastectomy (UM) for primary unilateral breast carcinoma between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2010 were included. Patients who underwent CPM on the same day as UM were isolated to create two distinct cohorts. Patient and procedure characteristics were compared across groups using R software (version 3.1.0). The percentage of CPMs per year was determined. The Cochrane-Armitage test was used to assess the trend of CPMs over time. A P value of < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: A total of 811 women met the inclusions/exclusion criteria; 759 (93.6%) underwent UM alone and 52 (6.4%) underwent UM with immediate CPM. The absolute number of procedures (UM and UM + CPM) increased over time, from 83 in 2004 to 147 in 2010 reflecting an increase in mastectomy volume. Annual CPM rates did not increase over time (P = 0.7) and varied between 2.6% to 10.7%. Family history of breast cancer [OR 3.6 (1.8-7.3)] and immediate reconstruction [10.0 (5.2-19.3)] were both significantly associated with CPM. Women who underwent CPM were younger (median age CPM 49 years vs UM 52 years, P < 0.0001) but age less than 50 years was not statistically associated with increased rates of CPM. CONCLUSION: CPM rates from 2004 to 2010 at a high-volume Canadian breast cancer center did not increase over time, in contrast to trends observed in the United States. PMID:27298770

  1. Trends and Variation in Use of Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Mastectomy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concerns exist regarding breast cancer patients' access to breast reconstruction, which provides important psychosocial benefits. Patients and Methods Using the MarketScan database, a claims-based data set of US patients with employment-based insurance, we identified 20,560 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998 to 2007. We evaluated time trends using the Cochran-Armitage test and correlated reconstruction use with plastic-surgery workforce density and other treatments using multivariable regression. Results Median age of our sample was 51 years. Reconstruction use increased from 46% in 1998 to 63% in 2007 (P < .001), with increased use of implants and decreased use of autologous techniques over time (P < .001). Receipt of bilateral mastectomy also increased: from 3% in 1998 to 18% in 2007 (P < .001). Patients receiving bilateral mastectomy were more likely to receive reconstruction (odds ratio [OR], 2.3; P < .001) and patients receiving radiation were less likely to receive reconstruction (OR, 0.44; P < .001). Rates of reconstruction receipt varied dramatically by geographic region, with associations with plastic surgeon density in each state and county-level income. Autologous techniques were more often used in patients who received both reconstruction and radiation (OR, 1.8; P < .001) and less frequently used in patients with capitated insurance (OR, 0.7; P < .001), patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy (OR, 0.5; P < .001), or patients in the highest income quartile (OR, 0.7; P = .006). Delayed reconstruction was performed in 21% of patients who underwent reconstruction. Conclusion Breast reconstruction has increased over time, but it has wide geographic variability. Receipt of other treatments correlates with the use of and approaches toward reconstruction. Further research and interventions are needed to ensure equitable access to this important component of multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24550418

  2. Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords “contralateral breast cancer” and “contralateral prophylactic mastectomy”. These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

  3. A Case Report of Local Recurrence Developing 24 Years After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer Recurrence From Breast Cancer After 24 Years

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Linlin; Hu, Xudong; Wang, Suzhen; Yong-Sheng, Gao; Yu, Qingxi; Gao, Song; Zhang, Hui; Wei, Yuchun; Zhao, Qian; Yuan, Shuang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Breast cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer, in which most patients’ metastases (about 75%) occurred in 5 years after the initial diagnosis, especially in 3 years. Recrudescence exceeding 20 years is rarely reported in the past several decades. Case information: A 68-year-old female patient presented with breast cancer in which 3 focal increased 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the right supraclavicular lymph node, the mediastinum and sternum were found on positron emission tomography and computed tomography. Then we learned that the patient had suffered from breast cancer and been given a right-sided mastectomy 24 years ago. Histopathology from the mediastinum revealed metastatic, moderately differentiated breast adenomatous cell carcinoma. Conclusion: We report this late recurrence of breast cancer 24 years following mastectomy, suggesting that possible recurrence of this disease with a 24-year latency period should be taken into consideration. PMID:27258518

  4. An Eighteen-Gene Classifier Predicts Locoregional Recurrence in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Skye H.; Horng, Chen-Fang; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Huang, Erich S.; Tsou, Mei-Hua; Shi, Li-Sun; Yu, Ben-Long; Chen, Chii-Ming; Huang, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified 34 genes of interest (GOI) in 2006 to aid the oncologists to determine whether post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is indicated for certain patients with breast cancer. At this time, an independent cohort of 135 patients having DNA microarray study available from the primary tumor tissue samples was chosen. Inclusion criteria were 1) mastectomy as the first treatment, 2) pathology stages I-III, 3) any locoregional recurrence (LRR) and 4) no PMRT. After inter-platform data integration of Affymetrix U95 and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays and quantile normalization, in this paper we used 18 of 34 GOI to divide the mastectomy patients into high and low risk groups. The 5-year rate of freedom from LRR in the high-risk group was 30%. In contrast, in the low-risk group it was 99% (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the 18-gene classifier independently predicts rates of LRR regardless of nodal status or cancer subtype. PMID:27077114

  5. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Manning, Aidan T; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-02-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  6. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Aidan T.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  7. [The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].

    PubMed

    López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain. PMID:25275850

  8. Patient-Reported Quality of Life and Satisfaction with Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation and Mastectomy with and without Reconstruction: Results of a Survey of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Li, Yun; Morrow, Monica; Janz, Nancy; Alderman, Amy; Graff, John; Hamilton, Ann; Katz, Steven; Hawley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although breast conservation is therapeutically equivalent to mastectomy for most early-stage breast cancer patients, an increasing number are pursuing mastectomy, which may be followed by breast reconstruction. We sought to evaluate long-term quality of life (QOL) and cosmetic outcomes after different locoregional management approaches, as perceived by patients themselves. Methods We surveyed women diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer from 2005-07, as reported to the Los Angeles and Detroit population-based SEER registries. We received responses from 2290 women approximately 9 months after diagnosis (73% response rate) and from 1536 of these 4 years later. We evaluated QOL and patterns and correlates of satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes overall, and more specifically within the subgroup undergoing mastectomy with reconstruction, using multivariable linear regression. Results Of the 1450 patients who responded to both surveys and had not recurred, 963 underwent breast conserving surgery, 263 mastectomy without reconstruction, and 222 mastectomy with reconstruction. Cosmetic satisfaction was similar between those receiving breast conservation and those receiving mastectomy with reconstruction. Among patients receiving mastectomy with reconstruction, reconstruction type and radiation receipt were associated with satisfaction (p<0.001), with an adjusted scaled satisfaction score of 4.7 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction without radiation, 4.4 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction and radiation therapy, 4.1 for patients receiving implant reconstruction without radiation, and 2.8 for patients receiving implant reconstruction and radiation. Discussion Patient-reported cosmetic satisfaction was similar after breast conservation and after mastectomy with reconstruction. In patients undergoing post-mastectomy radiation, use of autologous reconstruction may mitigate radiation's deleterious impact on cosmetic outcomes. PMID:25654742

  9. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  10. Younger women's experiences of deciding against delayed breast reconstruction post-mastectomy following breast cancer: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Holland, Fiona; Archer, Stephanie; Montague, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Most women do not reconstruct their breast(s) post-mastectomy. The experiences of younger women who maintain this decision, although important to understand, are largely absent in the research literature. This interview-based study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the experiences of six women, diagnosed with primary breast cancer in their 30s/40s, who decided against delayed reconstruction. Findings reported here focus on one superordinate theme (decision-making) from a larger analysis, illustrating that the women's drive to survive clearly influenced their initial decision-making process. Their tenacity in maintaining their decision is highlighted, despite non-reconstruction sometimes being presented negatively by medical teams. Patient-centred support recommendations are made. PMID:25516557

  11. A decision-analytic model for early stage breast cancer: lumpectomy vs mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Büyükdamgaci-Alogan, G; Elele, T; Hayran, M; Erman, M; Kiliçkap, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to construct a decision model that incorporated patient preferences over differing health state prospects and to analyze the decision context of early stage breast cancer patients in relation to two main surgical treatment options. A Markov chain was constructed to project the clinical history of breast carcinoma following surgery. A Multi Attribute Utility Model was developed for outcome evaluation. Transition probabilities were obtained by using subjective probability assessment. This study was performed on the sample population of female university students and utilities were elicited from these healthy volunteers. The results were validated by using Standard Gamble technique. Finally, Monte Carlo Simulation was utilized in Treeage-Pro 2006-Suit software program in order to calculate expected utility generated by each treatment option. The results showed that, if the subject had mastectomy, mean value for the quality adjusted life years gained was 6.42; on the other hand, if the preference was lumpectomy, it was 7.00 out of a possible 10 years. Sensitivity analysis on transition probabilities to local recurrence and salvaged states was performed and two threshold values were observed. Additionally, sensitivity analysis on utilities showed that the model was more sensitive to no evidence of disease state; however, was not sensitive to utilities of local recurrence and salvaged states. The decision model was developed with reasonable success for early stage breast cancer patients, and tested by using general public data. The results obtained from these data showed that lumpectomy was more favourable for these participants. PMID:18348655

  12. Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Na; Dang, Shao-Nong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Surgical Department of Oncology Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from March to November 2009. A total of 120 breast cancer patients who received Personal Controlled Analgesia (PCA) following surgery (mastectomy) were randomly allocated to two groups, an intervention group and a control group (60 patients in each group). The intervention group accepted music therapy from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third admission to hospital for chemotherapy in addition to the routine nursing care, while the control group received only routine nursing care. Pain scores were measured at baseline and three post-tests using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Short-Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the change in the Pain Rating Index (PRI-total) score from baseline. Music therapy was found to reduce the PRI-total score in the intervention group significantly compared with the control group with a mean difference (95% CI) of -2.38 (-2.80, -1.95), -2.41 (-2.85, -1.96), and -1.87 (-2.33, -1.42) for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd post-tests, respectively. Similar results were found for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scores. The findings of the study provide some evidence that music therapy has both short- and long-term positive effects on alleviating pain in breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy. PMID:21537935

  13. Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status. According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

  14. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  15. Pattern of External Breast Prosthesis Use by Post Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients in India: Descriptive Study from Tertiary Care Centre.

    PubMed

    Ramu, D; Ramesh, Rakesh S; Manjunath, Suraj; Shivakumar; Goel, Vipin; Hemnath, G N; Alexander, Annie

    2015-12-01

    In India, Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in urban and 2nd most common in rural areas [1]. The incidence is rising, more younger women are getting affected and due to increase in survival rates there is an increase in the total number of women suffering from breast Cancer. So far there are no studies evaluating the pattern of breast prosthesis use in Indian scenario. The aim of this study is to address the patterns of external breast prosthesis used in India and view of Indian women on such prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This was a descriptive longitudinal study. In this study we interviewed (telephonic) 63 people, after three years of completing treatment under The Department of Surgical Oncology, St. Johns medical college, Bangalore. Among the study group, 27 members (40 %) were using various prosthesis, rest 36 women were not using any type of prosthesis. Among the users of prosthesis, silicon prosthesis was used by 6 women, padded cups by 8 women, cloth or cotton by 12 women and 1 woman used other type of prosthesis. Most women use simple items like cloth and cotton (44 %). Next most commonly used prosthesis are padded cups(). Only 22 % of women were found using silicon prosthesis in this study. Most of the well educated patients used external prosthesis either in the form of silicon prosthesis or padded cups. Most of women below age of 50 used external breast prosthesis. Use of prosthesis was more in urban compared to rural population (48 % vs 25 %). Prosthesis users worried more about the body image than women not using prosthesis. 25 % of women using prosthesis had body image issues where as only 5 % of non prosthesis users had such problems. Prosthesis users need improvement in terms of comfort, size, shape and affordability. Most common reasons for not using prosthesis are age, lack of motivation and awareness. Less than half of the women included in this study used external prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer

  16. Advances in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Faulkner, Brent C; Bill, Timothy J; Lin, Kant Y

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, surgical reconstruction of the breast following mastectomy has become an important aspect of the cancer patient's rehabilitation process. While the surgical emphasis remains on a cure for the cancer, experience with breast reconstruction has not demonstrated any increased rate of cancer recurrence, even when reconstruction is performed immediately following tumor resection. Advances in surgical technique and biotechnology have made post-mastectomy reconstruction possible. The development of silicone gel and saline-filled implants as well as tissue expanders has revolutionized breast reconstruction. The elucidation of musculocutaneous flaps now provides the surgeon with the ability to transfer adequate quantities of vascularized tissue to reconstruct the surgical defects. The advent of microsurgical techniques has provided an additional reconstructive option, with free tissue transfer allowing the plastic surgeon to move musculocutaneous flaps from remote or distant sites to reconstruct the defect. The option of having the reconstruction immediately following the mastectomy procedure is now available to the patient. When reviewing the anatomy of the breast region, the surgeon must consider the mammary gland, its vascular supply, and its lymphatic system. The surgical techniques involved in reconstruction after mastectomy include the use of breast implants and tissue expansion, as well as reconstruction with autogenous tissues. Reconstruction with autogenous tissues includes the use of latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap, transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap, free flap transfer, as well as nipple-areola reconstruction. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy should be undertaken by a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with considerable training and experience with these diversified procedures. PMID:15777171

  17. Perceptions, knowledge, and satisfaction with contralateral prophylactic mastectomy among young women with breast cancer: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M.; Tracy, Michaela S.; Meyer, Meghan E.; Sepucha, Karen; Gelber, Shari; Hirshfield-Bartek, Judi; Troyan, Susan; Morrow, Monica; Schapira, Lidia; Come, Steven E.; Winer, Eric P.; Partridge, Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a dramatic increase in rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), particularly among younger women with breast cancer, however little is known about how women approach the decision to undergo CPM. Objective To examine preferences, knowledge, decision-making, and experiences of young women with breast cancer who chose CPM. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Eight academic and community medical centers that enrolled 550 women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 and younger, between November 2006 and November 2010. Patients 123 women without known bilateral breast cancer who reported having a bilateral mastectomy. Measurements A one-time, 23 item survey that included items related to decision-making, knowledge, risk perception, and breast cancer worry. Results Most women (98%) indicated that the desire to lower the chance of developing a contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and to improve survival (94%) were extremely or very important factors in their decision to undergo CPM. However, only 18% indicated that women with breast cancer who undergo CPM live longer than women who do not. BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation carriers more accurately perceived their risk of a CBC while women without a known mutation substantially overestimated this risk. Limitations The survey, administered a median of two years post-surgery, was not validated and some questions might have been misinterpreted by respondents or subject to recall bias. Generalizability of our findings might be limited. Conclusions Despite knowing that CPM does not clearly improve survival, women who have undergone the procedure do so, in part, to extend their lives. Many women overestimate their actual risk of developing breast cancer in the unaffected breast. Interventions aimed at improving risk communication in an effort to promote evidence-based decision-making are warranted. PMID:24042365

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of Harmonic technology compared with conventional techniques in mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery with lymphadenectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hang; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Ferko, Nicole C; Patel, Leena; Soleas, Ireena M; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background Mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) are important treatment options for breast cancer patients. A previous meta-analysis demonstrated that the risk of certain complications can be reduced with the Harmonic technology compared with conventional methods in mastectomy. However, the meta-analysis did not include studies of BCS patients and focused on a subset of surgical complications. The objective of this study was to compare Harmonic technology and conventional techniques for a range of clinical outcomes and complications in both mastectomy and BCS patients, including axillary lymph node dissection. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing Harmonic technology and conventional methods in breast cancer surgery. Outcome measures included blood loss, drainage volume, total complications, seroma, necrosis, wound infections, ecchymosis, hematoma, hospital length of stay, and operating time. Risk of bias was analyzed for all studies. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models for mean differences of continuous variables and a fixed-effects model for risk ratios of dichotomous variables. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Across surgery types, compared to conventional techniques, Harmonic technology reduced total complications by 52% (P=0.002), seroma by 46% (P<0.0001), necrosis by 49% (P=0.04), postoperative chest wall drainage by 46% (P=0.0005), blood loss by 38% (P=0.0005), and length of stay by 22% (P=0.007). Although benefits generally appeared greatest in mastectomy patients with lymph node dissection, Harmonic technology showed significant reductions in complications in the BCS study subgroup. Conclusion In this meta-analysis of both mastectomy and BCS procedures, the use of Harmonic technology reduced the risk of most complications by about half across breast cancer surgery patients. These benefits may be due to superior hemostatic capabilities of Harmonic

  19. Interleukin-2 administration after modified radical mastectomy in breast cancer therapy increases peripheral regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunli; Zhou, Lei; Sun, Bei; Li, Xiaoxiao; Duan, Kaiming; Wu, Yuhui; Ouyang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC) deaths are a major concern worldwide, and modified radical mastectomy (MRM) still represents a primary therapeutic strategy. Post-surgery administration of interleukin (IL)-2 for BC therapy has been implemented in China recently. Although its impact on regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been documented in some cancer types, such as melanoma, the IL-2-mediated changes in the Treg composition after MRM in BC treatment remain unknown. Methods: As registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, 34 newly diagnosed BC patients, aged 20-65 years, were enrolled in this trial. Patients were randomized to the IL-2-treated group (n=15) and the untreated control group (n=19). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated at time points of pre-operation (PreOP) and post-operation Day 1 (POD1), POD3, and POD7. Cells were subjected to flow cytometric assays to identify CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs, as well as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of FOXP3 expression. Results: We found that the surgery caused a significant decrease in the percentage of Tregs on POD1, followed by a significant increase characterized by a peak value on POD7 with a more than 18% increase relative to the Pre-OP levels. We observed that the Treg percentages in the IL-2-treated group were significantly greater than those in the control group on POD3 and POD7, whereas no such statistical difference was observed on POD1. The FOXP3 expression analysis revealed consistent trends as observed by flow cytometry. Conclusions: Post-operative administration of IL-2 amplifies the surgery-induced augmentation of both Tregs and FOXP3 expression in BC therapy. PMID:26221334

  20. Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy in Young Breast Cancer Patients with and without Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Phuong L.; Lagos, Veronica I.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Decisions regarding contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) among women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer can potentially be influenced by age at diagnosis and other factors. In this study, we examined the use of CRRM before versus after genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) in women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of women with invasive breast cancer diagnosed before age 50 who were seen for GCRA between October 1996 and March 2005. Associations between the presence of generally accepted indications for risk-reducing surgery among women who had CRRM and the timing of GCRA were examined. Results The cohort included 378 women, of whom 57 had CRRM pre-GCRA and 45 had CRRM post-GCRA after a median follow-up of 26 months. Women who had CRRM pre-GCRA were more likely to not have a generally accepted indication for the procedure than those who did after GCRA (odds ratio [OR] 5.3, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.6–17.8, P = .007). Women diagnosed with breast cancer before BRCA genetic testing became clinically available (1997) were more likely to have had CRRM pre-GCRA than those who were diagnosed more recently (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6–5.2, P = .0003). Conclusion When personal and family history was carefully examined, a substantial proportion of women seen in our clinic did not have a clear indication for CRRM. Decreased use of empiric CRRM among women diagnosed after 1997 may indicate increased awareness and use of GCRA. Thus, judicious application of GCRA may help focus use of surgical risk reduction measures to the most risk-appropriate patients. PMID:18836779

  1. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  2. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Skye Hongiun . E-mail: skye@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Horng, C.-F.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Tsou, M.-H.; Tsai, Stella Y.; Chen, C.-M.; Jian, James J.; Liu, M.-C.; West, Mike; Huang, Andrew T.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. {>=}4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size.

  3. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    PubMed

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts <40 and ≥40 as well cohorts by decade (20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s). Statistical trends were reported as odds of risk per year of increasing age using logistic regression; linear regression, χ(2), and Fischer's exact were used to compare <40 and ≥40 and split cohorts for comparison. Comorbidities, tumor staging, oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation, disease characteristics and genetics, and mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P < 0.005). Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort

  4. Oncological safety of prophylactic breast surgery: skin-sparing and nipple-sparing versus total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Maijers, Marike C.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Koppert, Linetta B.

    2015-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1/2 gene mutation and others with a high breast cancer risk may opt for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. To allow for immediate breast reconstruction the skin envelope is left in situ with or without the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Although possibly leading to a more natural aesthetic outcome than the conventional total mastectomy, so-called skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) may leave some breast glandular tissue in situ. The oncological risk associated with remaining breast glandular tissue is unclear. We present a case of primary breast cancer after prophylactic mastectomy followed by a review of the literature on remaining breast glandular tissue after various mastectomy techniques and oncological safety of prophylactic mastectomies. PMID:26645001

  5. Prospective Study of Surgical Decision-making Processes for Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Patricia A.; Peterson, Susan K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Crosby, Melissa A.; Shen, Yu; Black, Dalliah M.; Babiera, Gildy; Kuerer, Henry M.; Ying, Jun; Dong, Wenli; Cantor, Scott B.; Brewster, Abenaa M.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective We prospectively examined the psychosocial predictors and the decision-making process regarding contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with sporadic breast cancer. Summary Background Data Increasing numbers of women with breast cancer are seeking CPM. Data are limited about the surgical decision-making process and the psychosocial factors that influence interest in CPM. Methods Women with early stage unilateral breast cancer (n=117) were recruited before their first surgical visit at MD Anderson and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge of and interest in CPM and associated psychosocial factors. After the appointment, women and their surgeons completed questions about the extent that various surgical options (including CPM) were discussed; also, the women rated their perceived likelihood of having CPM and the surgeons rated the appropriateness of CPM. Results Before their first visit, 50% of women were moderately to extremely interested in CPM and 12 (10%) of women had CPM at the time of their primary breast cancer surgery. Less knowledge about breast cancer (P=0.02) and greater cancer worry (P=0.03) predicted interest in CPM. Greater cancer worry predicted who had CPM (P=0.02). Interest in CPM before surgical visit and the likelihood of having CPM after the visit differed (P =<0.001). Surgeons’ rating of the appropriateness of CPM and the patient’s reported likelihood of having CPM were not significantly different (P=0.49). Conclusions Interest in CPM is common among women with sporadic breast cancer. The informational and emotional aspects of CPM may affect the decision to have CPM and should be addressed when discussing surgical options. PMID:25822675

  6. The Changing Face of Mastectomy (from Mutilation to Aid to Breast Reconstruction)

    PubMed Central

    Zurrida, Stefano; Bassi, Fabio; Arnone, Paolo; Martella, Stefano; Del Castillo, Andres; Ribeiro Martini, Rafael; Semenkiw, M. Eugenia; Caldarella, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Primary treatment is surgery, with mastectomy as the main treatment for most of the twentieth century. However, over that time, the extent of the procedure varied, and less extensive mastectomies are employed today compared to those used in the past, as excessively mutilating procedures did not improve survival. Today, many women receive breast-conserving surgery, usually with radiotherapy to the residual breast, instead of mastectomy, as it has been shown to be as effective as mastectomy in early disease. The relatively new skin-sparing mastectomy, often with immediate breast reconstruction, improves aesthetic outcomes and is oncologically safe. Nipple-sparing mastectomy is newer and used increasingly, with better acceptance by patients, and again appears to be oncologically safe. Breast reconstruction is an important adjunct to mastectomy, as it has a positive psychological impact on the patient, contributing to improved quality of life. PMID:22312537

  7. Benefits and risks of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in women undergoing treatment for sporadic unilateral breast cancer: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Lee, Janie M; Gogineni, Keerthi; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Schwartz, J Sanford; Prosnitz, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The rate of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is rising rapidly, despite limited evidence about the procedure's relative benefits and harms. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of CPM on life expectancy (LE) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) in women with sporadic unilateral breast cancer. A Markov model was developed to compare 18 hypothetical cohorts of 45-year-old women with newly diagnosed unilateral, sporadic breast cancer treated with or without CPM. The probability of developing distant metastases by American Joint Committee on Cancer stage and molecular subtype was derived from British Columbia Cancer Agency data. Additional model parameters were identified from the medical literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the impact of plausible variations in key model parameters on results. CPM improved LE in all cohorts (range 0.06-0.54 years). Stage had more effect on LE than subtype (stage I mean, 0.44 years, stage III mean, 0.11 years). However, after adjusting for quality-of-life, No CPM was favored in all cohorts. Univariate sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the most influential model parameter was the post-CPM health state utility. The preferred strategy shifted from No CPM to CPM when the post-CPM utility exceeded 0.83 (base case value 0.81). PSA indicated that LE gains and QALE decreases were stable in all cohorts. The primary determinant of survival after unilateral breast cancer is stage at diagnosis. Our results suggest that routine CPM would not improve quality-adjusted survival for the majority of women with unilateral sporadic breast cancer. PMID:26062750

  8. A Study on Dosimetric Outcomes and Acute Toxicity of Post Mastectomy Adjuvant Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shivaprasad; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Srinivasa, Vidyasagar Mamidipudi; Yathiraj, Prahlad Hiremagalur; Singh, Anshul; Reddy, Anusha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy (HFRT) is a relatively new adjuvant Radiotherapy (RT) schedule for breast cancers following breast conservation surgery and less commonly, following mastectomy. Here we report our experience on normal tissue exposure and acute toxicity of HFRT after mastectomy. Aim To assess the dosimetric outcomes and acute toxicity profile of adjuvant HFRT following mastectomy for breast cancer. Materials and Materials This prospective observational study considered consecutive patients planned for adjuvant HFRT (42.5 Gy in 16 sessions delivered over 3 weeks) to the chest wall with/without regional nodes between October 2014 and June 2015. The dosimetric parameters including dose homogeneity to the target volume and exposure to heart and lung were analyzed. Acute haematological and dermatological toxicity was recorded until upto three months after completion of RT. Results Among the 56 patients treated with HFRT, the mean age was 49 years (range: 28-69 years). Pathologically positive nodes and ≥pT3 primary was observed in 44 (78.6%) and 12 (21.4%) patients, respectively. Majority (87.5%) received prior adjunct chemotherapy. RT to the supraclavicular fossa was delivered for 39 (69.6%) patients. The mean V90 and V95 to the Planning Target Volume (PTV) were 95% (± 3.3%) and 93% (± 4%), respectively. The maximum dose received was on average 47.7 Gy (112%; range: 46.2-48.5 Gy). The mean lung dose was 10.2 Gy (± 3.5 Gy) and V20 was 20.9% (± 6%). The mean V25 to heart was 6.6% (± 4.8%) for left sided and 0% for right sided tumours (p=0.001). Acute skin toxicity peaked at completion of RT and was tolerable (grade 0, I, II and III reactions were 75%, 16% and 1.8%, respectively). No patient had ≥ grade III haematological toxicity, and treatment was not interrupted for any patient. Conclusion Adjuvant HFRT could be planned while meeting the dose constraints to normal tissues in all patients and was well tolerated, with mild

  9. The recurrence pattern following delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer suggests a systemic effect of surgery on occult dormant micrometastases.

    PubMed

    Dillekås, Hanna; Demicheli, Romano; Ardoino, Ilaria; Jensen, Svein A H; Biganzoli, Elia; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the recurrence dynamics in breast cancer patients after delayed reconstruction. We hypothesized that surgical reconstruction might stimulate dormant micrometastases and reduce time to recurrence. All mastectomy breast cancer patients with delayed surgical reconstruction at Haukeland University Hospital, between 1977 and 2007, n = 312, were studied. Our control group consisted of 1341 breast cancer patients without reconstruction. For each case, all patients in the control group with identical T and N stages and age ±2 years were considered. A paired control was randomly selected from this group. 10 years after primary surgery, 39 of the cases had relapsed, compared to 52 of the matched controls. The reconstructed group was analyzed for relapse dynamics after mastectomy; the first peak in relapses was similarly timed, but smaller than for the controls, while the second peak was similar in time and size. Second, the relapse pattern was analyzed with reconstruction as the starting point. A peak in recurrences was found after 18 months, and a lower peak at the 5th-6th year. The height of the peak correlated with the extent of surgery and initial T and N stages. Timing of the peak was not affected, neither was the cumulative effect. The relapse pattern, when time origin is placed both at mastectomy and at reconstruction, is bimodal with a peak position at the same time points, at 2 years and at 5-6 years. The timing of the transition from dormant micrometastases into clinically detectable macrometastases might be explained by an enhancing effect of surgery. PMID:27306422

  10. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  11. Cytogenetic Biomonitoring in Buccal Mucosa Cells from Women Submitted to Chemotherapy After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina Flygare; DA Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; Seixas, Camila; DE Oliveira Scudeller, Tania Terezinha; DO Amaral, Maria Teresa Pace; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-04-01

    In addition to surgery, one of the most widely applied treatments for breast cancer is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is currently considered efficient in curing this disease; however, the therapy may induce damage to the patient's genetic material. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate putative cytotoxic and mutagenic effects induced by chemotherapy in women diagnosed with breast cancer. For this purpose, a cross-sectional study was carried out in 42 women, aged 18 to 70 years, allocated according to the diagnosis and stage of breast cancer treatment: control group (healthy) (n=15), chemotherapy group (n=11) and post-chemotherapy group (n=16). Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity were analyzed by the micronucleus test in buccal mucosa cells. A higher frequency (p<0.05) of micronucleated cells was detected in the chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy groups when compared to the control. A higher frequency (p<0.05) of karyorrhexis and pyknosis in the chemotherapy group was also noted. Taken together, our results indicate that chemotherapy induces mutagenicity and cytotoxicity in buccal mucosa cells of women diagnosed with breast cancer, being persistent after finishing their treatment. PMID:27069186

  12. The burden of breast cancer in Italy: mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed between 2001 and 2008 based on nationwide hospital discharge records

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Where population coverage is limited, the exclusive use of Cancer Registries might limit ascertainment of incident cancer cases. We explored the potentials of Nationwide hospital discharge records (NHDRs) to capture incident breast cancer cases in Italy. Methods We analyzed NHDRs for mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed between 2001 and 2008. The average annual percentage change (AAPC) and related 95% Confidence Interval (CI) in the actual number of mastectomies and quadrantectomies performed during the study period were computed for the full sample and for subgroups defined by age, surgical procedure, macro-area and singular Region. Re-admissions of the same patients were separately presented. Results The overall number of mastectomies decreased, with an AAPC of −2.1% (−2.3 -1.8). This result was largely driven by the values observed for women in the 45 to 64 and 65 to 74 age subgroups (−3.0%, -3.4 -3.6 and −3.3%, -3.8 -2.8, respectively). We observed no significant reduction in mastectomies for women in the remaining age groups. Quadrantectomies showed an overall +4.7 AAPC (95%CI:4.5–4.9), with no substantial differences by age. Analyses by geographical area showed a remarkable decrease in mastectomies, with inter-regional discrepancies possibly depending upon variability in mammography screening coverage and adherence. Quadrantectomies significantly increased, with Southern Regions presenting the highest average rates. Data on repeat admissions within a year revealed a total number of 46,610 major breast surgeries between 2001 and 2008, with an overall +3.2% AAPC (95%CI:2.8-3.6). Conclusions In Italy, NHDRs might represent a valuable supplemental data source to integrate Cancer Registries in cancer surveillance. PMID:23168067

  13. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams.

    PubMed

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-04-01

    Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams.Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3 different designs were employed with RapidArc form: conventional-VMAT plan (C-VMAT), modified-VMAT plan (M-VMAT), and modified-VMAT plan using FFF beams (M-VMAT-F). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans.For each technique in homogeneity, there were no statistically significant differences. VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT in conformity. C-VMAT plans were obviously not only superior to 3DCRT in the medium to high-dose regions (about 15-50 Gy) but also resulted in larger volumes in low-dose regions (about 0-10 Gy). M-VMAT plans were similar to M-VMAT-F. Both of them might significantly reduce the regions of low dose compared with C-VMAT (V5lung: ∼ 11.5%; V5heart: ∼ 23.8%, P < 0.05), even less than 3DCRT in heart irradiation (V2.5heart, 9.4%, P < 0.05). For liver, contralateral breast, and lung irradiation, M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior to M-VMAT with a reduction of ∼0.08, 0.2, and 0.24 Gy in the respective mean doses (P < 0.05).C-VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT, while also resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. M-VMAT and M-VMAT-F plans might not only reduce the region in the medium to high doses but also have lower volumes in low-dose regions. M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior compared with M-VMAT due to further contralateral organs sparing. PMID:27057896

  14. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3 different designs were employed with RapidArc form: conventional-VMAT plan (C-VMAT), modified-VMAT plan (M-VMAT), and modified-VMAT plan using FFF beams (M-VMAT-F). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans. For each technique in homogeneity, there were no statistically significant differences. VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT in conformity. C-VMAT plans were obviously not only superior to 3DCRT in the medium to high-dose regions (about 15–50 Gy) but also resulted in larger volumes in low-dose regions (about 0–10 Gy). M-VMAT plans were similar to M-VMAT-F. Both of them might significantly reduce the regions of low dose compared with C-VMAT (V5lung: ∼ 11.5%; V5heart: ∼ 23.8%, P < 0.05), even less than 3DCRT in heart irradiation (V2.5heart, 9.4%, P < 0.05). For liver, contralateral breast, and lung irradiation, M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior to M-VMAT with a reduction of ∼0.08, 0.2, and 0.24 Gy in the respective mean doses (P < 0.05). C-VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT, while also resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. M-VMAT and M-VMAT-F plans might not only reduce the region in the medium to high doses but also have lower volumes in low-dose regions. M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior compared with M-VMAT due to further contralateral organs sparing. PMID:27057896

  15. Long-term results of post-operative radiation therapy following mastectomy with or without chemotherapy in Stage I--III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Minoru; Bornstein, B.A.; Recht, A.; Abner, A.; Silver, B. ); Come, S.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Shulman, L.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Harris, J.R.

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the risk of local-regional failure following post-mastectomy radiotherapy and the incidence of complications associated with such treatment. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results in 309 patients with Stage I--III invasive breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiation therapy between 1975 and 1985. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2.25 Gy fractions. One hundred forty-seven (48%) of the patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 115 (78%) of these receiving a CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regime. The median follow-up time of surviving patients was 130 months (range, 28 to 191 months) after mastectomy. Seventeen patients (6%) developed a local-regional failure at an interval of 4 to 87 months after radiotherapy. Moderate or severe complications related to radiotherapy and requiring treatment were uncommon. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in four patients (1.3%), arm edema in 18 (5.8%), and brachial plexopathy in 2 (0.6%). The authors conclude that post-operative radiotherapy is a safe and effective means of reducing local-regional failure following mastectomy. The efficacy of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in improving survival should be addressed in new large randomized controlled studies. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction and its subsequent complications: a comparison between obese and non-obese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinhai; Smith, Benjamin D; Giordano, Sharon H; Reece, Gregory P; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2016-06-01

    To compare the utilization pattern of breast reconstruction between obese and non-obese patients and assess the association between obesity and postoperative complications as well as healthcare costs. Using MarketScan databases, we identified 2558 breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy between 2009 and 2012. Temporal trends in breast reconstruction were assessed using the Cochran-Armitage test. Logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between obesity and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Healthcare costs were compared using a generalized linear model. Among 2558 patients treated with mastectomy, the breast reconstruction rate of non-obese patients (76.2 %) was significantly higher than patients in obese class I and class II&III (63.3 and 60.2 %, respectively; P < 0.001). Compared with non-obese patients, obese patients had significantly higher rates of infection (OR 1.53, for obese class I, and OR 1.60, for obese class II&III, both P < 0.01), wound (OR 1.51, P = 0.01 for obese class I, and OR 1.98, P < 0.001 for obese class II&III), and perfusion complications (OR 1.73, P = 0.01 for obese class I, and OR 2.21, P < 0.01 for obese class II&III). The mean postoperative complication cost for non-obese patients ($4684) was significantly lower than those for obese class I patients ($6250) and obese class II&III patients ($7868; P < 0.001). Our analysis demonstrated a significant gap in breast reconstruction between obese and non-obese patients, and our finding underscores the need for careful preoperative assessment of obese patients and call for additional research to minimize the risk of complications. PMID:27178333

  17. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  18. Breast forms after mastectomy--patient's issues.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, K; Milch, W; Reimer, C

    1995-11-01

    After mastectomy restoration of body symmetry, a very important aspect of coping with daily life, may be achieved either using breast forms that are suspended in a brassière or by a new system in which breast forms are attached by adhesive strips to the thorax walls. The system promises free and easy movement, favourable effects on lymphoedema, and improvements with respect to dressing. Brassières are not necessarily needed. The influence of improved prosthetics on patients' self concept and well-being was investigated. A group of 67 patients after unilateral mastectomy tested custom breast forms and self-adhesive breast forms. Using the Frankfurter Selbstkonzeptionsskalen (Frankfurt Self-Concept Scales), plus additional questions concerning problems after mastectomy, self-concept was assessed before study and after 3 months. Analysis of variance with repeated measures revealed significant differences with respect to the scale Social Contact and Relations (FSKU). Most patients were better satisfied with epicutaneous self-adhesive breast forms. The weight and type of movement of the self-adhesive breast forms were considered natural, and adhesive strips were well tolerated. A total of 78% were able to wear more fashionable clothing. Breast reconstruction became less important for 62%. The new concept of self-adhesive breast forms is an improvement with respect to social and pyschological rehabilitation. PMID:8564350

  19. MedlinePlus: Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... G. Komen for the Cure) - PDF Also in Spanish Mastectomy (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Mastectomy -- The Surgical Procedure (Susan G. Komen for the Cure) Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer (National ... Also in Spanish Surgical Procedures for Breast Cancer - Mastectomy and Breast ...

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V5). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. PMID:25534167

  2. The Assessment of the Magnitude of Frontal Plane Postural Changes in Breast Cancer Patients After Breast-Conserving Therapy or Mastectomy - Follow-up Results 1 Year After the Surgical Procedure.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Iwona; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Hagner, Wojciech; Nowacka, Krystyna; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Polish women. Management of breast cancer includes surgical treatment as well as adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, and combination regimens. One of the adverse consequences of oncological management of breast cancer may involve changes in frontal plane body posture. The objective of the study was to assess the frontal plane body posture changes in women treated for breast cancer. A prospective study including 101 of female breast cancer patients subjected to surgical treatment in the period from October 2011 to October 2012 (mastectomy was performed in 51 cases while breast conserving therapy was administered in the remaining 50 cases). The body posture in the frontal plane was assessed using the computer-assisted postural assessment system with Moiré fringe analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed in pre-operational postural parameters of interest. Exam II revealed highly significant differences in SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Exam III revealed highly significant differences in PIA, SH, SD and SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Undesirable postural changes occur both in women who were treated with radical mastectomy and in those who underwent breast-conserving surgery; breast-conserving surgery is associated with decreased severity in postural abnormalities. PMID:26510430

  3. [A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Treated with Modified Radical Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction Using a Tissue Expander after Endocrine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Tei, Seika; Haraoka, Goichi; Hosoi, Kosuke; Fujii, Naho; Tsujio, Gen; Hiramatsu, Soichiro; Wang, En; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Morimoto, Junya; Nishii, Takafumi; Kosaka, Kinshi; Uchima, Yasutake; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We experienced a case of locally advanced breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander after endocrine therapy. A 64-year-old postmenopausal woman had a 50 mm tumor in her right breast with extensive reddening of the skin. She had axillary lymph node metastasis. Core needle biopsy showed invasive ductal carcinoma with positive hormone receptor (ER+, PgR+) and negative HER2 status. The patient was diagnosed with locally-advanced breast cancer (cT4bN1M0, stage ⅢB). She was treated with anastrozole at a dose of 1 mg per day. The tumor decreased in size gradually and became operable after 7 months of anastrozole monotherapy. She underwent modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander. The resected specimen was a 30 mm tumor; adverse effects due to endocrine therapy were of Grade 1a severity. Seven months after adjuvant chemotherapy (FEC→DTX), the tissue expander was removed, and the right breast was reconstructed using an implant. No complications were noted, and the patient was treated with radiation therapy. Ten months have passed since surgery, and no local recurrence or distant metastasis has been noted. PMID:26805181

  4. Breast reconstruction: options post-mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rolph, R; Mehta, S; Farhadi, J

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the UK. Breast reconstruction after resection of breast cancers increases patients' quality of life and psychosocial functioning. This article introduces this field and explores the options available to patients with breast cancer. PMID:27269748

  5. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  6. Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16 cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

  7. Isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer following mastectomy: Radiotherapeutic management

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, K.J.; Perez, C.A.; Kuske, R.R.; Garcia, D.M.; Simpson, J.R.; Fineberg, B. )

    1990-10-01

    Two hundred twenty-four patients with their first, isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer were irradiated with curative intent. Patients who had previous chest wall or regional lymphatic irradiation were not included in the study. With a median follow-up of 46 months (range 24 to 241 months), the 5- and 10-year survival for the entire group were 43% and 26%, respectively. Overall, 57% of the patients were projected to be loco-regionally controlled at 5 years. The 5-year local-regional tumor control was best for patients with isolated chest wall recurrences (63%), intermediate for nodal recurrences (45%), and poor for concomitant chest wall and nodal recurrences (27%). In patients with solitary chest wall recurrences, large field radiotherapy encompassing the entire chest wall resulted in a 5- and 10-year freedom from chest wall re-recurrence of 75% and 63% in contrast to 36% and 18% with small field irradiation (p = 0.0001). For the group with recurrences completely excised, tumor control was adequate at all doses ranging from 4500 to 7000 cGy. For the recurrences less than 3 cm, 100% were controlled at doses greater than or equal to 6000 cGy versus 76% at lower doses. No dose response could be demonstrated for the larger lesions. The supraclavicular failure rate was 16% without elective radiotherapy versus 6% with elective radiotherapy (p = 0.0489). Prophylactic irradiation of the uninvolved chest wall decreased the subsequent re-recurrence rate (17% versus 27%), but the difference is not statistically significant (p = .32). The incidence of chest wall re-recurrence was 12% with doses greater than or equal to 5000 cGy compared to 27% with no elective radiotherapy, but again was not statistically significant (p = .20). Axillary and internal mammary failures were infrequent, regardless of prophylactic treatment.

  8. Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors and Residual Nodal Disease following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Shravan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Harari, Saul; Fasola, Carolina; Mister, Donna; Yu, David S.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates are unclear in women with ER+ tumors treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy without postmastectomy radiation (PMRT). To determine if PMRT is needed in these patients, we compared LRR rates of patients with ER+ tumors (treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy) with women who have non-ER+ tumors. 85 consecutive breast cancer patients (87 breast tumors) treated with NAC and mastectomy without PMRT were reviewed. Patients were divided by residual nodal disease (ypN) status (ypN+ versus ypN0) and then stratified by receptor subtype. Among ypN+ patients (n = 35), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 5%, 33%, and 37%, respectively (p = 0.02). Among ypN+/ER+ patients, lymphovascular invasion and grade three disease increased the five-year LRR risk to 13% and 11%, respectively. Among ypN0 patients (n = 52), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 7%, 22%, and 6%, respectively (p = 0.71). In women with ER+ tumors and residual nodal disease, endocrine therapy may be sufficient adjuvant treatment, except in patients with lymphovascular invasion or grade three tumors where PMRT may still be indicated. PMID:26266050

  9. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  10. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  11. Immediate reconstruction following nipple-sparing mastectomy: one option for young breast cancer patients with early stage disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rachel L; Kelz, Rachel R; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2013-06-01

    The article entitled "Application of immediate breast reconstruction with silicon prosthetic implantation following bilateral mammary gland excision in treatment of young patients with early breast cancer" published in Journal of Thoracic Disease, examined the oncologic and cosmetic outcomes of the aforementioned procedures. We aimed to describe the unique circumstances of young breast cancer patients with early stage disease and highlight the multitude of surgical treatment and reconstructive options available to these patients. PMID:23825742

  12. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  13. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Li Yexiong; Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

  14. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Freilich, Jessica; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuong, Michael; Acs, Geza

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

  15. Immediate reconstruction following nipple-sparing mastectomy: one option for young breast cancer patients with early stage disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rachel L.; Kelz, Rachel R.

    2013-01-01

    The article entitled “Application of immediate breast reconstruction with silicon prosthetic implantation following bilateral mammary gland excision in treatment of young patients with early breast cancer” published in Journal of Thoracic Disease, examined the oncologic and cosmetic outcomes of the aforementioned procedures. We aimed to describe the unique circumstances of young breast cancer patients with early stage disease and highlight the multitude of surgical treatment and reconstructive options available to these patients. PMID:23825742

  16. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  17. Multi-view stereophotogrammetry for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiangyang; Henseler, Helga; Peng, Matthew Jian-Qiao; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ray, Arup K; Ayoub, Ashraf F

    2016-03-01

    A multi-view three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry system was developed to capture 3D shape of breasts for breast cancer patients. The patients had received immediate unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy by the extended latissimus dorsi flap and without contralateral surgery. In order to capture the whole breast shape including the inframammary fold, the patients were introduced to the imaging room and leaned over the imaging rig to open up the inframammary fold and to expose the entire area of each breast. The imaging system consisted of eight high-resolution ([Formula: see text] pixels) digital cameras and four flash units. The cameras were arranged in four stereo pairs from four different view angles to cover the whole surface of the breasts. The system calibration was carried out ahead of every capture session, and the stereo images were matched to generate four range images to be integrated using an elastic model proposed. A watertight breast mesh model was reconstructed to measure the volume of the breast captured. The accuracy of using the developed multi-view stereophotogrammetry system for breast volume measurement was 11.12cc with SEM 7.74cc, comparing to the measurements of the water displacement method. It was concluded that the 3D stereophotogrammetry image system developed was more reliable than the method of water displacement. PMID:26133282

  18. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Jay P.; Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

  19. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  20. Epicutaneous breast forms. A new system promises to improve body image after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, K; Schüttler, B; Milch, W; Sachsse, S; Zygmunt, M; Kullmer, U; Vahrson, H

    1998-05-01

    Mastectomies will remain a treatment alternative for breast cancer in spite of efforts to perform more breast-conserving treatment. Restoration of body symmetry may then be an important issue, which can be achieved by surgical breast reconstruction or with an epicutaneous breast prosthesis. A new improved system has recently been developed, which is self-adhesive to the thorax wall. In this study we investigated the advantages and disadvantages of the new system. The body image of 55 patients after unilateral mastectomy was assessed before they entered the study and after approximately 6 months of experience with the system. The "Frankfurter Körperkonzeptskalen" plus additional questions concerning problems after mastectomy and the handling of the new breast form were used for the assessment. About 50% of the patients had problems with the adhesiveness of the breast form, which remains a problem to be solved. Patients who suffered badly from mastectomy, have a smooth and plane mastectomy scar, and who were not suffering from hot flushes, which can impair the adhesiveness of the prosthesis, were more likely to profit from the new self-supporting breast forms. Significant differences were observed in the scales "self-acceptance of the body", acceptance of the body by others" for the subsets of patients mentioned above. The differences were less pronounced in patients who were already familiar with another type of epicutaneous breast form, which is attached to an adhesive plate on the thorax wall by nylon touch and close fasteners. Most (90.7%) of the patients would recommend this new type of breast prosthesis for other patients with mastectomy. The concept of self-supporting breast forms is an improvement with respect to social and psychological rehabilitation. According to the manufacturer, the problem with adhesion has meanwhile been solved. PMID:9629886

  1. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Andrew; Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle; Kuerer, Henry M.; Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul; Strom, Eric A.; Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  2. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  3. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine; Labib, Alain; Le Scodan, Romuald

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  4. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy and targeted therapy. This helps to increase survival. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two main types of breast ... shown lumpectomy plus radiation offers the same overall survival benefit as mastectomy for early ... (almost always followed by radiation): The surgeon ...

  5. The value of breast MRI in high-risk patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer to exclude invasive disease in the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy: Is there a role to choose wisely patients for sentinel node biopsy?

    PubMed

    Freitas, Vivianne; Crystal, Pavel; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Ghai, Sandeep; Bukhanov, Karina; Escallon, Jaime; Scaranelo, Anabel M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of clinically and mammographically occult disease using breast MRI in a cohort of cancer patients undergoing contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) and the utmost indication of axillary assessment (sentinel node biopsy (SLNB)) for this side. A retrospective review of patients with unilateral invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) from institutional MRI registry data (2004-2010) was conducted. Characteristics of patients undergoing CPM with breast MRI obtained less than 6 month before surgery were evaluated. A total of 2322 consecutive patients diagnosed with DCIS or stage I to III infiltrating breast cancer underwent preoperative breast MRI. Of these, 1376 patients (59.2%) had contralateral clinical breast exam and mammography without abnormalities; and 116 patients (4.9%) underwent CPM (28 excluded patients had breast MRI more than 6 months before CPM). The mean age of the 88 patients was 49 years (range 28-76 years). Two (2.3%) DCIS identified on surgical pathology specimen were not depicted by MRI and the 5 mm T1N0 invasive cancer (1.1%) was identified on MRI. Preoperative MRI showed 95% accuracy to demonstrate absence of occult disease with negative predicted value (NPV) of 98% (95% CI: 91.64-99.64%). Occult disease was present in 3.4% of CPM. MRI accurately identified the case of invasive cancer in this cohort. The high negative predictive value suggests that MRI can be used to select patients without consideration of SLNB for the contralateral side. PMID:26992816

  6. A geometric analysis of mastectomy incisions: Optimizing intraoperative breast volume

    PubMed Central

    Chopp, David; Rawlani, Vinay; Ellis, Marco; Johnson, Sarah A; Buck, Donald W; Khan, Seema; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Kim, John YS

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The advent of acellular dermis-based tissue expander breast reconstruction has placed an increased emphasis on optimizing intraoperative volume. Because skin preservation is a critical determinant of intraoperative volume expansion, a mathematical model was developed to capture the influence of incision dimension on subsequent tissue expander volumes. METHODS: A mathematical equation was developed to calculate breast volume via integration of a geometrically modelled breast cross-section. The equation calculates volume changes associated with excised skin during the mastectomy incision by reducing the arc length of the cross-section. The degree of volume loss is subsequently calculated based on excision dimensions ranging from 35 mm to 60 mm. RESULTS: A quadratic relationship between breast volume and the vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision exists, such that incrementally larger incisions lead to a disproportionally greater amount of volume loss. The vertical dimension of the mastectomy incision – more so than the horizontal dimension – is of critical importance to maintain breast volume. Moreover, the predicted volume loss is more profound in smaller breasts and primarily occurs in areas that affect breast projection on ptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to model the relationship between the vertical dimensions of the mastectomy incision and subsequent volume loss. These geometric principles will aid in optimizing intra-operative volume expansion during expander-based breast reconstruction. PMID:22654531

  7. Should Women Younger Than 40 Years of Age With Invasive Breast Cancer Have a Mastectomy?: 15-Year Outcomes in a Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Truong, Pauline T.; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Olson, Robert; Coulombe, Genevieve; Keyes, Mira; Weir, Lorna; Gelmon, Karen; Bernstein, Vanessa; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Optimal local management for young women with early-stage breast cancer remains controversial. This study examined 15-year outcomes among women younger than 40 years treated with breast-conserving surgery plus whole-breast radiation therapy (BCT) compared with those treated with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: Women aged 20 to 39 years with early-stage breast cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2003 were identified in a population-based database. Primary outcomes of breast cancer–specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and secondary outcomes of local relapse–free survival (LRFS), locoregional relapse–free survival (LRRFS), and distant relapse–free survival (DRFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared between BCT and MRM cohorts using log-rank tests. A planned subgroup analysis was performed on patients considered “ideal” for BCT (ie, T1N0, negative margins and no extensive ductal carcinoma in situ) and in whom local therapy may have the largest impact on survival because of low systemic risk. Results: 965 patients were identified; 616 had BCT and 349 had MRM. The median follow-up time was 14.4 years (range, 8.4-23.3 years). Overall, 15-year rates of BCSS (76.0% vs 74.1%, P=.62), OS (74.2% vs 73.0%, P=.75), LRFS (85.4% vs 86.5%, P=.95), LRRFS (82.2% vs 81.6%, P=.61), and DRFS (74.4% vs 71.6%, P=.40) were similar between the BCT and MRM cohorts. In the “ideal” for BCT subgroup, there were 219 BCT and 67 MRM patients with a median follow-up time of 15.5 years. The 15-year BCSS (86.1% vs 82.9%, P=.57), OS (82.6% vs 82.9%, P=.89), LRFS (86.2% vs 84.2%, P=.50), LRRFS (83.1% vs 78.3%, P=.24), and DRFS (84.8% vs 79.1%, P=.17) were similar in the BCT and MRM cohorts. Conclusions: This population-based analysis with long-term follow-up confirmed that women younger than 40 years treated with BCT had similar 15-year outcomes compared with MRM. Young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  8. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn's-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both 5F-IMRT and 2P-VMAT plans exhibited similar PTV coverage (V95%), hotspot areas (V110%) and conformity (all p > 0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p < 0.001). In addition, 5F-IMRT plans provided significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure than 2P-VMAT (all p < 0.05). The 3DCRT-FinF plans with accurately estimated CTV displacement exhibited enhanced target coverage but worse organs at risk (OARs) sparing compared with those plans with underestimated displacements. Our results indicate that 5F-IMRT has dosimetrical advantages compared with the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  9. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn’s-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both 5F-IMRT and 2P-VMAT plans exhibited similar PTV coverage (V95%), hotspot areas (V110%) and conformity (all p > 0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p < 0.001). In addition, 5F-IMRT plans provided significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure than 2P-VMAT (all p < 0.05). The 3DCRT-FinF plans with accurately estimated CTV displacement exhibited enhanced target coverage but worse organs at risk (OARs) sparing compared with those plans with underestimated displacements. Our results indicate that 5F-IMRT has dosimetrical advantages compared with the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  10. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  11. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  12. Dead space closure with quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage for the prevention of seroma after mastectomy for breast cancer (QUISERMAS): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Bonastre, Julia; Brunet-Houdard, Solène; Body, Gilles; Giraudeau, Bruno; Caille, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative wound seroma is common after mastectomy. This complication is associated with significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. The optimal closure approach for seroma prevention remains unknown but some evidence suggests that quilting suture of the dead space could lower the incidence of seroma. The aim of this trial is to compare seroma formation using quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage in patients undergoing mastectomy. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre, superiority, randomised controlled trial in women undergoing mastectomy with or without axillary involvement. Exclusion criteria include indication of bilateral mastectomy or immediate reconstruction and any physical or psychiatric condition that could impair patient's ability to cooperate with postoperative data collection or that do not allow an informed consent. 320 participants will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either quilting suture or conventional wound closure with drain. The primary outcome is seroma requiring either aspiration or surgical intervention within 21 days following mastectomy. Secondary outcomes include seroma regardless of whether or not it requires an intervention, surgical site infection, pain score, cosmetic result, patient's quality of life, costs and cost-effectiveness. The primary analysis will be an intention-to treat analysis performed with a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test). Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by Tours Research ethics committee (CPP TOURS—Region Centre—Ouest 1, 2014-R20, 16 December 2014). Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international breast cancer conferences. Trial registration number NCT02263651. PMID:27044574

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  14. Trends and concepts in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Farhangkhoee, Hana; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    A number of factors have contributed to a paradigm shift in US post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. The increasing numbers of contralateral prophylactic mastectomies strongly correlated to a rise in implant-based reconstructions. Autologous reconstruction, however, has faced a number of barriers including technically complicated perforator flaps and declining reimbursements. As such, a market concentration has developed within high volume microsurgical centers. As more patients receive radiation, the timing and method of reconstruction has become a controversial topic. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:891-894. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876921

  15. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905

  16. Sociodemographic Predictors of Breast Reconstruction Procedure Choice: Analysis of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Tiffany N. S.; Kim, Yeonil; Cohen, Wess A.; Hamill, Jennifer B.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Kim, H. Myra; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To promote patient-centered care, it is important to understand the impact of sociodemographic factors on procedure choice for women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction. In this context, we analyzed the effects of these variables on the reconstructive method chosen. Methods. Women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction were recruited for the prospective Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study. Procedure types were divided into tissue expander-implant/direct-to-implant and abdominally based flap reconstructions. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from logistic regression. Results. The analysis included 2,203 women with current or previous breast cancer and 202 women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. Compared with women <40 years old with current or previous breast cancer, those 40 to 59 were significantly more likely to undergo an abdominally based flap. Women working or attending school full-time were more likely to receive an autologous procedure than those working part-time or volunteering. Women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy who were ≥50 years were more likely to undergo an abdominal flap compared to those <40. Conclusions. Our results indicate that sociodemographic factors affect the reconstructive procedure received. As we move forward into a new era of patient-centered care, providing tailored treatment options to reconstruction patients will likely lead to higher satisfaction and better outcomes for those we serve. PMID:26605082

  17. Considerations arising from requests from patients for a bilateral mastectomy who are eligible for breast-conserving surgery: Factors weighing for and against performing the operation

    PubMed Central

    FANCELLU, ALESSANDRO

    2016-01-01

    Rates of mastectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) are increasing in patients with unilateral breast cancer who would be candidates for receiving breast-conserving surgery, according to recent studies. One reason for this finding is the entitlement of patients to choose to undergo a bilateral mastectomy as a surgery option. The present case report details the case of a 52-year-old woman, eligible for breast conservation, who had no high risk of developing a contralateral breast cancer, but who asked for a bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction instead of breast-conserving surgery. The request for a bilateral mastectomy was declined on the basis that it would be unnecessary for the patient, and an excessive intervention; the patient subsequently obtained an independent second opinion, and she underwent a bilateral mastectomy with implant reconstruction prior to receiving wound care and follow-up at our institution. At follow-up 1 year later, the patient complained of sensations of general discomfort, sexual difficulties and a loss of sensation in the nipples. On the basis of the clinical outcomes of the bilateral mastectomy and the patient's experience of the operation, the present case study highlights a need for surgeons to clearly inform patients presenting with unilateral breast cancer about the attendant risks and real benefits of bilateral mastectomy, in order to reach a mutual decision in terms of health care that is not fuelled by anxiety or an overestimation of the risk of developing secondary cancer. Bilateral mastectomy should be attentively evaluated as an option only in patients with a higher-than-average risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. PMID:27347213

  18. Generation of voxelized breast phantoms from surgical mastectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Michael O’Connor, J.; Das, Mini; Dider, Clay S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In the research and development of dedicated tomographic breast imaging systems, digital breast object models, also known as digital phantoms, are useful tools. While various digital breast phantoms do exist, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic high-resolution model suitable for simulating three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities. The primary goal was to design a model capable of producing simulations with realistic breast tissue structure. Methods: The methodology for generating an ensemble of digital breast phantoms was based on imaging surgical mastectomy specimens using a benchtop, cone-beam computed tomography system. This approach allowed low-noise, high-resolution projection views of the mastectomy specimens at each angular position. Reconstructions of these projection sets were processed using correction techniques and diffusion filtering prior to segmentation into breast tissue types in order to generate phantoms. Results: Eight compressed digital phantoms and 20 uncompressed phantoms from which an additional 96 pseudocompressed digital phantoms with voxel dimensions of 0.2 mm3 were generated. Two distinct tissue classification models were used in forming breast phantoms. The binary model classified each tissue voxel as either adipose or fibroglandular. A multivalue scaled model classified each tissue voxel as percentage of adipose tissue (range 1%–99%). Power spectral analysis was performed to compare simulated reconstructions using the breast phantoms to the original breast specimen reconstruction, and fits were observed to be similar. Conclusions: The digital breast phantoms developed herein provide a high-resolution anthropomorphic model of the 3D uncompressed and compressed breast that are suitable for use in evaluating and optimizing tomographic breast imaging modalities. The authors believe that other research groups might find the phantoms useful, and therefore they offer to make them available for wider use

  19. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  20. Right Breast Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Tissue Expander under Thoracic Paravertebral Blocks in a 12-Week Parturient

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Weyker, Paul David; Cohn, Shara; Wheeler, Amanda; Lee, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Paravertebral blocks are becoming increasingly utilized for breast surgery with studies showing improved postoperative pain control, decreased need for opioids, and less nausea and vomiting. We describe the anesthetic management of an otherwise healthy woman who was 12 weeks pregnant presenting for treatment of her breast cancer. For patients undergoing breast mastectomy and reconstruction with tissue expanders, paravertebral blocks offer an anesthetic alternative when general anesthesia is not desired. PMID:26229692

  1. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  2. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  3. Perceptions of Prophylactic Mastectomy in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Young; Lee, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasingly, prophylactic mastectomy has been evaluated as a treatment of breast cancer. Hereditary breast cancer now accounts for approximately 5%–10% of all cases of breast cancer, meaning that the widespread implementation of prophylactic mastectomy may significantly reduce the occurrence of breast cancer. However, prophylactic mastectomy is rarely performed in Korea. Therefore, in this study, we assessed Koreans' attitudes toward and awareness of preventive mastectomy. Methods This was a prospective study of a cohort of patients attending outpatient clinics and their relatives. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires assessing sex, age, educational level, knowledge of breast cancer, understanding of prophylactic mastectomy, attitudes toward prophylactic mastectomy, and reasons for choosing prophylactic mastectomy. Results Sixty-five patients were included. Most patients (36.9%) were between 40 and 49 years of age and 58.4% were college graduates. Only six respondents (9%) understood prophylactic mastectomy, and 17 respondents (27%) stated that they would agree to undergo prophylactic mastectomy if necessary. Reasons given for refusing prophylactic mastectomy included aesthetic concerns (38%), the perception that it would not cure the disease (26%), possible surgical complications (24%), and financial cost (6%). Conclusions In this study, most of the respondents showed a poor knowledge of prophylactic mastectomy. Ultimately, it will be necessary to establish medical guidelines for patients with a high risk of breast cancer, with the objective of providing accurate information and proper treatment at hospitals. PMID:26848446

  4. Breast Conservation Therapy Versus Mastectomy: Shared Decision-Making Strategies and Overcoming Decisional Conflicts in Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Margenthaler, Julie A; Ollila, David W

    2016-10-01

    Although breast-conserving therapy is considered the preferred treatment for the majority of women with early-stage breast cancer, mastectomy rates in this group remain high. The patient, physician, and systems factors contributing to a decision for mastectomy are complicated. Understanding the individual patient's values and goals when making this decision is paramount to providing a shared decision-making process that will yield the desired outcome. The cornerstones of this discussion include education of the patient, access to decision-aid tools, and time to make an informed decision. However, it is also paramount for the physician to understand that a significant majority of women with an informed and complete understanding of their surgical choices will still prefer mastectomy. The rates of breast conservation versus mastectomy should not be considered a quality measure alone. Rather, the extent by which patients are informed, involved in decision-making, and undergoing treatments that reflect their goals is the true test of quality. Here we explore some of the factors that impact the patient preference for breast conservation versus mastectomy and how shared decision-making can be maximized for patient satisfaction. PMID:27464606

  5. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy: does it decrease depression at the long-term?

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Eveline Anne-Jet; Torensma, Bart; Honig, Adriaan; Vrouenraets, Bartholomeus Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with breast cancer survivors in 22%. Although breast reconstruction (BR) is intended to provide psychological improvements such as reducing depression, literature is inconclusive and without long-term follow-up. The objective is to evaluate the impact of BR after breast cancer related mastectomy on the long-term depression risk and assess predictive factors for depression. Methods Women who underwent a curative mastectomy between 1999 and 2009 were included. After a mean follow-up of more than 6 years after operation, the Beck Depression Inventory-13 (BDI-13) evaluated depressive symptoms. Multivariable regression analysis provided predictors for depression. Results A total of 139 patients, 34 (24.5%) with and 105 (75.5%) without BR, were analyzed. Seventy-seven patients (48.2%) were at high risk for mild (n=58), moderate (n=5) or severe (n=4) depression. There was a trend for slightly better BDI-13 outcomes for women who underwent BR (2 vs. 4; P=0.06). Living alone [odds ratio (OR): 2.16; P=0.04], low educational level (OR: 3.70; P<0.01) and adjuvant hormonal/endocrine-therapy (OR: 2.36; P=0.02) were associated with an increased depression risk. Conclusions BR has no clear influence on depressive symptoms on the long-term. Predictive factors should alert clinicians to assess depressive symptoms in specific breast cancer patients during follow-up. PMID:27563558

  6. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  7. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jepson, A S; Fentiman, I S

    1998-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, often with a late presentation and poor prognosis. The mainstay of treatment is modified radical mastectomy, with axillary node dissection to assess stage, prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. When matched for age, tumour size, grade and axillary nodal status, the prognosis is similar for males and females. Concerted efforts must be made to educate both the public and health professionals, in order to make earlier diagnoses and thereby improve prognosis. PMID:10622057

  8. Options for Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy for Carcinoma of the Breast: An Observational Experience at MSKCC, New York under UICC Fellowship.

    PubMed

    Das, Prafulla Kumar; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    The first Author went to visit The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, USA on UICC ICRETT Fellowship to observe as many clinical situations of options of breast reconstruction after mastectomy for carcinoma breast during a period of 1 month in June 2014. The second Author was the Supervisor for such clinical observation at the Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Department of Surgery at MSKCC. The main objective of this project was to gain a deeper understanding of the various options for reconstruction and specific operative skills and techniques needed for reconstruction after surgical resections for breast carcinoma. The gained experience would benefit our Regional Cancer Center's physicians, patients, and families. All patients treated by the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) who underwent surgical resection and reconstruction of their breast mounds were observed during the period between June 1, 2014 and June 30, 2014. It was observed that a vast majority of patients who underwent a mastectomy at MSKCC were offered primary breast reconstruction. They underwent thorough counseling and teaching about the various options, and feasibility with regard to their specific case. Patients eventually made the final choice on type of reconstruction, type of implant, and type of nipple/areola reconstruction. A majority of patients underwent implant reconstruction at MSKCC. This was partly related to the high rate of bilateral mastectomies (close to 50 %) as well as a significant rate of post mastectomy radiation (15 to 20 %). PMID:27065656

  9. Introduction to conservative mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Gercovich, F. Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy (CM) has become an established alternative in the treatment of breast cancer, offering by different techniques a good cosmetic outcome, as well as oncologic control. The different options to achieve these goals are presented. Oncoplastic treatment of breast cancer needs planning and knowledge of well-established plastic surgery techniques. PMID:26644998

  10. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  11. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  13. [A 23-year delayed locoregional recurrence of breast carcinoma following mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Etou, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Gen; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Chiyoko; Hattori, Chikayuki; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-02-01

    A 77-year-old woman who underwent a right modified radical mastectomy 23 years ago with no further adjuvant treatment presented with a right chest wall mass (3 x 4 x 2 cm) at the scar. She had no symptoms nor metastasis. The laboratory data were normal including tumor marker. The mass was diagnosed as compatible with a local recurrence tumor from the previous breast cancer on the ultrasonography and chest CT. After obtaining her informed consent for the therapy, we performed 60 Gy/30 fr radiotherapy on the recurrent tumor on her right chest wall with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy. The first regimens were tamoxifen 20 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, followed by toremifene 80 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, and then the tumor disappeared. But three years later, we found tumor regrowth. We changed the regimen, giving 5'-DFUR 1,200 mg/day and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/day for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week drug-free period, then added 10 Gy/5 fr radiotherapy and hyperthermia twice a week. Final regimens were anastrozole 1 mg/day and capecitabine 900 mg/day. The recurrent tumor decreased and the disease stabilized. After these therapies, she had very good quality of life. We recommend radiation and/or hyperthermia with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy as useful for the delayed recurrence of elderly breast cancer after a modified radical mastectomy. PMID:18281775

  14. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  15. Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Kubicky, Charlotte; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

  16. Impact of different type of cancer treatment on the effectiveness of breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Szloch, Joanna; Marczyk, Elżbieta; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    For women undergoing mastectomy as part of their breast cancer treatment, breast reconstruction is an important part of therapy. However, neoadjuvant, adjuvant treatments as well as other patient-related factors can compromise the results of breast reconstruction techniques. In this article we have reviewed current approaches to the management of complications and risks that neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies pose on breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Non-treatment related factors influencing reconstruction techniques were reviewed as well. PMID:27562472

  17. THE MANAGEMENT OF CANCER OF THE BREAST

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Justin J.

    1958-01-01

    Radical mastectomy is excellent only for cases of operable breast cancer in which the tumor is limited to the breast or to the nodes in the axilla. That there is metastasis to the internal mammary lymph nodes in a high proportion of cases has been “overlooked” for many years. Also it is probable that metastasis occurs to the supraclavicular lymph nodes more often than is suspected. Hence the extended radical mastectomy operation leaves much to be desired. There has been no significant improvement in recent years in the mortality rate of mammary cancer. Simple mastectomy and thorough adequate postoperative radiation therapy have much to offer. Treatment of “operable” breast cancer should be a cooperative effort of surgeon, radiation therapist and pathologist. PMID:13511211

  18. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  19. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  20. From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

  1. Temporal Trends in Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy and Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frasier, Lane L.; Holden, Sara; Holden, Timothy; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Leverson, Glen; Anderson, Bethany; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Evolving data on the effectiveness of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) have led to changes in NCCN recommendations, counseling providers to “strongly consider” PMRT for breast cancer patients with tumors ≤5cm and 1-3 positive nodes; however, anticipated PMRT may lead to delay or omission of reconstruction which can have cosmetic, quality of life, and complication implications for patients. Objective To determine whether revised guidelines have increased PMRT and impacted receipt of breast reconstruction. We hypothesized that: 1) PMRT would increase for women affected by the revised guidelines while remaining stable in other cohorts, and 2) that these women would have decreased receipt of breast reconstruction while reconstruction increased in other groups. Design A retrospective, population-based cohort study Setting Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 2000 – 2011. Participants Women with stage I-III breast cancer undergoing mastectomy were identified. Our analytic sample (n=62,442) was divided into cohorts based on current NCCN radiation recommendations: “Radiation Recommended” (tumors >5 cm or ≥4 positive lymph nodes), “Strongly Consider Radiation” (tumor ≤5cm, 1-3 positive nodes), and “Radiation Not Recommended” (tumors ≤5cm, no positive nodes). Main Outcome Measure(s) We used joinpoint regression analysis to evaluate temporal trends in our outcomes of interest: receipt of PMRT and receipt of breast reconstruction. Results Rates of PMRT were unchanged in the “Radiation Recommended” and “Radiation Not Recommended” cohorts over the study period. In contrast, receipt of PMRT for the “Strongly Consider Radiation” cohort was unchanged until 2007, then significantly increased (APC 9.0%, p=0.013). Breast reconstruction increased across all cohorts. Despite increasing receipt of PMRT, the “Strongly Consider Radiation” cohort maintained a consistent increase in reconstruction (APC 7

  2. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  3. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-02-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  4. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction in patients with macromastia using the Passot breast reduction pattern.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Brian; Thornton, Brian P

    2014-01-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate tissue expander reconstruction poses a challenge in the patient with macromastia or excessive ptosis. Skin reduction via the Wise pattern has been described but is associated with high rates of skin necrosis. The study group consisted of 43 women with grade 2 or 3 ptosis who underwent SSM and immediate reconstruction with tissue expanders, using the Passot (horizontal) skin reduction pattern. Age ranged from 31 to 67 years (mean, 51 years). The endpoints measured were time to final expansion, mastectomy skin flap necrosis, infectious complications, and total complications. Thirty reconstructions were bilateral and 13 were unilateral (73 breasts total). Follow-up ranged from 6 to 55 months (mean, 20). Common comorbid conditions included hypertension (n = 16), obesity (n = 22), and smoking (n = 9). The mean body mass index was 30.6 (range, 19.4-58.6). Twenty-one patients underwent chemotherapy; 12 received radiation. The mean initial fill was 196 mL (range, 0-420 mL), and the mean time to final expansion was 84 days (range, 28-225 days). Five patients did not complete the reconstruction, 2 because of cancer recurrence and 3 because of infection. There were 3 cases of mastectomy flap necrosis occurring after tissue expander placement (7%). There were 7 infectious complications (16%). The use of a horizontal breast reduction pattern at the time of expander placement produces consistently good esthetic outcomes and a low rate of skin necrosis, and it should be considered as an option in patients with macromastia or ptosis undergoing SSM and immediate reconstruction. PMID:24835873

  5. Factors associated with patients in the Scottish Highlands who chose mastectomy when suitable for breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Majid; Hubbard, Gill; Abbott, Nick; Daltrey, Ian; Mullen, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite being suitable for breast conservation surgery (BCS) a proportion of women choose mastectomy. This study aimed to assess the pre-operative pathological and geographic factors associated with choosing mastectomy rather than BCS in a single centre that serves a large geographical area encompassing urban, rural and remote island populations. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients suitable for BCS between January 2011 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pre-operative pathological features were compared using the Pearson chi squared test as was distance to the treatment centre from the patient’s home. A questionnaire was sent to all those who chose mastectomy to identify the factors that influenced their decision. Results A total of 446 patients suitable for BCS were identified of which 46 (11%) chose to undergo mastectomy. Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to present symptomatically (P=0.009), have tumours larger than 20 mm at diagnostic imaging (P=0.001) and have positive axillary staging (P=0.004). Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to live remotely (P=0.051). Those patients who chose mastectomy felt this gave a better long-term outcome (18 patients, 44%) and peace of mind (14 patients, 34%). Conclusions Adverse pre-operative pathological features were associated with patients choosing mastectomy rather than BCS. There was a trend for patients who chose mastectomy to live remotely from the treatment centre. Patients choosing mastectomy most commonly cited a better long-term outcome and peace of mind as the reason behind their decision. Understanding what influences a patient’s surgical choice will allow clinicians and patients to engage in a fully informed pre-operative decision making process. PMID:27563559

  6. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index

  7. Mastectomy Weight and Tissue Expander Volume Predict Necrosis and Increased Costs Associated with Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yalanis, Georgia C.; Nag, Shayoni; Georgek, Jakob R.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Manahan, Michele A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired vascular perfusion in tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction leads to mastectomy skin necrosis. We investigated factors and costs associated with skin necrosis in postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Methods: Retrospective review of 169 women with immediate TE placement following mastectomy between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013 was performed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected. Logistic regression analysis on individual variables was performed to determine the effects of tissue expander fill volume and mastectomy specimen weight on skin necrosis. Billing data was obtained to determine the financial burden associated with necrosis. Results: This study included 253 breast reconstructions with immediate TE placement from 169 women. Skin necrosis occurred in 20 flaps for 15 patients (8.9%). Patients with hypertension had 8 times higher odds of skin necrosis [odd ratio (OR), 8.10, P < 0.001]. Patients with TE intraoperative fill volumes >300 cm3 had 10 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 10.66, P =0.010). Volumes >400 cm3 had 15 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 15.56, P = 0.002). Mastectomy specimen weight was correlated with skin necrosis. Specimens >500 g had 10 times higher odds of necrosis and specimens >1000 g had 18 times higher odds of necrosis (OR, 10.03 and OR, 18.43; P =0.003 and P <0.001, respectively). Mastectomy skin necrosis was associated with a 50% increased inpatient charge. Conclusion: Mastectomy flap necrosis is associated with HTN, larger TE volumes and mastectomy specimen weights, resulting in increased inpatient charges. Conservative TE volumes should be considered for patients with hypertension and larger mastectomy specimens. PMID:26301139

  8. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  9. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  10. Risk-reducing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Federica; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-10-01

    Mastectomy rates have significantly increased over the last decades, likely due to the rising trend of risk-reducing mastectomies (RRM) in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Growing evidence suggests that aggressive risk-reducing surgical strategies are only justified in high-risk breast cancer situations. Notably, in this selected cohort of women, prophylactic mastectomies offer evident benefit for local and contralateral disease control, and may also provide a survival benefit. Nevertheless, the extent of the increasing frequency of this operation is not explained by the broadening of the medical indications alone. Here we analyze the current evidence regarding RRM, its clinical practice, and possible explanations for the rising phenomenon of aggressive surgical locoregional control strategies. PMID:26785281

  11. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  12. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  13. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  14. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  17. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico; Giannitelli, Sara M; Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca; Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Cassese, Raffaele; Scuderi, Nicolò; Rainer, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. PMID:26354273

  18. Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A; Krieger, Y; Shoham, Y; Silberstein, E

    2013-01-01

    Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5 kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting. PMID:24381779

  19. Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A.; Krieger, Y.; Shoham, Y.; Silberstein, E.

    2013-01-01

    Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5 kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting. PMID:24381779

  20. Assessment of Pathological Response of Breast Carcinoma in Modified Radical Mastectomy Specimens after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Dhanya; Jayalakshmy, P S; Kumar, Suresh; Mathew, Siji

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Paclitaxel based neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen (NAT) in the setting of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) can render inoperable tumor (T4, N2/N3) resectable. The aim of this study was to assess the status of carcinoma in the breast and lymph nodes after paclitaxel based NAT in order to find out the patient and the tumor characteristics that correspond to the pathological responses which could be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the treatment response. Materials and Methods. Clinical and tumor characteristics of patients with breast carcinoma (n = 48) were assessed preoperatively. These patients were subjected to modified radical mastectomy after 3 courses of paclitaxel based NAT regimen. The pathological responses of the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes were studied by using Chevallier's system which graded the responses into pathological complete response (pCR), pathological partial response (pPR), and pathological no response (pNR). Results. Our studies showed a pCR of 27.1% and a pPR of 70.9% . Clinically small sized tumors (2-5 cms) and Bloom Richardson's grade 1 tumors showed a pCR. Mean age at presentation was 50.58 yrs. 79.2% of cases were invasive ductal carcinoma NOS; only 2.1% were invasive lobular carcinoma, their response to NAT being the same. There was no downgrading of the tumor grades after NAT. Ductal carcinoma in situ and lymphovascular invasion were found to be resistant to chemotherapy. The histopathological changes noted in the lymph nodes were similar to that found in the tumor bed. Discussion and Conclusion. From our study we conclude that histopathological examination of the tumor bed is the gold standard for assessing the chemotherapeutic tumor response. As previous studies have shown pCR can be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the tumor response. PMID:26697228

  1. Rare chondrosarcoma of the breast treated with quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PASTA, VITTORIO; SOTTILE, DANIELA; URCIUOLI, PAOLO; DEL VECCHIO, LUCA; CUSTURERI, FILIPPO; D’ORAZI, VALERIO

    2015-01-01

    Breast chondrosarcoma is a rare sarcoma that mainly occurs in females >50 years old. To the best of our knowledge, only 16 cases were reported in the literature prior to 2013 and all patients were surgically treated by mastectomy, with or without lymphadenectomy, which was occasionally preceded by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, the literature does not report the benefit of mastectomy compared with a more conservative surgery. The present study reports a novel case of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma of the breast. A 63-year-old female patient presented with a neoplasm localized in the upper-outer quadrant of the right breast. The palpable lesion with sharp margins was a firm parenchymatous mass, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and mammography. The patient underwent conservative quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy, followed by post-surgical chemotherapy. A positron emission tomography scan performed five months subsequent to the surgery revealed no remnants of the disease. The patient underwent a strict clinical and instrumental follow-up, and two and half years after surgery, there are no signs of recurrent disease. In conclusion, the present case is currently one of the two cases in which a more conservative quadrantectomy was performed, instead of mastectomy. This surgical approach did not lead to metastasis and resulted in a good follow-up for the patient. PMID:25663866

  2. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  3. History of mastectomy before and after Halsted.

    PubMed

    Ghossain, Antoine; Ghossain, Michel A

    2009-01-01

    The operation described by Halsted, in 1894 and called radical mastectomy, represents a milestone in the treatment of breast cancer. It consisted of removal of the breast, muscles and axillary lymph nodes. The pre-Halsted era saw attitudes ranging from the willful abstention to brutal treatments by cauterization or amputation. The introduction of anesthesia and asepsis enabled more advanced surgical attempts. The stratification of patients into operable and nonoperable categories has improved surgical outcome. After attempts to extend Halsted procedure (by extended or super-radical mastectomies) proved to be of little benefit, a minimally-invasive trend emerged gradually. It started with modified radical mastectomy that spares the muscles and was then followed by breast conservative surgery that leaves breast tissue behind. Then sentinel lymph node mapping was introduced with the hope of reducing the extent of axillary dissection. Finally, skin sparing mastectomy appeared in order to conserve skin and facilitate breast reconstruction. PMID:19623880

  4. Oncologic safety of conservative mastectomy in the therapeutic setting.

    PubMed

    Benson, John R; Dumitru, Dorin; Malata, Charles M

    2016-02-01

    Conservative mastectomy is a form of nipple-sparing mastectomy which is emerging as a surgical option for selected breast cancer patients. This technique differs from subcutaneous mastectomy which is well established as a technique for risk reduction but leaves behind a finite remnant of retro-areolar breast tissue. Clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy and safety of breast conservation therapy for smaller localised breast tumors whereby a variable amount of surrounding normal tissue is excised with administration of breast radiotherapy post-operatively. Conservative mastectomy aims to remove all breast tissue with dissection continued into the core of the nipple. However, the indication for conservative mastectomy remains to be defined but generally includes tumors of modest size located at least 2 cm away from the nipple. Patients undergoing conservative mastectomy do not necessarily receive adjuvant radiotherapy and this may only be intra-operative irradiation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Preservation of the NAC as part of a skin-sparing mastectomy in patients who might otherwise require standard mastectomy is of unproven safety from an oncologic perspective but is associated with enhanced cosmetic outcomes and quality-of-life. The advent of conservative mastectomy has coincided with a trend for "maximal surgery" with bilateral extirpation of all breast tissue in conjunction with immediate breast reconstruction. It is essential there is no compromise of local recurrence and survival in terms of ipsilateral breast cancer treatment. Further studies are required to clarify the indications for conservative mastectomy and confirm oncologic equivalence to either wide local excision and breast irradiation or conventional/skin-sparing mastectomy with sacrifice of the nipple areola complex. PMID:26855907

  5. Oncologic safety of conservative mastectomy in the therapeutic setting

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Dorin; Malata, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy is a form of nipple-sparing mastectomy which is emerging as a surgical option for selected breast cancer patients. This technique differs from subcutaneous mastectomy which is well established as a technique for risk reduction but leaves behind a finite remnant of retro-areolar breast tissue. Clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy and safety of breast conservation therapy for smaller localised breast tumors whereby a variable amount of surrounding normal tissue is excised with administration of breast radiotherapy post-operatively. Conservative mastectomy aims to remove all breast tissue with dissection continued into the core of the nipple. However, the indication for conservative mastectomy remains to be defined but generally includes tumors of modest size located at least 2 cm away from the nipple. Patients undergoing conservative mastectomy do not necessarily receive adjuvant radiotherapy and this may only be intra-operative irradiation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Preservation of the NAC as part of a skin-sparing mastectomy in patients who might otherwise require standard mastectomy is of unproven safety from an oncologic perspective but is associated with enhanced cosmetic outcomes and quality-of-life. The advent of conservative mastectomy has coincided with a trend for “maximal surgery” with bilateral extirpation of all breast tissue in conjunction with immediate breast reconstruction. It is essential there is no compromise of local recurrence and survival in terms of ipsilateral breast cancer treatment. Further studies are required to clarify the indications for conservative mastectomy and confirm oncologic equivalence to either wide local excision and breast irradiation or conventional/skin-sparing mastectomy with sacrifice of the nipple areola complex. PMID:26855907

  6. Risk factors for mastectomy flap necrosis following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mlodinow, Alexei S; Fine, Neil A; Khavanin, Nima; Kim, John Y S

    2014-10-01

    Tissue expander placement is a mainstay of reconstructive surgery in the post-mastectomy patient. Necrosis of the native breast tissue is one of the most significant concerns in their post-operative care. The goal of this study is to elucidate factors that confer risk of this outcome. Chart review was conducted for a consecutive series of immediate tissue expander reconstructions by the two senior authors. Data was collected for several preoperative and intraoperative variables, as well as the outcome of mastectomy flap necrosis. Of the 1566 breasts that were examined, 135 (8.6%) experienced flap necrosis. The cohorts with and without flap necrosis were well matched. Those with the outcome of interest had significantly higher rates of switching to an autologous method of reconstruction (31.9% vs 6.2%, p < 0.001). Regression analysis revealed smoking status, increased age, tumescent mastectomy technique, and high (>66.67%) intraoperative tissue expander fill to confer increased risk of mastectomy flap necrosis. While smoking and older age are well-supported by the literature, tumescent technique and tissue expander fill are more novel points of discussion, which may serve as proxies for other issues. Awareness of these risk factors and their interplay will aid in clinical judgement and postoperative care of these patients. PMID:24495186

  7. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  8. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  9. Dosimetric comparison of conventional and forward-planned intensity-modulated techniques for comprehensive locoregional irradiation of post-mastectomy left breast cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cavey, Matthew L. . E-mail: mlcavey@utmb.edu; Bayouth, John E.; Endres, Eugene J.; Pena, John M.; Colman, Martin; Hatch, Sandra

    2005-06-30

    Three recently published randomized trials have shown a survival benefit to postoperative radiation therapy when the internal mammary chain (IMC), supraclavicular (SCV), and axillary lymphatics are treated. When treating the IMC, techniques that minimize dose to the heart and lungs may be utilized to prevent excess morbidity and mortality and achieve the survival benefit reported. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (fIMRT) with conventional techniques for comprehensive irradiation of the chest wall and regional lymphatics. For irradiation of the chest wall and IMC, 3 treatment plans, (1) fIMRT, (2) partially-wide tangent (PWT) fields, and (3) a photon-electron (PE) technique, were compared for 12 patients previously treated at our institution with fIMRT to the left chest wall and regional lymphatics. Additionally, the SCV and infraclavicular lymphatics were irradiated and 4 methods were compared: 2 with anterior fields only (dose prescribed to 3 and 5 cm [SC3cm, SC5cm]) and 2 with anterior and posterior fields (fIMRT, 3DCRT). Each patient was planned to receive 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Regions of interest (ROIs) created for each patient included chest wall (CW) planning target volume (PTV), IMC PTV, and SCV PTV. Additionally, the following organs at risk (OAR) volumes were created: contralateral breast, heart, and lungs. For each plan and ROI, target volume coverage (V{sub 95-107}) and dose homogeneity (D{sub 95-5}) were evaluated. Additionally, the mean OAR dose and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were computed. For irradiation of the CW, target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were improved for the fIMRT technique as compared to PE (p < 0.001, p = 0.023, respectively). Similar improvements were seen with respect to IMC PTV (p = 0.012, p = 0.064). These dosimetric parameters were also improved as compared to PWT, but not to the same extent (p = 0.011, p = 0.095 for CW PTV

  10. What is the evidence behind conservative mastectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Besides the diffusion of breast reconstructive techniques, several “conservative” approaches in mastectomy have been developed, in order to perform an immediate reconstruction with better aesthetic results: the skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), the nipple-areola complex (NAC)-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and the skin-reducing mastectomy (SRM). During the last decade, SSMs and NSMs have gained widespread acceptance and are currently considered standard treatment for early breast cancer. We would like to investigate the evidence behind this radical shift towards conservative mastectomies, where there has been a renewed interest worldwide. Methods We reviewed English literature by consulting the following databases: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal and Clinicaltrials.gov. The objective is to include any randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a “conservative mastectomy” technique to breast conservative surgery or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. In the absence of randomized trials, we took into account prospective cohorts and retrospective series for a narrative description of available evidence. Results Our review included 58 studies [19 prospective cohorts (34%) and 39 retrospective series (66%)] considering NSM and immediate reconstruction and ten studies [1 prospective cohort (10%) and 9 (90%) retrospective series] considering SSM and immediate reconstruction. In the NSM group, 29 studies reported data about complication rates and 42 studies presented data on NAC partial or complete necrosis. In the NSM group 45 studies and all the studies in the SSM group presented data on local and NAC recurrence. Conclusions In order to achieve higher levels of evidence, RCTs comparing conservative mastectomies to traditional mastectomy and breast conservative surgery would be

  11. Oncologic Safety of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Matched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hoo; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Jin, Ung Sik; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and those undergoing mastectomy alone. Methods A retrospective review of patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for resectable invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 at a single center was conducted. These cases were matched to patients who underwent mastectomy alone in the same time period, performed by 1:2 matching. Matching control variables included age, tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis, and estrogen receptor status. Overall, 189 patients were identified in the IBR group, and 362 patients were matched to this group. Results In the IBR group, 75 patients (39.7%) underwent conventional total mastectomy, 78 (41.3%) underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), and 36 (19.0%) underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The IBR group was significantly younger than the control group (41.9 and 45.1 years, respectively) (p=0.032), in spite of matching between three age groups. The DFS rates were similar between the IBR group and mastectomy alone group, at 92.0% and 89.9%, respectively, at 5-year follow-up (log-rank test, p=0.496). The 5-year LRFS was 96.2% in the IBR group and 96.4% in the mastectomy alone group (log-rank test, p=0.704), similar to data from previous reports. Subgroup analyses for SSM or NSM patients showed no differences in LRFS and DFS between the two groups. Additionally, in stage III patients, IBR did not cause an increase in recurrence. Conclusion IBR after mastectomy, including both SSM and NSM, had no negative impact on recurrence or patient survival, even in patients with advanced disease. PMID:27064557

  12. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. PMID:26852151

  13. Patient Race and Provider Predict Patient Satisfaction Following Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shaterian, Ashkaun; Gandy, Jessica; Lalezari, Shadi; Smith, Sarah; Paydar, Keyianoosh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction is commonly performed in the United States with numerous options available to patients and providers. This study evaluated patient race and provider in prediction of patient satisfaction following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. METHODS The patient satisfaction for women who underwent post mastectomy breast reconstruction at University of California, Irvine Medical Center was evaluated between 2012 and 2014, randomly using Press Ganey Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Patient demographics and surgery related variables including type of reconstruction received were determined. RESULTS Between 2012 and 2014, ninety breast reconstruction patients completed a HCAHPS satisfaction survey. Average satisfaction score was 9.67/10. Multivariate linear regression analyses revealed that 34% of the variability in satisfaction scores was accounted for by the variables included in our statistical model. Analyses revealed race/ethnicity and provider to be independent predictors of satisfaction (p<0.05). Satisfaction scores ranged from 6-10 and varied by 11.7% across different providers and 8.9% across different races. The following variables were included, but did not influence patient satisfaction: type, timing, or laterality of reconstruction, presence of post-operative complication, body mass index (BMI), age, presence of comorbidity, and insurance type. CONCLUSION Achieving patient satisfaction is an important outcome of breast reconstruction. This study is one of the first to identify provider and race/ethnicity as predictors of patient satisfaction following breast reconstruction. The information provided here can help inform providers and improve satisfaction for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. PMID:27579266

  14. Bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenomas of the breasts-a rare indication for bilateral skin reducing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Laitano, Francisco Felipe; Neto, Francisco Laitano; Zerwes, Felipe Pereira

    2016-08-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign tumor of the breast but giant juvenile fibroadenoma represent only 0.5% of all fibroadenomas and when bilateral are much more rare. We describe the case of a 25 years old girl that presented with bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenomas and was treated by bilateral skin reducing mastectomy using the inferior dermal flap, implant, and free nipple graft. PMID:27563567

  15. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  16. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  17. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  18. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  20. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  1. Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Ptosis: Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction Allows Full Secondary Mastopexy with Complete Nipple Areolar Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Craig A.; Sullivan, Scott K.; Stolier, Alan; Trahan, Chris; Wise, M. Whitten; Duracher, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with moderate to severe ptosis are often considered poor candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. This results from the perceived risk of nipple necrosis and/or the inability of the reconstructive surgeon to reliably and effectively reposition the nipple-areola complex on the breast mound after mastectomy. Methods: A retrospective review identified patients with grade II/III ptosis who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate perforator flap reconstruction and subsequently underwent a mastopexy procedure. The mastopexies included complete, full-thickness periareolar incisions with peripheral undermining around the nipple-areola complex to allow for full transposition of the nipple-areola complex relative to the surrounding skin envelope. Results: Seventy patients with 116 nipple-sparing mastectomies met inclusion criteria. The most common complications were minor incisional dehiscence (7.7 percent) and variable degrees of necrosis in the preserved breast skin (3.4 percent) after the initial mastectomy. There were no cases of nipple-areola complex necrosis following the secondary mastopexy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that full mastopexy, including a complete full-thickness periareolar incision and nipple-areola complex repositioning on the breast mound, can be safely performed after nipple-sparing mastectomy and perforator flap breast reconstruction. The underlying flap provides adequate vascular ingrowth to support the perfusion of the nipple-areola complex despite complete incisional interruption of the surrounding cutaneous blood supply. These findings may allow for inclusion of women with moderate to severe ptosis in the candidate pool for nipple-sparing mastectomy if oncologic criteria are otherwise met. These findings also represent a significant potential advantage of autogenous reconstruction over implant reconstruction in women with breast ptosis who desire nipple-sparing mastectomy. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF

  2. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  3. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Frank, Simon G; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  4. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  5. Skin Reduction Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Jill; Fedele, Greg

    2015-10-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for many patients with early stage breast cancer. Large-breasted women who are gene positive or who have early breast cancer are not traditionally candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. The blood supply to the nipple is via the breast tissue and also the dermis, both of which would be severed if standard skin reduction were combined with mastectomy. This video shows how a nipple-sparing mastectomy can be combined with skin reduction while preserving the blood supply to the nipple. The excess skin is deepithelialized to preserve the dermal vessels. After mastectomy, the excess skin is imbricated to reduce the skin envelope. The deepithelialized lower flap "autoderm" can be sewn to the pectoralis muscle for coverage of the tissue expander. This technique allows large-breasted and ptotic patients to undergo mastectomy with preservation of their nipple-areolar complex as well as skin reduction to yield an improved cosmetic result. PMID:26271393

  6. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  7. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  8. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  9. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  10. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peirong

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  11. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  12. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  13. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  14. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  15. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  16. What is new in the surgical management and prevention of breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Spillane, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Australian women. As most women now survive breast cancer, improving quality-of-life outcomes is increasingly important and major changes are occurring in breast surgery to meet this challenge. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy results in lower mastectomy rates, broader surgical options and less surgical morbidity. Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) facilitates less frequent need for mastectomy, better aesthetic outcomes and improved quality of life. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) improves quality of life and can be considered in a large proportion of women requiring mastectomy; however, Australia's rate of IBR is low compared with similar countries. Breast cancer risk reduction can be achieved with lifestyle modifications and, in women at high risk, chemoprevention with selective oestrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy is an option for BRCA gene mutation carriers or those women otherwise established to have a high level of risk. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is increasingly performed at the time of initial breast cancer management, largely driven by patient preference. However, CPM does not improve survival and has similar rates of complications as therapeutic mastectomy. It should be cautiously considered, with full discussion of risks and benefits. Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand (BreastSurgANZ) coordinates training of most new breast surgeons and is fostering a broader range of multidisciplinary oncology, OBS and IBR skills in its members. The BreastSurgANZ Quality Audit monitors the quality of care provided by members. Training breast surgeons now have access to a Graduate Certificate in Surgery (Breast Surgery) to broaden their knowledge base. PMID:27125805

  17. Intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography for the evaluation of mastectomy flaps in immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Newman, Martin I; Samson, Michel C; Tamburrino, Joseph F; Swartz, Kimberley A

    2010-09-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy has been associated with flap ischemia and necrosis. Current clinical methods for assessment of flap viability following mastectomy are largely subjective and lack objective data to guide intraoperative decisions. Intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (LA-ICGA) was performed on 20 skin sparing mastectomy flaps. LA-ICGA data were retrospectively compared with clinical outcome. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative digital photographs along with clinical course were evaluated in an effort to identify potential complications. LA-ICGA was performed on 20 breasts in 12 patients. Eleven breasts (55%) demonstrated no wound-healing issues. Nine breasts (45%) experienced wound-healing issues, which were stratified as follows: 1 (5%) mild, 1 (5%) moderate, and 7 (35%) severe. Of these seven severe wound-healing issues, 5 (25%) required debridement and 2 (10%) required complete removal of the prosthetic device. Retrospective analysis demonstrated a 95% correlation between intraoperative imaging and clinical course with 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. There was a false-positive rate of 9%. This series suggests LA-ICGA is a useful adjunct to determine mastectomy flap viability. Further quantitative advances in this technology may provide objective numerical thresholds to guide intraoperative mastectomy flap debridement when indicated. PMID:20539977

  18. Institutional Variation in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Caprice C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hughes, Melissa E.; Edge, Stephen B.; Theriault, Richard; Wilson, John L.; Carter, W. Bradford; Blayney, Douglas W.; Niland, Joyce; Weeks, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between supply of subspecialty care and type of procedure preferentially performed for early stage breast cancer. Background Three surgical options exist for early stage breast cancer: (1) breast conserving surgery (BCS), (2) mastectomy with reconstruction (RECON), and (3) mastectomy alone. Current guidelines recommend that surgical treatment decisions should be based on patient preference if a patient is eligible for all 3. However, studies demonstrate persistent variation in the use of BCS and RECON. Methods Patients undergoing an operation for DCIS or stage I or II breast cancer at NCCN institutions between 2000 and 2006 were identified. Institutional procedure rates were determined. Spearman correlations measured the association between procedure types. Patient-level logistic regression models investigated predictors of procedure type and association with institutional supply of subspecialty care. Results Among 10,607 patients, 19% had mastectomy alone, 60% BCS, and 21% RECON. The institutional rate of BCS and RECON were strongly correlated (r = −0.80, P = 0.02). Institution was more important than all patient factors except age in predicting receipt of RECON or BCS. RECON was more likely for patients treated at an institution with a greater supply of reconstructive surgeons or where patients live further from radiation facilities. RECON was less likely at institutions with longer waiting times for surgery with reconstruction. Conclusions Even within the NCCN, a consortium of multidisciplinary cancer centers, the use of BCS and mastectomy with reconstruction substantially varies by institution and correlates with the supply of subspecialty care. PMID:21725233

  19. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. Comparative biomechanical study of using decellularized human adipose tissues for post-mastectomy and post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Seyyed M H; Omidi, Ehsan; Flynn, Lauren E; Samani, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Developing suitable biomaterials for post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction is highly important. This study is aimed at evaluating biomechanical suitability of decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) for this purpose. The study involves computational experiments for evaluating deformation of the breast reconstructed using DAT under loading conditions pertaining to two common body position changes of prone-to-supine and prone-to-upright. This was conducted using nonlinear finite element models where the breast geometry was obtained from MRI image of a female breast. The experiments were performed using DAT sourced from various adipose tissue depots in comparison to natural adipose tissue. Data obtained from the conducted experiments showed no contour defects with various DAT materials for simulated post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction under the loading conditions. They also demonstrated that a breast reconstructed using DAT derived from the breast or subcutaneous abdominal depots exhibit significantly closer deformation, both qualitatively and quantitatively, to that of a normal breast under the same loading conditions. Similarity of DAT deformation to that of natural breast tissue in post-surgery breast reconstruction was assessed using nonlinear finite element analysis. Our results provide evidence that DAT derived from subcutaneous abdominal and breast depots yield more analogous deformation pattern to the natural tissue in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction applications. This is quite encouraging, as breast and subcutaneous adipose tissue can be readily obtained in large quantities from breast or abdominal lipo-reduction surgery procedures. Furthermore, in post-lumpectomy cases all DAT samples used in this research showed similar deformation, and thus are suitable as breast tissue substituents. PMID:26735182

  1. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  2. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  3. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  4. Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

    2013-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3 years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

  5. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  6. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  7. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  8. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johnson KC, Olsson H, Casagrande JT, et al. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer: ... D, Ferlay J, Brinton LA, Cook MB. An international comparison of male and female breast cancer incidence ...

  9. Assessment of knowledge of cancer and lymphoedema among breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ochałek, Katarzyna; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Pitala, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema symptoms among mastectomy survivors. Material and methods The research was carried out in the Centre of Oncology Branch in Cracow. The survey comprised 60 hospitalized patients as well as 30 healthy subjects from the Małopolska region. The scientific method used was a specially designed questionnaire. Results Women with a history of cancer demonstrate a health-oriented approach. The subjects known as the experimental group perform breast self-examinations, regularly visit a gynaecologist, are aware of the most severe mastectomy complication – lymphoedema, and recognize the impact of physical activity on it. Breast cancer operation survivors have a good knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema, however, existing shortcomings in practical issues are worrying. On the contrary, the control group neglects regular check-ups, evaluates its own knowledge as negligible and, most surprisingly, is not interested in the subject of breast cancer and lymphoedema, even though the subjects of the group believe that arm swelling is connected to all types of breast cancer surgeries. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors have a good knowledge of their disorder but are still lacking some essential information. Respondents from the control group have a limited knowledge in the field of cancer and lymphoedema, are not interested in breast cancer matters and are not encouraged by gynaecologists to perform breast self-examinations. Educational prevention programs should develop a health-oriented approach among all women and emphasize their basic role in therapy. PMID:26327866

  10. Is there an Ideal Breast Conservation Rate for the Treatment of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed

    Tan, M P

    2016-09-01

    Since the results of randomised controlled trials in the last quarter of the twentieth century were reported, it has been conventionally accepted that breast conservation treatment (BCT) provides equivalent survival to mastectomy for early breast cancer. As expected, there was an initial fall in the use of mastectomy. The first decade of the twenty-first century, however, witnessed a trend of increasing mastectomy rates in some regions. This perplexing circumstance served as an impetus for a relook at survival outcomes with each surgical modality. Recent studies have demonstrated higher survival rates and improved local control associated with BCT. Such findings warrant a re-evaluation of treatment strategies, beginning with whether there is an optimum BCT rate. PMID:27177489

  11. Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Woo-Young; Lee, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Ho-Chang; Ryu, Dong-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo; Yun, Hyo-Young; Song, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Synchronous bilateral breast cancer is extremely rare in men and has not, up to date, been reported in Korea. A 54-year-old man presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. The right nipple was retracted and bilateral axillary accessory breasts and nipples were present. On physical examination, a 2 cm-sized mass was palpated directly under the right nipple, and, with squeezing, bloody discharge developed in a single duct of the left nipple. There was no palpable mass in the left breast, and axillary lymph nodes were not palpable. Physical examination of external genitalia revealed a unilateral undescended testis on the left side. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer was diagnosed using mammography, ultrasonography, and core-needle biopsy. Histopathological examination revealed invasive ductal carcinoma in the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ in the left breast. Bilateral total mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and excision of accessory breasts in the axilla were performed. PMID:22807945

  12. Ectopic breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Önel, Safa; Karateke, Faruk; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Özyazıcı, Sefa; Özdoğan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic breast may be present at any site, from the axilla to the vulva, other than its normal location. Cysts, adenofibromas and rarely carcinomas have been reported in ectopic breasts. In this case report, we present a patient with ectopic breast cancer. The patient had a thickening and enlarging of her ectopic breast tissue, on the left arcus costarium. Tru-cut biopsy revealed "invasive lobular carcinoma". Left ectopic mastectomy and level I-II axillary dissection were performed and then chemotherapy+radiotherapy+endocrine therapy treatment was commenced. During follow up, the patient is doing well; in spite of R1 resection, she has no evidence of local recurrences or distant metastases. PMID:25931856

  13. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  14. Breast cancer treatment in mutation carriers: surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Biglia, Nicoletta; D'Alonzo, Marta; Sgro, Luca G; Tomasi Cont, Nicoletta; Bounous, Valentina; Robba, Elisabetta

    2016-10-01

    The surgical option which should be reserved for patients with BRCA1/2 mutation and breast cancer diagnosis is still debated. Several aspects should be considered before the surgical decision-making: the risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), the potential survival benefit of prophylactic mastectomy, and the possible risk factors that could either increase or decrease the risk for IBR or CBC. Breast conservative treatment (BCT) does not increase the risk for IBR in BRCA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers in short term follow-up; however, an increased risk for IBR in carriers was observed in studies with long follow-up. In spite of the increased risk for IBR in patients who underwent BCT than patients with mastectomy, no significant difference in breast-cancer specific or overall survival was observed by local treatment type at 15 years. Patients with BRCA mutation had a higher risk for CBC compared with non-carriers and BRCA1-mutation carriers had an increased risk for CBC compared to BRCA2-mutation carriers. Bilateral mastectomy is intended to prevent CBC in BRCA mutation carriers, however, no difference in survival was found if a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was performed or not. For higher-risk groups of BRCA mutated patients, a more-aggressive surgical approach may be preferable, but there are some aspects that should be considered in the surgical decision-making process. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy and performing oophorectomy are associated with a decreased risk for IBR. When considering the risk for CBC, three risk factors were associated with significantly decreased risk: the use of adjuvant tamoxifen, performing oophorectomy and older age at first breast cancer diagnosis. As a result, we could identify a group of patients that might benefit from a more aggressive surgical approach (unilateral mastectomy or unilateral therapeutic mastectomy with concomitant contralateral prophylactic

  15. Current strategies for the prevention of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high incidence of breast cancer in the United States, optimal strategies for its prevention are imperative. This entails identification of women who are at an increased risk for breast cancer and an integrative approach that includes effective screening methods as well as nutritional, pharmacologic, and surgical management. Several breast cancer risk-assessment tools, such as the Gail and Claus models, can help clinicians determine the quantitative risk of breast cancer. The role of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as tamoxifen and raloxifene, for the prevention of breast cancer has been well established. Several other agents, such as aromatase inhibitors, are currently being investigated. The potential adverse effects of these chemopreventive agents, which include an impact on the quality of life, must be discussed with the patient before deciding on this approach. Additionally, breast cancer risk factors have been identified over the years; some of them are modifiable, but others are not. Although there is no conclusive evidence to suggest the protective role of specific dietary components, alcohol consumption and obesity are associated with an increased breast cancer risk; thus lifestyle changes can lead to a lower risk of developing breast cancer. Surgical approaches, including bilateral risk-reduction mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, are usually limited to women with a hereditary predisposition to development of breast cancer. The objective of this review is to summarize the various approaches directed at reducing the incidence of breast cancer. PMID:24833917

  16. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:27066090

  17. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk of breast ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any x-rays. ...

  18. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  19. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  1. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2012: Results from a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Kang, Eunyoung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Seokwon

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through utilization of an online registration program. We have reported the basic facts about breast cancer in Korea in 2012, and analyzed the changing patterns in the clinical characteristics and management of breast cancer in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were collected for the year 2012 from 97 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey, and from the online registry database. A total of 17,792 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 70.7 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 51 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women was higher than that of premenopausal women among those diagnosed with breast cancer. The proportion of cases of early breast cancer increased continuously, and breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in that same year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 3-fold over last 10 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all stages of breast cancer patients was extremely high. The clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed in ways that resulted in high overall survival over the past 10 years in Korea, and the surgical management of the disease has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:26155285

  2. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  3. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  4. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  5. Surgical options for the early-stage breast cancer: factors associated with patient choice and postoperative quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pusic, A; Thompson, T A; Kerrigan, C L; Sargeant, R; Slezak, S; Chang, B W; Kelzlsouer, K J; Manson, P N

    1999-10-01

    Patients with early-stage breast cancer have three surgical options: lumpectomy with radiotherapy, mastectomy alone, and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. Our objective was to compare women in these three groups with respect to demographics, preoperative counseling, postoperative body image, and quality of life. Women having undergone surgery for stage 1 or 2 breast cancer between 1990 and 1995 were selected by random sampling of hospital tumor registries and were mailed a self-administered questionnaire, which included the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36. Patients were stratified into three mutually exclusive groups: lumpectomy with axillary node dissection and radiotherapy, modified radical mastectomy, and modified radical mastectomy with breast reconstruction. In total, 267 of 525 surveys were returned (50.9 percent). Compared with mastectomy patients, breast reconstruction patients were younger (p < 0.001), better educated (p = 0.001), and more likely Caucasian (p = 0.02). Among mastectomy patients, 54.9 percent recalled that lumpectomy had been discussed preoperatively and 39.7 percent recalled discussion of breast reconstruction. Post-operative comfort with appearance was significantly lower for mastectomy patients. The relationship between type of surgery and postoperative quality of life varied with age. Under 55, quality of life was lowest for mastectomy patients on all but two Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 subscales. Over 55, quality of life was lowest for lumpectomy patients on all subscales (p < 0.05 for all subscales except social functioning and role-emotional). Treatment choice may be related to age, race, education, and preoperative counseling. Whereas the effect of breast cancer on a woman's life is complex and individual, the type of surgery performed is a significant variable, whose impact may be related to patient age. PMID:10513913

  6. Breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Chase, Margot E; Lin, Kant Y; Long, William B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report on breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics is to review the evidence for the efficacy of surveillance for early detection, bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy, and chemoprevention in preventing breast cancer and improving survival of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. This collective review highlights radiologic screening of patients with this genetic predisposition for cancer as well as discusses cancer risk reduction strategies and reproductive concerns in female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. It has now been well documented that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has a higher sensitivity than mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer in patients predisposed to breast cancer. We also emphasize that a new diagnostic device, molecular breast imaging (MBI), is now available and may be as sensitive as MRI. To date, this exciting technology, MBI, has not been used in studies of patients with BRCA1/2 genes. We also discuss in more detail the unique psychological ramifications of female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. These women face unique choices regarding management of their high risk for breast and ovarian cancer that impact their reproductive options. Despite their high levels of concern, few female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers consider assisted reproduction technologies such as pregnancy surrogate, cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos, or implantation genetic diagnosis to select embryos without BCRA1/2 mutation. Further research must be undertaken to explore the risk management of patients with inherited cancer predisposition and to incorporate these preferences into clinical care. PMID:19105530

  7. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  8. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. Case presentation A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Discussion Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. PMID:26773878

  9. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may result in a delay in diagnosis. Survival is highest when breast cancer is found early. If you notice any of ... chest or nipple, see a doctor right away. Survival rates are similar for men and women when breast cancer is found at the same stage. A man’s ...

  10. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  11. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  12. Skin-sparing mastectomy. Oncologic and reconstructive considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, G W; Bostwick, J; Styblo, T M; Moore, B; Bried, J T; Murray, D R; Wood, W C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors compared skin-sparing mastectomy and traditional mastectomy both followed by immediate reconstruction in the treatment of breast cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Skin-sparing mastectomy is used increasingly in the treatment of breast cancer to improve the aesthetic results of immediate reconstruction. The oncologic and reconstructive outcomes of this procedure have never been analyzed closely. METHODS: Institutional experience with 435 consecutive patients who underwent total mastectomy and immediate reconstruction from January 1989 through December 1994 was examined. Mastectomies were stratified into skin-sparing (SSM) and non-skin-sparing (non-SSM) types. RESULTS: Three hundred twenty-seven SSMs and 188 non-SSMs were performed. The mean follow-up was 41.3 months (SSM, 37.5 months, non-SSM, 48.2 months). Local recurrences from invasive cancer occurred after 4.8% of SSMs versus 9.5% of non-SSMs. Sixty-five percent of patients who underwent SSMs had nothing performed on the opposite breast versus 45% in the group of patients who underwent non-SSM (p = 0.0002). Native skin flap necrosis occurred in 10.7% of patients who underwent SSMs versus 11.2% of patients who underwent non-SSMs. CONCLUSIONS: Skin-sparing mastectomy facilitates immediate breast reconstruction by reducing remedial surgery on the opposite breast. Native skin flap necrosis is not increased over that seen with non-SSM. Skin-sparing mastectomies can be used in the treatment of invasive cancer without compromising local control. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9193184

  13. pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A.; Warner, E.

    2013-01-01

    Consider this scenario: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple’s relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman’s diagnosis. Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment? Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program—the first of its kind in Canada—for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

  14. MYC and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Yinghua; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2010-01-01

    MYC is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. MYC deregulation contributes to breast cancer development and progression and is associated with poor outcomes. Multiple mechanisms are involved in MYC deregulation in breast cancer, including gene amplification, transcriptional regulation, and mRNA and protein stabilization, which correlate with loss of tumor suppressors and activation of oncogenic pathways. The heterogeneity in breast cancer is increasingly recognized. Breast cancer has been classified into 5 or more subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and each subtype has distinct biological features and clinical outcomes. Among these subtypes, basal-like tumor is associated with a poor prognosis and has a lack of therapeutic targets. MYC is overexpressed in the basal-like subtype and may serve as a target for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 inhibits MYC’s transcriptional and transforming activity. Loss of BRCA1 with MYC overexpression leads to the development of breast cancer—especially, basal-like breast cancer. As a downstream effector of estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor family pathways, MYC may contribute to resistance to adjuvant therapy. Targeting MYC-regulated pathways in combination with inhibitors of other oncogenic pathways may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for breast cancer, the basal-like subtype in particular. PMID:21779462

  15. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  16. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  17. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Camilla; Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-12-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  18. Quality of Life in Patients with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema and Reconstructive Breast Surgery.

    PubMed

    Penha, Tiara R Lopez; Botter, Bente; Heuts, Esther M; Voogd, Adri C; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F; van der Hulst, René R

    2016-07-01

    Background To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors who have undergone breast reconstruction and have breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods Patients with a unilateral mastectomy with or without breast reconstruction were evaluated for BCRL and their QOL. Patients were divided into a non-BCRL and a BCRL group. Patients with subjective complaints of arm swelling and/or an interlimb volume difference of >200 mL, or undergoing treatment for arm lymphedema were defined as having BCRL. QOL was assessed using cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-B23) and disease specific (Lymph-ICF) questionnaires. Results In total, 253 patients with a mean follow-up time of 51.7 (standard deviation = 18.5) months since mastectomy completed the QOL questionnaires. Of these patients, 116 (46%) underwent mastectomy alone and 137 (54%) had additional breast reconstruction. A comparison of the QOL scores of 180 patients in the non-BCRL group showed a significantly better physical function (p = 0.004) for patients with reconstructive surgery compared with mastectomy patients. In the 73 patients with BCRL, a comparison of the QOL scores showed no significant differences between patients with mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. After adjusting for potential confounders, multivariate analysis showed a significant impact of BCRL on physical function (β =  - 7.46; p = 0.009), role function (β =  - 15.75; p = 0.003), cognitive function (β =  - 11.56; p = 0.005), body vision (β =  - 11.62; p = 0.007), arm symptoms (β = 20.78; p = 0.000), and all domains of the Lymph-ICF questionnaire. Conclusions This study implies that BCRL has a negative effect on the QOL of breast cancer survivors, potentially negating the positive effects on QOL reconstructive breast surgery has. PMID:26919383

  19. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  20. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  1. Treating early-stage breast cancer: hospital characteristics associated with breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Johantgen, M E; Coffey, R M; Harris, D R; Levy, H; Clinton, J J

    1995-01-01

    Despite growing acceptance of the fact that women with early-stage breast cancer have similar outcomes with lumpectomy plus radiation as with mastectomy, many studies have revealed the uneven adoption of such breast-conserving surgery. Discharge data from the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project, representing multiple payers, locations, and hospital types, demonstrate increasing trends in breast-conserving surgery as a proportion of breast cancer surgeries from 1981 to 1987. Women with axillary node involvement were less likely to have a lumpectomy, even though consensus recommendations do not preclude this form of treatment when local metastases are present. Non-White race, urban hospital location, and hospital teaching were associated with an increased likelihood of having breast-conserving surgery. PMID:7573632

  2. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  3. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy: issues and concerns.

    PubMed

    Stefanek, M E

    1995-01-01

    At present, the care of women at increased risk of developing breast cancer poses a clinical dilemma and remains an area of controversy. A number of investigators have addressed the pros and cons of prophylactic mastectomy versus close follow-up, utilizing annual mammography, semiannual or even more frequent physical examinations of the breast, and proficient monthly breast self-examinations. Recent efforts to isolate a gene (BRCA1) on chromosome 17q12-21 raise additional concerns about the management of women testing positive for BRCA1 mutations. These women are estimated to have an 85% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Testing for BRCA1 mutation carriers may soon be available for population screening. This article describes preliminary studies investigating health care provider and patient perceptions of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. In addition, a number of research questions remain regarding the efficacy and utilization of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy as a treatment option for women at increased risk of developing breast cancer. These women include those testing positive for BRCA1 mutations. In addition, women with a strong family history opting against testing for BRCA1 mutations may express interest in surgery. PMID:8573451

  4. Mastectomy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go to slide 3 out of 3 Normal anatomy Overview Breast cancer begins in the breast and ... M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn ...

  5. The Proportion of Women Who Have a Breast 4 Years after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mennie, Joanna C.; Mohanna, Pari-Naz; O’Donoghue, Joseph M; Rainsbury, Richard; Cromwell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous pathways in breast cancer treatment, many of which enable women to retain a breast after treatment. We evaluated the proportion of women who have a breast, either through conserving surgery (BCS) or reconstruction, at 4-years after diagnosis, and how this varied by patient group. Methods and Findings We identified women with breast cancer who underwent initial BCS or mastectomy in English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals between January 2008 and December 2009 using the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database. Women were assigned into one of four patient groups depending on their age at diagnosis and presence of comorbidities. The series of breast cancer procedure (BCS, mastectomy, immediate, or delayed reconstruction) undergone by each women was identified over four years, and the proportion of women with a breast calculated. Variation was examined across patient groups, and English Cancer Networks. Between 2008 and 2009, 60,959 women underwent BCS or mastectomy. The proportion with a breast at 4 years was 79.3%, and 64.0%, in women less than 70 years without, and with comorbidities. Whilst in women aged 70 and over without, and with comorbidities, proportions were 52.6%, and 38.2%, respectively. Comorbidities were associated with lower proportions of BCS, but had little effect on reconstruction rates unlike age. Networks variation of 15% or more was found within each patient group, and Cancer Networks tended to have either a high or low proportion across all four patient groups. However, while 14% of women under 70 years had undergone reconstruction, less than 2% of women aged 70 or more had this treatment option. Conclusion The proportion of women diagnosed with breast cancer who retain a breast at 4 years is strongly associated with age, and presence of comorbidities. There was significant variation between Cancer Networks indicating that women’s experience in England was dependent on their geographical location of

  6. Pregnancy After Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gemignani; Petrek

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The issue of pregnancy following the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is important because the incidence of breast cancer is increasing in women of childbearing age. The fact that many women are delaying childbearing, whether for educational, professional, or personal reasons, increases the number of women who will undergo breast cancer treatment before completing childbearing. METHODS: Data on pregnancy in breast cancer survivors are limited and consist only of retrospective data. This paper reviews the published literature on the influence of subsequent pregnancy on breast cancer, including three recent large-scale population-based studies. RESULTS: The survival of women with breast carcinoma who subsequently become pregnant is not reported to be decreased in any of the published series. However, several biases may be present that justify the concern regarding the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Further research on the safety of subsequent pregnancy after breast carcinoma treatment is needed. To address these issues, patients are currently being accrued for a large, prospective, multicenter study of young breast carcinoma patients. PMID:10758557

  7. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  8. Methylxanthines and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schairer, C; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R N

    1987-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between methylxanthine consumption and breast cancer using data from a case-control study which included 1,510 cases and 1,882 controls identified through a nation-wide breast cancer screening program. There was no evidence of a positive association between methylxanthine consumption and risk of breast cancer. In fact, there was some suggestion of a negative association, particularly in women diagnosed after age 50. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk with past or recent methylxanthine consumption, or with the consumption of caffeine or specific beverages, most notably brewed or instant caffeinated coffee and tea. PMID:3117709

  9. Nummular Eczema of Breast: A Potential Dermatologic Complication after Mastectomy and Subsequent Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iwahira, Yoshiko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Yusuke; Kuwata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Purposes. The present paper reports clinical cases where nummular eczema developed during the course of breast reconstruction by means of implantation and evaluates the occurrence patterns and ratios of this complication. Methods. 1662 patients undergoing breast reconstruction were reviewed. Patients who developed nummular eczema during the treatment were selected, and a survey was conducted on these patients regarding three items: (1) the stage of the treatment at which nummular eczema developed; (2) time required for the lesion to heal; (3) location of the lesion on the reconstructed breast(s). Furthermore, histopathological examination was conducted to elucidate the etiology of the lesion. Results. 48 patients (2.89%) developed nummular eczema. The timing of onset varied among these patients, with lesions developing after the placement of tissue expanders for 22 patients (45.8%); after the tissue expanders were replaced with silicone implants for 12 patients (25%); and after nipple-areola complex reconstruction for 14 patients (29.2%). Nummular eczema developed both in periwound regions (20 cases: 41.7%) and in nonperiwound regions (32 cases: 66.7%). Histopathological examination showed epidermal acanthosis, psoriasiform patterns, and reduction of sebaceous glands. Conclusions. Surgeons should recognize that nummular eczema is a potential complication of breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and silicone implants. PMID:26380109

  10. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  11. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  12. Pregnancy and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, R; Harvey, V

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) presents a challenging clinical situation. This article reviews the current evidence around the management of PABC and the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. The trend towards later age at first childbirth has resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer cases coexistent with pregnancy. The management of breast cancer during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Breast surgery can be safely performed during any trimester of pregnancy. Radiation therapy, if required, must be delayed until after delivery. The majority of patients with PABC require chemotherapy. The timing of delivery in relation to chemotherapy administration should be carefully considered. There is no evidence to date that pregnancy termination influences overall survival for the mother. To date, there is no clear evidence that subsequent pregnancy after breast cancer is associated with worse maternal survival. There is a suggestion that subsequent pregnancy may in fact be associated with an improved survival. However, the available studies are limited by potential biases.

  13. Effects of state-level medicaid policies and patient characteristics on time to breast cancer surgery among medicaid beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Michael T; Schrag, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Medicaid beneficiaries with cancer are less likely to receive timely and high-quality care. This study examined whether differences in state-level Medicaid policies affect delays in time to surgery (TTS) among women diagnosed with breast cancer. Using 2006-2008 Medicaid data, we identified women aged 18-64 enrolled in Medicaid diagnosed with breast cancer. Analyses examined associations of state-specific Medicaid surgery reimbursements, Medicaid eligibility recertification period (annually vs. shorter) and required patient copayment on time from breast cancer diagnosis to receipt of breast surgery. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Separate multivariable regression analyses controlling for patient demographic characteristics and clustering by state were performed for breast conserving surgery (BCS), inpatient mastectomy, and outpatient mastectomy. The study included 7542 Medicaid beneficiaries with breast cancer: 3272 received BCS, 2156 outpatient mastectomy, and 2115 inpatient mastectomy. Higher Medicaid reimbursements for BCS were associated with decreased time from diagnosis to surgery. A 12-month (vs. <12 month) Medicaid eligibility recertification period was associated with decreased TTS for BCS and outpatient mastectomy. Black Medicaid beneficiaries (compared with non-Hispanic White beneficiaries) were more likely to experience delays for all three types of surgery, while Hispanic beneficiaries were more likely to experience delays only for outpatient mastectomy. State-level Medicaid policies and patient characteristics can affect receipt of timely surgery among Medicaid beneficiaries with breast cancer. As delays in surgery can increase morbidity and mortality, changes to state Medicaid policies and health system programs are needed to improve access to care for this vulnerable population. PMID:27422241

  14. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  16. Breast cancer and protein biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gam, Lay-Harn

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

  17. Relationship Between Comorbid Conditions and Utilization Patterns of Immediate Breast Reconstruction Subtypes Post-mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Offodile, Anaeze C; Wenger, Julia; Guo, Lifei

    2016-05-01

    There is limited information on the influence of a patient's comorbid status on the type of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) selected. Our aim was to provide a population-based review of the relationship between baseline comorbid conditions and IBR subtype selected. This is a retrospective cohort study using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to identify IBR recipients. Multivariable regression analyses was performed to identify the association between comorbidity and IBR subtype selection (prosthetic, pedicled, and free autologous). A total of 48,096 mastectomy patients were identified, of which 17,404 patients received IBR. IBR patients were younger (51 ± 10.4 versus 61.5 ± 13.6 years) and had a lower body mass index (27.1 ± 6.4 versus 28.9 ± 7.3) relative to patients who did not pursue IBR (p < 0.001 for all). Overall, IBR patients had a significantly lower incidence of comorbid conditions. In adjusted models, patients aged 45-64 years were more likely to pursue pedicled-autologous reconstruction (OR: 1.43, p < 0.001) and those older than 65 years were less likely to undergo free-autologous reconstruction (OR: 0.64, p = 0.02). Class I and II obesity was associated with pedicled (class I OR: 1.57, class II OR: 1.41) and free transfer (class I OR: 1.81, class II OR: 1.66) autologous IBR utilization (all p < 0.001). Also, smoking was related to increased chance of prosthetic reconstruction while preoperative radiotherapy was linked to free-autologous IBR. IBR patients were noted to be healthier than their non-IBR counterparts, and each IBR subtype was associated with a particular comorbidity profile. This has significant implications with regard to creation of an IBR-predictive model. Such a tool will improve preoperative counseling and decision making. PMID:26843478

  18. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  19. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  1. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  3. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  4. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  6. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  7. The 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Oprea, Gabriela M.; Yu, David S.; Godette, Karen G.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. Methods 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Results Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Conclusions Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation. PMID:25472643

  8. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  9. Paget’s Disease of Nipple in Male Breast with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Periyasamy, Karthikkumaran

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma of the male breast accounts for less than 0.5% of all cases of breast cancer. However, Paget’s disease of nipple in male is extremely rare. We report on a case of Paget’s disease of nipple with breast cancer in a 51-year-old gentleman. He presented with a ulcerative lesion and lump in the left breast beneath the nipple-areolar region with single mobile ipsilateral central group of axillary nodes. Modified radical mastectomy was performed. On follow up, patient was doing well with no recurrence. PMID:27042526

  10. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093