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Sample records for breast cancer mastectomy

  1. Lumpectomy Plus Radiation May Beat Mastectomy for Early Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_156164.html Lumpectomy Plus Radiation May Beat Mastectomy for Early Breast Cancer Study ... the less-extensive surgery called lumpectomy, followed by radiation, rather than a mastectomy, a new study suggests. " ...

  2. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  3. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-06-10

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  4. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  5. Mastectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Breast removal surgery - discharge; Nipple-sparing mastectomy - discharge; Total mastectomy - discharge; Simple mastectomy - discharge; Modified radical mastectomy - discharge; Breast cancer - mastectomy -discharge

  6. [Nursing experience with a schizophrenic breast cancer patient after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Rong; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2014-10-01

    This case study used cognitive therapy to improve the life quality of a 46-year-old woman with chronic schizophrenia who had undergone a mastectomy for breast cancer. This case had suffered from schizophrenia for over 24 years and was hospitalized in the chronic ward of our hospital. Breast cancer was revealed during an annual comprehensive physical checkup. In May 2012, this case received a right mastectomy at a local hospital. After the surgery, she was readmitted to the psychiatric acute ward for further care from May 30th to August 28th, 2012. A holistic nursing assessment was conducted that addressed five major aspects. The major nursing problems found during hospitalization were: acute pain, body image disturbance, and low self-esteem. A decline in pain score from 10 to 4 was achieved by developing rapport with the patient, empathizing with her distress, and providing active care to the wound. Her body image changed because of loosing her breast. Her acceptance of the loss improved through helping her to explore her feelings of change. To improve her self-esteem, we offered cognitive therapy to change her negative thinking process. She became more sanguine and cheerful. Moreover, her dependence in terms of activities of daily living decreased. This individualized intervention contributed to the recovery of a post-mastectomy, schizophrenic patient from low self-esteem. PMID:25271038

  7. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    A mastectomy is surgery to remove a breast or part of a breast. It is usually done to treat ... cancer. Types of breast surgery include Total (simple) mastectomy - removal of breast tissue and nipple Modified radical ...

  8. Tendency to breast reconstruction after breast mastectomy among Iranian women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Homaei Shandiz, Fatemeh; Najaf Najafi, Mona; Abbasi Shaye, Zahra; Salehi, Mahta; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women with the medical history of breast cancer constitute the biggest group of patients who survived cancer. Despite the high rate of mastectomy after breast cancer in Iran; only limited patients elect reconstruction surgery. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of tendency to breast reconstruction (BR) surgery among women with breast cancer who had mastectomy but not undergone reconstruction. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Mashhad, north east of Iran during 2013. A total of 108 patients with mastectomy due to breast cancer were selected through convenience sampling and completed the questionnaire. Demographic data collected and 21 items of questionnaire were compared between patients with and without tendency to BR. Data were analyzed using Chi square, t tests and logistic regression. Results: In this study 62 (57.4%) patients had a tendency to BR and 46 (42.6%) had not. The mean (±SD) age of patients in first group was 43.3±8.03 and 49.6±9.9 in the second group (p<0.001). Frequency of agreement about impact of BR on appearance and beauty, mood, family living conditions and their opinion (p<0.001), lack of sufficient information (p=0.01), physician's opinion (p<0.001) and priority of cancer breast treatment (p=0.02) were significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: More than half of the patients had a tendency to BR although they did not go under the surgery yet. Identification of factors that can increase the tendency and factors that help to change the intention to action are important and should be investigate in future research. PMID:26478882

  9. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    Mastectomy - what to ask your doctor; Breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor; TRAM flap - what to ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about mastectomy and breast reconstruction; Breast cancer - mastectomy - what to ...

  10. [The experience of women after breast cancer mastectomy: objectification theory perspective].

    PubMed

    Fang, Su-Ying; Chiu, Shing-Charn; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2011-08-01

    The female breast is intimately tied to social values that define the ideal body standard for women. As such, women's bodies are regarded as objects to be evaluated and judged. This paper analyzed the experience of women with breast cancer after mastectomy from the perspective of objectification theory. The authors found that not only medical technology but women themselves objectified the female body. The process of patient-physician communication also strengthened the objectification phenomenon for post-mastectomy women. We found that women with breast cancer worried about facing critical evaluation from the public after losing their breasts and needed to cope with the stress of losing a part of their physical self. Social and cultural antecedents that regard breasts as "objects" strongly influence the perspectives of women facing breast cancer. We hope this analysis may assist healthcare professionals to understand how women's bodies are objectified after mastectomy and consider how to care for this population more appropriately. PMID:21809290

  11. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

  12. The Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients with breast cancer are being offered immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of IBR on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Methods We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed), ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase, and Google Scholar databases for studies reporting the overall recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients after mastectomy only and mastectomy with IBR. With these data, we conducted a meta-analysis of the clinical outcomes. Results Fourteen studies, including 3641 cases and 9462 controls, matched our criteria. Relevant information was extracted from these 14 studies. There was no significant heterogeneity (P for Q-statistic > 0.10 and I2 < 25%). Patients who underwent IBR showed no increased risk of overall recurrence of breast cancer (RR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75, 1.04; P = 0.14). Furthermore, patients receiving IBR had similar DFS (RR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.08); P = 0.10) and OS (RR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.05; P = 0.24)) as those of control patients. Conclusion This meta-analysis provides evidence that IBR does not have an adverse effect on prognosis. These data suggest that IBR is an appropriate and safe choice for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26024490

  13. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast…

  14. Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer are removed. This is also called breast conservation therapy or partial mastectomy. Most of your breast ... Medical history that may exclude you from breast conservation (this may include prior breast radiation and certain ...

  15. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with breast cancer: trends, predictors, and areas for future research.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Michaela S; Rosenberg, Shoshana M; Dominici, Laura; Partridge, Ann H

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed increasing rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with unilateral early stage breast cancer. This trend has raised concerns, given the lack of evidence for a survival benefit from CPM and the relatively low risk of contralateral breast cancer for most women in this setting. In this article, we review available data regarding the value of CPM, predictors, and outcomes related to CPM, and areas for future research and potential intervention. PMID:23893127

  16. Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords contralateral breast cancer and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

  17. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  18. The Relationship between Body Esteem and Hope and Mental Health in Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer and its treatment, including mastectomy, can cause feelings of mutilation, depreciation in the value of the body, reduction in attractiveness, and lead to mental disorders and hopelessness. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the relationship between appreciating the body, hope and mental health in women with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive study of 100 breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy and referred to the Sayed Al-Shohada Medical Center in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were selected by convenient sampling. Data gathering tools were the Body Esteem Scale (BES), Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25) mental health questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: Most of the patients had low body esteem. There was a significant direct linear relationship between body esteem and hope and mental health. This relationship was stronger between valuing the body and hope. Conclusion: Body esteem has a significant linear relationship with hope and mental health. PMID:26009674

  19. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the cancer removed (lumpectomy or breast-conserving surgery) might not need reconstruction, but sometimes they do. Breast reconstruction is done by a plastic surgeon. Should I have breast reconstruction? Breast reconstruction ...

  20. Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: 15-year experience.

    PubMed

    Stanec, Zdenko; Žic, Rado; Budi, Srećko; Stanec, Sanda; Milanović, Rudolf; Vlajčić, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Rudman, Franjo; Martić, Krešimir; Held, Rebeka; Božo, Gorjanc

    2014-11-01

    Skin and nipple-areola complex sparing mastectomy (SNSM) and primary reconstruction have been popular for breast cancer treatment in the last decade. An advantage of the SNSM technique is the removal of all breast tissue as a radical surgical procedure while preserving native breast integrity, nipple-areola complex (NAC), and submammary fold. This retrospective 15-year clinical study analyzes medical records from our breast surgery database collected at our department between 1997 and 2012. A total number of 3757 patients were treated for breast cancer; 411 (10.9%) patients had a skin-sparing mastectomy with the median (range) length follow-up of 63 months. This is the longest follow-up for SNSM in breast cancer patients; 3.7% of patients who underwent SNSM developed disease local recurrence, whereas occult NAC involvement with cancer occurred in 7.7% and local recurrence in the NAC in 1.2%. Partial necrosis of the NAC developed in 9.4% and total necrosis in 0.7% of operated breasts. All disease recurrences occurred in the first 10 years of the follow-up period. Local recurrence developed as first recurrence event has longer median cancer-specific survival time of 70 months than those with only distant metastases with 50 months and locoregional plus distant metastases with 35.5 months. The "Omega" pattern incision combines an oncological radical procedure with a lower incidence of skin flap necrosis. Patients reconstructed with autologous tissue were the group most satisfied. SNSM is an oncological safe procedure for breast cancer treatment with low recurrence in properly selected patients. PMID:24378808

  1. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  2. Harmonic Scalpel versus Electrocautery Dissection in Modified Radical Mastectomy for Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinbo; Yu, Yinghua; Wei, Changyuan; Qin, Qinghong; Mo, Qinguo; Yang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the common use of conventional electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, the harmonic scalpel is recently emerging as a dominant surgical instrument for dissection and haemostasis, which is thought to reduce the morbidity, such as seroma and blood loss. But the results of published trials are inconsistent. So we made the meta-analysis to assess the intraoperative and postoperative endpoints among women undergoing modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery. Methods A comprehensive literature search of case-control studies from PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases involving modified radical mastectomy with harmonic scalpel or electrocautery was performed. We carried out a meta-analysis of primary endpoints including postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and secondly endpoints including operative time and wound complications. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the effect size for categorical outcomes and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous outcomes. Results A total of 11 studies with 702 patients were included for this meta-analysis. There was significant difference in total postoperative drainage (SMD: -0.74 [95%CI: -1.31, -0.16]; P< 0.01), seroma development[OR: 0.49 (0.34, 0.70); P < 0.01], intraoperative blood loss(SMD: -1.14 [95%CI: -1.81,-0.47]; P < 0.01) and wound complications [OR: 0.38 (0.24, 0.59); P < 0.01] between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. No difference was found as for operative time between harmonic scalpel dissection and standard electrocautery (SMD: 0.04 [95%CI: -0.41, 0.50]; P = 0.85). Conclusion Compared to standard electrocautery, harmonic scalpel dissection presents significant advantages in decreasing postoperative drainage, seroma development, intraoperative blood loss and wound complications in modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer, without increasing operative time. Harmonic scalpel can be recommended as a preferential surgical instrument in modified radical mastectomy. PMID:26544716

  3. Chemoprevention or mastectomy for women at high risk of developing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sismondi, Piero; D'Alonzo, Marta; Pecchio, Silvia; Bounous, Valentina Elisabetta; Robba, Elisabetta; Biglia, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed invasive cancer among women; in developed countries, BC occurs in one out of eight women during her lifetime. Many factors, both genetic and non-genetic, determine a woman's risk of breast cancer and several mathematical models have been proposed that determine the risk. It is important to identify those at high risk, as there are now effective preventive strategies, such as chemoprevention therapy and risk-reduction surgery. Risk-reduction agents are recommended for women aged 35 years or more who are at high risk of breast cancer. Tamoxifen is presently deemed to be the agent of choice. However, raloxifene may be preferable, at least for some postmenopausal women, because of its lack of effect on the endometrium and the reduced incidence of venous thromboembolic events compared with tamoxifen. Prophylactic surgery has been widely investigated. Bilateral mastectomy decreases the risk of developing breast cancer by approximately 90% in women at moderate or high risk and in known BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. This review summarizes the recent advances in the identification of women at high risk of developing breast cancer and reports on the strategies used to prevent breast cancer; the risk-benefit balance of such preventive choices is also briefly analyzed. PMID:26276104

  4. Trends and Variation in Use of Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Mastectomy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concerns exist regarding breast cancer patients' access to breast reconstruction, which provides important psychosocial benefits. Patients and Methods Using the MarketScan database, a claims-based data set of US patients with employment-based insurance, we identified 20,560 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998 to 2007. We evaluated time trends using the Cochran-Armitage test and correlated reconstruction use with plastic-surgery workforce density and other treatments using multivariable regression. Results Median age of our sample was 51 years. Reconstruction use increased from 46% in 1998 to 63% in 2007 (P < .001), with increased use of implants and decreased use of autologous techniques over time (P < .001). Receipt of bilateral mastectomy also increased: from 3% in 1998 to 18% in 2007 (P < .001). Patients receiving bilateral mastectomy were more likely to receive reconstruction (odds ratio [OR], 2.3; P < .001) and patients receiving radiation were less likely to receive reconstruction (OR, 0.44; P < .001). Rates of reconstruction receipt varied dramatically by geographic region, with associations with plastic surgeon density in each state and county-level income. Autologous techniques were more often used in patients who received both reconstruction and radiation (OR, 1.8; P < .001) and less frequently used in patients with capitated insurance (OR, 0.7; P < .001), patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy (OR, 0.5; P < .001), or patients in the highest income quartile (OR, 0.7; P = .006). Delayed reconstruction was performed in 21% of patients who underwent reconstruction. Conclusion Breast reconstruction has increased over time, but it has wide geographic variability. Receipt of other treatments correlates with the use of and approaches toward reconstruction. Further research and interventions are needed to ensure equitable access to this important component of multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24550418

  5. Nipple-sparing Mastectomy in Breast Cancer: From an Oncologic Safety Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nai-Si; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the oncologic safety of nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for breast cancer patients based on current literature. Data Sources: A comprehensive literature search of Medline, Embase databases was conducted for studies published through March 2014. Study Selection: Our search criteria included English-language studies that focused on NSM at nipple-areola complex (NAC) involvement, patient selection, and recurrence. Prophylaxis NSM, case series or reports that based on very small population were excluded. In the end, 42 studies concerning NSM and oncological safety were included into the review. Results: NSM is a surgical procedure that allows the preservation of the skin and NAC in breast cancer patients or in patients with prophylactic mastectomy. However, the oncologic safety and patient selection criteria associated with NSM are still under debate. The incidence of NAC involvement of breast cancer in recent studies ranges from 9.5% to 24.6%, which can be decreased through careful patient selection. Tumour-nipple distance, tumour size, lymph node involvement and molecular characteristics can be evaluated preoperatively by clinical examinations, imaging studies and biopsies to predict the risk of NAC involvement. Currently, there is no available standard protocol for surgical approaches to NSM or pathological examination of NSM specimens. The local recurrence (ranges from 0% to 24%) of NSM is not significantly higher than that of traditional mastectomy in selected patients based on long-term follow-up. The role of radiotherapy in NSM is still controversial and is not universally accepted. Conclusions: NSM appears to be oncologically safe following careful patient selection and assessment of margins. PMID:26265622

  6. An Eighteen-Gene Classifier Predicts Locoregional Recurrence in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Skye H.; Horng, Chen-Fang; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Huang, Erich S.; Tsou, Mei-Hua; Shi, Li-Sun; Yu, Ben-Long; Chen, Chii-Ming; Huang, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified 34 genes of interest (GOI) in 2006 to aid the oncologists to determine whether post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is indicated for certain patients with breast cancer. At this time, an independent cohort of 135 patients having DNA microarray study available from the primary tumor tissue samples was chosen. Inclusion criteria were 1) mastectomy as the first treatment, 2) pathology stages I-III, 3) any locoregional recurrence (LRR) and 4) no PMRT. After inter-platform data integration of Affymetrix U95 and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays and quantile normalization, in this paper we used 18 of 34 GOI to divide the mastectomy patients into high and low risk groups. The 5-year rate of freedom from LRR in the high-risk group was 30%. In contrast, in the low-risk group it was 99% (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the 18-gene classifier independently predicts rates of LRR regardless of nodal status or cancer subtype. PMID:27077114

  7. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Manning, Aidan T; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-02-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from conservative mastectomy techniques such as NSM, resulting in improved cosmesis and, possibly, a reduced psychological impact. PMID:26855909

  8. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Aidan T.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from conservative mastectomy techniques such as NSM, resulting in improved cosmesis and, possibly, a reduced psychological impact. PMID:26855909

  9. [The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].

    PubMed

    López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain. PMID:25275850

  10. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient's condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  11. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  12. Treatment choices in breast cancer: a comparative analysis of mastectomy patients and radiation patients

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.

    1985-01-01

    This descriptive-exploratory study identified factors that distinguished women on the basis of the treatment they chose for breast cancer. A semi-structured interview and questionnaire was administered to 30 respondents who received mastectomy and 31 who received lumpectomy with radiation. The variables investigated as potential predictors of treatment choice were (1) participation in treatment planning, (2) knowledge of illness and treatment alternatives, (3) health locus of control, (4) sex-role identification, (5) body image, (6) social support and (7) age. As perceptions of the outcome of treatment influence attitudes about treatment choice, five variables relating to perceived treatment consequences were also examined. These were (1) social support, (2) body image, (3) satisfaction with medical care, (4) satisfaction with treatment and (5) general well-being. The major findings in regard to the predictor variables included a profile of the characteristics of each group. The radiation group had more knowledge, participated in planning to a greater extent, investigated treatment options more often and typically made their own decisions about treatment. The mastectomy group was older, attributed locus of control to chance and demonstrated nonsignificant trends toward locus of control in powerful others and toward a feminine sex-role identification; 50% cited Surgeon's Advice as the basis of their choice.

  13. Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Na; Dang, Shao-Nong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Surgical Department of Oncology Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from March to November 2009. A total of 120 breast cancer patients who received Personal Controlled Analgesia (PCA) following surgery (mastectomy) were randomly allocated to two groups, an intervention group and a control group (60 patients in each group). The intervention group accepted music therapy from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third admission to hospital for chemotherapy in addition to the routine nursing care, while the control group received only routine nursing care. Pain scores were measured at baseline and three post-tests using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Short-Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the change in the Pain Rating Index (PRI-total) score from baseline. Music therapy was found to reduce the PRI-total score in the intervention group significantly compared with the control group with a mean difference (95% CI) of -2.38 (-2.80, -1.95), -2.41 (-2.85, -1.96), and -1.87 (-2.33, -1.42) for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd post-tests, respectively. Similar results were found for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scores. The findings of the study provide some evidence that music therapy has both short- and long-term positive effects on alleviating pain in breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy. PMID:21537935

  14. Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status. According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

  15. Five-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing total mastectomy and segmental mastectomy with or without radiation in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Bauer, M.; Margolese, R.; Poisson, R.; Pilch, Y.; Redmond, C.; Fisher, E.; Wolmark, N.; Deutsch, M.; Montague, E.

    1985-03-14

    In 1976 the authors began a randomized trial to evaluate breast conservation by a segmental mastectomy in the treatment of State I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm in size. The operation removes only sufficient tissue to ensure that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. Women were randomly assigned to total mastectomy, segmental mastectomy alone, or segmental mastectomy followed by breast irradiation. All patients had auxillary dissections, and patients with positive nodes received chemotherapy. Life-tables estimates based on data from 1843 women indicated that treatment by segmental mastectomy, with or without breast irradiation, resulted in disease-free, distant-disease-free, and overall survival at five years that was no worse than that after total breast removal. In fact, disease-free survival after segmental mastectomy plus radiation was better than disease-free survival after total mastectomy, and overall survival after segmental mastectomy, with or without radiation, was better than overall survival after total mastectomy. A total of 92.3% of women treated with radiation remained free of breast tumor at five years, as compared with 72.1% of those receiving no radiation. Among patients with positive nodes 97.9% of women treated with radiation and 63.8% of those receiving no radiation remained tumor-free, although both groups received chemotherapy. They conclude that segmental mastectomy, followed by breast irradiation in all patients and adjuvant chemotherapy in women with positive nodes, is appropriate therapy for Stage I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm, provided that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. 23 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Advances in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Faulkner, Brent C; Bill, Timothy J; Lin, Kant Y

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, surgical reconstruction of the breast following mastectomy has become an important aspect of the cancer patient's rehabilitation process. While the surgical emphasis remains on a cure for the cancer, experience with breast reconstruction has not demonstrated any increased rate of cancer recurrence, even when reconstruction is performed immediately following tumor resection. Advances in surgical technique and biotechnology have made post-mastectomy reconstruction possible. The development of silicone gel and saline-filled implants as well as tissue expanders has revolutionized breast reconstruction. The elucidation of musculocutaneous flaps now provides the surgeon with the ability to transfer adequate quantities of vascularized tissue to reconstruct the surgical defects. The advent of microsurgical techniques has provided an additional reconstructive option, with free tissue transfer allowing the plastic surgeon to move musculocutaneous flaps from remote or distant sites to reconstruct the defect. The option of having the reconstruction immediately following the mastectomy procedure is now available to the patient. When reviewing the anatomy of the breast region, the surgeon must consider the mammary gland, its vascular supply, and its lymphatic system. The surgical techniques involved in reconstruction after mastectomy include the use of breast implants and tissue expansion, as well as reconstruction with autogenous tissues. Reconstruction with autogenous tissues includes the use of latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap, transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap, free flap transfer, as well as nipple-areola reconstruction. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy should be undertaken by a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with considerable training and experience with these diversified procedures. PMID:15777171

  17. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rights Act (WHCRA) has required group health plans, insurance companies, and HMOs that offer mastectomy coverage to also ... and health insurance coverage with her doctor and insurance company before choosing to have the surgery. Some insurance ...

  18. Treatment of primary breast cancer without mastectomy. The Los Angeles community experience and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    Between 1977 and 1983, 150 women with primary breast cancer, ranging in age from 26 to 84, were treated with a breast-sparing procedure involving lumpectomy, axillary node dissection, external beam radiotherapy, and 192-iridium implant. Median follow-up to date is 46+ months, with a range of 14 to 96+ months. All surviving patients have been followed for a minimum of 24+ months. Actuarial disease-free survival projected to 8 years is 79% for the entire group, 100% for the five noninfiltrating intraductal cancer patients, 97% for the 71 Stage I patients, and 68% for the 74 Stage II patients. Eighteen of the 150 patients (12%) have developed local recurrences thus far. Five (3%) have developed second, nonbreast, primary tumors. This community-based study, examined together with other published reports of similar procedures and compared to published results following mastectomy, helps confirm lumpectomy-radiotherapy as a legitimate approach to the management of primary breast cancer.

  19. Body image issues after bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction in healthy women at risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gopie, Jessica P; Mureau, Marc A M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Ter Kuile, Moniek M; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B E; Timman, Reinier; Tibben, Aad

    2013-09-01

    The outcome of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction (BPM-IBR) in healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers can be potentially burdensome for body image and the intimate relationship. Therefore, in the current analysis the impact on body image, sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was prospectively investigated in women opting for BPM-IBR as well as cancer distress and general quality of life. Healthy women undergoing BPM-IBR completed questionnaires preoperatively (T0, n = 48), at 6 months (T1, n = 44) and after finishing breast reconstruction (median 21 months, range 12-35) (T2, n = 36). With multi-level regression analyses the course of outcome variables was investigated and a statistically significant change in body image and/or sexual and partner relationship satisfaction was predicted by baseline covariates. Body image significantly decreased at T1. At T2 sexual relationship satisfaction and body image tended to be lower compared to baseline. The overall partner relationship satisfaction did not significantly change. At T2, 37 % of the women reported that their breasts felt unpleasantly, 29 % was not satisfied with their breast appearance and 21 % felt embarrassed for their naked body. Most body image issues remained unchanged in 30 % of the women. A negative body image was predicted by high preoperative cancer distress. BPM-IBR was associated with adverse impact on body image in a substantial subgroup, but satisfaction with the overall sexual and partner relationship did not significantly change in time. The psychosocial impact of BPM-IBR in unaffected women should not be underestimated. Psychological support should ideally be integrated both before and after BPM-IBR. PMID:23224779

  20. Predictors for Reconstruction and Mood Disorder Associated With Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer and Mastectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Chu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Li-Fen; Hsieh, Pi-Ching; Chang, Kun-Chia; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance medical claims to investigate the predictors for operative modes chosen by early-stage breast cancer patients; as well as to assess whether operative modes are associated with risk of mood disorder. We included 36,377 patients with breast cancer who received surgery between 2000 and 2008, and were followed to the end of 2010; they were further classified into 3 groups: mastectomy alone (n = 34,900), along with early reconstruction (n = 1080), and along with delayed reconstruction (n = 397). The results showed that age, insurance premium, urbanization level, and postsurgery chemotherapy and radiotherapy were all significant predictors for the selection of operative modes. Breast cancer patients with mastectomy alone, early reconstruction, and delayed reconstruction showed a cumulative incidence rate of mood disorder of 36.90%, 41.56%, and 33.89%, respectively. The multiple cox proportional model further revealed that early (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-1.21) and delayed (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.96-1.42) reconstruction were associated with a slightly higher but insignificant risk of mood disorder, as compared to the patients received no reconstruction. PMID:26817890

  1. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  2. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery for breast cancer Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Mastectomy Lymph node surgery for breast cancer Radiation therapy ... is delivered. But breast biopsy procedures and even mastectomy and lymph node removal can be done safely ...

  3. Prognostic index score and clinical prediction model of local regional recurrence after mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Skye Hongiun . E-mail: skye@mail.kfcc.org.tw; Horng, C.-F.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; Tsou, M.-H.; Tsai, Stella Y.; Chen, C.-M.; Jian, James J.; Liu, M.-C.; West, Mike; Huang, Andrew T.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical prediction models for local regional recurrence (Lr) of breast carcinoma after mastectomy that will be superior to the conventional measures of tumor size and nodal status. Methods and Materials: Clinical information from 1,010 invasive breast cancer patients who had primary modified radical mastectomy formed the database of the training and testing of clinical prognostic and prediction models of LRR. Cox proportional hazards analysis and Bayesian tree analysis were the core methodologies from which these models were built. To generate a prognostic index model, 15 clinical variables were examined for their impact on LRR. Patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (<4 vs. {>=}4) and local regional status (recurrent vs. control) and then, within strata, randomly split into training and test data sets of equal size. To establish prediction tree models, 255 patients were selected by the criteria of having had LRR (53 patients) or no evidence of LRR without postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (202 patients). Results: With these models, patients can be divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups on the basis of axillary nodal status, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion, and age at diagnosis. In the low-risk group, there is no influence of PMRT on either LRR or survival. For intermediate-risk patients, PMRT improves LR control but not metastases-free or overall survival. For the high-risk patients, however, PMRT improves both LR control and metastasis-free and overall survival. Conclusion: The prognostic score and predictive index are useful methods to estimate the risk of LRR in breast cancer patients after mastectomy and for estimating the potential benefits of PMRT. These models provide additional information criteria for selection of patients for PMRT, compared with the traditional selection criteria of nodal status and tumor size.

  4. Breast reconstruction with autologous tissue following mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, HR; Stergioula, S; Eder, M; Kovacs, L; Biemer, E; Papadopulos, NA

    2006-01-01

    Breast cancer remains to be one of the most malignant diseases in the female population. It affects an essential part of female self-consciousness, and therefore causes a wide range of psychological traumas. The incidence in Europe and North America varies between 70 up to 100 new cases in 100.000 inhabitants per year. According to contemporary literature, mastectomy remains one of the most effective methods in the laborious effort to treat and overcome cancer. In this report the history of breast reconstruction is presented. The established methods which are taken into consideration after mastectomy and their clinical outcome are portrayed. The authors propose the free TRAM and DIEP flap as the methods of first choice after mastectomy, which offer most reliable transfer and low morbidity. In the recent past, increasing interest is observed for the SIEA flap. The free S-GAP flap is proposed for patients who are not candidates for a TRAM, DIEP or SIEA flap. Moreover, the pedicled Latissimus Dorsi flap remains still as a reliable, versatile alternative, particularly in case of contraindications for the above mentioned free flaps or when complications occurred. PMID:22087053

  5. Oncological safety of prophylactic breast surgery: skin-sparing and nipple-sparing versus total mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Maijers, Marike C.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Koppert, Linetta B.

    2015-01-01

    Women with a BRCA1/2 gene mutation and others with a high breast cancer risk may opt for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. To allow for immediate breast reconstruction the skin envelope is left in situ with or without the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Although possibly leading to a more natural aesthetic outcome than the conventional total mastectomy, so-called skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) and nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSM) may leave some breast glandular tissue in situ. The oncological risk associated with remaining breast glandular tissue is unclear. We present a case of primary breast cancer after prophylactic mastectomy followed by a review of the literature on remaining breast glandular tissue after various mastectomy techniques and oncological safety of prophylactic mastectomies. PMID:26645001

  6. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L. Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  7. Clinical investigation: Regional nodal failure patterns in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Woodward, Wendy A.; Katz, Angela; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Perkins, George H.; Jhingran, Anuja; Theriault, Richard; Singletary, Eva; Sahin, Aysegul; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe regional nodal failure patterns in patients who had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection to define subgroups of patients who might benefit from supplemental regional nodal radiation to the axilla or supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 1031 patients treated with mastectomy (including a level I-II axillary dissection) and doxorubicin-based systemic therapy without radiation on five clinical trials at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Patient records, including pathology reports, were retrospectively reviewed. All regional recurrences (with or without distant metastasis) were recorded. Median follow-up was 116 months (range, 6-262 months). Results: Twenty-one patients recurred within the low-mid axilla (10-year actuarial rate 3%). Of these, 16 were isolated regional failures (no chest wall failure). The risk of failure in the low-mid axilla was not significantly higher for patients with increasing numbers of involved nodes, increasing percentage of involved nodes, larger nodal size or gross extranodal extension. Only 3 of 100 patients with <10 nodes examined recurred in the low-mid axilla. Seventy-seven patients had a recurrence in the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex (10-year actuarial rate 8%). Forty-nine were isolated regional recurrences. Significant predictors of failures in this region included {>=}4 involved axillary lymph nodes, >20% involved axillary nodes, and the presence of gross extranodal extension (10-year actuarial rates 15%, 14%, and 19%, respectively, p < 0.0005). The extent of axillary dissection and the size of the largest involved node were not predictive of failure within the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Conclusions: These results suggest that failure in the level I-II axilla is an uncommon occurrence after modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Therefore, supplemental radiotherapy to the dissected axilla is not warranted for most patients. However, patients with {>=}4 involved axillary lymph nodes, >20% involved axillary nodes, or gross extranodal extension are at increased risk of failure in the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex and should receive radiation to undissected regions in addition to the chest wall.

  8. Subcutaneous Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aiping; Wu, Di; Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shifu; Li, Sijie; Xu, Hui; Xie, Huijun; Fan, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Background Without a doubt, nipple-sparing mastectomy affords a better cosmetic result than modified radical mastectomy. However, the surgical safety, radicality, complications, indications, and psychological benefits associated with this method are controversially discussed. Patients and Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of 35 patients (study group) who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy between 2000 and 2008. Indications, incision selection, postoperative complications, recurrence, morbidity rate, and psychological status were recorded and assessed. Results The survival outcome (5.7 vs. 6%; p = 0.35) and complication rate (5.7 vs. 19%; p = 0.062) of patients who underwent subcutaneous nipple-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with prosthesis were similar to those of patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy. Most patients in the study group were completely satisfied with the aesthetic results (immediately, p < 0.001; < 1 year, p < 0.001; > 1 year, p < 0.001), and no serious psychological disorders or stress were detected relative to patients with traditional mastectomy. Conclusion Subcutaneous nipple-sparing mastectomy was beneficial and safe in this cohort of breast cancer patients. The approach is suitable for patients with isolated lesions located ≥ 2 cm from the nipple, as well as for patients with multiple lesions who are anxious about a good cosmetic appearance. PMID:22740800

  9. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  10. Mastectomy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation therapy is as effective as a radical mastectomy. Typically, lumpectomy does not require a breast replacement ( ... is unnecessary. A procedure such as a segmental mastectomy can be performed. In segmental mastectomy, the cancer ...

  11. Cytogenetic Biomonitoring in Buccal Mucosa Cells from Women Submitted to Chemotherapy After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Carolina Flygare; DA Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; Seixas, Camila; DE Oliveira Scudeller, Tania Terezinha; DO Amaral, Maria Teresa Pace; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-04-01

    In addition to surgery, one of the most widely applied treatments for breast cancer is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is currently considered efficient in curing this disease; however, the therapy may induce damage to the patient's genetic material. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate putative cytotoxic and mutagenic effects induced by chemotherapy in women diagnosed with breast cancer. For this purpose, a cross-sectional study was carried out in 42 women, aged 18 to 70 years, allocated according to the diagnosis and stage of breast cancer treatment: control group (healthy) (n=15), chemotherapy group (n=11) and post-chemotherapy group (n=16). Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity were analyzed by the micronucleus test in buccal mucosa cells. A higher frequency (p<0.05) of micronucleated cells was detected in the chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy groups when compared to the control. A higher frequency (p<0.05) of karyorrhexis and pyknosis in the chemotherapy group was also noted. Taken together, our results indicate that chemotherapy induces mutagenicity and cytotoxicity in buccal mucosa cells of women diagnosed with breast cancer, being persistent after finishing their treatment. PMID:27069186

  12. The effects of relaxation on reducing depression, anxiety and stress in women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Fahimeh; Babaee, Sima; Bahrami, Masoud; Valiani, Mahboobeh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies among Iranian women. These patients suffer from a wide range of physical and mental (depression, anxiety and stress) signs and symptoms during the diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Despite the improvement in survival rates due to advances in medical care, different types of psychosocial interventions are still growingly needed considering the increasing number of cancer patients with longer survival times. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of relaxation on depression, anxiety and stress in women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted during about 4.5 months in a referral chemotherapy clinic of a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran. The participants consisted of 48 breast cancer patients who were selected by simple random sampling. They were randomly assigned into two groups of control and case. The control group was treated only by usual medical therapy, whereas the case group was treated by combined medical-relaxation therapy. Data collection tools were the validated Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS42) and a demographic questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS using descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square test and paired t-test.. Findings: The baseline mean scores of depression, anxiety and stress were not significantly different between the case and control groups. However, the scores in the case group improved significantly after the treatment (p < 0.05). On the contrary, such improvement was not seen in the control group. Conclusions: Relaxation therapy can be effective in the improvement of depression, anxiety and stress. Therefore, it can be recommended as an effective care program in patients with malignant disorders. PMID:23493112

  13. Modified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Left Sided Breast Cancer After Radical Mastectomy With Flattening Filter Free Versus Flattened Beams.

    PubMed

    Lai, Youqun; Chen, Yanyan; Wu, Sangang; Shi, Liwan; Fu, Lirong; Ha, Huiming; Lin, Qin

    2016-04-01

    Conventional volumetric modulated arc therapy (C-VMAT) for breast cancer after radical mastectomy had its limitation that resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. We explored whether there was a way to deal with this disadvantage and determined the potential benefit of flattening filter-free (FFF) beams.Twenty patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy were subjected to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and VMAT treatment planning. For VMAT plans, 3 different designs were employed with RapidArc form: conventional-VMAT plan (C-VMAT), modified-VMAT plan (M-VMAT), and modified-VMAT plan using FFF beams (M-VMAT-F). Plan quality and efficiency were assessed for all plans.For each technique in homogeneity, there were no statistically significant differences. VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT in conformity. C-VMAT plans were obviously not only superior to 3DCRT in the medium to high-dose regions (about 15-50 Gy) but also resulted in larger volumes in low-dose regions (about 0-10 Gy). M-VMAT plans were similar to M-VMAT-F. Both of them might significantly reduce the regions of low dose compared with C-VMAT (V5lung: ∼ 11.5%; V5heart: ∼ 23.8%, P < 0.05), even less than 3DCRT in heart irradiation (V2.5heart, 9.4%, P < 0.05). For liver, contralateral breast, and lung irradiation, M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior to M-VMAT with a reduction of ∼0.08, 0.2, and 0.24 Gy in the respective mean doses (P < 0.05).C-VMAT plans showed superiority compared with 3DCRT, while also resulted in larger volumes of normal tissue receiving low doses. M-VMAT and M-VMAT-F plans might not only reduce the region in the medium to high doses but also have lower volumes in low-dose regions. M-VMAT-F plans were slightly superior compared with M-VMAT due to further contralateral organs sparing. PMID:27057896

  14. Long-term results of post-operative radiation therapy following mastectomy with or without chemotherapy in Stage I--III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Minoru; Bornstein, B.A.; Recht, A.; Abner, A.; Silver, B. ); Come, S.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Shulman, L.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Harris, J.R.

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the risk of local-regional failure following post-mastectomy radiotherapy and the incidence of complications associated with such treatment. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results in 309 patients with Stage I--III invasive breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiation therapy between 1975 and 1985. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2.25 Gy fractions. One hundred forty-seven (48%) of the patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 115 (78%) of these receiving a CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regime. The median follow-up time of surviving patients was 130 months (range, 28 to 191 months) after mastectomy. Seventeen patients (6%) developed a local-regional failure at an interval of 4 to 87 months after radiotherapy. Moderate or severe complications related to radiotherapy and requiring treatment were uncommon. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in four patients (1.3%), arm edema in 18 (5.8%), and brachial plexopathy in 2 (0.6%). The authors conclude that post-operative radiotherapy is a safe and effective means of reducing local-regional failure following mastectomy. The efficacy of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in improving survival should be addressed in new large randomized controlled studies. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction and its subsequent complications: a comparison between obese and non-obese women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinhai; Smith, Benjamin D; Giordano, Sharon H; Reece, Gregory P; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2016-06-01

    To compare the utilization pattern of breast reconstruction between obese and non-obese patients and assess the association between obesity and postoperative complications as well as healthcare costs. Using MarketScan databases, we identified 2558 breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy between 2009 and 2012. Temporal trends in breast reconstruction were assessed using the Cochran-Armitage test. Logistic regression models were performed to determine the association between obesity and the occurrence of postoperative complications. Healthcare costs were compared using a generalized linear model. Among 2558 patients treated with mastectomy, the breast reconstruction rate of non-obese patients (76.2 %) was significantly higher than patients in obese class I and class II&III (63.3 and 60.2 %, respectively; P < 0.001). Compared with non-obese patients, obese patients had significantly higher rates of infection (OR 1.53, for obese class I, and OR 1.60, for obese class II&III, both P < 0.01), wound (OR 1.51, P = 0.01 for obese class I, and OR 1.98, P < 0.001 for obese class II&III), and perfusion complications (OR 1.73, P = 0.01 for obese class I, and OR 2.21, P < 0.01 for obese class II&III). The mean postoperative complication cost for non-obese patients ($4684) was significantly lower than those for obese class I patients ($6250) and obese class II&III patients ($7868; P < 0.001). Our analysis demonstrated a significant gap in breast reconstruction between obese and non-obese patients, and our finding underscores the need for careful preoperative assessment of obese patients and call for additional research to minimize the risk of complications. PMID:27178333

  16. The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Edward; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Younus, Jawaid; Elfiki, Tarek; Stitt, Larry; Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael; Tai, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

  17. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  18. [Quality of life of women recovering from breast cancer after being subjected to mastectomies compared with those who had conservative surgery: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Majewski, Juliana Machado; Lopes, Aline Daniela Fernandes; Davoglio, Tárcia; Leite, José Carlos de Carvalho

    2012-03-01

    This study reviews the literature on the quality of life (QoL) of women with breast cancer who have been subjected to mastectomy, compared with those who had conservative surgery. Eight random controlled trials were selected. The studies were compared with respect to the moment quality of life was assessed (whether during or after treatment for breast cancer), the measurement tools of quality of life used, and also the methodology and results achieved. The results of four studies suggest a stronger negative impact in the QoL of mastectomized women; the other four studies showed no difference between the groups in terms of QoL. Objective measurements of quality of life may help identify potentially critical situations of daily life and assist in planning actions to promote health among women who have been subjected to breast cancer surgery. PMID:22450412

  19. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  20. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco; Durofil, Elena; Polesel, Jerry; Roncadin, Mario; Perin, Tiziana; Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica; Quitadamo, Daniela; Massarut, Samuele; Carbone, Antonino; Trovo, Mauro G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

  1. The Assessment of the Magnitude of Frontal Plane Postural Changes in Breast Cancer Patients After Breast-Conserving Therapy or Mastectomy - Follow-up Results 1 Year After the Surgical Procedure.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Iwona; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Hagner, Wojciech; Nowacka, Krystyna; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Polish women. Management of breast cancer includes surgical treatment as well as adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, and combination regimens. One of the adverse consequences of oncological management of breast cancer may involve changes in frontal plane body posture. The objective of the study was to assess the frontal plane body posture changes in women treated for breast cancer. A prospective study including 101 of female breast cancer patients subjected to surgical treatment in the period from October 2011 to October 2012 (mastectomy was performed in 51 cases while breast conserving therapy was administered in the remaining 50 cases). The body posture in the frontal plane was assessed using the computer-assisted postural assessment system with Moiré fringe analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed in pre-operational postural parameters of interest. Exam II revealed highly significant differences in SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Exam III revealed highly significant differences in PIA, SH, SD and SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Undesirable postural changes occur both in women who were treated with radical mastectomy and in those who underwent breast-conserving surgery; breast-conserving surgery is associated with decreased severity in postural abnormalities. PMID:26510430

  2. [A Case of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Treated with Modified Radical Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction Using a Tissue Expander after Endocrine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Tei, Seika; Haraoka, Goichi; Hosoi, Kosuke; Fujii, Naho; Tsujio, Gen; Hiramatsu, Soichiro; Wang, En; Iwauchi, Takehiko; Morimoto, Junya; Nishii, Takafumi; Kosaka, Kinshi; Uchima, Yasutake; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We experienced a case of locally advanced breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander after endocrine therapy. A 64-year-old postmenopausal woman had a 50 mm tumor in her right breast with extensive reddening of the skin. She had axillary lymph node metastasis. Core needle biopsy showed invasive ductal carcinoma with positive hormone receptor (ER+, PgR+) and negative HER2 status. The patient was diagnosed with locally-advanced breast cancer (cT4bN1M0, stage ?B). She was treated with anastrozole at a dose of 1 mg per day. The tumor decreased in size gradually and became operable after 7 months of anastrozole monotherapy. She underwent modified radical mastectomy with immediate reconstruction using a tissue expander. The resected specimen was a 30 mm tumor; adverse effects due to endocrine therapy were of Grade 1a severity. Seven months after adjuvant chemotherapy (FEC?DTX), the tissue expander was removed, and the right breast was reconstructed using an implant. No complications were noted, and the patient was treated with radiation therapy. Ten months have passed since surgery, and no local recurrence or distant metastasis has been noted. PMID:26805181

  3. Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, Tse-Kuan

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

  4. Increase of mastectomy rates after preoperative MRI in women with breast cancer is not influenced by patients age.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Gianni Antonio; Rocco, Nicola; Sabatino, Vincenzo; Rispoli, Corrado; Riccardi, Albina; Falco, Giuseppe; Pezzulo, Carmine; Romano, Federica; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Bruno; Accurso, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for staging women with breast cancer, including screening for occult ipsilateral or contralateral cancer. If breast-conserving surgery is planned, a MRI examination should be performed in all ages women with suspected breast cancer, especially those exhibiting dense or heterogeneously dense breast parenchyma, for which the sensitivity of both ultrasonography and mammography is low. MRI staging causes more extensive breast surgery in a significative proportion of women by identifying additional cancer. If the ability to find additional occult cancer is the true value of MRI, this is not influenced by patients' ages. For this reason, preoperative MRI should be counseled to all women with breast cancer by clinicians, independently from the age, as the age alone does not preclude additional findings. PMID:25159548

  5. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  6. Immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy is as safe as mastectomy alone.

    PubMed

    Vinton, A L; Traverso, L W; Zehring, R D

    1990-10-01

    We evaluated wound complications and potential risk factors after mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction and compared them with similar data after modified radical mastectomy. The incidences of infection, seroma, hematoma, and epidermolysis were compared among 395 patients (305 with modified radical mastectomies and 90 with mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction) from Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Wash, between 1983 and 1989. Obesity, age (60 years or older), smoking, antibiotics, and wound drainage were examined as possible risk factors. There were more wound complications in the modified radical mastectomy group (48% vs 31%), and specifically, more seromas (30% vs 13%). In the modified radical mastectomy group, age of 60 years or older was associated with seroma and infection, drainage greater than 30 mL per day (at time of drain removal) with seroma, and smoking with epidermolysis. In the mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction group, obesity was associated with seroma and epidermolysis. We conclude that mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction appears to be as safe as modified radical mastectomy alone with respect to wound complications. PMID:2222169

  7. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Van Zee, Kimberly J.; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  8. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  9. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Li Yexiong; Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

  10. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Freilich, Jessica; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuong, Michael; Acs, Geza

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

  11. Multi-view stereophotogrammetry for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiangyang; Henseler, Helga; Peng, Matthew Jian-Qiao; Khambay, Balvinder S; Ray, Arup K; Ayoub, Ashraf F

    2016-03-01

    A multi-view three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry system was developed to capture 3D shape of breasts for breast cancer patients. The patients had received immediate unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy by the extended latissimus dorsi flap and without contralateral surgery. In order to capture the whole breast shape including the inframammary fold, the patients were introduced to the imaging room and leaned over the imaging rig to open up the inframammary fold and to expose the entire area of each breast. The imaging system consisted of eight high-resolution ([Formula: see text] pixels) digital cameras and four flash units. The cameras were arranged in four stereo pairs from four different view angles to cover the whole surface of the breasts. The system calibration was carried out ahead of every capture session, and the stereo images were matched to generate four range images to be integrated using an elastic model proposed. A watertight breast mesh model was reconstructed to measure the volume of the breast captured. The accuracy of using the developed multi-view stereophotogrammetry system for breast volume measurement was 11.12cc with SEM 7.74cc, comparing to the measurements of the water displacement method. It was concluded that the 3D stereophotogrammetry image system developed was more reliable than the method of water displacement. PMID:26133282

  12. Findings from NSABP Protocol No. B-04: comparison of radical mastectomy with alternative treatments. II. The clinical and biologic significance of medial-central breast cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Wolmark, N.; Redmond, C.; Deutsch, M.; Fisher, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Findings from 1665 women with primary breast cancer, treated at 34 NSABP institutions in Canada and the United States, have failed to demonstrate that patients with medial-central tumors had a greater probability of developing distant metastases or dying than did those with lateral tumors despite the greater incidence of internal mammary (IM) node involvement when tumors are medial-central in location. A comparison of patients with similar clinical nodal status and tumor location who were treated either by radical mastectomy (RM) or by total mastectomy plus radiation therapy (TM + RT) failed to indicate that radiation of IM nodes reduced the probability of distant treatment failure (TF) or mortality. When findings from patients having equivalent clinical nodal status and tumor location treated by TM alone or TM + RT were compared, it was found that the addition of RT failed to alter the probability of the occurrence of a distant TF or of death. This was despite the fact that in the nonradiated group two putative sources of further tumor spread, i.e., positive axillary and IM nodes, were left unremoved and untreated. The findings provide further insight into the biologic significance of the positive lymph node and confirm our prior contention that positive regional lymph nodes are indicators of a host-tumor relationship which permits the development of metastases and that they are not important investigators of distant disease.

  13. Long-Term Outcomes in Patients With Isolated Supraclavicular Nodal Recurrence After Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Jay P.; Levy, Larry; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcome of patients who developed an isolated locoregional recurrence (LRR) involving the supraclavicular fossa (SCV) after initial treatment with modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records from 140 breast cancer patients treated on five prospective trials with mastectomy and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, with or without radiation, who developed a LRR were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier survival times were calculated using date of LRR as time zero. Results: The median follow-up after LRR was 2.9 years (N = 140; interquartile range, 1.3-6.6 years). In all, 47 of 140 patients (34%) had an SCV component to their LRR. These patients had lower 3-y distant metastasis-free survival (40% vs. 54%, p = 0.003) and overall survival (49% vs. 69%, p = 0.04) than patients without an SCV component. Multivariate analysis revealed that LRR involving an SCV component (hazard ratio, 1.96, p = 0.004) and patients with lymphovascular space invasion in their primary tumors (hazard ratio, 1.65, p = 0.029) were independently associated with a poor distant metastasis-free survival. However, among 23 patients with isolated SCV recurrence, Overall survival was not statistically significantly different between isolated chest wall recurrence and isolated SCV recurrence. Patients with isolated SCV recurrence displayed a median follow-up of 3.3 years (IR, 1.2-5.2). Only 6 LRR of 23 patients were treated with aggressive local therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation (alone or in combination). Conclusions: Although breast cancer recurrence with SCV involvement carries a high risk of distant metastasis and death, among women with recurrence limited to the SCV alone, overall survival after isolated SCV recurrence can be long (25% >5 years).

  14. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  15. [HER2-Positive T1a Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Liver and Brain in a Patient Who Died Four Years and Three Months after Mastectomy--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Ayumi; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Norihito; Hayashi, Mikiko; Park, Sonjin; Iseki, Hideaki; Bei, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    The prognosis of patients with T1a breast cancer is generally good, with a 5-year overall survival rate of 95%. However, HER2 overexpression is a risk factor for recurrence. A 46-year-old woman with left breast cancer underwent a total breast resection. The resected specimen showed invasive ductal carcinoma (T1a, NX, MX, g, ly0, v0, ER [-], PgR [-], HER2 [3+], Ki-67 20%). The patient did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy based on treatment guidelines. Nine months after the mastectomy, multiple liver metastases and severe acute hepatic insufficiency were found. The patient received chemotherapy with trastuzumab and paclitaxel, and a complete response was observed with disappearance of the liver metastases. One year and 11 months after the mastectomy, multiple brain metastases appeared. The patient received whole brain radiation therapy, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and Cyber Knife radiosurgery. However, the brain metastasis could not be controlled, and the patient died 4 years and 3 months after mastectomy. HER2 positive T1a breast cancer should be observed carefully, and treatment with trastuzumab should be considered. PMID:26805170

  16. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice.

  17. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Andrew; Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle; Kuerer, Henry M.; Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul; Strom, Eric A.; Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  18. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine; Labib, Alain; Le Scodan, Romuald

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  19. For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54 months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

  20. Comparative effectiveness study of breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy in the general population: A NCDB analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liling; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Jacobs, Lisa K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed that breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with radiotherapy (RT) led to better survival than mastectomy in some populations. We compared the efficacy of BCS+RT and mastectomy using the National Cancer Database (NCDB, USA). Methods Non-metastatic breast cancers in the NCDB from 2004–2011 were identified. The Kaplan-Meier method, Coxregression and propensity score analysis were used to compare the overall survival (OS) among patients with BCS+RT, mastectomy alone and mastectomy+RT. Results A total of 160,880 patients with a median follow-up of 43.4 months were included. The respective 8-year OS values were 86.5%, 72.3% and 70.4% in the BCS+RT, mastectomy alone and mastectomy+RT group, respectively (P < 0.001). After exclusion of patients with comorbidities, mastectomy (alone or with RT) remained associated with a lower OS in N0 and N1 patients. However, the OS of mastectomy+RT was equivalent to BCS+RT in N2–3 patients. Among patients aged 50 or younger, the OS benefit of BCS+RT over mastectomy alone was statistically significant (HR1.42, 95% CI 1.16–1.74), but not clinically significant (<5%) in N0 patients, whereas in N2–3 patients, the OS of BCS+RT was equivalent to mastectomy+RT (85.2% vs. 84.8%). The results of the propensity analysis were similar. Conclusions BCS+RT resulted in improved OS compared with mastectomy ± RT in N0 and N1 patients. In N2–3 patients, BCS+RT has an OS similar to mastectomy+RT when patients with comorbidities were excluded. Among patients aged 50 or younger, the OS of BCS+RT is equivalent to mastectomy ± RT. PMID:26517676

  1. Skin-Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Breast and Nipple Reconstruction: A New Technique of Nipple Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Raffaele; Miglietta, Anna Maria; Abonante, Sergio; Giordano, Vincent; Buffone, Gianluca; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Most women with breast cancer today can be managed with breast conservation; however, some women still require mastectomy for treatment of their disease. Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction has emerged as a favorable option for many of these patients. The authors combined the SSM technique with the preservation of a small part of the areola with immediate nipple together with with breast reconstruction. Methods. In an 8-year-period 155 female patients (age: 20–52 years old; mean age: 37.5 years) with extensive ductal intraepithelial neoplasia (DIN) or invasive breast cancer were treated with areola skin sparing mastectomy with immediate nipple and breast reconstruction. Patients were followed up prospectively by the breast surgeon, the plastic surgeon, and the oncologist for complications and recurrence. Results. After treatment, only 2 cases (1.29%) had a local recurrence. 8 out of 155 (5.5%) patients developed early complications (infections, seroma, haematoma), and 5 out of 155 patients (3.22%) developed delayed complications (implant rotation, aestethic deterioration) in the post operative time period. The final aesthetic outcome was judged as positive in 150 out of 155 patients (96.78%). Conclusion. In our experience, immediate nipple reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy is a technically feasible procedure which can give excellent cosmetic results. PMID:23346394

  2. Comparison of quality of life, satisfaction with surgery and shoulder-arm morbidity in breast cancer survivors submitted to breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy followed by immediate breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Silva, Renata; Conde, Délio Marques; de Freitas-Júnior, Ruffo; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to compare the prevalence of shoulder-arm morbidity, patient satisfaction with surgery and the quality of life of women submitted to breast-conserving therapy or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional study of women who underwent breast-conserving therapy (n = 44) or modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (n = 26). Quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. RESULTS: No differences were found in the prevalence of lymphedema. The movements that were most commonly affected by these procedures were abduction, flexion and external rotation. When the two groups were compared, however, we only found a statistically significant difference for the prevalence of restricted internal rotation, which occurred in 32% of women in the breast-conserving therapy group and 12% of those in the modified radical mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction group (OR: 7.23; p = 0.03 following adjustment for potential confounding factors). No difference in quality of life or satisfaction with surgery was found between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the type of surgery did not affect the occurrence of lymphedema. Breast-conserving therapy, however, increased the risk of shoulder movement limitation. No differences were found between the two surgical techniques with respect to quality of life or satisfaction with surgery. PMID:20835555

  3. Should Women Younger Than 40 Years of Age With Invasive Breast Cancer Have a Mastectomy?: 15-Year Outcomes in a Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Truong, Pauline T.; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Olson, Robert; Coulombe, Genevieve; Keyes, Mira; Weir, Lorna; Gelmon, Karen; Bernstein, Vanessa; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Optimal local management for young women with early-stage breast cancer remains controversial. This study examined 15-year outcomes among women younger than 40 years treated with breast-conserving surgery plus whole-breast radiation therapy (BCT) compared with those treated with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: Women aged 20 to 39 years with early-stage breast cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2003 were identified in a population-based database. Primary outcomes of breast cancer–specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and secondary outcomes of local relapse–free survival (LRFS), locoregional relapse–free survival (LRRFS), and distant relapse–free survival (DRFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared between BCT and MRM cohorts using log-rank tests. A planned subgroup analysis was performed on patients considered “ideal” for BCT (ie, T1N0, negative margins and no extensive ductal carcinoma in situ) and in whom local therapy may have the largest impact on survival because of low systemic risk. Results: 965 patients were identified; 616 had BCT and 349 had MRM. The median follow-up time was 14.4 years (range, 8.4-23.3 years). Overall, 15-year rates of BCSS (76.0% vs 74.1%, P=.62), OS (74.2% vs 73.0%, P=.75), LRFS (85.4% vs 86.5%, P=.95), LRRFS (82.2% vs 81.6%, P=.61), and DRFS (74.4% vs 71.6%, P=.40) were similar between the BCT and MRM cohorts. In the “ideal” for BCT subgroup, there were 219 BCT and 67 MRM patients with a median follow-up time of 15.5 years. The 15-year BCSS (86.1% vs 82.9%, P=.57), OS (82.6% vs 82.9%, P=.89), LRFS (86.2% vs 84.2%, P=.50), LRRFS (83.1% vs 78.3%, P=.24), and DRFS (84.8% vs 79.1%, P=.17) were similar in the BCT and MRM cohorts. Conclusions: This population-based analysis with long-term follow-up confirmed that women younger than 40 years treated with BCT had similar 15-year outcomes compared with MRM. Young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  4. Improved overall survival after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a history of unilateral breast cancer: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Bernadette A M; Rookus, Matti A; Aalfs, Cora M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Collée, Johanna M; Jansen, Liesbeth; Kets, C Marleen; Keymeulen, Kristien B M I; Koppert, Linetta B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Mooij, Thea M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Vasen, Hans F A; Hooning, Maartje J; Seynaeve, Caroline

    2015-02-01

    Data on survival of BRCA1/2-associated primary breast cancer (PBC) patients who opt for subsequent contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are scarce and inconsistent. We examined the efficacy of CRRM on overall survival in mutation carriers with a history of PBC. From a Dutch multicentre cohort, we selected 583 BRCA-associated PBC patients, being diagnosed between 1980 and 2011. Over time, 242 patients (42%) underwent CRRM and 341 patients (58%) remained under surveillance. Survival analyses were performed using Cox models, with CRRM as a time-dependent covariate. The median follow-up after PBC diagnosis was 11.4 years. In the CRRM group, four patients developed contralateral breast cancer (2%), against 64 patients (19%) in the surveillance group (p < 0.001). The mortality was lower in the CRRM group than in the surveillance group (9.6 and 21.6 per 1000 person-years of observation, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval 0.29-0.82). Survival benefit was especially seen in young PBC patients (<40 years), in patients having a PBC with differentiation grade 1/2 and/or no triple-negative phenotype, and in patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. We conclude that CRRM is associated with improved overall survival in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a history of PBC. Further research is warranted to develop a model based on age at diagnosis and tumour and treatment characteristics that can predict survival benefit for specific subgroups of patients, aiming at further personalized counselling and improved decision making. PMID:24947112

  5. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn’s-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both 5F-IMRT and 2P-VMAT plans exhibited similar PTV coverage (V95%), hotspot areas (V110%) and conformity (all p > 0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p < 0.001). In addition, 5F-IMRT plans provided significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure than 2P-VMAT (all p < 0.05). The 3DCRT-FinF plans with accurately estimated CTV displacement exhibited enhanced target coverage but worse organs at risk (OARs) sparing compared with those plans with underestimated displacements. Our results indicate that 5F-IMRT has dosimetrical advantages compared with the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  7. Conservative treatment versus mastectomy in breast cancer tumors with macroscopic diameter of 20 millimeters or less. The experience of the Institut Gustave-Roussy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, D.; Le, M.; Roueesse, J.; Contesso, G.; Petit, J.Y.; Lacour, J.; Viguier, J.; Hill, C.

    1984-03-01

    A clinical trial was conducted at the Institut Gustave Roussy between October 1972 and December 1980 to compare mastectomy with local excision plus Cobalt-irradiation, in patients with breast cancer tumors of 20 mm in diameter or less at macroscopic examination. Low-axillary dissection and extemporaneous histologic examination were carried out for all patients. If one or more positive nodes were found, complete axillary dissection was performed. The study included 179 patients. No significant difference was detected in either overall or relapse-free survival between the two groups, although the conservatively treated group showed slightly better results. The results of conservative treatment were esthetically satisfactory in 92% of the cases. The trial included a second randomization for the patients with positive axillary nodes to assess the value of nodal area irradiation; 72 patients were studied in this part of the trial. No significant differences were found between the two groups after adjustment for the number of positive axillary nodes, although the no-nodal irradiation group showed better results and less complications than the nodal irradiation group.

  8. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  9. Isolated locoregional recurrence patterns of breast cancer after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies in the contemporary era

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lihua; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Zhen; Shao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the recurrence patterns in a series of patients who presented with isolated locoregional recurrences (ILRRs) after mastectomy and adjuvant systemic therapies in the contemporary era. Methods A total of 235 patients who developed ILRRs between 2005 and 2013 were classified into subgroups based on nodal status, hormone receptor status, and biologic subtype. The annual frequency of recurrences, association between biologic subtype and interval to recurrence (ITR), and anatomical distribution were evaluated. Results For the entire group, recurrence peaked within the first 3 years after mastectomy, and then decreased significantly with time. Node-positive patients were observed to recur early, and a greater proportion recurred within 5 years (86.7% vs. 72.8%, χ2 = 6.83, P = 0.008) than did node-negative subgroup. Overall, the median ITR was 33.2 (range, 4.5 – 236) months. Biologic subtype specific median ITR were 43.3 (7.9 – 236.0) months for luminal A, 42.2 (6.1 – 143.3) months for luminal B, 23.8 (6.9 – 47.3) months for luminal HER2, 18.2 (6.6 – 117.5) months for HER2, and 21.8 (4.5 – 138.2) months for TNBC, and their difference was statistically significant (χ2 = 7.4, P = 0.001). Among all ILRRs, 51.5% (n = 121) were isolated to regional nodes. Conclusions We demonstrates that the time course is consistent with previous description, biologic subtype is associated with ITR, and regional nodes is the most common place for recurrences in this series of patients who developed ILRRs following mastectomy and contemporary adjuvant systemic therapies but without PMRT. PMID:26416456

  10. Dead space closure with quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage for the prevention of seroma after mastectomy for breast cancer (QUISERMAS): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Bonastre, Julia; Brunet-Houdard, Solène; Body, Gilles; Giraudeau, Bruno; Caille, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative wound seroma is common after mastectomy. This complication is associated with significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. The optimal closure approach for seroma prevention remains unknown but some evidence suggests that quilting suture of the dead space could lower the incidence of seroma. The aim of this trial is to compare seroma formation using quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage in patients undergoing mastectomy. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre, superiority, randomised controlled trial in women undergoing mastectomy with or without axillary involvement. Exclusion criteria include indication of bilateral mastectomy or immediate reconstruction and any physical or psychiatric condition that could impair patient's ability to cooperate with postoperative data collection or that do not allow an informed consent. 320 participants will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either quilting suture or conventional wound closure with drain. The primary outcome is seroma requiring either aspiration or surgical intervention within 21 days following mastectomy. Secondary outcomes include seroma regardless of whether or not it requires an intervention, surgical site infection, pain score, cosmetic result, patient's quality of life, costs and cost-effectiveness. The primary analysis will be an intention-to treat analysis performed with a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test). Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by Tours Research ethics committee (CPP TOURS—Region Centre—Ouest 1, 2014-R20, 16 December 2014). Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international breast cancer conferences. Trial registration number NCT02263651. PMID:27044574

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  12. Timing of risk reducing mastectomy in breast cancer patients carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation: retrospective data from the Dutch HEBON study.

    PubMed

    Wevers, M R; Schmidt, M K; Engelhardt, E G; Verhoef, S; Hooning, M J; Kriege, M; Seynaeve, C; Collée, M; van Asperen, C J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Koppert, L B; Witkamp, A J; Rutgers, E J T; Aaronson, N K; Rookus, M A; Ausems, M G E M

    2015-09-01

    It is expected that rapid genetic counseling and testing (RGCT) will lead to increasing numbers of breast cancer (BC) patients knowing their BRCA1/2 carrier status before primary surgery. Considering the potential impact of knowing one's status on uptake and timing of risk-reducing contralateral mastectomy (RRCM), we aimed to evaluate trends over time in RRCM, and differences between carriers identified either before (predictively) or after (diagnostically) diagnosis. We collected data from female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers diagnosed with BC between 1995 and 2009 from four Dutch university hospitals. We compared the timing of genetic testing and RRCM in relation to diagnosis in 1995-2000 versus 2001-2009 for all patients, and predictively and diagnostically tested patients separately. Of 287 patients, 219 (76%) had a diagnostic BRCA1/2 test. In this cohort, the median time from diagnosis to DNA testing decreased from 28 months for those diagnosed between 1995 and 2000 to 14 months for those diagnosed between 2001 and 2009 (p < 0.001). Similarly, over time women in this cohort underwent RRCM sooner after diagnosis (median of 77 vs. 27 months, p = 0.05). Predictively tested women who subsequently developed BC underwent an immediate RRCM significantly more often than women who had a diagnostic test (21/61, 34%, vs. 13/170, 7.6 %, p < 0.001). Knowledge of carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation when diagnosed with BC influenced decisions concerning primary surgery. Additionally, in more recent years, women who had not undergone predictive testing were more likely to undergo diagnostic DNA testing and RRCM sooner after diagnosis. This suggests the need for RGCT to guide treatment decisions. PMID:25700605

  13. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905

  14. Sociodemographic Predictors of Breast Reconstruction Procedure Choice: Analysis of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Tiffany N. S.; Kim, Yeonil; Cohen, Wess A.; Hamill, Jennifer B.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Kim, H. Myra; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To promote patient-centered care, it is important to understand the impact of sociodemographic factors on procedure choice for women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction. In this context, we analyzed the effects of these variables on the reconstructive method chosen. Methods. Women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction were recruited for the prospective Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study. Procedure types were divided into tissue expander-implant/direct-to-implant and abdominally based flap reconstructions. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from logistic regression. Results. The analysis included 2,203 women with current or previous breast cancer and 202 women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. Compared with women <40 years old with current or previous breast cancer, those 40 to 59 were significantly more likely to undergo an abdominally based flap. Women working or attending school full-time were more likely to receive an autologous procedure than those working part-time or volunteering. Women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy who were ≥50 years were more likely to undergo an abdominal flap compared to those <40. Conclusions. Our results indicate that sociodemographic factors affect the reconstructive procedure received. As we move forward into a new era of patient-centered care, providing tailored treatment options to reconstruction patients will likely lead to higher satisfaction and better outcomes for those we serve. PMID:26605082

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States than ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. ...

  16. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  17. Right Breast Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Tissue Expander under Thoracic Paravertebral Blocks in a 12-Week Parturient.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Weyker, Paul David; Cohn, Shara; Wheeler, Amanda; Lee, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Paravertebral blocks are becoming increasingly utilized for breast surgery with studies showing improved postoperative pain control, decreased need for opioids, and less nausea and vomiting. We describe the anesthetic management of an otherwise healthy woman who was 12 weeks pregnant presenting for treatment of her breast cancer. For patients undergoing breast mastectomy and reconstruction with tissue expanders, paravertebral blocks offer an anesthetic alternative when general anesthesia is not desired. PMID:26229692

  18. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  19. Intercostal nerves block for mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Israel K.; Adesina, Michael D.; Olaoye, Iyiade O.

    2006-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is recognized as an alternative to general anesthesia for modern breast cancer surgery. Various techniques of block have been described. Each has its unique problems. Regional anesthesia was chosen for simple mastectomy in two patients with advanced breast malignancy, due to compromised pulmonary status resulting from widespread malignant infiltration of both lungs. We used intercostal nerves block. The block was supplemented with an infraclavicular infiltration to interrupt the branches of the superficial cervical plexus that provide sensation to the upper chest wall and subcutaneous infiltration in the midline to block the nerve supply from the contralateral side. Anesthesia was generally effective and the operations were uneventful. Both patients and surgeons expressed satisfaction. We conclude that where patients have significant comorbidities that make general anesthesia undesirable, the use of intercostal nerves block remains a safe and reliable anesthetic option that allows the patient access to surgery for simple mastectomy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16573313

  20. Hepatic Lesions Detected after Mastectomy, in Breast Cancer Patients with Hepatitis Background May Need to Undergo Liver Biopsy to Rule Out Second Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-nan; Ning, Zhou-yu; Gao, Song; Shen, Ye-hua; Meng, Zhi-qiang; Vargulick, Sonya; Wang, Bi-yun; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Liver metastasis is a common phenomenon in breast cancer patients. Hepatic lesions detected in breast cancer patients may be easily misdiagnosed as metastatic sites, rather than being treated as primary foci. This descriptive study aims to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of second primary hepatocellular carcinoma in breast cancer patients and to infer in which circumstances liver biopsy is needed. Methods Eighty-one consecutive breast cancer patients with hepatic lesions admitted to our department were retrospectively studied and analyzed from January 2009 to March 2014 according to Warren and Gates’ criteria for second primary cancers. Results Second primary hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in sixteen of seventy eight patients with breast cancer. There was a significant difference in HBV status between the second HCC group and liver metastases group (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference in age (P = 0.2254) and family history (P = 0.1160) between second primary HCC and metastases group. Two of these patients had synchronous second primary hepatocellular carcinoma and the remaining fourteen patients had metachronous second primary HCC. All sixteen patients were infected with hepatitis, including hepatitis virus B and C, or resolved HBV infection. Conclusions Breast cancer patients with either HBV infection or resolved HBV infection, regardless of an elevated AFP level, may receive liver biopsy to avoid unnecessary and inappropriate treatments for metastasis. Awareness of second primary HCC in breast cancer patients needs to be emphasized. PMID:26766567

  1. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  2. Impact of rapid genetic counselling and testing on the decision to undergo immediate or delayed prophylactic mastectomy in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients: findings from a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wevers, M R; Aaronson, N K; Verhoef, S; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Kuenen, M A; van der Sanden-Melis, J; Brouwer, T; Hogervorst, F B L; van der Luijt, R B; Valdimarsdottir, H B; van Dalen, T; Theunissen, E B M; van Ooijen, B; de Roos, M A; Borgstein, P J; Vrouenraets, B C; Vriens, E; Bouma, W H; Rijna, H; Vente, J P; Witkamp, A J; Rutgers, E J T; Ausems, M G E M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Female breast cancer patients with a BRCA1/2 mutation have an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer. We investigated the effect of rapid genetic counselling and testing (RGCT) on choice of surgery. Methods: Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients with at least a 10% risk of a BRCA1/2 mutation were randomised to an intervention group (offer of RGCT) or a control group (usual care; ratio 2 : 1). Primary study outcomes were uptake of direct bilateral mastectomy (BLM) and delayed contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Results: Between 2008 and 2010, we recruited 265 women. On the basis of intention-to-treat analyses, no significant group differences were observed in percentage of patients opting for a direct BLM (14.6% for the RGCT group vs 9.2% for the control group; odds ratio (OR) 2.31; confidence interval (CI) 0.92–5.81; P=0.08) or for a delayed CPM (4.5% for the RGCT group vs 5.7% for the control group; OR 0.89; CI 0.27–2.90; P=0.84). Per-protocol analysis indicated that patients who received DNA test results before surgery (59 out of 178 women in the RGCT group) opted for direct BLM significantly more often than patients who received usual care (22% vs 9.2% OR 3.09, CI 1.15–8.31, P=0.03). Interpretation: Although the large majority of patients in the intervention group underwent rapid genetic counselling, only a minority received DNA test results before surgery. This may explain why offering RGCT yielded only marginally significant differences in uptake of BLM. As patients who received DNA test results before surgery were more likely to undergo BLM, we hypothesise that when DNA test results are made routinely available pre-surgery, they will have a more significant role in surgical treatment decisions. PMID:24423928

  3. Perceptions of Prophylactic Mastectomy in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Young; Lee, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasingly, prophylactic mastectomy has been evaluated as a treatment of breast cancer. Hereditary breast cancer now accounts for approximately 5%–10% of all cases of breast cancer, meaning that the widespread implementation of prophylactic mastectomy may significantly reduce the occurrence of breast cancer. However, prophylactic mastectomy is rarely performed in Korea. Therefore, in this study, we assessed Koreans' attitudes toward and awareness of preventive mastectomy. Methods This was a prospective study of a cohort of patients attending outpatient clinics and their relatives. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires assessing sex, age, educational level, knowledge of breast cancer, understanding of prophylactic mastectomy, attitudes toward prophylactic mastectomy, and reasons for choosing prophylactic mastectomy. Results Sixty-five patients were included. Most patients (36.9%) were between 40 and 49 years of age and 58.4% were college graduates. Only six respondents (9%) understood prophylactic mastectomy, and 17 respondents (27%) stated that they would agree to undergo prophylactic mastectomy if necessary. Reasons given for refusing prophylactic mastectomy included aesthetic concerns (38%), the perception that it would not cure the disease (26%), possible surgical complications (24%), and financial cost (6%). Conclusions In this study, most of the respondents showed a poor knowledge of prophylactic mastectomy. Ultimately, it will be necessary to establish medical guidelines for patients with a high risk of breast cancer, with the objective of providing accurate information and proper treatment at hospitals. PMID:26848446

  4. Prophylactic Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Angelos, Peter; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Euhus, David M.; Herrmann, Virginia M.; Katz, Steven J.; Pusic, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has both increased significantly over the last decade. Various risk models have been developed to identify patients at increased risk for breast cancer. Indications for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy in patients without a diagnosis of breast cancer include patients at high risk from BRCA or other genetic susceptibility gene mutations, a very strong family history with no identifiable mutation, and patients with high risk based on breast histology. Additionally, the use of CPM has more than doubled in the last decade, and this increase is noted among all stages of breast cancer, even in patients with ductal carcinoma in-situ (Stage0). The risk of contralateral breast cancer is often over-estimated by both patients and physicians. Nevertheless, specific risk factors are associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer, including BRCA or other genetic mutation, young age at diagnosis, lobular histology, family history, and prior chest wall irradiation. While CPM reduces the incidence of contralateral breast cancer, the effect on disease-free and more importantly overall survival is questionable and is underscored by the fact that the reason most patients choose CPM is ‘peace of mind’. Newer and effective reconstructive options have made the procedure more attractive. This panel addresses the indications and rationale for bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and CPM, the decision-making process by patients, and ethical considerations. Changes in the physician-patient relationship over the past few decades have altered our approach, and ethical considerations are paramount in addressing these issues. PMID:26259752

  5. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... puckering or dimpling An unusual increase in the size of one breast One breast unusually lower than the other Other Organizations American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Network Susan G. Komen for ...

  6. Fifteen-year results of a randomized prospective trial of hyperfractionated chest wall irradiation versus once-daily chest wall irradiation after chemotherapy and mastectomy for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org; Strom, Eric A.; Oswald, Mary Jane; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia; Domain, Delora; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tereffe, Welela; Singletary, S. Eva; Thomas, Eva; Buzdar, Aman U.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the results of a Phase III clinical trial that investigated whether a hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) schedule could reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1989, 200 patients with clinical Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer were enrolled in a prospective study investigating neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 179 patients treated with mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 108 participated in a randomized component of the trial that compared a dose-escalated, hyperfractionated (twice-daily, b.i.d.) chest wall RT schedule (72 Gy in 1.2-Gy b.i.d. fractions) with a once-daily (q.d.) schedule (60 Gy in 2-Gy q.d. fractions). In both arms of the study, the supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex were treated once daily to 50 Gy. The median follow-up period was 15 years. Results: The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence rate was 7% for the q.d. arm and 12% for the b.i.d. arm (p = 0.36). The rates of severe acute toxicity were similar (4% for q.d. vs. 5% for b.i.d.), but moist desquamation developed in 42% of patients in the b.i.d. arm compared with 28% of the patients in the q.d. arm (p = 0.16). The 15-year actuarial rate of severe late RT complications did not differ between the two arms (6% for q.d. vs. 11% for b.i.d., p = 0.54). Conclusion: Although the sample size of this study was small, we found no evidence that this hyperfractionation schedule of postmastectomy RT offered a clinical advantage. Therefore, we have concluded that it should not be further studied in this cohort of patients.

  7. More American Women Opting for Mastectomy, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_157390.html More American Women Opting for Mastectomy, Study Finds Rate went up 36 percent between ... More women in the United States are undergoing mastectomies, even though the overall rate of breast cancer ...

  8. Extreme oncoplasty: breast conservation for patients who need mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

  9. Psychological effects of breast conserving therapy in comparison with radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelink, H.; van Dam, F.; van Dongen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Psychosocial sequelae of breast conserving therapy (BCT) and radical mastectomy (RM) have been compared. Also, in the BCT group, the cosmetic results were judged by the patients themselves and two plastic surgeons. Body image in the BCT group (n = 114) was significantly more positive than in the RM group (n = 58). Patients treated with BCT had even less fear of recurrence of the cancer and would, if necessary, choose the same treatment again. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 75% of the cases as judged by the two plastic surgeons. Most of the patients with a bad grading by the surgeons were happy with the results.

  10. Sexuality After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment Emotional aspects of breast cancer Body image after breast cancer treatment Sexuality after breast cancer ... treatment for breast cancer stops working Previous Topic Body image after breast cancer treatment Next Topic Pregnancy after ...

  11. Radiation therapy of early carcinoma of the breast without mastectomy. [Linear acceleraor and iridium implants

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, S.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.

    1980-08-15

    The results of the treatment of 176 patients with early breast cancer, using radiation therapy without mastectomy are reported. The likelihood of local recurrence was 5% for Stage I patients and 7% for Stage II patients. Local control was significantly greater in those patients receiving an iridium implant. The cumulative survival probability at five years is 96% for Stage I and 68% for Stage II. Gross tumor resection with careful reapproximation of the breast tissue and well-placed incisions facilitates the radiation therapy. Homogeneous external beam radiation to the breast and draining lymph nodes (4500 to 5000 rads) and supplemental local radiation to the sites of the primary lesion (in this series using interstitial implantation) are recommended. The frequency of normal tissue complications was low.

  12. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  13. Salvage mastectomy after failed breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, L. C.; Brunt, A. M.; Phillips, R. H.; Ellis, H.

    1991-01-01

    The indications, technique and complications of salvage mastectomy in 25 patients with local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy for carcinoma of the breast have been reviewed. Two patients required myocutaneous flaps to repair the defect, and six patients (24%) suffered wound infection or breakdown. Subsequent local relapse occurred in a total of five patients, two of whom died with uncontrolled chest wall skin nodules. PMID:2018316

  14. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... that obese women produce more estrogen. This may fuel the development of breast cancer. Radiation . If you ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ...

  15. [Mastectomy without wound draining in case of mammary gland cancer].

    PubMed

    Salatov, R N; Vashchenko, L N; Kuchkina, L P; Shatova, Iu S; Lisutin, A É; Kechedzhieva, É É; Semiletkin, O M

    2014-01-01

    It was performed the retrospective analysis of radical mastectomy results in 6994 patients with verified mammary gland cancer. The first group included 3957 patients after developed wound closure during radical mastectomy. It was used improved method of wound suturing in 2037 patients of the second group. The control group included 1000 patients after radical mastectomy for Madden with installation of drainage system. It was concluded that wound suturing without drainage system installation significantly decreases the frequency and severity of lymphorrhea, length of hospital stay. It is not necessary to use expensive materials such as polymers, adhesives, gels and optional equipment in case of wound suturing without drainage system installation. Initial technique improvement provided more pronounced positive results such as significantly decreasing of frequency, severity and duration of lymphorrhea, reduction of hospital stay length. PMID:25327744

  16. Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Kubicky, Charlotte; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

  17. Individual and Marital Adjustment in Spouse Pairs Subsequent to Mastectomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ross E.; Carter, Charlene A.

    1993-01-01

    Explored effects of mastectomy for breast cancer on individual and marital adjustment among 20 spouse pairs in which wife had single mastectomy. Results indicated that both husbands and wives had adapted to mastectomy and were functioning well as individuals. Measures of marital adjustment, however, indicated serious problems with extremes of…

  18. Total Skin Sparing (Nipple Sparing) Mastectomy: What is the Evidence?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amar; Borgen, Patrick Ivan

    2010-07-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved from radical mastectomy with routine removal of the nipple-areolar complex (NAC) to breast conservative therapy with preservation of the breast and NAC. Each step along this evolutionary process was met with criticism, skepticism, controversy, anger, emotion, and often bitter and impassioned debate. Today we find ourselves at yet another therapeutic decision point: the management of the skin of the nipple-areolar complex in mastectomy. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of breast cancer coupled with rising interest in improved cosmesis has led to the investigation of the skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy as potential modifications to conventional mastectomy. PMID:20620927

  19. Temporal Trends in Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy and Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frasier, Lane L.; Holden, Sara; Holden, Timothy; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Leverson, Glen; Anderson, Bethany; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Evolving data on the effectiveness of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) have led to changes in NCCN recommendations, counseling providers to “strongly consider” PMRT for breast cancer patients with tumors ≤5cm and 1-3 positive nodes; however, anticipated PMRT may lead to delay or omission of reconstruction which can have cosmetic, quality of life, and complication implications for patients. Objective To determine whether revised guidelines have increased PMRT and impacted receipt of breast reconstruction. We hypothesized that: 1) PMRT would increase for women affected by the revised guidelines while remaining stable in other cohorts, and 2) that these women would have decreased receipt of breast reconstruction while reconstruction increased in other groups. Design A retrospective, population-based cohort study Setting Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data from 2000 – 2011. Participants Women with stage I-III breast cancer undergoing mastectomy were identified. Our analytic sample (n=62,442) was divided into cohorts based on current NCCN radiation recommendations: “Radiation Recommended” (tumors >5 cm or ≥4 positive lymph nodes), “Strongly Consider Radiation” (tumor ≤5cm, 1-3 positive nodes), and “Radiation Not Recommended” (tumors ≤5cm, no positive nodes). Main Outcome Measure(s) We used joinpoint regression analysis to evaluate temporal trends in our outcomes of interest: receipt of PMRT and receipt of breast reconstruction. Results Rates of PMRT were unchanged in the “Radiation Recommended” and “Radiation Not Recommended” cohorts over the study period. In contrast, receipt of PMRT for the “Strongly Consider Radiation” cohort was unchanged until 2007, then significantly increased (APC 9.0%, p=0.013). Breast reconstruction increased across all cohorts. Despite increasing receipt of PMRT, the “Strongly Consider Radiation” cohort maintained a consistent increase in reconstruction (APC 7.5%) throughout the study period. This is similar to the increase in reconstruction observed for the “Radiation Recommended” (10.7%) and “Radiation Not Recommended (8.4%) cohorts. Conclusions and Relevance NCCN guideline changes have increased PMRT receipt for patients with tumors ≤5cm and 1-3 positive nodes without an associated decrease in receipt of reconstruction. This may represent increasing provider comfort with the prospect of irradiating a new breast reconstruction, and may have significant cosmetic and quality of life implications for patients. PMID:26539936

  20. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  1. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-02-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  2. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction in patients with macromastia using the Passot breast reduction pattern.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Brian; Thornton, Brian P

    2014-01-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate tissue expander reconstruction poses a challenge in the patient with macromastia or excessive ptosis. Skin reduction via the Wise pattern has been described but is associated with high rates of skin necrosis. The study group consisted of 43 women with grade 2 or 3 ptosis who underwent SSM and immediate reconstruction with tissue expanders, using the Passot (horizontal) skin reduction pattern. Age ranged from 31 to 67 years (mean, 51 years). The endpoints measured were time to final expansion, mastectomy skin flap necrosis, infectious complications, and total complications. Thirty reconstructions were bilateral and 13 were unilateral (73 breasts total). Follow-up ranged from 6 to 55 months (mean, 20). Common comorbid conditions included hypertension (n = 16), obesity (n = 22), and smoking (n = 9). The mean body mass index was 30.6 (range, 19.4-58.6). Twenty-one patients underwent chemotherapy; 12 received radiation. The mean initial fill was 196 mL (range, 0-420 mL), and the mean time to final expansion was 84 days (range, 28-225 days). Five patients did not complete the reconstruction, 2 because of cancer recurrence and 3 because of infection. There were 3 cases of mastectomy flap necrosis occurring after tissue expander placement (7%). There were 7 infectious complications (16%). The use of a horizontal breast reduction pattern at the time of expander placement produces consistently good esthetic outcomes and a low rate of skin necrosis, and it should be considered as an option in patients with macromastia or ptosis undergoing SSM and immediate reconstruction. PMID:24835873

  3. [Breast cancer update].

    PubMed

    Armuss, A

    2014-06-01

    Breast Cancer, with a life-time prevalence of about 10-12%, is the most common cancer in women. In 2013, the actress Angelina Jolie, by announcing she had a double mastectomy, increased the awareness of a family history of breast and ovarian cancer and the treatment available to reduce the inherited risks. In Germany, each year about 25 out of 100,000 women (age-standardized according to European Standard) die of the disease. The number of newly diagnosed cases is about 72,000 per year. In comparison, many other countries record higher levels. Investing in the development of new therapies has therefore been key for many years. Prevention programs, such as the mammography screening are publicly touted, in both cases with the aim to reduce breast cancer mortality. To accurately assess the risk in underwriting, it is important to know about the risk factors for the development of breast cancer, as well as the latest advances in prevention, therapy and their prognostic classification. The following article provides an overview. PMID:25000626

  4. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer ... common types of breast cancer surgery. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) This type of surgery removes only a ...

  5. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index tumours supporting the importance of contralateral breast cancer screening at the time of primary diagnosis and during follow-up. BBC occurs more frequently in old age group and majority of these tumours are estrogen dependent. There is good pathological concordance between the index tumour and the contralateral breast cancer. PMID:26500995

  6. Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?

    SciTech Connect

    Coulombe, Genevieve; Tyldesley, Scott . E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca; Speers, Caroline B.A.; Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Bernstein, Vanessa; Truong, Pauline T.; Keyes, Mira; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  7. What are patients' goals and concerns about breast reconstruction after mastectomy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Clara N; Hultman, Charles Scott; Sepucha, Karen

    2010-05-01

    Discussions about breast reconstruction should include factual information and consideration of the patient's personal concerns. Providers are familiar with the relevant facts but may not know which personal concerns are important to patients. Experience with breast cancer patients has found that providers frequently do not know their patients' treatment preferences. To help reconstructive surgeons discuss personal preferences with their patients, we sought to identify women's key concerns related to breast reconstruction. We employed a qualitative design and convened a sample of 65 women in 7 focus groups and 15 semi-structured interviews. Women with a recent history of early-stage breast cancer who had a mastectomy with or without reconstruction were included. A variety of backgrounds, including underserved populations, low education levels, and various ages were represented. Qualitative content analysis was performed, and key themes were identified. Five key themes emerged. (1) Magnitude of surgery and recovery. Many women reported that concerns over the number of operations, duration of recovery, and risk of complications strongly affected their decision-making. (2) Using one's own tissue. Several women felt comforted by the notion of using their own tissue for reconstruction. (3) Looking natural in clothing. Many women pointed out the difference between how they look in clothing versus how they look naked. (4) Avoiding an external prosthesis. Several women stressed practical concerns and framed the reconstruction decision in terms of not having to use prosthesis. (5) Considering others' opinions. A few women reported that their partners' opinion strongly influenced their decision. Many women stated that they ultimately followed their doctor's recommendation. Women considering reconstruction have some unmet emotional and physical needs as well as important goals and concerns that can affect their decisions about and experience with reconstruction. In particular, some breast cancer patients are unprepared for the full effect of surgery on their lives and for the recovery process. Discussions about reconstruction would benefit from inclusion of these key concerns. PMID:20354433

  8. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  9. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  10. Defining the Relationship between Patient Decisions to Undergo Breast Reconstruction and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Kraft, Casey T.; Kozlow, Jeffrey H.; Sabel, Michael S.; Chung, Kevin C.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies suggest that the decision to undergo breast reconstruction and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) are closely related. Here we describe the relationship between method of reconstruction and decision to undergo CPM. We also evaluate recent trends in CPM use in the context of literature questioning its oncologic benefit. STUDY DESIGN Female patients with unilateral breast cancer were identified and data extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database from 2000 through 2010. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study the relationship between having CPM and key demographic, oncologic and reconstructive factors among women with unilateral breast cancer. RESULTS A total of 157,042 patients with unilateral breast cancer were included. CPM rate increased from 7.7% to 28.3% during the study period, and the proportion of reconstructed patients who underwent CPM increased from 19% to 46%. Reconstruction was associated with higher odds of CPM (odds ratio (OR) 2.79, 95% CI 2.70-2.88, p<0.0001) after controlling for oncologic and demographic factors. Among women who had reconstruction, implant-based reconstruction was associated with significantly higher odds of CPM than autologous tissue reconstruction (OR 1.38, p<0.0001). Over the study period Implant reconstruction rates increased from 28.2% to 43.5% while autologous reconstruction rates decreased from 32.2% to 27.3% in CPM patients. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of CPM continues to increase in spite of literature questioning its oncologic benefit. Our study confirms that reconstruction and the decision to undergo CPM are closely related, with implant reconstruction dominating in patients who undergo CPM. Given the relationship between reconstruction and the choice for CPM, plastic surgeons should play an active role in educating patients to avoid decisions made based on inaccurate information. PMID:25719688

  11. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  12. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  14. Current controversies in breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Critchley, A C; Thompson, A M; Chan, H Y; Reed, M W

    2013-02-01

    Contemporary management of the axilla in breast cancer surgery remains in evolution. Axillary lymph node status in breast cancer is a major prognostic factor and remains integral to guiding adjuvant treatment decisions. There remains controversy regarding the management of the node-positive axilla in clinically node-negative primary breast cancer. Trials to date have suggested re-evaluation of the historical therapeutic strategy that a positive sentinel node requires axillary node dissection. However, further evidence is required before modern clinical management of the axilla should be altered. As patient awareness and technical expertise grow, national rates of breast reconstruction after mastectomy continue to rise. Oncoplastic techniques continue to evolve and many patients are suitable for a plethora of reconstructive options. Despite the widespread practice of breast reconstruction globally, there is limited randomised evidence comparing the optimal type and/or timing of breast reconstruction on which to base practice. Breast reconstruction type is either purely autologous, implant-based or a combination of these two techniques. We explore the benefits and limitations of these techniques and some of the key findings of the National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit. The timing of reconstruction after mastectomy is either immediate (a single procedure) or delayed (for an indefinite period after mastectomy). The ideal reconstruction is one that is best aligned to the patient's expectations, as this will achieve the highest levels of long-term patient satisfaction. Selecting the optimal type of breast reconstruction at the right time for the right patient remains the key challenge in breast reconstruction. PMID:23183307

  15. The effect of post-mastectomy radiation therapy on breast implants: Unveiling biomaterial alterations with potential implications on capsular contracture.

    PubMed

    Ribuffo, Diego; Lo Torto, Federico; Giannitelli, Sara M; Urbini, Marco; Tortora, Luca; Mozetic, Pamela; Trombetta, Marcella; Basoli, Francesco; Licoccia, Silvia; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Cassese, Raffaele; Scuderi, Nicol; Rainer, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction with expanders and implants is recognized as an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Its main complication is represented by capsular contracture, which leads to poor expansion, breast deformation, and pain, often requiring additional surgery. In such a scenario, the debate continues as to whether the second stage of breast reconstruction should be performed before or after post-mastectomy radiation therapy, in light of potential alterations induced by irradiation to silicone biomaterial. This work provides a novel, multi-technique approach to unveil the role of radiotherapy in biomaterial alterations, with potential involvement in capsular contracture. Following irradiation, implant shells underwent mechanical, chemical, and microstructural evaluation by means of tensile testing, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (ATR/FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), high resolution stylus profilometry, and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Our findings are consistent with radiation-induced modifications of silicone that, although not detectable at the microscale, can be evidenced by more sophisticated nanoscale surface analyses. In light of these results, biomaterial irradiation cannot be ruled out as one of the possible co-factors underlying capsular contracture. PMID:26354273

  16. Trends and clinical implications of preoperative breast MRI in Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Killelea, Brigid K.; Long, Jessica B.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Ma, Xiaomei; Soulos, Pamela R.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While there has been increasing interest in the use of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for women with breast cancer, little is known about trends in MRI use, or the association of MRI with surgical approach among older women. Methods Using the SEER–Medicare database, we identified a cohort of women diagnosed with breast cancer from 2000-2009 who underwent surgery. We used Medicare claims to identify preoperative breast MRI and surgical approach. We evaluated temporal trends in MRI use according to age and type of surgery, and identified factors associated with MRI. We assessed the association between MRI and surgical approach: breast conserving surgery (BCS) vs. mastectomy, bilateral vs. unilateral mastectomy, and use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Results Among the 72,461 women in our cohort, 10.1% underwent breast MRI. Preoperative MRI use increased from 0.8% in 2000-2001 to 25.2% in 2008-2009 (p<.001). Overall, 43.3% received mastectomy and 56.7% received BCS. After adjustment for clinical and demographic factors, MRI was associated with an increased likelihood of having a mastectomy compared to BCS (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.21, 95% CI: 1.14-1.28). Among women who underwent mastectomy, MRI was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of having bilateral cancer diagnosed (9.7%) and undergoing bilateral mastectomy (12.5%) compared to women without MRI (3.7% and 4.1% respectively, p <.001 for both). Conclusion The use of preoperative breast MRI has increased substantially among older women with breast cancer and is associated with an increased likelihood of being diagnosed with bilateral cancer, and more invasive surgery. PMID:23942872

  17. Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A; Krieger, Y; Shoham, Y; Silberstein, E

    2013-01-01

    Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5 kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting. PMID:24381779

  18. Utilization of Inferiorly Based Dermofat Flap in Breast Reconstruction after Simple Mastectomy due to Gigantomastia

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov-Berezovsky, A.; Krieger, Y.; Shoham, Y.; Silberstein, E.

    2013-01-01

    Gigantomastia (GM) is a rare disabling condition characterized by excessive breast tissue growth. To date, there is no universal classification and definition of GM. At present, GM is determined as weight over 1.5 kg per breast (Dancey et al., 2008) or 3% or more of the patient's total body weight (Dafydd et al., 2011). The lack of generally acknowledged approach regarding GM is expressed by the different methods of its treatment ranging from hormonal prescription to mastectomy and subsequent complex breast reconstruction (Shoma et al., 2011). We describe a treatment approach, including simple mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction by an inferiorly based dermofat flap with silicone implants and nipple grafting. PMID:24381779

  19. The Management of Breast Cancer Detected by Reduction Mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Grant W

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of occult breast cancer detected by reduction mammoplasty is 0.06% to 5.45%. Preoperative screening mammography is indicated in all women 40 years and older and in women age 35 with a positive family or personal history of breast cancer before reduction mammoplasty. Breast MRI is considered in women with dense breasts and those with hereditary breast cancer syndromes. Management of occult breast cancer is impacted by specimens being typically removed in pieces and not oriented before submission to pathology. Total mastectomy is the most common treatment because of the uncertainties regarding margin status and disease extent. PMID:27012792

  20. Assessment of Pathological Response of Breast Carcinoma in Modified Radical Mastectomy Specimens after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Dhanya; Jayalakshmy, P. S.; Kumar, Suresh; Mathew, Siji

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Paclitaxel based neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen (NAT) in the setting of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) can render inoperable tumor (T4, N2/N3) resectable. The aim of this study was to assess the status of carcinoma in the breast and lymph nodes after paclitaxel based NAT in order to find out the patient and the tumor characteristics that correspond to the pathological responses which could be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the treatment response. Materials and Methods. Clinical and tumor characteristics of patients with breast carcinoma (n = 48) were assessed preoperatively. These patients were subjected to modified radical mastectomy after 3 courses of paclitaxel based NAT regimen. The pathological responses of the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes were studied by using Chevallier's system which graded the responses into pathological complete response (pCR), pathological partial response (pPR), and pathological no response (pNR). Results. Our studies showed a pCR of 27.1% and a pPR of 70.9% . Clinically small sized tumors (2–5 cms) and Bloom Richardson's grade 1 tumors showed a pCR. Mean age at presentation was 50.58 yrs. 79.2% of cases were invasive ductal carcinoma NOS; only 2.1% were invasive lobular carcinoma, their response to NAT being the same. There was no downgrading of the tumor grades after NAT. Ductal carcinoma in situ and lymphovascular invasion were found to be resistant to chemotherapy. The histopathological changes noted in the lymph nodes were similar to that found in the tumor bed. Discussion and Conclusion. From our study we conclude that histopathological examination of the tumor bed is the gold standard for assessing the chemotherapeutic tumor response. As previous studies have shown pCR can be used as a surrogate biomarker to assess the tumor response. PMID:26697228

  1. Attitudes to contralateral risk reducing mastectomy among breast and plastic surgeons in England.

    PubMed

    Basu, N N; Littlechild, S; Barr, L; Ross, G L; Evans, D G

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Rates of contralateral risk reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are rising despite a paucity of data to support this practice. Surgeons work as part of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). They may counsel women on these requests without the benefit of established guidelines or agreed protocol. This study assessed the practices and perceptions of breast and plastic surgeons in England on CRRM. Methods A postal questionnaire was sent to 455 breast and 364 plastic surgeons practising in England. Basic demographics, trends in CRRM, risk assessment, role of the MDT and knowledge base were assessed. Results The response rate among breast surgeons was 48.3% (220/455) and 12.6% (46/364) among plastic surgeons. Nearly half (44%) of the respondents felt there had been an increase in rates of CRRM over the last three years. Seventy-one per cent of those surveyed performed 1-5 CRRMs annually while sixteen per cent did not perform this procedure at all. A third (32%) of respondents correctly quoted their patients an annual risk of 0.5-0.7%. Funding was refused in 4% of cases and 43% of the surgeons felt that in the future they would have to apply to relevant clinical commissioning groups. Over half (58%) of all respondents reported that decisions for CRRM are always discussed in the MDT meeting but 6% stated that these cases are never discussed by the MDT. BRCA mutation was perceived as the main risk factor for contralateral breast cancer by 81% of respondents. Surgeons felt that women requested CRRM mainly to alleviate anxiety. The next most common reasons were carriage of BRCA mutation and a desire to have reconstructions match. Conclusions A wide variation of surgical practices and perceptions exist in assessing women for CRRM. Guidelines to standardise practices are required. PMID:26741657

  2. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly. PMID:26229606

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  4. Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  5. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  6. Oncologic safety of conservative mastectomy in the therapeutic setting.

    PubMed

    Benson, John R; Dumitru, Dorin; Malata, Charles M

    2016-02-01

    Conservative mastectomy is a form of nipple-sparing mastectomy which is emerging as a surgical option for selected breast cancer patients. This technique differs from subcutaneous mastectomy which is well established as a technique for risk reduction but leaves behind a finite remnant of retro-areolar breast tissue. Clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy and safety of breast conservation therapy for smaller localised breast tumors whereby a variable amount of surrounding normal tissue is excised with administration of breast radiotherapy post-operatively. Conservative mastectomy aims to remove all breast tissue with dissection continued into the core of the nipple. However, the indication for conservative mastectomy remains to be defined but generally includes tumors of modest size located at least 2 cm away from the nipple. Patients undergoing conservative mastectomy do not necessarily receive adjuvant radiotherapy and this may only be intra-operative irradiation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Preservation of the NAC as part of a skin-sparing mastectomy in patients who might otherwise require standard mastectomy is of unproven safety from an oncologic perspective but is associated with enhanced cosmetic outcomes and quality-of-life. The advent of conservative mastectomy has coincided with a trend for "maximal surgery" with bilateral extirpation of all breast tissue in conjunction with immediate breast reconstruction. It is essential there is no compromise of local recurrence and survival in terms of ipsilateral breast cancer treatment. Further studies are required to clarify the indications for conservative mastectomy and confirm oncologic equivalence to either wide local excision and breast irradiation or conventional/skin-sparing mastectomy with sacrifice of the nipple areola complex. PMID:26855907

  7. Oncologic safety of conservative mastectomy in the therapeutic setting

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Dorin; Malata, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy is a form of nipple-sparing mastectomy which is emerging as a surgical option for selected breast cancer patients. This technique differs from subcutaneous mastectomy which is well established as a technique for risk reduction but leaves behind a finite remnant of retro-areolar breast tissue. Clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy and safety of breast conservation therapy for smaller localised breast tumors whereby a variable amount of surrounding normal tissue is excised with administration of breast radiotherapy post-operatively. Conservative mastectomy aims to remove all breast tissue with dissection continued into the core of the nipple. However, the indication for conservative mastectomy remains to be defined but generally includes tumors of modest size located at least 2 cm away from the nipple. Patients undergoing conservative mastectomy do not necessarily receive adjuvant radiotherapy and this may only be intra-operative irradiation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC). Preservation of the NAC as part of a skin-sparing mastectomy in patients who might otherwise require standard mastectomy is of unproven safety from an oncologic perspective but is associated with enhanced cosmetic outcomes and quality-of-life. The advent of conservative mastectomy has coincided with a trend for “maximal surgery” with bilateral extirpation of all breast tissue in conjunction with immediate breast reconstruction. It is essential there is no compromise of local recurrence and survival in terms of ipsilateral breast cancer treatment. Further studies are required to clarify the indications for conservative mastectomy and confirm oncologic equivalence to either wide local excision and breast irradiation or conventional/skin-sparing mastectomy with sacrifice of the nipple areola complex. PMID:26855907

  8. Dosimetric comparison of conventional and forward-planned intensity-modulated techniques for comprehensive locoregional irradiation of post-mastectomy left breast cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cavey, Matthew L. . E-mail: mlcavey@utmb.edu; Bayouth, John E.; Endres, Eugene J.; Pena, John M.; Colman, Martin; Hatch, Sandra

    2005-06-30

    Three recently published randomized trials have shown a survival benefit to postoperative radiation therapy when the internal mammary chain (IMC), supraclavicular (SCV), and axillary lymphatics are treated. When treating the IMC, techniques that minimize dose to the heart and lungs may be utilized to prevent excess morbidity and mortality and achieve the survival benefit reported. The purpose of this study was to dosimetrically compare forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (fIMRT) with conventional techniques for comprehensive irradiation of the chest wall and regional lymphatics. For irradiation of the chest wall and IMC, 3 treatment plans, (1) fIMRT, (2) partially-wide tangent (PWT) fields, and (3) a photon-electron (PE) technique, were compared for 12 patients previously treated at our institution with fIMRT to the left chest wall and regional lymphatics. Additionally, the SCV and infraclavicular lymphatics were irradiated and 4 methods were compared: 2 with anterior fields only (dose prescribed to 3 and 5 cm [SC3cm, SC5cm]) and 2 with anterior and posterior fields (fIMRT, 3DCRT). Each patient was planned to receive 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Regions of interest (ROIs) created for each patient included chest wall (CW) planning target volume (PTV), IMC PTV, and SCV PTV. Additionally, the following organs at risk (OAR) volumes were created: contralateral breast, heart, and lungs. For each plan and ROI, target volume coverage (V{sub 95-107}) and dose homogeneity (D{sub 95-5}) were evaluated. Additionally, the mean OAR dose and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were computed. For irradiation of the CW, target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were improved for the fIMRT technique as compared to PE (p < 0.001, p = 0.023, respectively). Similar improvements were seen with respect to IMC PTV (p = 0.012, p = 0.064). These dosimetric parameters were also improved as compared to PWT, but not to the same extent (p = 0.011, p = 0.095 for CW PTV, and p = 0.164, p > 0.2 for IMC PTV). The PE technique resulted in the lowest heart V{sub 30}, although this difference was not significant (p > 0.2). The NTCP values for excess cardiac mortality for fIMRT and PE were equivalent (1.9%) and lower than with PWT (2.8%, p > 0.2). The fIMRT technique was able to reduce heart dose and NTCP for each patient as compared to PWT. When comparing the anterior field techniques of treating SCV PTV, prescribing dose to 5 cm resulted in a improved V50 (p = 0.089). However, when compared to fIMRT, the SC3cm and SC5cm had inferior target volume coverage (p = 0.055, p = 0.014) and significantly greater dose heterogeneity (p = 0.031, p = 0.043). The addition of a posterior field increased the volume of lung receiving 40 and 50 Gy, but not significantly (p > 0.2). For complex breast treatments that irradiate the chest wall, IMC, and SCV, fIMRT resulted in improved dose homogeneity and target volume coverage as compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the dosimetric gains in target volume coverage with fIMRT came at no significant increase in dose to OAR. The fIMRT technique demonstrated the ability to maintain the advantage of each of the other 2 techniques: reducing the dose to OARs, as with PE, and providing superior target volume coverage, as with PWT.

  9. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. PMID:26852151

  10. What is the evidence behind conservative mastectomies?

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Giuseppe; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Besides the diffusion of breast reconstructive techniques, several “conservative” approaches in mastectomy have been developed, in order to perform an immediate reconstruction with better aesthetic results: the skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), the nipple-areola complex (NAC)-sparing mastectomy (NSM) and the skin-reducing mastectomy (SRM). During the last decade, SSMs and NSMs have gained widespread acceptance and are currently considered standard treatment for early breast cancer. We would like to investigate the evidence behind this radical shift towards conservative mastectomies, where there has been a renewed interest worldwide. Methods We reviewed English literature by consulting the following databases: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal and Clinicaltrials.gov. The objective is to include any randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a “conservative mastectomy” technique to breast conservative surgery or modified radical mastectomy (MRM) for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. In the absence of randomized trials, we took into account prospective cohorts and retrospective series for a narrative description of available evidence. Results Our review included 58 studies [19 prospective cohorts (34%) and 39 retrospective series (66%)] considering NSM and immediate reconstruction and ten studies [1 prospective cohort (10%) and 9 (90%) retrospective series] considering SSM and immediate reconstruction. In the NSM group, 29 studies reported data about complication rates and 42 studies presented data on NAC partial or complete necrosis. In the NSM group 45 studies and all the studies in the SSM group presented data on local and NAC recurrence. Conclusions In order to achieve higher levels of evidence, RCTs comparing conservative mastectomies to traditional mastectomy and breast conservative surgery would be desirable. However we can conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmetics and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645005

  11. Oncologic Safety of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Matched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hoo; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Jin, Ung Sik; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and those undergoing mastectomy alone. Methods A retrospective review of patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for resectable invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 at a single center was conducted. These cases were matched to patients who underwent mastectomy alone in the same time period, performed by 1:2 matching. Matching control variables included age, tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis, and estrogen receptor status. Overall, 189 patients were identified in the IBR group, and 362 patients were matched to this group. Results In the IBR group, 75 patients (39.7%) underwent conventional total mastectomy, 78 (41.3%) underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), and 36 (19.0%) underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The IBR group was significantly younger than the control group (41.9 and 45.1 years, respectively) (p=0.032), in spite of matching between three age groups. The DFS rates were similar between the IBR group and mastectomy alone group, at 92.0% and 89.9%, respectively, at 5-year follow-up (log-rank test, p=0.496). The 5-year LRFS was 96.2% in the IBR group and 96.4% in the mastectomy alone group (log-rank test, p=0.704), similar to data from previous reports. Subgroup analyses for SSM or NSM patients showed no differences in LRFS and DFS between the two groups. Additionally, in stage III patients, IBR did not cause an increase in recurrence. Conclusion IBR after mastectomy, including both SSM and NSM, had no negative impact on recurrence or patient survival, even in patients with advanced disease. PMID:27064557

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  13. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  14. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  15. Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Ptosis: Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction Allows Full Secondary Mastopexy with Complete Nipple Areolar Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Craig A.; Sullivan, Scott K.; Stolier, Alan; Trahan, Chris; Wise, M. Whitten; Duracher, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with moderate to severe ptosis are often considered poor candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. This results from the perceived risk of nipple necrosis and/or the inability of the reconstructive surgeon to reliably and effectively reposition the nipple-areola complex on the breast mound after mastectomy. Methods: A retrospective review identified patients with grade II/III ptosis who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate perforator flap reconstruction and subsequently underwent a mastopexy procedure. The mastopexies included complete, full-thickness periareolar incisions with peripheral undermining around the nipple-areola complex to allow for full transposition of the nipple-areola complex relative to the surrounding skin envelope. Results: Seventy patients with 116 nipple-sparing mastectomies met inclusion criteria. The most common complications were minor incisional dehiscence (7.7 percent) and variable degrees of necrosis in the preserved breast skin (3.4 percent) after the initial mastectomy. There were no cases of nipple-areola complex necrosis following the secondary mastopexy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that full mastopexy, including a complete full-thickness periareolar incision and nipple-areola complex repositioning on the breast mound, can be safely performed after nipple-sparing mastectomy and perforator flap breast reconstruction. The underlying flap provides adequate vascular ingrowth to support the perfusion of the nipple-areola complex despite complete incisional interruption of the surrounding cutaneous blood supply. These findings may allow for inclusion of women with moderate to severe ptosis in the candidate pool for nipple-sparing mastectomy if oncologic criteria are otherwise met. These findings also represent a significant potential advantage of autogenous reconstruction over implant reconstruction in women with breast ptosis who desire nipple-sparing mastectomy. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:26111328

  16. Oncoplastic breast surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap for Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arigami, Takaaki; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-09-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with Paget's disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap in two patients. In these two patients, who were diagnosed as having Paget's disease with a restricted intraductal component in the central area of their non-ptotic breast, we performed oncoplastic surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap. Neither of the two patients received contralateral surgery to produce symmetrical breasts. The observation period ranged from 6 to 12months, and the bilateral breast volumes and inframammary lines were symmetric. OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap was successfully performed in two patients with Paget's disease. PMID:23925716

  17. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  18. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Frank, Simon G; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  19. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  20. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of breast cancer, have had breast biopsies in the past, or take hormones. False-negative results . These are tests that come back normal even though there ... have breast cancer and delay treatment. Exposure to radiation is ...

  1. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to remake their breast. This type of surgery ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  2. Skin Reduction Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Jill; Fedele, Greg

    2015-10-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for many patients with early stage breast cancer. Large-breasted women who are gene positive or who have early breast cancer are not traditionally candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. The blood supply to the nipple is via the breast tissue and also the dermis, both of which would be severed if standard skin reduction were combined with mastectomy. This video shows how a nipple-sparing mastectomy can be combined with skin reduction while preserving the blood supply to the nipple. The excess skin is deepithelialized to preserve the dermal vessels. After mastectomy, the excess skin is imbricated to reduce the skin envelope. The deepithelialized lower flap "autoderm" can be sewn to the pectoralis muscle for coverage of the tissue expander. This technique allows large-breasted and ptotic patients to undergo mastectomy with preservation of their nipple-areolar complex as well as skin reduction to yield an improved cosmetic result. PMID:26271393

  3. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... your screen to choose another section to continue reading this guide. ‹ Breast Cancer - Stages up Breast Cancer - About Clinical Trials › f t g e P + H Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Breast Cancer ...

  4. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  5. BRCA mutation testing in determining breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen Lisa; Isaacs, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer differs from sporadic breast cancer with regard to future cancer risks and sensitivity to systemic therapies. Now that rapid genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is available at the time of breast cancer diagnosis, BRCA mutation status can be considered when making treatment and prevention decisions for BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer. This article reviews surgical options for management of affected BRCA mutation carriers with emphasis on the risks of ipsilateral recurrence and contralateral breast cancer. The roles of breast-conserving surgery, prophylactic mastectomy, and oophorectomy are reviewed. In addition, the sensitivity of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer to endocrine therapy, platinum chemotherapy, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors is reviewed. PMID:22157293

  6. Fluctuating mastectomy rates across time and geography.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etienne, Carlos A; Tomatis, Mariano; Heil, Joerg; Danaei, Mahmoud; Rageth, Christoph J; Marotti, Lorenza; Rosselli Del Turco, Marco; Ponti, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    In 2009, 2 single-institution studies from the United States reported increasing mastectomy rates during the last decade. We have recently reported unilateral mastectomy trends from a European database and demonstrated a significant trend of decreasing mastectomy rates from 38.1 % in 2005 to 13.1 % in 2010. A recent study from the SEER registry in the United States confirmed a previously reported decrease in mastectomy rates from 40.1 % in year 2000 to 35.6 % in 2005, but showed a statistically significant increase in mastectomy rates up to 38.4 % in 2008. This report provides evidence that mastectomy trends may be in opposite directions in different geographical areas. The sharpest increase in mastectomy rates across all ages in the recent SEER study occurs right after year 2005, which interestingly corresponds with the time of publication of the meta-analysis by the EBCTCG that highlighted the importance of local control in breast cancer. The coincident timing raises the question of whether this evidence may have indirectly triggered an increase in mastectomy rates in the United States that would partially explain the observed trend, and more importantly, of whether an increase would be justified on this basis. Multiple factors influence the proportion between mastectomy and breast conservation, so it may be unreasonable to think of an optimal cutoff. There is not necessarily a right or wrong direction for mastectomy trends, but aiming to determine explanations for these differences may help provide a clearer insight of the decision-making process involved in the surgical management of breast cancer. PMID:23640480

  7. Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. Methods We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. Results In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%–69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. Interpretation There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives. PMID:25077125

  8. Technical Advances in Skin Sparing Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Grant W.

    2011-01-01

    Skin sparing mastectomy has resulted in marked improvement in the aesthetic results of immediate breast reconstruction. Mature data has confirmed its oncological safety in the treatment of breast cancer. The procedure has gained wide acceptance and has undergone numerous technical advances since its introduction over twenty years ago. Careful patient selection and choice of skin incisions are necessary to avoid complications. PMID:22312504

  9. Predictors that Influence Election of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy among Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ who are BRCA-Negative

    PubMed Central

    Elsayegh, Nisreen; Profato, Jessica; Barrera, Angelica M. Gutierrez; Lin, Heather; Kuerer, Henry M.; Ardic, Can; Litton, Jennifer K.; Tripathy, Debasish; Arun, Banu K.

    2015-01-01

    The authors retrospectively examined the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rate among 100 women with ductal carcinoma in situ who are BRCA negative. Of 100 women with ductal carcinoma in situ, 31 elected contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Factors associated with increased likelihood of undergoing contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among this cohort were: family history of ovarian cancer, marital status, reconstruction, mastectomy of the affected breast, and tamoxifen use. PMID:26078790

  10. What is new in the surgical management and prevention of breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Spillane, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Australian women. As most women now survive breast cancer, improving quality-of-life outcomes is increasingly important and major changes are occurring in breast surgery to meet this challenge. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy results in lower mastectomy rates, broader surgical options and less surgical morbidity. Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS) facilitates less frequent need for mastectomy, better aesthetic outcomes and improved quality of life. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) improves quality of life and can be considered in a large proportion of women requiring mastectomy; however, Australia's rate of IBR is low compared with similar countries. Breast cancer risk reduction can be achieved with lifestyle modifications and, in women at high risk, chemoprevention with selective oestrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors. Bilateral prophylactic mastectomy is an option for BRCA gene mutation carriers or those women otherwise established to have a high level of risk. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is increasingly performed at the time of initial breast cancer management, largely driven by patient preference. However, CPM does not improve survival and has similar rates of complications as therapeutic mastectomy. It should be cautiously considered, with full discussion of risks and benefits. Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand (BreastSurgANZ) coordinates training of most new breast surgeons and is fostering a broader range of multidisciplinary oncology, OBS and IBR skills in its members. The BreastSurgANZ Quality Audit monitors the quality of care provided by members. Training breast surgeons now have access to a Graduate Certificate in Surgery (Breast Surgery) to broaden their knowledge base. PMID:27125805

  11. Intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography for the evaluation of mastectomy flaps in immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Newman, Martin I; Samson, Michel C; Tamburrino, Joseph F; Swartz, Kimberley A

    2010-09-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy has been associated with flap ischemia and necrosis. Current clinical methods for assessment of flap viability following mastectomy are largely subjective and lack objective data to guide intraoperative decisions. Intraoperative laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography (LA-ICGA) was performed on 20 skin sparing mastectomy flaps. LA-ICGA data were retrospectively compared with clinical outcome. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative digital photographs along with clinical course were evaluated in an effort to identify potential complications. LA-ICGA was performed on 20 breasts in 12 patients. Eleven breasts (55%) demonstrated no wound-healing issues. Nine breasts (45%) experienced wound-healing issues, which were stratified as follows: 1 (5%) mild, 1 (5%) moderate, and 7 (35%) severe. Of these seven severe wound-healing issues, 5 (25%) required debridement and 2 (10%) required complete removal of the prosthetic device. Retrospective analysis demonstrated a 95% correlation between intraoperative imaging and clinical course with 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. There was a false-positive rate of 9%. This series suggests LA-ICGA is a useful adjunct to determine mastectomy flap viability. Further quantitative advances in this technology may provide objective numerical thresholds to guide intraoperative mastectomy flap debridement when indicated. PMID:20539977

  12. Comparative biomechanical study of using decellularized human adipose tissues for post-mastectomy and post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Seyyed M H; Omidi, Ehsan; Flynn, Lauren E; Samani, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Developing suitable biomaterials for post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction is highly important. This study is aimed at evaluating biomechanical suitability of decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) for this purpose. The study involves computational experiments for evaluating deformation of the breast reconstructed using DAT under loading conditions pertaining to two common body position changes of prone-to-supine and prone-to-upright. This was conducted using nonlinear finite element models where the breast geometry was obtained from MRI image of a female breast. The experiments were performed using DAT sourced from various adipose tissue depots in comparison to natural adipose tissue. Data obtained from the conducted experiments showed no contour defects with various DAT materials for simulated post-mastectomy or post-lumpectomy breast reconstruction under the loading conditions. They also demonstrated that a breast reconstructed using DAT derived from the breast or subcutaneous abdominal depots exhibit significantly closer deformation, both qualitatively and quantitatively, to that of a normal breast under the same loading conditions. Similarity of DAT deformation to that of natural breast tissue in post-surgery breast reconstruction was assessed using nonlinear finite element analysis. Our results provide evidence that DAT derived from subcutaneous abdominal and breast depots yield more analogous deformation pattern to the natural tissue in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction applications. This is quite encouraging, as breast and subcutaneous adipose tissue can be readily obtained in large quantities from breast or abdominal lipo-reduction surgery procedures. Furthermore, in post-lumpectomy cases all DAT samples used in this research showed similar deformation, and thus are suitable as breast tissue substituents. PMID:26735182

  13. Coping after Mastectomy: Antecedents and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    Psychological well-being following mastectomy is a concern of rehabilitation psychologists as the life expectancy of women treated for breast cancer is increasing. Well-being can be threatened by stress that these women may suffer from the diagnosis of cancer and amputation of a significant body part. A study was conducted to examine the…

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of preemptive analgesia with bupivacaine in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Jacek; Jaworski, Radoslaw; Smietanska, Irmina; Irga, Ninela; Wujtewicz, Maria; Jaskiewicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial we tested the hypothesis that preemptive analgesia with bupivacaine applied in the area of the surgical incision in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer would reduce post-operative acute pain and would reduce the amount of analgesics used during surgery and in the post-operative period. Material/Methods Participants were assigned into 1 of 2 groups – with bupivacaine applied in the area of surgical incision or with placebo. We assessed the intraoperative consumption of fentanyl, the postoperative consumption of morphine delivered using a PCA method, and the subjective pain intensity according to VAS score reported by patients in the early post-operative period. Results Out of 121 consecutive cases qualified for mastectomy, 112 women were allocated randomly to 1 of 2 groups – group A (bupivacaine) and group B (placebo). The final study group comprised 106 breast cancer cases. Between the groups, a statistically significant difference was observed with respect to: lower fentanyl consumption during surgery (p=0.011), lower morphine (delivered by means of a PCA) consumption between the 4–12th postoperative hours (p=0.02) and significantly lower pain intensity assessed according to VAS score at the 4th and 12th hours after surgery (p=0.004 and p=0.02 respectively) for the group A patients. Conclusions Preemptive analgesia application in the form of infiltration of the area of planned surgical incisions with bupivacaine in breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy decreases post-operative pain sensation, limits the amount of fentanyl used during surgery, and reduces the demand for opiates in the hours soon after surgery. PMID:21959614

  15. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Physical exam Mammogram Breast MRI Breast Ultrasound Breast Biopsy, either ultrasound or stereotactic Chest x-ray CT ... Turner RM. Staging the axilla in women with breast cancer: the utility or ... needle biopsy. Cancer Biol Med . 2014 June;11(2):69- ...

  16. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  17. Breast Cancer: Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  18. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  19. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  20. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  1. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is discussed.

  2. Assessment of knowledge of cancer and lymphoedema among breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ochałek, Katarzyna; Krzywonos-Zawadzka, Anna; Pitala, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema symptoms among mastectomy survivors. Material and methods The research was carried out in the Centre of Oncology Branch in Cracow. The survey comprised 60 hospitalized patients as well as 30 healthy subjects from the Małopolska region. The scientific method used was a specially designed questionnaire. Results Women with a history of cancer demonstrate a health-oriented approach. The subjects known as the experimental group perform breast self-examinations, regularly visit a gynaecologist, are aware of the most severe mastectomy complication – lymphoedema, and recognize the impact of physical activity on it. Breast cancer operation survivors have a good knowledge of breast cancer and lymphoedema, however, existing shortcomings in practical issues are worrying. On the contrary, the control group neglects regular check-ups, evaluates its own knowledge as negligible and, most surprisingly, is not interested in the subject of breast cancer and lymphoedema, even though the subjects of the group believe that arm swelling is connected to all types of breast cancer surgeries. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors have a good knowledge of their disorder but are still lacking some essential information. Respondents from the control group have a limited knowledge in the field of cancer and lymphoedema, are not interested in breast cancer matters and are not encouraged by gynaecologists to perform breast self-examinations. Educational prevention programs should develop a health-oriented approach among all women and emphasize their basic role in therapy. PMID:26327866

  3. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing 'keyhole' mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Peyser, P. M.; Abel, J. A.; Straker, V. F.; Hall, V. L.; Rainsbury, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The popularity of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) which preserves the breast skin envelope is increasing, but the risks and benefits of this approach are only beginning to emerge. A technique involving ultra-conservative SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been evaluated to establish the surgical and oncological sequelae of skin conservation. Between 1994-1998, 67 consecutive patients underwent 71 SSM and expander-assisted immediate latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstructions (follow up, 24.1 months; range, 2-52 months). Breast resection, axillary dissection and reconstruction were performed through a 5-6 cm circular peri-areolar 'keyhole' incision. Patients were discharged 6.5 days (range, 5-15 days) after the 3.9 h (range, 3.0-5.5 h) procedure, and expansion was completed by 4.0 months (range, 0-10 months). Local recurrence occurred in 3% of breasts at risk, skin envelope necrosis occurred in 10%, and contralateral surgery was required to achieve symmetry in 14%. SSM and IBR is an oncologically safe, minimal-scar procedure which can be performed by surgeons trained in 'oncoplastic' techniques. It results in low rates of local recurrence and complication, and reduces the need for contralateral surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10932655

  4. Breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Bellet, M.; Alonso, C.; Ojeda, B.

    1995-01-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly has attracted considerable interest in recent years for three main reasons. Firstly, information concerning the profile (clinical and biological) of the disease in the geriatric population is scarce; secondly, the number of patients is increasing, and thirdly there are conflicting data regarding the actual effectiveness of the different treatments. The present review attempts to outline the specific characteristics of this malignancy in the elderly in terms of histological pattern, stage at diagnosis, and outcome. The feasibility of standard therapies (mastectomy/lumpectomy, axillary clearance, and radio-therapy) in the elderly is carefully analysed, and compared to the efficacy of less aggressive procedures. The use of tamoxifen as a primary treatment, instead of surgery, is critically reconsidered, as well as its use as an adjuvant therapy. Finally, the effectiveness of systemic therapy in advanced disease is also discussed. Images Figure PMID:7494769

  5. Male breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, IS

    2009-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

  6. A survey of general surgeons' attitudes towards breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Spyrou, G. E.; Titley, O. G.; Cerqueiro, J.; Fatah, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    Within the last 15-20 years there have been many changes in the management of breast cancer. Along with changes in treatment, possibilities for breast reconstruction have become increasingly sophisticated and commonplace. Despite the availability of breast reconstruction, we have noted large variations in referral patterns. Because the surgical treatment of breast cancer is largely undertaken by general surgeons, we investigated general surgeons' attitudes towards reconstruction using a postal questionnaire. In 1995, a questionnaire involving hypothetical criticisms was sent to general surgical members of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland. A total of 136 surgeons responded, 79 (58%) of whom had a specialist interest in breast cancer. Each surgeon saw an average of 68 new cases of breast cancer per year (range 0-400). The general surgeons were concerned about three areas: (1) 32.3% felt that breast reconstruction might adversely delay the detection of local recurrence; (2) 16.6% were worried that breast reconstruction has high morbidity; and (3) 17.4% said that patients did not want breast reconstruction despite being advised of its availability. To investigate these concern's further, an extensive literature search was undertaken. There is no evidence that breast reconstruction delays the detection of local recurrence. With appropriate patient selection, the morbidity of reconstructive options appears very acceptable. Finally, immediate breast reconstruction has psychological benefits when compared with delayed reconstruction. PMID:9682639

  7. Ectopic breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Önel, Safa; Karateke, Faruk; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Özyazıcı, Sefa; Özdoğan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic breast may be present at any site, from the axilla to the vulva, other than its normal location. Cysts, adenofibromas and rarely carcinomas have been reported in ectopic breasts. In this case report, we present a patient with ectopic breast cancer. The patient had a thickening and enlarging of her ectopic breast tissue, on the left arcus costarium. Tru-cut biopsy revealed "invasive lobular carcinoma". Left ectopic mastectomy and level I-II axillary dissection were performed and then chemotherapy+radiotherapy+endocrine therapy treatment was commenced. During follow up, the patient is doing well; in spite of R1 resection, she has no evidence of local recurrences or distant metastases. PMID:25931856

  8. Synchronous bilateral male breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Woo-Young; Lee, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Ho-Chang; Ryu, Dong-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo; Yun, Hyo-Young; Song, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Synchronous bilateral breast cancer is extremely rare in men and has not, up to date, been reported in Korea. A 54-year-old man presented with a palpable mass in the right breast. The right nipple was retracted and bilateral axillary accessory breasts and nipples were present. On physical examination, a 2 cm-sized mass was palpated directly under the right nipple, and, with squeezing, bloody discharge developed in a single duct of the left nipple. There was no palpable mass in the left breast, and axillary lymph nodes were not palpable. Physical examination of external genitalia revealed a unilateral undescended testis on the left side. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer was diagnosed using mammography, ultrasonography, and core-needle biopsy. Histopathological examination revealed invasive ductal carcinoma in the right breast and ductal carcinoma in situ in the left breast. Bilateral total mastectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and excision of accessory breasts in the axilla were performed. PMID:22807945

  9. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer , Coping with Cancer Your Body After Breast Cancer Article date: September 28, 2012 By Melissa Weber ... age 24, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in 2010. “I had no control over what ...

  10. Medicare Breast Surgery Fees and Treatment Received by Older Women with Localized Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Jack; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Mitchell, Jean M; Weeks, Jane C; Guadagnoli, Edward; Hwang, Yi-Ting

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether area-level Medicare physician fees for mastectomy and breast conserving surgery were associated with treatment received by Medicare beneficiaries with localized breast cancer and to compare these results with an earlier analysis conducted using small areas (three-digit zip codes) as the unit of observation. Data Source Medicare claims and physician survey data for a national sample of elderly (aged 67 or older) Medicare beneficiaries with localized breast cancer treated in 1994 (unweighted n=1,787). Study Design Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to estimate a model of treatment received as a function of Medicare fees, controlling for other area economic factors, patient demographic and clinical characteristics, physician experience, and region. Principal Findings In 1994, average Medicare fees (adjusted for the effects of modifiers and procedure mix) for mastectomy (MST) and breast conserving surgery (BCS) were $904 and $305, respectively. Holding other fees and factors fixed, a 10 percent increase in the BCS fee increased the odds of breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy relative to mastectomy to 1.34 (p=0.02), while a 10 percent decrease in the MST fee increased the odds of breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy to 1.86 (p<0.01). Conclusions Among older women with localized breast cancer, financial incentives appear to influence the use of mastectomy and breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that physicians are responsive to financial incentives when the alternative procedures have clinically equivalent outcomes and the patient's clinical condition does not dominate the treatment choice. We also find that the fee effects derived from this analysis of individual data with more precise measurement of both diagnosis and treatment are qualitatively similar to the results of the small-area analysis. This suggests that the earlier study was not severely affected by ecological bias or other data limitations inherent in Medicare claims data. PMID:12785561

  11. Locoregional treatment of breast cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Toesca, Antonio; Gentilini, Oreste; Peccatori, Fedro; Azim, Hatem A; Amant, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with breast cancer during pregnancy is very demanding and it should be better performed in highly qualified and experienced centers. Referral to institutes and physicians trained in this special clinical scenario allows reducing the risk of both overtreating and undertreating the patients. Moreover, patients can receive appropriate information regarding safety of treatments without old-fashioned taboo. The purpose of the current paper is to discuss the main issues concerning surgical management and in general locoregional treatment of patients diagnosed with breast cancer and treated during gestation, focusing on those women who chose to continue their pregnancy. We cover the issues regarding type of breast surgery, radiation therapy, immediate reconstruction during mastectomy, and management of the axilla. PMID:25419205

  12. Management of women with a family history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Curry, P; Fentiman, I S

    1999-01-01

    Five to ten per cent of breast cancer results from an inherited germ line mutation. The main susceptibility genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2, but others include Cowden's disease, Li Fraumeni syndrome and ataxia-telangiectasia. For those with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations the lifetime probability of breast cancer is between 0.40 and 0.73. Genetic testing needs to be offered to young women with breast cancer before considering testing their relatives. The efficacy of surveillance in women with genetic susceptibility has yet to be proved. The value of tamoxifen as a preventive agent in women with genetic susceptibility has yet to be confirmed. Prophylactic bilateral mastectomy will probably reduce the risk of breast cancer but this may not be absolute because of the difficulty of removing all breast tissue. New approaches may enable the selective destruction of mammary epithelium without disturbance to breast architecture. PMID:10665131

  13. Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-02-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget's disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

  14. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast

  15. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:27066090

  16. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2013: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Zisun; Hur, Min Hee; Yoon, Chan Seok; Park, Eun-Hwa; Jung, Kyu-Won

    2016-03-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) has reported a nationwide breast cancer data since 1996. We present a comprehensive report on the facts and trends of breast cancer in Korea in 2013. Data on the newly diagnosed patients in the year 2013 were collected from 99 hospitals by using nationwide questionnaire survey. Clinical characteristics such as stage of cancer, histologic types, biological markers, and surgical management were obtained from the online registry database. A total of 19,316 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer including carcinoma in situ was 76.2 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportions of postmenopausal women with breast cancer accounted for more than half of total patients. The proportion of early breast cancer increased consistently, and the pathologic features have changed accordingly. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in the year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries markedly increased approaching 3-fold in last 11 years. According to annual percentile change of invasive cancer incidence, the incidence increased rapidly until 2010. And thereafter the increase of it became steadier. For ductal carcinoma in situ, the incidence consistently increased during the same period without any joinpoint. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to defining of the trends and characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:27066090

  17. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  18. Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy: Review of Risk Factors and Risk-Reducing Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Basu, N. N.; Barr, L.; Ross, G. L.; Evans, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy have increased substantially over the last decade. Surgical oncologists are often in the frontline, dealing with requests for this procedure. This paper reviews the current evidence base regarding contralateral breast cancer, assesses the various risk-reducing strategies, and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy. PMID:25692038

  19. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  20. New Insights into the Surgical Management of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David M

    2016-01-01

    William Halstead is considered by many as the father of modern breast surgery. He popularized the notion that breast cancer progresses in an orderly fashion and that appropriately timed radical surgery can interrupt this progression to save lives. This view dominated for nearly 100 years and still persists to one extent or another in the minds of physicians and patients alike. Rapid advances in breast cancer biology have highlighted the heterogeneity of breast cancer and paradigm-shifting clinical trials have successfully challenged prevailing wisdom to effect a seed change in breast cancer surgery. Advances in radiation and systemic therapies permit more limited surgery for most patients. Recurrence rates of all kinds are on the decline; yet, paradoxically, use of bilateral mastectomy is increasing. PMID:26617207

  1. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2012: Results from a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Kang, Eunyoung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Seokwon

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through utilization of an online registration program. We have reported the basic facts about breast cancer in Korea in 2012, and analyzed the changing patterns in the clinical characteristics and management of breast cancer in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were collected for the year 2012 from 97 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey, and from the online registry database. A total of 17,792 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 70.7 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 51 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women was higher than that of premenopausal women among those diagnosed with breast cancer. The proportion of cases of early breast cancer increased continuously, and breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in that same year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 3-fold over last 10 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all stages of breast cancer patients was extremely high. The clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed in ways that resulted in high overall survival over the past 10 years in Korea, and the surgical management of the disease has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:26155285

  2. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  3. Maxillofacial metastasis from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Namad, Tariq; Benbrahim, Zineb; Najib, Rajae; Mohammed, Afif; Baggar, Soufiane; Bouyahia, Nezar; Arifi, Samia; Mellas, Nawfel

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic tumors to paranasal sinuses are exclusively rare. In this paper, we report a case of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the right maxilla. The metastasis occurred 5 years after radical mastectomy and presented as a primary sinonasal mass. The diagnosis was confirmed with histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination however the patient died before starting any specific treatment because of tumor bleeding. PMID:25767674

  4. Maxillofacial metastasis from breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Namad, Tariq; Benbrahim, Zineb; Najib, Rajae; Mohammed, Afif; Baggar, Soufiane; Bouyahia, Nezar; Arifi, Samia; Mellas, Nawfel

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic tumors to paranasal sinuses are exclusively rare. In this paper, we report acase of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the right maxilla. The metastasis occurred 5 years after radical mastectomy and presented as a primary sinonasalmass. The diagnosis was confirmed with histopathologic andimmunohistochemical examination however the patient died before starting any specific treatment because of tumor bleeding. PMID:25767674

  5. Breast cancer statistics, 2013.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Ma, Jiemin; Bryan, Leah; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,620 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2013. One in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer incidence rates increased slightly among African American women; decreased among Hispanic women; and were stable among whites, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives from 2006 to 2010. Historically, white women have had the highest breast cancer incidence rates among women aged 40 years and older; however, incidence rates are converging among white and African American women, particularly among women aged 50 years to 59 years. Incidence rates increased for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers in the youngest white women, Hispanic women aged 60 years to 69 years, and all but the oldest African American women. In contrast, estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers declined among most age and racial/ethnic groups. These divergent trends may reflect etiologic heterogeneity and the differing effects of some factors, such as obesity and parity, on risk by tumor subtype. Since 1990, breast cancer death rates have dropped by 34% and this decrease was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. Nevertheless, survival disparities persist by race/ethnicity, with African American women having the poorest breast cancer survival of any racial/ethnic group. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. PMID:24114568

  6. Clinical studies on the use of radiation therapy as primary treatment of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.; Beadle, G.F.; Hellman, S.

    1984-02-01

    The treatment of operable breast cancer by primary radiation therapy instead of mastectomy is undergoing evaluation in the United States and Europe. Retrospective studies of patients treated by primary radiation therapy show that local control and survival rates are comparable to those obtained by mastectomy. Detailed analysis of local failure following primary radiation therapy indicates the importance of excisional biopsy of the primary tumor, moderate doses of radiation to the breast and draining lymph node areas, and the use of a boost to the primary tumor area in maximizing local control. Further, the judicious use of local excision combined with meticulous radiotherapy technique yields highly satisfactory results for the majority of treated patients. Preliminary results from prospective trials also indicate that primary radiation therapy provides both local control and survival rates equivalent to mastectomy. Primary radiation therapy is becoming an increasingly important alternative to mastectomy where surgical and radiotherapeutic expertise are available to optimize both local tumor control and the final cosmetic outcome.

  7. Symptomatic cardiac metastases of breast cancer 27 years after mastectomy: a case report with literature review - pathophysiology of molecular mechanisms and metastatic pathways, clinical aspects, diagnostic procedures and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metastases to the heart and pericardium are rare but more common than primary cardiac tumours and are generally associated with a rather poor prognosis. Most cases are clinically silent and are undiagnosed in vivo until the autopsy. We present a female patient with a 27-year-old history of an operated primary breast cancer who was presented with dyspnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and orthopnoea. The clinical signs and symptoms aroused suspicion of congestive heart failure. However, the cardiac metastases were detected during a routine cardiologic evaluation and confirmed with computed tomography imaging. Additionally, this paper outlines the pathophysiology of molecular and clinical mechanisms involved in the metastatic spreading, clinical presentation, diagnostic procedures and treatment of heart metastases. The present case demonstrates that a complete surgical resection and systemic chemotherapy may result in a favourable outcome for many years. However, a lifelong medical follow-up, with the purpose of a detection of metastases, is highly recommended. We strongly call the attention of clinicians to the fact that during the follow-up of all cancer patients, such heart failure may be a harbinger of the secondary heart involvement. PMID:23343205

  8. Breast Cancer -- Inflammatory

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer - Inflammatory ... with Side Effects Follow-up Care and Monitoring ...

  9. Skin-sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto O.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  10. Skin-sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    González, Eduardo G; Rancati, Alberto O

    2015-12-01

    The surgical treatment of breast cancer has evolved rapidly in recent decades. Conservative treatment was adopted in the late 1970s, with rates above 70%, and this was followed by a period during which the indications for surgical intervention were expanded to those patients at high risk for BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations, and also due to new staging standards and use of nuclear magnetic resonance. This increase in the indications for mastectomy coincided with the availability of immediate breast reconstruction as an oncologically safe and important surgical procedure for prevention of sequelae. Immediate reconstruction was first aimed at correcting the consequences of treatment, and almost immediately, the challenge of the technique became the achievement of a satisfactory breast appearance and shape, as well as normal consistency. The skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) in conservation first and nipple-areola complex (NAC) later was a result of this shift that occurred from the early 1990s to the present. The objective of this review is to present all these developments specifically in relation to SSM and analyze our personal experience as well as the experience of surgeons worldwide with an emphasis on the fundamental aspects, indications, surgical technique, complications, oncological safety, and cosmetic results of this procedure. PMID:26645008

  11. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  13. Conservative treatment for breast cancer. Complications requiring reconstructive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bostwick, J. 3d.; Paletta, C.; Hartrampf, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Women who select conservative treatment for carcinoma of the breast (tumor excision followed by supervoltage radiation therapy) place a premium on breast preservation and aesthetics. When local control fails and they require a mastectomy, or when the aesthetic appearance is unacceptable, they may request breast reconstruction. The goal of this study is to evaluate a series of 10 patients who required reconstructive breast surgery after complications of conservative treatment. Patient classification: I. Breast or chest wall necrosis (3). II. Breast fibrosis and gross asymmetry (3). III. Local recurrence of breast cancer (5). IV. Positive margins after the initial lumpectomy (1). The mean age was 34 years. Radiation dosage average was 5252 rads with two patients receiving iridium-192 implant boosts. The reconstructive management was complex and usually required a major musculocutaneous flap because of the radiation effects.

  14. Effects of breast cancer surgery and surgical side effects on body image over time.

    PubMed

    Collins, Karen Kadela; Liu, Ying; Schootman, Mario; Aft, Rebecca; Yan, Yan; Dean, Grace; Eilers, Mark; Jeffe, Donna B

    2011-02-01

    We examined the impact of surgical treatments (breast-conserving surgery [BCS], mastectomy alone, mastectomy with reconstruction) and surgical side-effects severity on early stage (0-IIA) breast cancer patients' body image over time. We interviewed patients at 4-6 weeks (T1), six (T2), 12 (T3), and 24 months (T4) following definitive surgical treatment. We examined longitudinal relationships among body image problems, surgery type, and surgical side-effects severity using the Generalized Estimating Equation approach, controlling for demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. We compared regression coefficients of surgery type from two models, one with and one without surgical side-effects severity. Of 549 patients enrolled (mean age 58; 75% White; 65% BCS, 12% mastectomy, 23% mastectomy with reconstruction), 514 (94%) completed all four interviews. In the model without surgical side-effects severity, patients who underwent mastectomy with reconstruction reported poorer body image than patients who underwent BCS at T1-T3 (each P < 0.02), but not at T4. At T2, patients who underwent mastectomy with reconstruction also reported poorer body image than patients who underwent mastectomy alone (P = 0.0106). Adjusting for surgical side-effects severity, body image scores did not differ significantly between patients with BCS and mastectomy with reconstruction at any interview; however, patients who underwent mastectomy alone had better body image at T2 than patients who underwent mastectomy with reconstruction (P = 0.011). The impact of surgery type on body image within the first year of definitive surgical treatment was explained by surgical side-effects severity. After 2 years, body image problems did not differ significantly by surgery type. PMID:20686836

  15. Life after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Kirsty; Brennan, Meagan; French, James; Houssami, Nehmat; Boyages, John

    2006-04-01

    This thirteenth article in our series on breast disease explores the many concerns that patients face after completion of their breast cancer treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is an ordeal for women on a number of levels. Similarly, there are often a multitude of issues and concerns raised after the completion of treatment. Having an awareness of these medical and survivorship issues allows the general practitioner to provide important support to both the patient and her family. PMID:16642238

  16. Update on the surgical management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Gianluca; Sanchez, Alejandro Martin; Di Leone, Alba; Magno, Stefano; Moschella, Francesca; Accetta, Cristina; Natale, Maria; Di Giorgio, Danilo; Scaldaferri, Assunta; D'Archi, Sabatino; Scardina, Lorenzo; Masetti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has undergone continuous and profound changes over the last three decades. For patients with early stage breast cancer, breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy has been definitively validated as a safe alternative to radical mastectomy, with similar survival rates, better cosmetic outcomes and acceptable rates of local recurrence. Thanks to the improvements in diagnostic work-up, as well as the wider diffusion of screening programs and efforts in patient and physician education, tumors are more often detected at an early stage, furtherly facilitating the widespread use of breast conserving techniques. Breast-conserving surgery has been introduced also in the treatment of patients with locally advanced tumors after tumor downsizing with preoperative chemotherapy, with acceptable rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. When performing breast-conserving surgery all efforts should be made to ensure negative surgical margins in order minimize the risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence as they are associated with worse distant-disease-free and breast cancer- specific survival rates. The recent introduction of "oncoplastic techniques", that may allow more extensive excisions of the breast without compromising the cosmetic results, has furtherly increased the use of breast-conserving procedures. Mastectomy remains a valid surgical alternative in selected cases and is usually associated with immediate reconstructive procedures. Staging of the axilla has also gradually evolved toward less aggressive approaches with the adoption of sentinel node biopsy, but several controversies still remain about completion of axillary lymph node dissection in patients with a pathologic positivity in sentinel lymph node biopsy. The present work will highlight the benefits and unresolved issues of the different surgical treatment options in breast cancer and axillary treatment. PMID:25951853

  17. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. Case presentation A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Discussion Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. PMID:26773878

  18. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Munck, Linda de; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siesling, Sabine; Maduro, John H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  20. Benefits versus risks in conservation surgery with irradiation for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, S.H.; Mandel, J.

    1984-07-01

    This report analyzes the survival and complications inherent in the conventional treatment of breast cancer, radical mastectomy, and the more conservative procedure, conservation surgery with irradiation. Both procedures have benefits and risks. The benefits as measured by survivorship appear to be approximately the same. The major benefit of conservation surgery with irradiation is that the breast is left intact. The possible complication of irradiation carcinogenesis is addressed, and the literature analyzed. This review indicates that the absolute risk of breast cancer developing in the second breast is not nearly as great as originally thought. It is concluded that if a woman with breast cancer is a candidate for either mastectomy or the conservative procedure, it is the clinician's obligation to objectively present the evidence regarding the benefits and risks of these procedures.

  1. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  2. Skin-sparing mastectomy. Oncologic and reconstructive considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, G W; Bostwick, J; Styblo, T M; Moore, B; Bried, J T; Murray, D R; Wood, W C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors compared skin-sparing mastectomy and traditional mastectomy both followed by immediate reconstruction in the treatment of breast cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Skin-sparing mastectomy is used increasingly in the treatment of breast cancer to improve the aesthetic results of immediate reconstruction. The oncologic and reconstructive outcomes of this procedure have never been analyzed closely. METHODS: Institutional experience with 435 consecutive patients who underwent total mastectomy and immediate reconstruction from January 1989 through December 1994 was examined. Mastectomies were stratified into skin-sparing (SSM) and non-skin-sparing (non-SSM) types. RESULTS: Three hundred twenty-seven SSMs and 188 non-SSMs were performed. The mean follow-up was 41.3 months (SSM, 37.5 months, non-SSM, 48.2 months). Local recurrences from invasive cancer occurred after 4.8% of SSMs versus 9.5% of non-SSMs. Sixty-five percent of patients who underwent SSMs had nothing performed on the opposite breast versus 45% in the group of patients who underwent non-SSM (p = 0.0002). Native skin flap necrosis occurred in 10.7% of patients who underwent SSMs versus 11.2% of patients who underwent non-SSMs. CONCLUSIONS: Skin-sparing mastectomy facilitates immediate breast reconstruction by reducing remedial surgery on the opposite breast. Native skin flap necrosis is not increased over that seen with non-SSM. Skin-sparing mastectomies can be used in the treatment of invasive cancer without compromising local control. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9193184

  3. Dynamic response to heat--a novel physical characteristic of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengli; Purdie, Colin A; Brown, Stuart I; Frank, Timothy; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2008-08-01

    We report a novel observation about breast cancer. We imaged 6 fresh pathological specimens of breast cancer (1 mastectomy and 5 lumpectomies) with a sensitive infrared camera. We found that, following exposure to hot air for 1min, the cancers warmed up much less than the surrounding normal breast with a difference ranging from 12 to 20 degrees C. We believe that this physical property of cancer should be explored and may give us better insight into the nature of cancer, its diagnosis (including intraoperative diagnosis) and targeted treatment. PMID:18359674

  4. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castrellon, Aurelio B; Glück, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    Breast cancer remains the second leading cause of malignancy-related death in women in the USA, regardless of advances in novel therapeutic agents. High priority should be given to research aimed at the study of pharmacological and natural compounds that could potentially prevent the development of breast cancer in susceptible patients. Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce the incidence of estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer in women with a high risk of developing this condition by nearly 50%, and studies in osteoporosis have revealed a similar protective effect of raloxifene in postmenopausal women. The aromatase inhibitors are superior to tamoxifen in reducing the recurrence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women; large clinical trials are currently evaluating the chemopreventive effect of these agents. The list of agents with the potential for chemoprevention in breast cancer is extensive and continues to expand. There is an immense need to develop drugs that will decrease the incidence of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in women at high risk of developing the disease. Herein, we review the most important chemopreventive agents in breast cancer and clinical trials that have evaluated their efficacy. PMID:18366291

  5. An update in breast cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sanjay; Tapia, Grace; Goltsman, David; Beith, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the main controversies in a number of key areas of breast cancer management. Relevant studies that have contributed to guide the treatment of this heterogeneous disease in the field of breast screening, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are highlighted. Mammography and ultrasound are the main methods of breast screening. MRI and tomosynthesis are emerging as new screening tools for a selected group of breast cancer patients. From a surgical perspective, oncoplastic techniques and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are improving cosmetic results in breast-conserving surgery. For high-risk patients, controversies still remain regarding prophylactic mastectomies. Finally, the appropriate management of the axilla continues evolving with the increasing role of radiotherapy as an alternative treatment to axillary dissection. PMID:26689336

  6. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-01-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  7. Nipple areola complex sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Camilla; Mingozzi, Matteo; Curcio, Annalisa; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo

    2015-12-01

    Breast conservative therapy (BCT) is established as a safe option for most women with early breast cancer (BC). The best conservative mastectomy that can be performed, when mastectomy is unavoidable, is nipple-areola-complex sparing mastectomy (NSM), which allows the complete glandular dissection preserving the skin envelope and the nipple areola complex. In the treatment of BC, the cosmetic outcomes have become fundamental goals, as well as oncologic control. NSM is nowadays considered an alternative technique to improve the overall quality of life for women allowing excellent cosmetic results because it provides a natural appearing breast. The breast surgeon must pay attention to details and skin incision must be planned to minimize vascular impairment to the skin and the nipple. Preservation of the blood supply to the nipple is one of the most important concern during NSM because nipple or areolar necrosis is a well-described complication of this surgery. Another issue associated with the nipple preservation and the surgical technique is oncological safety related to nipple-areola-complex (NAC) involvement in patients with invasive BC. The authors present their experience on 252 NSM performed in the Breast Surgery Unit in Forlì. Careful selection of patients for this surgical procedure is imperative and many patients are not ideal candidates for this procedure because of concerns about nipple-areolar viability as women with significant large/ptotic breast, pre-existing breast scars and history of active cigarette smoking. To extend the benefits of nipple preservation to patients who are perceived to be at higher risk for nipple necrosis the authors describe technical modifications of NSM to allow nipple preservation and obtain good cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26645007

  8. Breast cancer and obesity.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, M; Giammanco, M

    2001-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence links breast cancer, a typical endocrine-related tumor, with western lifestyle, in particular eating habits. Yet, it's necessary to distinguish premenopausal from postmenopausal breast cancer. Visceral obesity and body weight gain are considered responsible for the increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. In fact, the mammary gland is sensitive to the level of circulating estrogens, visceral obesity is usually associated with higher levels of free steroid hormones, and the adipose tissue performs important endocrine function (clearance and aromatisation of androgens, regulation of free testoterone/DHEAS molar ratio). Before menopause, ovarian polycystosis is often seen with android obesity, and breast cancer risk could arise; however, as visceral obesity is generally less frequent, genetic factors are more important than nutritional ones. Furthermore, variations have been recorded in the secretion of insulin and insulin-like growth factors, involved in the genesis of the breast cancer. High body weight and male fat distribution negatively influence prognosis of breast cancer, too; this association is linked with the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors in tumoral cells. Links between diet quality and breast cancer risk are shown: increased use of saturated fats and animal proteins, and a consequently decreased use of vegetables, legumes and fruit, constituting the so-called Mediterranean diet, are considered responsible for the increased risk of breast cancer. Lower fat and alcohol ingestion, the use of dietary fibre and a higher use of complex carbohydrates could reduce breast cancer risk. Finally, starting from the results of our previous animal researches, we suggest using a tryptophan devoid diet for a few days for premenopausal women with male obesity and alterations to the menstrual cycle. PMID:11449184

  9. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  10. The Proportion of Women Who Have a Breast 4 Years after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mennie, Joanna C.; Mohanna, Pari-Naz; O’Donoghue, Joseph M; Rainsbury, Richard; Cromwell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous pathways in breast cancer treatment, many of which enable women to retain a breast after treatment. We evaluated the proportion of women who have a breast, either through conserving surgery (BCS) or reconstruction, at 4-years after diagnosis, and how this varied by patient group. Methods and Findings We identified women with breast cancer who underwent initial BCS or mastectomy in English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals between January 2008 and December 2009 using the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database. Women were assigned into one of four patient groups depending on their age at diagnosis and presence of comorbidities. The series of breast cancer procedure (BCS, mastectomy, immediate, or delayed reconstruction) undergone by each women was identified over four years, and the proportion of women with a breast calculated. Variation was examined across patient groups, and English Cancer Networks. Between 2008 and 2009, 60,959 women underwent BCS or mastectomy. The proportion with a breast at 4 years was 79.3%, and 64.0%, in women less than 70 years without, and with comorbidities. Whilst in women aged 70 and over without, and with comorbidities, proportions were 52.6%, and 38.2%, respectively. Comorbidities were associated with lower proportions of BCS, but had little effect on reconstruction rates unlike age. Networks variation of 15% or more was found within each patient group, and Cancer Networks tended to have either a high or low proportion across all four patient groups. However, while 14% of women under 70 years had undergone reconstruction, less than 2% of women aged 70 or more had this treatment option. Conclusion The proportion of women diagnosed with breast cancer who retain a breast at 4 years is strongly associated with age, and presence of comorbidities. There was significant variation between Cancer Networks indicating that women’s experience in England was dependent on their geographical location of treatment. PMID:27148870

  11. Epigenomics and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

  12. Progesterone and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lange, Carol A; Yee, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    Progesterone is an ovarian steroid hormone that is essential for normal breast development during puberty and in preparation for lactation and breastfeeding. The actions of progesterone are primarily mediated by its high-affinity receptors, which include the classical progesterone receptor (PR)-A and -B isoforms, located in diverse tissues, including the brain, where progesterone controls reproductive behavior, and the breast and reproductive organs. Progestins are frequently prescribed for contraception or during postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy, in which progestins are combined with estrogen as a means to block estrogen-induced endometrial growth. The role of estrogen as a potent breast mitogen is undisputed, and inhibitors of the estrogen receptor and estrogen-producing enzymes (aromatases) are effective first-line cancer therapies. However, PR action in breast cancer is grossly understudied and remains controversial. Herein, we review existing evidence and discuss the challenges to defining a role for progesterone in breast cancer. PMID:19072517

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Smoking and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Peggy

    2013-03-01

    The potential role of smoking in breast cancer risk has been the subject of over 100 publications, numerous scientific reviews, and animated debate. Tobacco exposure is a well-established cause of lung cancer, and is thought to account for nearly one third of all cancer deaths. Tobacco smoke contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are known to be mammary carcinogens. Although not initially thought to be a tobacco-related cancer, over the last several decades evidence has been accumulating on the role of both active smoking and secondhand smoking in the etiology of breast cancer. The human health evidence has been systematically evaluated not only by several independent researchers but also by several expert agency panels including those of the U.S. Surgeon General, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and a coalition of Canadian health agencies. Although the assessments have varied with time and across reviewers, the most recent weight of the evidence has suggested a potentially casual role for active smoking and breast cancer, particularly for long-term heavy smoking and smoking initiation at an early age. The role of secondhand smoking and breast cancer is less clear, although there has been some suggestion for an increased risk for premenopausal breast cancer. Recent studies evaluating the possible modifying role of polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of tobacco products, particularly NAT2, have contributed another dimension to these assessments, although to date that evidence remains equivocal. PMID:23179580

  15. Nummular Eczema of Breast: A Potential Dermatologic Complication after Mastectomy and Subsequent Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iwahira, Yoshiko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Shimizu, Yusuke; Kuwata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Purposes. The present paper reports clinical cases where nummular eczema developed during the course of breast reconstruction by means of implantation and evaluates the occurrence patterns and ratios of this complication. Methods. 1662 patients undergoing breast reconstruction were reviewed. Patients who developed nummular eczema during the treatment were selected, and a survey was conducted on these patients regarding three items: (1) the stage of the treatment at which nummular eczema developed; (2) time required for the lesion to heal; (3) location of the lesion on the reconstructed breast(s). Furthermore, histopathological examination was conducted to elucidate the etiology of the lesion. Results. 48 patients (2.89%) developed nummular eczema. The timing of onset varied among these patients, with lesions developing after the placement of tissue expanders for 22 patients (45.8%); after the tissue expanders were replaced with silicone implants for 12 patients (25%); and after nipple-areola complex reconstruction for 14 patients (29.2%). Nummular eczema developed both in periwound regions (20 cases: 41.7%) and in nonperiwound regions (32 cases: 66.7%). Histopathological examination showed epidermal acanthosis, psoriasiform patterns, and reduction of sebaceous glands. Conclusions. Surgeons should recognize that nummular eczema is a potential complication of breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and silicone implants. PMID:26380109

  16. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  17. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not a complete listing of breast cancer materials or information. The information contained herein is not ... quality or non-infringement of any of the materials, products or information provided by the organizations referenced ...

  18. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... men are hormone receptor- positive, hormone therapy (with tamoxifen) is often used depending on the stage. Chemotherapy may be given before tamoxifen. For men with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer, ...

  19. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22:9-23. [PubMed Abstract] Bertucci F, Ueno NT, Finetti P, et al. Gene expression profiles of ... Abstract] Fouad TM, Kogawa T, Reuben JM, Ueno NT. The role of inflammation in inflammatory breast cancer. ...

  20. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... UP FOR OUR MAILING LIST SIGN UP Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Menu News & Opinion Blog Programs & Events About Us I Am... Facebook Twitter More Breast Cancer Helpline Donate Search form Search ...

  1. [Screening for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hessler, C

    1988-01-01

    On the "why", "whom" and "how" of breast screening for carcinoma, the following answers can be provided: Why? As there is no primary prevention, secondary prevention by early diagnosis is the only way to reduce breast cancer mortality. On the other hand, breast cancers discovered by screening can be conservatively treated more often than when they become symptomatic; this is especially important in young patients. For whom? Every woman over the age of 35-40 should be accepted for breast cancer screening. In countries such as Switzerland it is unthinkable to impose screening or even to send personal invitations for screening to the population. Only repeated information through newspapers, TV and conferences will induce women to come for screening. The costs would be paid for by the patient, as medical insurances do not cover this type of preventive medicine. How? Only screening through mammography with or without breast palpation, performed by paramedical personnel, can be considered, because of the cost. It should be done outside the senologic consultation setup for symptomatic patients where a doctor is in charge of the clinical consultation. As Doctor Van der Linde said at the end of his talk at the last Convention of the Swiss Senology Society in Lausanne, pilot projects for breast screening in Switzerland should be started. The Swiss Cancer Society has lately created a commission for early detection of breast cancer to study ways of launching a project. PMID:3165216

  2. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism reveals marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction. She exhibits a total lack of development of spoken language, with no attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture. During the visit, she occupies herself with repetitive motor mannerisms. Susan believes that Amy struggles with overstimulation from tactile input. Therefore, she is combative with health-care providers and intolerant of invasive devices. Susan has an intimate understanding of Amy's ability to communicate her needs and wants through nonverbal changes. RECURRENCE Approximately 2 months ago, Amy began favoring her right arm and appeared to be in pain when participating in various activities. Susan became aware of Amy's pain issues by noticing that her posture was slightly altered and she was carrying herself differently. Further investigation with a CT scan showed concern for local disease recurrence involving the axillary lymph nodes. No distant metastases were seen. The standard of care for this diagnosis is surgical resection and consideration of radiation therapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (NCCN, 2012). Susan does not want Amy to undergo further surgery and believes radiation would be too difficult to maneuver. The next best option would be a medical approach with chemotherapy as the main modality. DIFFICULT DECISIONS If treatment is pursued, the advanced practitioner will need to perform regular examinations and prescribe and monitor chemotherapy. The delivery of therapy, requiring frequent blood draws and IV access, will be a challenge for the health-care staff. The APN is apprehensive about the ability to accomplish these tasks safely given Amy's limited capacity to participate. The APN is also concerned with how treatment will affect Amy's life. The APN may have her own individual conflict of morals to contend with, given the limited understanding of the patient vs. nontreatment of a potentially curative malignancy. Chemotherapy is not an easy task for any patient to undertake, especially for a patient with challenges such as Amy has. Although Susan can give legal consent for her sister, Amy is unable to participate in this decision-making. Susan strongly believes that Amy's quality of life is much more important than the quantity. Withholding treatment may shorten the natural course of Amy's life, yet administering chemotherapy will alter the quality of life that she now enjoys without her understanding or consent. Should Amy receive chemotherapy or should Susan refuse treatment on her behalf? PMID:25031990

  3. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  5. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  6. Atypical breasts cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lucie; Ng, Cho Ee; Fasih, Tarannum

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With increasing incidence of breast cancers there are now a larger number of cases diagnosed with rare malignancies. These can be diagnostic dilemmas and management strategy can be different by various breast multi-disciplinary teams (MDT). We aim to discuss the evidence-based approach for management of these atypical breast cancers which were identified in patients from a single breast screening unit. Method Patient with unusual breast malignancies (all types except invasive ductal and lobular) treated under the care of a single surgeon were identified during the breast multi-disciplinary discussion from 2011 to 2015. The histology and management of these cases were reviewed and literature search of electronic databases via PubMed and the search engines Google/Google Scholar was performed. Emphasis on keywords based on the histology type was used to limit search. Search was focused on the diagnosis, management and prognosis of these unusual breast cancers. Conclusion This series aims to focus on the evidence-based management of these rare breast malignancies; the diagnosis of which is crucial as it affects the overall treatment and prognosis. PMID:26812668

  7. Relationship Between Comorbid Conditions and Utilization Patterns of Immediate Breast Reconstruction Subtypes Post-mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Offodile, Anaeze C; Wenger, Julia; Guo, Lifei

    2016-05-01

    There is limited information on the influence of a patient's comorbid status on the type of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) selected. Our aim was to provide a population-based review of the relationship between baseline comorbid conditions and IBR subtype selected. This is a retrospective cohort study using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database to identify IBR recipients. Multivariable regression analyses was performed to identify the association between comorbidity and IBR subtype selection (prosthetic, pedicled, and free autologous). A total of 48,096 mastectomy patients were identified, of which 17,404 patients received IBR. IBR patients were younger (51 ± 10.4 versus 61.5 ± 13.6 years) and had a lower body mass index (27.1 ± 6.4 versus 28.9 ± 7.3) relative to patients who did not pursue IBR (p < 0.001 for all). Overall, IBR patients had a significantly lower incidence of comorbid conditions. In adjusted models, patients aged 45-64 years were more likely to pursue pedicled-autologous reconstruction (OR: 1.43, p < 0.001) and those older than 65 years were less likely to undergo free-autologous reconstruction (OR: 0.64, p = 0.02). Class I and II obesity was associated with pedicled (class I OR: 1.57, class II OR: 1.41) and free transfer (class I OR: 1.81, class II OR: 1.66) autologous IBR utilization (all p < 0.001). Also, smoking was related to increased chance of prosthetic reconstruction while preoperative radiotherapy was linked to free-autologous IBR. IBR patients were noted to be healthier than their non-IBR counterparts, and each IBR subtype was associated with a particular comorbidity profile. This has significant implications with regard to creation of an IBR-predictive model. Such a tool will improve preoperative counseling and decision making. PMID:26843478

  8. Aspects of the psychological management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Magarey, C J

    1988-03-01

    Psychological factors influence the survival of patients with breast cancer through the early detection of the cancer and through compliance with the treatment. There is now evidence that psychological factors also influence the immune factors which control micrometastases. In particular, stoical acceptance of cancer is associated with a shorter survival of the patient, while the expression of hostility towards the cancer is associated with a longer survival of the patient. Unrecognized psychological morbidity can impair the quality of a patient's life for years. Such psychological morbidity may be reduced by more open communication with the patient, by encouragement of the expression of feelings (especially anger), by preoperative diagnosis of the cancer by biopsy and by a greater time allowance before a mastectomy is performed. Morbidity may also be reduced by the encouragement of patients to take an active part in their treatment decisions, by the avoidance of a mastectomy, by immediate breast-reconstruction surgery, and by appropriate psychological support which includes self-help techniques, such as meditation. Breast cancer can be a positive turning-point in a person's life. PMID:3278200

  9. The 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Oprea, Gabriela M.; Yu, David S.; Godette, Karen G.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. Methods 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Results Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Conclusions Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation. PMID:25472643

  10. Paget’s Disease of Nipple in Male Breast with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Periyasamy, Karthikkumaran

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma of the male breast accounts for less than 0.5% of all cases of breast cancer. However, Paget’s disease of nipple in male is extremely rare. We report on a case of Paget’s disease of nipple with breast cancer in a 51-year-old gentleman. He presented with a ulcerative lesion and lump in the left breast beneath the nipple-areolar region with single mobile ipsilateral central group of axillary nodes. Modified radical mastectomy was performed. On follow up, patient was doing well with no recurrence. PMID:27042526

  11. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  12. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to make the diagnosis. See Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer to learn more about the ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  13. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how they are tested, see Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Needle biopsy: A hollow needle ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  14. Ten-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing radical mastectomy and total mastectomy with or without radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Redmond, C.; Fisher, E.R.; Bauer, M.; Wolmark, N.; Wickerham, L.; Deutsch, M.; Montague, E.; Margolese, R.; Foster, R.

    1985-03-14

    In 1971 a randomized trial was begun to compare alternative local and regional treatments of breast cancer, all of which employ breast removal. Life-table estimates were obtained for 1665 women enrolled in the study for a mean of 126 months. There were no significant differences among three groups of patients with clinically negative auxillary nodes, with respect to disease-free survival, distant-disease-free survival, or overall survival (about 57%) at 10 years. The patients were treated by radical mastectomy, total (simple) mastectomy without auxillary dissection but with regional irradiation, or total mastectomy without irradiation plus auxillary dissection only if nodes were subsequently positive. Similarly, no differences, were observed between patients with clinically positive nodes treated by radical mastectomy or by total mastectomy without auxillary dissection but with regional irradiation. Survival at 10 years was about 38% in both groups. Our findings indicate that the location of a breast tumor does not influence the prognosis and that irradiation of internal mammary nodes in patients with inner-quadrant lesions does not improve survival. The data also demonstrate that the results obtained at five years accurately predict the outcome at 10 years. It was concluded that the variations of local and regional treatment used in this study are not important in determining survival of patients with breast cancer. 25 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  15. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Palo, G; Costa, A; Formelli, F; Del Vecchio, M; Marubini, E; Veronesi, U

    1993-01-01

    Chemoprevention of cancer is a new branch of the medical science and represents a topic of increasing concern in public health. Over the last decade chemoprevention has been extensively studied from many points of view, and topics in the field of chemoprevention have expanded considerably. Breast cancer, the most common malignant neoplasm in women, is one of the areas of clinical interest for chemoprevention. In this paper the authors synthesized the "status of art" in chemoprevention of breast cancer with retinoids and antiestrogens. PMID:8193278

  16. Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David; Di Carlo, Philip A; Khouri, Nagi F

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening has become a controversial topic. Understanding the points of contention requires an appreciation of the conceptual framework underpinning cancer screening in general, knowledge of the strengths and limitations of available screening modalities, and familiarity with published clinical trial data. This review is data intense with the intention of presenting enough information to permit the reader to enter into the discussion with an ample knowledge base. The focus throughout is striking a balance between the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. PMID:26315519

  17. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jessica; Griffith, Kent A.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Janz, Nancy K.; Sabel, Michael S.; Katz, Steven J.; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

  19. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  1. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  2. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  3. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

  4. Nonfamilial breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ringnr, Markus; Staaf, Johan; Jnsson, Gran

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, our knowledge in somatic genetic events related to breast cancer has increased -enormously. Through usage of various genome-wide molecular approaches, it has become increasingly clear that breast cancer is a vastly heterogeneous disease. Microarray-based gene expression profiling has divided breast cancer into five distinct intrinsic subtypes termed basal-like, HER2-enriched, normal-like, luminal A, and luminal B. Importantly, these subtypes are closely correlated to clinical variables as well as different outcomes, with luminal A tumors as the good prognostic group. Initial studies using genome-wide DNA copy number data broadly partitioned breast cancers into three types, complex, amplifier, and simple, and moreover associated distinct copy number changes with the intrinsic subtypes defined by gene expression profiles. More recently, this genomic classification was refined into six genomic subtypes demonstrating strong resemblance to the intrinsic gene expression classification. Additionally, inherited BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated tumors were significantly correlated to specific subtypes. In this chapter, we will review the current status regarding genomic subtypes of nonfamilial breast cancer. PMID:23412797

  5. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of ... and/or a medical oncologist. Types of breast surgery Most men with breast cancer have some type ...

  6. [The risk-reducing mastectomy: unnecessary hysteria or life-saving prophylaxis?].

    PubMed

    Olariu, Radu; Shafighi, Maziar; Constantinescu, Mihai A

    2014-12-01

    The prophylactic (risk-reducing) mastectomy is a world-wide recognized method for specifically treating the increased breast cancer risk in patients showing a BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation as well as other patient groups at increased breast cancer risk. This option should be offered to all patients having the pertinent risk profile. Breast reconstruction is an integral part of the risk-reducing mastectomy procedure and all possible methods of breast reconstruction, especially autologous tissue reconstruction should be offered to all patients having a medical indication and desiring this surgical treatment. These patients are best managed in certified Breast Care Centres where the different medical and surgical specialists can address interdisciplinary all aspects of genetic counselling, preoperative counselling, mastectomy and reconstructive techniques as well as the necessary postoperative surveillance. PMID:25447091

  7. Prognostic role of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer: A historical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Verkooijen, Helena M; Wong, Fuh-Yong; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Kwong, Ava; Tan, Ern-Yu; Aishah Taib, Nur; Nei, Wen-Long; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; Tan, Benita; Chan, Patrick; Lee, Soo-Chin; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng-Har; Dent, Rebecca

    2015-11-15

    The value of adjuvant radiotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is currently debated. We assessed the association between adjuvant radiotherapy and survival in a large cohort of Asian women with TNBC. Women diagnosed with TNBC from 2006 to 2011 in five Asian centers (N = 1,138) were included. Survival between patients receiving mastectomy only, breast-conserving therapy (BCT, lumpectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy) and mastectomy with radiotherapy were compared, and adjusted for demography, tumor characteristics and chemotherapy types. Median age at diagnosis was 53 years (range: 23-96 years). Median tumor size at diagnosis was 2.5 cm and most patients had lymph node-negative disease. The majority of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 861, 76%) comprising predominantly anthracycline-based regimes. In 775 women with T1-2, N0-1, M0 TNBCs, 5-year relative survival ratio (RSR) was highest in patients undergoing mastectomy only (94.7%, 95% CI: 88.8-98.8%), followed by BCT (90.8%, 95% CI: 85.0-94.7%), and mastectomy with radiotherapy (82.3%, 95% CI: 73.4-88.1%). The adjusted risks of mortality between the three groups were not significantly different. In 363 patients with T3-4, N2-3, M0 TNBCs, BCT was associated with highest 5-year RSR (94.1%, 95% CI: 81.3-99.4%), followed by mastectomy with radiotherapy (62.7%, 95% CI: 54.3-70.1%), and mastectomy only (58.6%, 95% CI: 43.5-71.6%). Following multivariable adjustment, BCT and mastectomy with radiotherapy remained significantly associated with lower mortality risk compared to mastectomy only. Overall, adjuvant radiotherapy was associated with higher survival in women aged <40 years, but not in older women. Adjuvant radiotherapy appears to be independently associated with a survival gain in locally advanced as well as in very young TNBC. PMID:26018878

  8. [Synchronous male bladder cancer and breast cancer - a case report].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Kunugi, Chikara; Nakadai, Jyunpei; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Nakamura, Akihiko; Masuda, Aya; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Ohashi, Masakazu; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-11-01

    A 74-year-old man complained of blood in his urine over a 1-week period beginning in early October 2013, and was examined in the urology department of our hospital. A thorough examination revealed bladder cancer, and surgery was planned after two cycles of preoperative gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy. A chest computed tomography (CT) performed to evaluate the response to chemotherapy revealed a mass in the right breast. The patient had previously complained about the same site, and mammography and ultrasonography had suggested the possibility of a malignant mammary gland tumor. The results of aspiration cytology were Class V, and based on that finding, a diagnosis of cancer of the right breast was made. In February 2014, we performed a mastectomy, while preserving the pectoral muscles, along with sentinel node biopsy, total cystectomy, urethrectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and ureteroileal anastomosis. The histopathological diagnosis of the right breast tumor was invasive ductal carcinoma[scirrhous carcinoma, ly (+), v (-), g (+), f (+), s (+), nuclear grade 1=atypia 2+mitosis 1, EIC (-), ICT (-), NCAT (-)]. A micrometastatic tumor measuring approximately 1mm was observed in the sentinel lymph node. The breast disease was classified as pT1N1mi(sn)M0, Stage IIA, and the tumor was ER (+), PgR (+), HER2/neu (2+), and FISH (-). The bladder cancer was diagnosed as urothelial carcinoma, non-papillary, invasive G2>G3, pT2a; no pelvic lymph node metastases were detected, and it was classified as pT2aN0M0, Stage II. Synchronous male breast cancer and bladder cancer is a very rare condition, and we report the case with a review of the literature. PMID:25731395

  9. Patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors associated with treatment of early-stage breast cancer among Asian American women in California

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Press, David J.; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Shema, Sarah J.; Le, Gem M.; Kurian, Allison W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines recommend breast conserving surgery (BCS) with radiation as a viable alternative to mastectomy for treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Yet, Asian Americans (AA) are more likely than other groups to have mastectomy or omit radiation after BCS. Methods We applied polytomous logistic regression and recursive partitioning (RP) to analyze factors associated with mastectomy, or BCS without radiation, among 20,987 California AAs diagnosed with stage 0II breast cancer from 19902007. Results The percentage receiving mastectomy ranged from 40% among US-born Chinese to 58% among foreign-born Vietnamese. Factors associated with mastectomy included tumor characteristics such as larger tumor size, patient characteristics such as older age and foreign birthplace among some AA ethnicities, and additional factors including hospital (smaller hospital size, not NCI cancer center, low socioeconomic status (SES) patient composition, and high hospital AA patient composition) and neighborhood characteristics (ethnic enclaves of low SES). These hospital and neighborhood characteristics were also associated with BCS without radiation. Through RP, the highest mastectomy subgroups were defined by tumor characteristics such as size and anatomic location, in combination with diagnosis year and nativity. Conclusions Tumor characteristics and, secondarily, patient, hospital and neighborhood factors, are predictors of mastectomy and omission of radiation following BCS among AAs. Impact By focusing on interactions among patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors in the differential receipt of breast cancer treatment, our study identifies subgroups of interest for further study, and translation into public health and patient-focused initiatives to ensure that all women are fully informed about treatment options. PMID:22402290

  10. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  11. Neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Naoto T; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the advantage of converting unresectable breast tumors to resectable tumors and allowing more conservative surgery in some mastectomy candidates. Chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, which are recommended in the adjuvant setting, are also considered in the neoadjuvant setting. Here, we review studies of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer. PubMed and conference or congress proceedings were searched for clinical studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant agent in breast cancer. Twenty studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant setting were identified. In addition to reviewing key efficacy and safety data, we discuss how each trial assessed response, focusing on pathologic complete response and residual cancer burden scoring. Safety profiles are also reviewed. nab-Paclitaxel demonstrated antitumor activity and an acceptable safety profile in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Ongoing and future trials will further evaluate preoperative nab-paclitaxel in breast cancer, including in combination with many novel immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27072366

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  13. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control, CSS, and overall survival were similar after mastectomy and BCT. Young age (<45 years), close/positive margins ({<=}2 mm), no breast radiation, and lower electron boost energies ({<=}9 MeV) were associated with IBTR. Local failure and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were found to have a small (4%-12%) but statistically significantly negative impact on the rates of distant metastasis and CSS. These results suggest that optimizing local therapy (surgery and radiation) is crucial to improve local control and CSS in patients treated with DCIS.

  14. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  15. [A case of inflammatory breast cancer responding to anastrozole].

    PubMed

    Sato, Takanobu; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Kuwayama, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Suzuki, Shiho; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2009-11-01

    A case is 61 years old woman. In February 2008, she was aware of swelling, skin redness and edema in her left breast and visited our hospital. We diagnosed it as inflammatory breast cancer with positive hormone receptor (ER+, PgR+) and unexpression of HER2 (HercepTest 1 +). We started preoperative chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel followed by FEC100, but we canceled chemotherapy because she developed cerebral infarction when we administered paclitaxel twice. Then, hormonotherapy using anastrozole (Arimidex) was therefore attempted. Three months later, treatment with anastrozole alone reduced the swelling, skin redness and edema in her left breast. After eight months of administration, the breast swelling, skin redness and edema were completely disappeared. MRI revealed the disappearance of the enhanced area. Then mastectomy with auxiliary dissection was performed. PMID:20037461

  16. How Is Penile Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about biopsies, see our document Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer . Imaging tests Imaging tests use ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  17. Breast Cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mungrue, K.; Chase, H.; Gordon, J.; Knowles, D.; Lockhart, K.; Miller, N.; Morley, T.; Sealey, L.; Turner, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women in the Bahamas, which consists of many islands. This is the first attempt to identify which island has the highest occurrence of breast cancer. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to describe the sociodemographical and spatial features of breast cancer in the Bahamas in 2009–2011. METHODS A review of the medical records of all women with a confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer during the period January 1, 2009–December 31, 2011, was undertaken. Data were first obtained from the National Oncology Board of the Bahamas and validated by a review of the medical records. The patient address was geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS 10.0 Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) to satellite images obtained from The Nature Conservancy in the Bahamas. RESULTS We recruited 270 patients who satisfied the entry criteria. The cumulative incidences of breast cancer for the years 2009–2011 were 51.4, 45.4, and 51.4, respectively. Breast cancer occurred most often in women of African origin with a mean age at diagnosis of 56.6 ± 13.8 years. Ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type observed with most cancers occurring in Grade II or higher and presenting as late stage (≥ Stage II). Surgery was the preferred method of treatment with modified radical mastectomy being the procedure of choice. Spatial distribution of cases across the Bahamas revealed one cluster, which is present on the island of New Providence. Further analysis of New Providence showed a consistently skewed kernel density in the central and eastern regions, compared with a scattered distribution in the southern and western regions. CONCLUSION The island of New Providence had the highest occurrence of breast cancer among all the islands of the Bahamas. The increasing incidence of breast cancer in young women is likely to impose a significant burden on the future of Bahamian health care. PMID:27127408

  18. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  19. [Solitary oesophageal metastasis of breast cancer after 17 years latency].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Ottó; Kotsis, Lajos; Krasznai, Géza

    2007-12-01

    The authors discuss a case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with dysphagia, 17 years after radical mastectomy for breast cancer. CT scan showed a juxta esophageal mediastinal tumour. A biopsy via right thoracotomy revealed a metastatic adenocarcinoma of the oesophageal wall from the previous breast carcinoma. Minimally invasive oesophageal intubation was used for palliation. Hormonal manipulation and radiotherapy was commenced postoperatively. The patient was well after eight months follow-up. A combination of high clinical suspicion with EUS and deep oesophageal biopsy can lead to the correct diagnosis of this very rare clinical entity. The biology of metastatic breast cancer may demand palliation by oesophageal intubation or stenting combined with adjuvant chemo, radio or hormonal therapy in such instances. PMID:18065370

  20. Local regional effectiveness of surgery and radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, E.D.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1985-05-01

    Although gross tumor can be controlled with high doses of radiation therapy, control is achieved at the expense of severe radiation sequelae. In order to improve tumor control with minimum complications, the field of treatment should contain only subclinical disease. This article reviews the successful combination of surgery for the removal of gross cancer and radiation of moderate dose for the treatment of subclinical disease in patients with breast cancer. In patients with clinically favorable and operable disease, the combination of a radical or modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy of 5000 rad to the peripheral lymphatics and chest wall can secure 90% of the treated areas. For patients with locally and regionally advanced breast cancer, the combination of a simple mastectomy and dissection of the lateral axilla followed by postoperative irradiation of 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the chest wall, axilla, and peripheral lymphatic areas will control more than 85% of the patients treated as compared with approximately 70% control when surgery or radiotherapy alone is used, even with chemotherapy. Yet another clinical application of the subclinical disease concept is the successful combination of conservation surgery (whether segmental mastectomy, quadrantectomy, or wide excision) for gross tumor in the breast and axilla and irradiation for residual microscopic and multiple foci of tumor, yielding more than 90% control of locoregional disease with survival rates equal to those patients treated with radical or modified radical mastectomy. Results of multiple clinical trials and reported series are reviewed.

  1. Cancer risk of incremental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in electrocautery smoke for mastectomy personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electrocautery applications in surgical operations produce evasive odorous smoke in the cleanest operation rooms. Because of the incomplete combustion of electrical current in the tissues and blood vessels during electrocautery applications, electrocautery smoke (ES) containing significant unknown chemicals and biological forms is released. The potential hazards and cancer risk should be further investigated from the perspective of the occupational health of surgical staff. Methods The particle number concentration and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ES were thoroughly investigated in 10 mastectomies to estimate the cancer risk for surgical staff. The particle number concentration and gaseous/particle PAHs at the surgeons’ and anesthetic technologists’ (AT) breathing heights were measured with a particle counter and filter/adsorbent samplers. PAHs were soxhlet-extracted, cleaned, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Abundant submicron particles and high PAH concentrations were found in ES during regular surgical mastectomies. Most particles in ES were in the size range of 0.3 to 0.5 μm, which may potentially penetrate through the medical masks into human respiration. The average particle/gaseous phase PAH concentrations at the surgeon’s breathing height were 131 and 1,415 ng/m3, respectively, which is 20 to 30 times higher than those in regular outdoor environments. By using a toxicity equivalency factor, the cancer risk for the surgeons and anesthetic technologists was calculated to be 117 × 10-6 and 270 × 10-6, respectively; the higher cancer risk for anesthetic technologists arises due to the longer working hours in operation rooms. Conclusions The carcinogenic effects of PAHs in ES on the occupational health of surgical staff should not be neglected. The use of an effective ES evacuator or smoke removal apparatus is strongly suggested to diminish the ES hazards to surgical staff. PMID:24499532

  2. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh Chen, C.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

  3. [Breast cancer imaging].

    PubMed

    Canale, Sandra; Balleyguier, Corinne; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of breast cancer is multimodal. Mammography uses X-rays, the development of digital mammography has improved its quality and enabled implementations of new technologies such astomosynthesis (3D mammography) or contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Ultrasound is added to mammography when there is need to improve detection in high-density breast, to characterize an image, or guide apuncture or biopsy. Breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality. It detects a possible tumor angiogenesis by highlighting an early and intense contrast uptake. This method has an excellent negative predictive value, but its lack of specificity (false positives) can be problematic, thus it has to be prescribed according to published standards. An imaging breast screening report must be concluded by the BI-RADS lexicon classification of the ACR and recommendations about monitoring or histological verification. PMID:24579332

  4. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  6. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  7. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically inactive sulfates. The action of progestins in breast cancer is very controversial; some studies indicate an increase in breast cancer incidence, others show no difference and still others a significant decrease. Progestin action can also be a function of combination with other molecules (e.g. estrogens). In order to clarify and better understand the response of progestins in breast cancer (incidence, mortality), as well as in hormone replacement therapy or endocrine dysfunction, new clinical trials are needed studying other progestins as a function of the dose and period of treatment. PMID:17943537

  8. [Oncoplastic techniques for immediate reconstruction with nipple-areolar preservation following radical resection of a centrally located breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Flierl, D; Hanker, J P

    2001-07-01

    There are few breast-conserving therapies (BCT) for centrally located breast cancer. The present paper describes a BCT for breast cancers in such a location, which permits conservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), provided this has not been infiltrated. After histological detection of the breast cancer by punch biopsy, a central segmental mastectomy and an axillary dissection are performed. An immediate reconstruction of the subareolar defect is carried out by means of a local flap technique, thus conserving the NAC. PMID:11534300

  9. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  10. Surgical decision making in conservative mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Nicola; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We present some clinical advice to drive the decision process in performing conservative mastectomies. Several factors are taken into consideration to indicate these techniques. First of all, we need to identify patients who need a mastectomy due to the extension of the disease. In this case we suggest assessing patients anthropometric characteristics (breast volumeptosis), and personal preferences regarding the extension of surgical treatment. Small, medium size, without ptosis or with moderate ptosis can be better served by standard nipple-sparing mastectomy. Large and ptotic breast can be removed and reconstructed performing a skin-reducing mastectomy. Mastectomies cannot replace breast conservation and should be discouraged whenever breast-conserving surgery can be performed with good results. However, in some selected cases, and especially in patients with small breast, conservative mastectomies with contralateral reshape can yield favourable results. PMID:26855911

  11. Surgical decision making in conservative mastectomies.

    PubMed

    Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2016-02-01

    We present some clinical advice to drive the decision process in performing conservative mastectomies. Several factors are taken into consideration to indicate these techniques. First of all, we need to identify patients who need a mastectomy due to the extension of the disease. In this case we suggest assessing patients anthropometric characteristics (breast volume-ptosis), and personal preferences regarding the extension of surgical treatment. Small, medium size, without ptosis or with moderate ptosis can be better served by standard nipple-sparing mastectomy. Large and ptotic breast can be removed and reconstructed performing a skin-reducing mastectomy. Mastectomies cannot replace breast conservation and should be discouraged whenever breast-conserving surgery can be performed with good results. However, in some selected cases, and especially in patients with small breast, conservative mastectomies with contralateral reshape can yield favourable results. PMID:26855911

  12. Spectrum of very early breast cancer in a setting without organised screening

    PubMed Central

    Bhoo-Pathy, N; Subramaniam, S; Taib, N A; Hartman, M; Alias, Z; Tan, G-H; Ibrahim, R I; Yip, C-H; Verkooijen, H M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Within a setting without organised breast cancer screening, the characteristics and survival of very early breast cancer were determined. Methods: All 4930 women diagnosed with breast cancer in University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia from 1993 to 2011 were included. Factors associated with very early presentation (stage I) at diagnosis were identified. Tumour characteristics, management patterns, and survival of very early breast cancer were described, and where appropriate, compared with other settings. Results: Proportion of women presenting with stage I breast cancer significantly increased from 15.2% to 25.2% over two decades. Factors associated with very early presentation were Chinese ethnicity, positive family history of breast cancer, and recent period of diagnosis. Within stage I breast cancers, median tumour size at presentation was 1.5?cm. A majority of stage I breast cancer patients received mastectomy, which was associated with older age, Chinese ethnicity, postmenopausal status, and larger tumours. Chemotherapy was administered in 36% of patients. Five-year age-adjusted relative survival for women with stage I breast cancer was 99.1% (95% CI: 97.699.6%). Conclusions: The proportion of women presenting with very early breast cancer in this setting without organised screening is increasing. These women seem to survive just as well as their counterparts from affluent settings. PMID:24736587

  13. Reproduction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, Stefanos; Iatrakis, George; Navrozoglou, Iordanis

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women of developed countries, and as a result of new developments in breast cancer treatment, more women are cured after being diagnosed with this disease. It is important that fertility preservation strategies are addressed before chemotherapy, because chemotherapy may induce premature ovarian failure (depending on the woman's age, the drugs used, the dosage and duration of treatment). Among possible solutions are embryos or oocytes cryopreservation, ovarian tissue cryopreservation-freezing with a subsequent orthotopic and heterotopic autotransplantation, whole ovary cryopreservation, ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which inhibit ovarian follicular depletion induced by chemotherapeutic agents and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) after ovulation induction with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen. PMID:20170848

  14. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  15. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  16. [Proteoglycans and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Delehedde, M; Deudon, E; Boilly, B; Hondermarck, H

    1997-04-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are complex sulphated macromolecules composed of linear polysaccharide chains of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) covalently attached to a core protein. These GAG chains contain sulphate groups at various positions, giving them a high density of negative charges, and allowing them to interact with extracellular matrix molecules, including various growth factors. In the developing mammary gland, sulphated proteoglycans participate in morphogenesis and interact with extracellular matrix components in order to constitute a functional matrix. In breast pathogenesis, qualitative or quantitative changes in PG may have important consequences on cell proliferation and/or differentiation. Thus, several studies showed large variations in the nature and distribution of PG/GAG in breast cancer. Accumulation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans was described in the stromal compartment of mammary biopsy sections, and content in heparan sulfate proteoglycans, which were more specifically distributed in the epithelial compartment, increased with the level of malignancy and invasiveness of breast cancer tissues. Furthermore, heparan sulfate proteoglycans seem to be involved in control of the growth-promoting activity of numerous growth factors such as fibroblast growth factors also named Heparin-Binding Growth Factors (HBGF). The implication of PG in growth factor activity suggest that PG may have prognostic value in breast cancer. In future, structural studies into the specific HS-sequences involvement in growth factors binding could allow the development of new antiproliferative strategies. PMID:9296079

  17. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 ... of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project P–1 Study. Journal of the National Cancer ...

  18. Radiotherapy in the treatment of hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Lori J; Haffty, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer represents approximately 5% to 10% of breast cancers and a larger portion of patients with early-onset disease. Given the relatively recent identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the available literature with respect to outcomes related to radiation therapy has inherent limitations with relatively small patient numbers and a lack of prospective randomized trials. There is, however, a growing body of literature describing treatment and toxicity outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery and after mastectomy for breast cancer patients who have BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Acknowledging the limitations in the available data, there does not appear to be any evidence of more severe normal tissue reactions or compromised long-term survival rates in women electing breast-conserving surgery and radiation. These studies are reviewed in this article. Outcomes related to radiation therapy in patients with variants in other breast cancer-related genes, such as p53, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, and PTEN, are even less well documented because of the paucity of data. Available reports on radiation-related outcomes in these and single nucleotide polymorphisms in radiation repair and response genes are discussed. PMID:21134653

  19. Lower extremity anterior compartment syndrome complicating bilateral mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tashakkor, A Yashar; Macadam, Sheina A

    2012-01-01

    ‘Well leg compartment syndrome’ refers to compartment syndrome occurring in a nontraumatic setting. This occurs most commonly in the lower limb during surgery performed with the patient in an anatomically vulnerable position. While this complication is well documented in the setting of orthopedic, urological and gynecological surgeries, it is an exceptionally rare complication in plastic surgery; only seven cases have been published on compartment syndrome complicating an operation performed on a supine patient. A case involving a 56-year-old woman who developed an anterior compartment syndrome of her right lower leg following a bilateral mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is presented. A detailed literature review is also included. PMID:23730157

  20. Treatment of early stage breast cancer by limited surgery and radical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, A.M.; Cope, O.; Russo, R.; Wang, C.C.; Schulz, M.D.; Wang, C.; Rodkey, G.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five female patients with early stage breast cancer, i.e., Stage I and II were treated by limited surgery followed by radical radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between January, 1956 and December, 1974. Patients included those who were medically inoperable or who refused mastectomy. The 5-year survival rate was 83% and 76% for Stage I and II, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival (absolute) was 67% and 42%. Although the number of patients so treated is small, there was no significant difference in survival from the results of the radical mastectomy series at the same institution. No major complications were encountered. Seventeen of eighty-five patients developed minor problems; mostly fibrosis and minimal arm lymphedema stemmming from older orthovoltage equipment and treatment techniques. With the current availability of megavoltage equipment, improvements in techniques and dosimetry, complications should decrease. Combined limited surgery and radical radiation therapy should be considered in those patients where a radical mastectomy is not feasible because of psychological or medical problems. Since this procedure results in a cosmetically acceptable breast, radical radiation in early stage breast cancer seems a reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy.

  1. Breast and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E.; Couchman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression. Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression. PMID:22205677

  2. Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

  3. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... for breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Breast Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer ...

  5. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  6. Reproduction and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-12-01

    Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  7. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  8. FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mammography and Breast Cancer Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: ...

  9. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  10. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low-resource environment. PMID:27191360

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  14. Frontiers in Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christine M.; Rabinovitch, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The development of breast-conserving treatment for early-stage breast cancer is one of the most important success stories in radiation oncology in the latter half of the twentieth century. Lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy provides an appealing alternative to mastectomy for many women. In recent years, there has been a shift in clinical investigational focus toward refinements in the methods of delivering adjuvant radiotherapy that provide shorter, more convenient schedules of external-beam radiotherapy and interstitial treatment. Expedited courses of whole-breast treatment have been demonstrated to be equivalent to traditional lengthier courses in terms of tumor control and cosmetic outcome and to provide an opportunity for cost efficiencies. PMID:25113764

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  16. Surgical Treatment Differences Among Latina and African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Campesino, Maureen; Koithan, Mary; Ruiz, Ester; Glover, Johanna Uriri; Juarez, Gloria; Choi, Myunghan; Krouse, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe breast cancer treatment choices from the perspectives of Latina and African American breast cancer survivors. Design An interdisciplinary team conducted a mixed-methods study of women treated for stages I–IV breast cancer. Setting Participants’ homes in metropolitan areas. Sample 39 participants in three groups: monolingual Spanish-speaking Latinas (n = 15), English-speaking Latinas (n = 15), and African American women (n = 9). Methods Individual participant interviews were conducted by racially and linguistically matched nurse researchers, and sociodemographic data were collected. Content and matrix analysis methods were used. Main Research Variables Perceptions of breast cancer care. Findings High rates of mastectomy were noted for early-stage treatment (stage I or II). Among the participants diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, the majority of English-speaking Latinas (n = 9) and African American women (n = 4) received a mastectomy. However, the majority of the Spanish-speaking Latina group (n = 5) received breast-conserving surgery. Four factors influenced the choice of mastectomy over lumpectomy across the three groups: clinical indicators, fear of recurrence, avoidance of adjuvant side effects, and perceived favorable survival outcomes. Spanish-speaking Latinas were more likely to rely on physician treatment recommendations, and the other two groups used a shared decision-making style. Conclusions Additional study is needed to understand how women select and integrate treatment information with the recommendations they receive from healthcare providers. Among the Spanish-speaking Latina group, limited English proficiency, the use of translators in explaining treatment options, and a lack of available educational materials in Spanish are factors that influenced reliance on physician recommendations. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses were notably absent in supporting the women’s treatment decision making. Advanced practice oncology nurses, coupled with language-appropriate educational resources, may provide essential guidance in clarifying surgical treatment choices for breast cancer among culturally and linguistically diverse populations. PMID:22750902

  17. Understanding breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin L

    2010-01-01

    With mammography firmly established as an integral part of efforts to reduce breast cancer mortality, many believe it is time to concentrate on prevention. Part of the multifaceted approach to preventing and treating this disease is unraveling its molecular, genetic and physiological makeup. Another aspect is ensuring that women have the information they need to make informed decisions about screening and treatment. Studies also point to the influence of nutrition, exercise, medicines and a patient's adherence to screening on cancer risk and recovery. PMID:20445140

  18. Breast cancer risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Marzena; Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  19. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy and late mortality: evidence from the Cancer Research Campaign trial for early breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Haybittle, J. L.; Brinkley, D.; Houghton, J.; A'Hern, R. P.; Baum, M.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify any excess mortality caused by adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer. DESIGN--Prospective randomised clinical trial. Two thousand subjects needed for study to have a 90% chance of detecting a difference in survival rate of 7% with 95% significance. Patients were followed up until June 1988, giving follow up of 158-216 months. SETTING--A multicentre trial mainly drawing patients from centres in the United Kingdom. PATIENTS--2800 Women presenting with clinical stage I or II carcinoma of the breast from June 1970 to April 1975. INTERVENTIONS--One group of women (n = 1376) had simple mastectomy followed by immediate postoperative radiotherapy (1320 to 1510 rets). The remaining women (n = 1424) had simple mastectomy with subsequent careful observation of the axilla, radiotherapy being delayed until there was obvious progression or recurrence of disease locally. END POINT--Increased mortality in patients treated with radiotherapy from causes other than breast cancer. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Survival was measured from time of first treatment to death or last follow up. Deaths from any cause and from specified causes were counted as events. Comparison over the whole follow up showed a slight excess mortality in the group treated with radiotherapy (relative risk 1.04; 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.15). The relative risk of death from breast cancer was 0.97 (0.87 to 1.08) but that of death from other causes was 1.37 (1.09 to 1.72), the increase mainly being in women who had had tumours of the left breast (1.61 (1.17 to 2.24)) and had been treated with orthovoltage (1.85 (1.27 to 2.71)). Analysis of causes of death after five years showed a relative risk of 2.11 (1.25 to 3.59) for new malignancies and of 1.65 (1.05 to 2.58) for cardiac disease, the increase in cardiac mortality being most pronounced in patients who had had tumours of the left breast and whose treatment had included orthovoltage radiation (relative risk 2.67 (1.28 to 5.55)). CONCLUSIONS--Adjuvant radiotherapy after simple mastectomy for early breast cancer produces a small excess late mortality from other cancers and cardiac disease. The risk has to be balanced against the higher risk of local recurrence when immediate postoperative radiotherapy is not given. The balance has to be assessed for each patient, and for many patients radiotherapy will still be desirable in the initial treatment of their early breast cancer. PMID:2503148

  1. Secondary cancer rates following breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wesley, David

    2007-01-01

    Life table analysis and other mortality methods apply well to end points other than mortality. This paper demonstrates the application of mortality experience methodology to the recurrence of breast cancer and/or new primaries in women previously diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Specific recurrence rates are broken out by duration as well as attributes available at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis: stage, histology, age band, and year of diagnosis. Use of attained age is demonstrated to control for the effect of aging over long durations. Breast cancer recurrence is shown to drop to a relatively low rate compared with the rate of new primary occurrence. PMID:17941334

  2. Improving quality of breast cancer surgery through development of a national breast cancer surgical outcomes (BRCASO) research database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Common measures of surgical quality are 30-day morbidity and mortality, which poorly describe breast cancer surgical quality with extremely low morbidity and mortality rates. Several national quality programs have collected additional surgical quality measures; however, program participation is voluntary and results may not be generalizable to all surgeons. We developed the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO) database to capture meaningful breast cancer surgical quality measures among a non-voluntary sample, and study variation in these measures across providers, facilities, and health plans. This paper describes our study protocol, data collection methods, and summarizes the strengths and limitations of these data. Methods We included 4524 women ≥18 years diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003-2008. All women with initial breast cancer surgery performed by a surgeon employed at the University of Vermont or three Cancer Research Network (CRN) health plans were eligible for inclusion. From the CRN institutions, we collected electronic administrative data including tumor registry information, Current Procedure Terminology codes for breast cancer surgeries, surgeons, surgical facilities, and patient demographics. We supplemented electronic data with medical record abstraction to collect additional pathology and surgery detail. All data were manually abstracted at the University of Vermont. Results The CRN institutions pre-filled 30% (22 out of 72) of elements using electronic data. The remaining elements, including detailed pathology margin status and breast and lymph node surgeries, required chart abstraction. The mean age was 61 years (range 20-98 years); 70% of women were diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, 20% with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 10% with invasive lobular carcinoma. Conclusions The BRCASO database is one of the largest, multi-site research resources of meaningful breast cancer surgical quality data in the United States. Assembling data from electronic administrative databases and manual chart review balanced efficiency with high-quality, unbiased data collection. Using the BRCASO database, we will evaluate surgical quality measures including mastectomy rates, positive margin rates, and partial mastectomy re-excision rates among a diverse, non-voluntary population of patients, providers, and facilities. PMID:22472011

  3. [Incidence and treatment of local recurrences after conservative surgical treatment for cancer of the breast].

    PubMed

    Caravati, F; Ginelli, S; Riva, M; Chiesa, E; Calvi, A

    1994-11-01

    Long-term survival is comparable after total mastectomy or conservative surgery for early breast cancer. Our purpose was to evaluate the rate and therapy of breast relapse at the Regional Hospital of Varese (Italy) in a 10 years period. From 1/1/1980 to 31/12/1990 a total of 606 patients with early breast cancer (Stage I or II early) were evaluated. They all were submitted to quadrantectomy, axillary dissection and radiotherapy. In case of metastases to the axillary lymph nodes, hormono or chiotherapy were performed. 425 patients were regularly followed for a period of 2.5-13 years. In 15 patients (3.2%) a local recurrence was discovered. They were treated as follows, 8 patients: mastectomy, 4 patients: conservative surgery, 4 patients: no therapy. The surgical approach of the local recurrence, mastectomy or conservative surgery, does not influence long-term survival of patients treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early stage breast cancer. Conservative surgery is often possible in treating local recurrence without interfering with complete removal of the tumor and long-term survival. PMID:7860691

  4. SEOM clinical guidelines in Hereditary Breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Llort, G; Chirivella, I; Morales, R; Serrano, R; Sanchez, A Beatriz; Teulé, A; Lastra, E; Brunet, J; Balmaña, J; Graña, B

    2015-12-01

    Approximately, 7 % of all breast cancers (BC) and 11-15 % of ovarian cancers (OC) are associated with inherited predisposition, mainly related to germline mutations in high penetrance BRCA1/2 genes. Clinical criteria for genetic testing are based on personal and family history to estimate a minimum 10 % detection rate. Selection criteria are evolving according to new advances in this field and the clinical utility of genetic testing. Multiplex panel testing carries its own challenges and we recommend inclusion of genes with clinical utility. We recommend screening with annual mammography from age 30 and breast MRI from age 25 for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy should be offered to women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, between 35 and 40 years and after completion of childbearing, or individualise based on the earliest age of ovarian cancer diagnosed in the family. Bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy is an option for healthy BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, as well as contralateral mastectomy for young patients with a prior BC diagnosis. BRCA genetic testing in patients with BC and OC may influence their locoregional and systemic treatment. PMID:26669313

  5. Epidemiology of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joli R; Moysich, Kirsten B; Swede, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer in men is a rare disease, accounting for approximately 1% of all breast cancer cases. Although the epidemiologic literature regarding female breast cancer is extensive, relatively little is known about the etiology of male breast cancer (MBC). This review is intended to summarize the existing body of evidence on genetic and epidemiologic risk factors for breast cancer in men. Overall, the epidemiology of MBC presents similarities with the epidemiology of female breast cancer. Major genetic factors associated with an increased risk of breast cancer for men include BRCA2 mutations, which are believed to account for the majority of inherited breast cancer in men, Klinefelter syndrome, and a positive family history. Suspected genetic factors include AR gene mutations, CYP17 polymorphism, Cowden syndrome, and CHEK2. Epidemiologic risk factors for MBC include disorders relating to hormonal imbalances, such as obesity, testicular disorders (e.g., cryptorchidism, mumps orchitis, and orchiectomy), and radiation exposure. Suspected epidemiologic risk factors include prostate cancer,prostate cancer treatment, gynecomastia, occupational exposures (e.g., electromagnetic fields, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high temperatures), dietary factors (e.g., meat intake and fruit and vegetable consumption), and alcohol intake. PMID:15668471

  6. Breast cancer recurrence after sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    AlSaif, Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look into the pattern of breast cancer recurrence following mastectomy, breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy or chemotherapy after SLNB at our institution. Methods: Between January 2005 and December 2014, all patients diagnosed with breast cancer with clinically negative axilla, underwent SLNB. We reviewed their medical records to identify pattern of cancer recurrence. Results: The median follow-up was 35.5 months. Eighty five patients (70.8%) had a negative sentinel lymph node (SLN) and subsequently had no further axillary treatment, one of them (1.2%) developed axillary recurrence 25 months postoperatively. Twenty five patients (20.8%) had a positive SLN (macrometastases) and subsequently had immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Ten patients (8.3%) had a positive SLN (micrometastases). In the positive SLN patients (macrometastases and micrometastases), there were two ipsilateral breast recurrences (5.7%), seen three and four years postoperatively. Also in this group, there was one (2.9%) distant metastasis to bone three years postoperatively. Conclusion: In this series, the clinical axillary false negative rate for SLNB was 1.2% which is in accordance with the published literature. This supports the use of SLNB as the sole axillary staging procedure in breast cancer patients with negative SLNB. Axillary lymph node dissection can be safely omitted in patients with micrometastases in their sentinel lymph node(s). PMID:26870109

  7. [Cancer of the breast and the receptor status].

    PubMed

    Buonomo, O; Serao, A; Muggianu, A; Guglielmelli, E; Davoli, E; Amori, A

    1991-04-01

    Correlation between survival and hormonal receptor status in patients with breast cancer is still controversial. The results of a study carried out, from 1973 to 1988, on 55 patients (average age 56.7) affected with breast cancer and submitted to radical (Halsted) mastectomy, are reported. Estradiol receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) were determined using the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) method and the enzymatic immuno assay (EIA). The threshold value for defining the ER positivity was 10 f/mole/mg of cytosol protein and 50 f/mole/mg for PR positivity. Forty-one patients resulted as ER+, 31 were also PR+. Moreover, 41 patients were treated with tamoxifen (10 mg x 2 die per os). In a 15-year follow-up, no significant difference in survival rate between patients with receptor-positive tumors or treated with tamoxifen and patients with receptor-negative tumors was recorded. PMID:1911078

  8. Breast-feeding may reduce breast-cancer risk.

    PubMed

    1994-04-30

    A case control study of 6000 women with breast cancer and about 8000 women with cancer living in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin found that younger women who breast feed are at a 20% lower risk of developing breast cancer before menopause than those who have never breast fed or have breast fed only briefly. The younger a woman was when she first breast fed, the less likely she was to develop premenopausal breast cancer. The length of total time a woman breast fed in her life was inversely related to the risk of developing breast cancer before menopause. For example, if a woman breast feeds for 4-12 months, the risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal women is reduced 11% when compared to women who breast feed for less than 3 months and those who do not breast feed. The risk can be reduced by about 25%, if women breast feed for at least 2 years. Neither young age nor long duration of total time breast feeding appeared to influence the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause, however. One hypothesis is that breast feeding suppresses the production of ovarian hormones which may be associated with breast cancer. Since most breast cancer cases in the US are postmenopausal, the reduction in breast cancer cases would be rather small, however. Another study of about 90,000 US nurses found no relationship between breast feeding and breast cancer. The lack of a relationship may have been due to the fact that the nurses were much less likely to breast feed at a young age since they had a high educational level. Further, breast feeding practices have changed in the last 20-30 years from feeding every 4 hours to feeding on demand. In India most rural women breast feed, beginning when they are young. They even practice communal breast feeding, which allows women to work outside their homes. PMID:12179188

  9. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  10. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  11. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  12. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  13. A novel technique for post-mastectomy breast irradiation utilising non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, M; Zhang, B; Naqvi, S; Liu, B; Mohiuddin, M M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the post-mastectomy setting can reduce the dose to normal structures and improve target coverage. We compared this IMRT technique with a standard partial wide tangential (PWT) plan and a five-field (5F) photon-electron plan. 10 patients who underwent left-sided mastectomy were planned to 50.4 Gy using either (1) PWT to cover the internal mammary (IM) nodes and supraclavicular fields, (2) 5F comprising standard tangents, supraclavicular fields and an electron field for the IM nodes or (3) IMRT. The planning target volume (PTV) included the left chest wall, supraclavicular, axillary and IM lymph nodes. No beams were directed at the right lung, right breast or heart. Mean dose–volume histograms were constructed by combining the dose–volume histogram data from all 10 patients. The mean PTV to receive 95% of the dose (V95%) was improved with the IMRT plan to 94.2% from 91.4% (p = 0.04) with the PWT plan and from 87.7% (p = 0.012) with the 5F plan. The mean V110% of the PTV was improved to 3.6% for the IMRT plan from 16.8% (p = 0.038) for the PWT plan and from 51.8% (p = 0.001) for the 5F plan. The mean fraction volume receiving 30 Gy (v30Gy) of the heart was improved with the IMRT plan to 2.3% from 7.5% (p = 0.01) for the PWT plan and 4.9% (p = 0.02) for the 5F plan. In conclusion, non-coplanar IMRT results in improved coverage of the PTV and a lower heart dose when compared with a 5F or PWT plan. PMID:20223909

  14. A novel technique for post-mastectomy breast irradiation utilising non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Koshy, M; Zhang, B; Naqvi, S; Liu, B; Mohiuddin, M M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the post-mastectomy setting can reduce the dose to normal structures and improve target coverage. We compared this IMRT technique with a standard partial wide tangential (PWT) plan and a five-field (5F) photon-electron plan. 10 patients who underwent left-sided mastectomy were planned to 50.4 Gy using either (1) PWT to cover the internal mammary (IM) nodes and supraclavicular fields, (2) 5F comprising standard tangents, supraclavicular fields and an electron field for the IM nodes or (3) IMRT. The planning target volume (PTV) included the left chest wall, supraclavicular, axillary and IM lymph nodes. No beams were directed at the right lung, right breast or heart. Mean dose-volume histograms were constructed by combining the dose-volume histogram data from all 10 patients. The mean PTV to receive 95% of the dose (V95%) was improved with the IMRT plan to 94.2% from 91.4% (p = 0.04) with the PWT plan and from 87.7% (p = 0.012) with the 5F plan. The mean V110% of the PTV was improved to 3.6% for the IMRT plan from 16.8% (p = 0.038) for the PWT plan and from 51.8% (p = 0.001) for the 5F plan. The mean fraction volume receiving 30 Gy (v30Gy) of the heart was improved with the IMRT plan to 2.3% from 7.5% (p = 0.01) for the PWT plan and 4.9% (p = 0.02) for the 5F plan. In conclusion, non-coplanar IMRT results in improved coverage of the PTV and a lower heart dose when compared with a 5F or PWT plan. PMID:20223909

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of early breast cancer has evolved from the removal of the entire breast and surrounding tissues (mastectomy) to the removal of the tumour together with a margin of healthy tissue (lumpectomy). Adjuvant radiotherapy, however, is still mainly given to the whole breast. Furthermore, external beam radiotherapy is often given several months after initial surgery and requires the patient to attend the radiotherapy centre daily for several weeks. A single fraction of radiotherapy given during surgery directly to the tumour bed (intraoperative radiotherapy) avoids these problems. The rationale and level-1 evidence for the safety and efficacy of the technique are reviewed. PMID:22295220

  16. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ≤ 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ≤ 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ≤ 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ≤ 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results. PMID:24507962

  17. [Factors influencing on the prognosis in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, T; Horino, T; Ota, J

    1988-07-01

    TNM classification, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, histological type of primary tumor, ER status and biological tumor markers have been recognized as prognostic factors in breast cancer. The 673 breast cancer patients undergoing radical mastectomy at this department were analyzed for TNM classification influencing on the postoperative prognosis. Five-and ten- year survival rates were 93% and 89% in stage I, 83.9% and 75.5% in stage II, 67.3% and 60% in stage III. The most common histological type, namely, invasive ductal carcinoma, of primary breast cancer was classified into three types by Japan Mammary Cancer Society. The first type was papillotubular carcinoma, the second solid-tubular carcinoma, and the third scirrhous carcinoma. The prognosis of papillotubular carcinoma was best. Many investigators reported that the prognosis of ER positive breast cancer was good. But in the latest report, the opposite result is obtained. More study is necessary to evaluate the prognostic value of ER. The most common biological tumor markers were CEA, LDH and ALP. The CEA was the best prognosis-factor in biological tumor markers. PMID:2456037

  18. Surgical Management for Early-Stage Bilateral Breast Cancer Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-yan; Quan, Chen-lian; Tan, Yu-long; Liu, Guang-yu; Shao, Zhi-min; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC) patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014. Results A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5%) suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC), and 296 (2.0%) suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC). Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC. Conclusions Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options. PMID:25874699

  19. [New aspects in the treatment of breast cancer (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hohl, K

    1975-01-01

    The specific treatment of primary breast carcinoma in the future may depend on viral genes in the development of antiviral substances, or a specific chemotherapeutic method. In this manner the turnover rate of the RNS virus is successfully inhibited (as the preceding communicated observations about the probably produced inhibition effect of rifampicin derivates of streptovarizin complexes). Prophylactically, by familiar breast cancer, breast feeding must be prohibited so that a supposed virus factor would not transfer with the milk. So far we hope that a supposed virus diagnosis of the primary tumor leads to decreased surgical interventions (tumorectomy, radical mastectomy), and technical as well as high energy postradiotherapy. This would not only give a smaller psychologic shock to the patient (small operation trauma) but would also decrease the complications (arm edema, movement restriction). This opinion now appears to effect international thinking after radical and subradical surgery have not given better results. For the late stage there is modern chemotherapy, combined with proper radiotherapy treatment of painful skeletal metastases, eventually also brain metastases which can now be successfully irradiated. Whether better late results are obtained by the early chemotherapy as well as the improvement of the immunity reaction quickly after sugical intervention (modified radical mastectomy) will be seen in the near future. PMID:1197673

  20. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-17

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 877-465-6636 • Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization: www. y- me. org or call 1-800-221-2141 What you can do to prevent breast cancer and to see if you have it? Lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise and avoiding excess alcohol, ...

  3. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Gallbladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worldwide, gallbladder cancer is much more common in India, Pakistan, and Central European and South American countries ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... had breast cancer in the past. Lactation (breast milk production) and breast-feeding should be stopped if ... methotrexate , may occur in high levels in breast milk and may harm the nursing baby. Women receiving ...

  6. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... had breast cancer in the past. Lactation (breast milk production) and breast-feeding should be stopped if ... methotrexate , may occur in high levels in breast milk and may harm the nursing baby. Women receiving ...

  7. Breast cancer update.

    PubMed

    Kuter, I

    2000-01-01

    The large number of excellent presentations on breast cancer at this year's ASCO meeting reflects the enormous interest in clinical trials of this common disease. In the reports of adjuvant hormonal therapy, the most interesting included Abstract 273 by Boccardo et al., who reported that postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER(+)) cancers who had already completed three years of tamoxifen experienced better overall survival if treated with two years of subsequent aminoglutethimide (a first-generation aromatase inhibitor) rather than another two years of tamoxifen. This whets our appetite for studies currently under way to define the role of third-generation aromatase inhibitors in the adjuvant setting. A report by FISHER: from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-23 study (Abstract 277) provided confirmation of what is rapidly becoming accepted, that the addition of tamoxifen to chemotherapy does not benefit breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes who have ER(-) cancers. In premenopausal women, another report of the benefit of hormonal therapy, this time by the French Adjuvant Study Group using complete hormonal blockade with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and tamoxifen (Abstract 279) showed that hormonal therapy can be at least as good as, if not better, than six cycles of 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2), epirubicin 50 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2) in terms of disease-free survival and overall survival. Among the papers on adjuvant chemotherapy, a controversial paper from the German Adjuvant Breast Cancer Group reported that three cycles of CMF (a dose-intense regimen with all three drugs being given on days 1 and 8) were as good as six cycles (Abstract 283). Another report, from the International Breast Cancer Study Group, raised the controversial question of whether there really is much added benefit from the addition of chemotherapy to tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with negative lymph nodes if their tumors have ERs (Abstract 281). A second study (the first was the CALGB study reported at ASCO in 1998) showing a benefit to the addition of Taxol to an anthracycline-based adjuvant regimen, was reported from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (Abstract 285), giving further impetus to the inclusion of Taxol in standard adjuvant treatment. Finally, there were a number of interesting presentations on HER-2. Reported here are three of these, all addressing the effect of HER-2 overexpression on the response to hormonal therapy. Taken together, they uphold the emerging concern that women with ER(+) cancers may not benefit significantly from endocrine treatment if the tumors also overexpress HER-2. Observations such as these will afford us the ability to predict more accurately which women will benefit from specific treatments. PMID:10964995

  8. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  9. Does neoadjuvant chemotherapy increase breast conservation in operable breast cancer: an Egyptian experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Bary, N; El-Kased, AF; Aiad, HAZ

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer is well established, as are its indications. Likewise, the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer is well established. The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer has only recently become of interest to researchers. Patients and methods: This study included 34 cases of operable breast cancer that were given four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the form of FEC100 then subjected to surgery. The surgery done was either breast conserving surgery or modified radical mastectomy. All patients completed the treatment regimen and no patients were excluded from the study. All surgical specimens were studied pathologically for chemotherapy effect. Results: An overall objective response was observed in 70.6% of the patients. Seven patients (20.6%) experienced a clinical complete response (cCR), 17 patients (50.0%) had partial response, nine patients (26.5%) had no change of their disease and only one patient had disease progression. Of the seven patients who had a cCR, only four patients (11.8%) had pathologic complete response (pCR), while pCR for the whole group was 14.7%(5/34). Tumour size of more than 2 cm was observed in 28 patients (82.4%) at time of presentation, while tumour size of 2 cm or less was seen in six patients (17.6%) only. After completion of the course of chemotherapy, 23 patients (67.6%) were observed to have tumours of 2 cm or less that allowed for less extensive resections. Twenty-three patients underwent breast conservative surgery (67.6%) while modified radical mastectomy was performed in 11 patients (32.4%). Conclusion: The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in operable breast cancer in this study was associated with tumour and axillary downstaging, which increased the proportion of cases undergoing breast conservation, with acceptable side effects and reasonable cost. During the limited follow-up time of this study no loco regional recurrences were recorded and one distant treatment failure was recorded. Its impact if any on overall or disease-free survival was not addressed in this study. Larger multi-centre randomized studies with a long follow-up are needed to compare the overall and disease-free survival benefit of this treatment modality, especially in different subtypes stratified by pathological response. PMID:22275993

  10. The Angelina Jolie Effect in Jewish Law: Prophylactic Mastectomy and Oophorectomy in BRCA Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Sharon Galper

    2015-01-01

    Background Following the announcement of actress Angelina Jolie’s prophylactic bilateral mastectomies and subsequent prophylactic oophorectomy, there has been a dramatic increase in interest in BRCA testing and prophylactic surgery. Objective To review current medical literature on the benefits of prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy among BRCA-positive women and its permissibility under Jewish law. Results Recent literature suggests that in BRCA-positive women who undergo prophylactic oophorectomy the risk of dying of breast cancer is reduced by 90%, the risk of dying of ovarian cancer is reduced by 95%, and the risk of dying of any cause is reduced by 77%. The risk of breast cancer is further reduced by prophylactic mastectomy. Prophylactic oophorectomy and prophylactic mastectomy pose several challenges within Jewish law that call into question the permissibility of surgery, including mutilation of a healthy organ, termination of fertility, self-wounding, and castration. A growing number of Jewish legal scholars have found grounds to permit prophylactic surgery among BRCA carriers, with some even obligating prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy. Conclusion Current data suggest a significant reduction in mortality from prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy in BRCA carriers. While mutilation of healthy organs is intrinsically forbidden in Jewish law, the ability to preserve human life may contravene and even mandate prophylactic surgery. PMID:26886774

  11. Twelve years' experience with irradiation as the primary treatment for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nobler, M.P.; Venet, L.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety patients received comprehensive, high-dose, supervoltage teletherapy as the primary treatment for carcinoma of the breast, following a biopsy or a segmental resection. The tumor doses delivered to the breast ranged between 5600 and 7000 rad in six to nine weeks; the draining lymph nodes received tumor doses of 5000 to 7000 rad in six to eight weeks. In five cases, Iridium-192 implants were employed to boost the radiation dose to the breast, and in seven instances a toilette mastectomy was performed for residual cancer. Satisfactory local control and cosmetic results were achieved in 86 patients. The patients were followed for 2 1/2 to 12 1/2 years. The local control rates were: Stage I, 100%, Stage II, 95%; Stage III, 100%; Stave IV (M-0), 89%; Stave IV (M-1), 100%. The overall disease-free survival figures were: Stage I, 85%; Stage II, 48%; Stage III, 50%; and Stage IV (M-0), 29%. We feel that this approach to the initial management of breast cancer is a practical, useful, and successful substitute for mastectomy when medical or surgical contraindications exist, or when the patient refuses a mastectomy.

  12. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  13. Landmark clinical trials influencing surgical management of non-invasive and invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Julian, Thomas B; Venditti, Charis A; Duggal, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has changed considerably since the use of the Halstedian radical mastectomy early in the 20th century. Over the last 50 years, several landmark clinical trials from the USA and Europe have resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer toward less radical forms of surgery with the combined use of multi-modality treatments including systemic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and radiotherapy. Advances in such research have established a new worldwide standard of care for breast cancer surgical management and treatment, which has become more patient centric and which places a higher emphasis on cosmesis and improved patient quality of life. In this chapter, we review the landmark clinical trials that have influenced surgical management for non-invasive and invasive breast cancer and that serve to guide current clinical practices to date. PMID:25521007

  14. 'In vivo' Dosimetry in Tangential and Axilosupraclavicular Radiation Fields for Breast Cancer Postmastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Heredia A.; Ruiz, Trejo C. G.; Buenfil, Burgos A. E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Poitevin, Chacon M. A.; Flores, J. M. Castro; Rodriguez, M. Ponce; Angeles, Zaragoza S. O.

    2008-08-11

    This work is an 'in vivo' dosimetry study for breast cancer patients, treated with external radiotherapy. Patients who have suffered a modified radical mastectomy have been included in the study. Measurements will be made with thermoluminescent dosimeters and with radiochromic films. Such dosimetry will let us know the dose distribution in the zone which the applied beams overlap and compare the measureddose with that calculated one using the Eclipse 6.5 (Varian) planning system.

  15. Adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.; Hellman, S.

    1983-11-01

    Two trends in breast cancer management - less radical local treatment and more radical systemic treatment - are conjoined when one considers the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients treated by primary radiation therapy. This editorial discusses a number of important issues regarding this combination of treatments. The most important issue is whether the survival results of combined radiation and chemotherapy are equivalent to those obtained with mastectomy and chemotherapy.

  16. Contributions of radiology to the diagnosis, management, and cure of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    The role of radiology in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of advances in diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology in the overall care of patients with this disease. The author discusses the early history of mammography, the results of large-scale screening studies, improvements in the understanding of the biology of tumors, and the principles underlying the movement away from radical or modified radical mastectomy for tumor control.

  17. Quality of life and patient satisfaction in breast cancer patients after immediate breast reconstruction: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Elder, Elisabeth Edström; Brandberg, Yvonne; Björklund, Tina; Rylander, Richard; Lagergren, Jakob; Jurell, Göran; Wickman, Marie; Sandelin, Kerstin

    2005-06-01

    The aim of immediate breast reconstruction is to improve well-being and quality of life for women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer. This prospective study used the SF-36 Health Survey questionnaire to assess quality of life before and 12 months after mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction together with patients' expectations of and satisfaction with the immediate breast reconstruction with implant. Scores for 76 participants were compared with those in 920 age-matched women from the general population. Preoperative scores for emotional well-being and physical role functioning were lower than in the reference population, while after 12 months the scores in all domains had improved and were comparable with those in the reference population. The most common reason for immediate reconstruction was the desire to avoid an external prosthesis. Most women were satisfied with immediate reconstruction, and the major determinant of aesthetic satisfaction was completion of the procedure. Although many factors may influence quality of life, 1 year after breast cancer surgery with immediate reconstruction scores are equivalent to those of the normal population. PMID:15927829

  18. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  20. Current Status of Breast Reconstruction in Southern China: A 15 Year, Single Institutional Experience of 20,551 Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jia-jian, Chen; Nai-si, Huang; Jing-yan, Xue; Ben-long, Yang; Guang-yu, Liu; Gen-hong, Di; Zhi-min, Shao; Jiong, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study of this study is to assess the current status and trend of the application of breast reconstruction in China. A retrospective review of all patients who had received surgical treatment for breast cancer in the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between January 1999 and June 2014 was performed. The clinicopathological and epidemiological parameters and the follow-up information of each patient were collected. A total of 20,551 patients with 20,974 surgeries were identified. Of those, the rates of patients received mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, and breast reconstruction were 81.2% (17,040 cases), 15.3% (3216 cases), and 3.4% (718 cases), respectively. Skin-sparing mastectomy with autologous breast reconstruction was algate the dominant option for breast reconstruction although a rapid growth in the application of prosthetic reconstructions was observed in recent years. The rates of complications that required reoperation in patients reconstructed with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, free flaps, and prosthesis were 1.2%, 8.5%, 11.4%, and 10.5%, respectively, while the revision rates were 0.7%, 6.1 %, 5.3%, and 2.3%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis confirmed that types of surgery did not affect the disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Skin-sparing mastectomy with breast reconstruction is oncologically safe while achieving satisfactory aesthetic outcomes. Autologous reconstruction remains the most commonly used technique while there is a rapid increase of prosthetic reconstruction in recent years. The low demand for breast aesthetics among Chinese women, defects of healthcare system, and the limited availability of recourses impeded the development of breast reconstruction techniques in China. PMID:26313786

  1. Successfully treated advanced esophageal cancer with left axillary lymph node metastasis and synchronous right breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Shioi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Fumitaka; Ishida, Kazushige; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Otsuka, Koki; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Koeda, Keisuke; Mizuno, Masaru; Kimura, Yusuke; Sasaki, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of double cancer of the esophagus and breast is rare, and axillary lymph node metastasis (ALM) in esophageal cancer is also very rare. We report a case of advanced esophageal cancer with left ALM and synchronous right breast cancer. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with dysphagia. The clinical diagnosis was esophageal cancer (T3N0M1 stage IV) and right breast cancer (T1cN0M0 stage I). She was initially treated with triple chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. The primary lesion in the esophagus achieved almost complete response as assessed by esophageal endoscopy. A computed tomography scan showed that the left ALM reduced in size and that stable disease was achieved for the right breast cancer. She underwent partial mastectomy of the right breast and bilateral axillary lymph node dissection. The histopathological diagnosis of the breast cancer was T1cN1M0 stage IIA. The lymph nodes from the left axilla contained metastatic cells from the squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Complete response was achieved for the primary lesion in the esophagus following chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and the patient has been relapse free 2 years after treatment. Thus, we report the successful treatment of synchronous double cancers of the esophagus with left ALM and right breast by combination therapy with chemotherapy, CRT, and surgery. PMID:26943418

  2. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part.

  3. A Longitudinal Study of BDNF Promoter Methylation and Depression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Kim, Hye-Ran; Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Myung-Geun; Yoon, Jung-Han; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is investigated in depression related to medical disorders and its secretion is influenced by epigenetic factors. We investigated the association between BDNF promoter methylation and depression following mastectomy for breast cancer. Methods In total, 309 patients with breast cancer were evaluated 1 week after mastectomy, and 244 (79%) were followed up 1 year later. Depression was diagnosed (major or minor depressive disorder) according to DSM-IV criteria and depression severity was estimated by Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We assessed BDNF promoter methylation using leukocyte DNA. The effects of BDNF methylation on depression diagnosis and severity were investigated using multivariate logistic and linear regression models, respectively. The two-way interaction between BDNF methylation and the val66met polymorphism on depression was also evaluated using multivariate logistic regression models. Results Higher BDNF methylation was independently associated with depression diagnosis and with more severe symptoms at both 1 week and 1 year after mastectomy. No significant methylation-genotype interactions were found. Conclusion A role for BDNF in depression related to breast cancer was supported. Indeed, the association between depression and BDNF methylation may be useful for identifying patients who are at high risk for depression and for suggesting directions for promising drug research. PMID:26508964

  4. Factors Associated With Guideline-Concordant Use of Radiotherapy After Mastectomy in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network

    SciTech Connect

    Punglia, Rinaa S. Hughes, Melissa E.; Edge, Stephen B.; Theriault, Richard L.; Bookman, Michael A.; Wilson, John L.; Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Niland, Joyce C.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rates and determinants of appropriate and inappropriate use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), as defined by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) practice guidelines, among women with Stage I-II breast cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition). Methods and Materials: Using clinical characteristics, 1,620 consecutive patients at eight NCCN institutions who had undergone mastectomy between July 1997 and June 2002 were classified into three cohorts according to whether the guidelines (1) recommended PMRT, (2) recommended against PMRT, or (3) made no definitive PMRT recommendation. We defined the absence of PMRT in the first cohort as underuse and receipt of PMRT in the second cohort as overuse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the association of clinical and sociodemographic factors with PMRT. Results: Overall, 23.8% of patients received PMRT. This included 199 (83.6%) of 238 in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort, 58 (5.6%) of 1,029 in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort, and 127 (38.6%) of 329 in the 'consider PMRT' cohort. The only factor associated with underuse in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort was nonreceipt of chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; p <0.0001). In addition to tumor characteristics, the factors associated with overuse in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort included age <50 years (OR, 2.28; p = 0.048), NCCN institution (OR, 1.04-8.29; p = 0.026), higher education (OR, 3.49; p = 0.001), and no reconstructive surgery (OR, 2.44; p = 0.019). The factors associated with PMRT in the 'consider PMRT' cohort included NCCN institution (OR, 1.1-9.01; p <0.0001), age <50 years (OR, 2.26; p = 0.041), and tumor characteristics. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concordance with definitive treatment guidelines was high. However, when current evidence does not support a definitive recommendation for PMRT, treatment decisions appear to be influenced, not only by patient age and clinical characteristics, but also by institution-specific patterns of care.

  5. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant predictors of receiving mastectomy after NT. PMID:26691964

  6. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around ... cancer causes Reducing breast cancer risk Managing DCIS New lab tests for breast cancer New imaging tests ...

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  8. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα) dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  9. Treatment Patterns Among Medicaid-Eligible Women With Breast Cancer in Georgia: Are Patterns Different Under the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act?

    PubMed Central

    Adams, E. Kathleen; Chien, Li-Nien; Gabram-Mendola, Sheryl G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate breast cancer treatment of patients enrolled under traditional Medicaid categories versus those in the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment Act (BCCPTA) in Georgia. Methods: Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry linked to Medicaid enrollment files were used to identify 2,048 enrollees with a primary cancer of the breast, of whom 1,046 were enrolled in BCCPTA, 674 were disabled, and 328 were in other Medicaid eligibility groups. Logistic regressions were used to estimate factors associated with the odds of receiving lumpectomy, mastectomy, or other surgery in addition to any drug regimen (hormonal or chemotherapy) and radiation. Results: Women in BCCPTA were more likely to receive any treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 4.71; 95% CI, 2.48 to 8.96), any drug regimen (OR = 3.58; 95% CI, 2.32 to 5.51), any radiation (OR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.15to 2.24), and any definitive surgery (OR = 2.52; 95% CI, 1.74 to 3.66) than the other eligibility group after controlling for covariates. There were no significant differences by eligibility group in the receipt of a lumpectomy versus a mastectomy. However, women in BCCPTA were more likely to receive more adjuvant follow-up after a mastectomy. Conclusion: The BCCPTA program in Georgia appears to create a quicker pathway for low-income, previously uninsured women with breast cancer to access services and, in turn, receive more treatment than women enrolled in the other, more traditional Medicaid eligibility groups. Yet the overall rate of adjuvant therapy, whether radiation, hormonal, or chemotherapy, appears to fall short of national criteria. This deserves attention in Georgia and, most likely, Medicaid programs in other states as well. PMID:22548011

  10. Triple Negative Breast Cancer in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Two Case Reports in Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ruchi; Butt, Qurat-Ul-Ain; Hamaoui, Abraham; Henderson, Cassandra; McCalla, Sydney; Gilak, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Despite studies suggesting that triple negative breast cancer is more often seen in women of African ancestry, we report here two cases of pregnancy associated triple negative breast cancer in Hispanic women. Cases. Case one is a 37-year-old female para 2-0-0-2, who presented with a left breast mass, at 19 weeks of gestation, the biopsy of which reported an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple receptor negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy during the pregnancy and was delivered with a cesarean at 37 weeks for obstetric indication. After delivery, the patient completed her chemotherapy that was followed by radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. Case two is a 28-year-old female para 6-0-1-5, who presented while breast-feeding with signs and symptoms of mastitis, and an engorged and tender right breast, five months postpartum. However, the sonogram revealed a fluid filled cavity. Aspiration and cytology did not reflect an infection and were negative for malignancy. High suspicion and lack of improvement led to biopsy that identified an invasive ductal carcinoma, found to be triple negative. The patient underwent chemotherapy followed by modified radical mastectomy. Conclusions. Triple negative breast cancer, during pregnancy or postpartum, poses a unique challenge and requires a multidisciplinary team to optimize treatment for these women. PMID:26448887

  11. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  13. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-02

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  14. Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Khanfir, Kaouthar; Kallel, Adel; Villette, Sylviane; Belkacemi, Yazid; Vautravers, Claire; Nguyen, TanDat; Miller, Robert; Li Yexiong; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Boersma, Liesbeth; Poortmans, Philip; Goldberg, Hadassah; Vees, Hansjorg; Senkus, Elzbieta; Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy

    2012-04-01

    Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

  15. Can Anal Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... experts recommend screening with regular DREs and anal cytology testing (also known as an anal Pap test ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  16. What Happens After Treatment for Adrenal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS Events Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches vs. Cancer Relay For Life Events College Relay For Life Relay Recess Donate a Car ...

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  18. ATM and breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Rahman, N

    2006-09-25

    ATM was originally identified by positional cloning as the gene that underlies the autosomal recessive condition ataxia-telangiectasia. The encoded protein plays a central role in the complex processes that repair DNA double-strand breaks. Nearly 20 years ago, epidemiological surveys of relatives of ataxia-telangiectasia cases suggested that female relatives were at modestly increased risk of breast cancer. Subsequently, many studies have tried to clarify the role of ATM in breast cancer susceptibility, but have produced inconclusive and/or inconsistent results. Recently, large epidemiological and molecular studies have finally provided conclusive evidence that ATM mutations that cause ataxia-telangiectasia are breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:16998505

  19. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  1. Leptomeningeal metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Brian J; Kesari, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer may be characterized as either parenchymal brain metastasis (BM) or leptomeningeal (LM) metastasis. BM are much more common (about 80% of all CNS metastases), and have been more extensively studied than LM. CNS metastasis in breast cancer has been associated with reduced overall survival, with the shortest survival generally observed in cases of LM. Here, we review the epidemiology, prognostic factors, diagnostic tools, currently available treatments, and potential future therapies for LM from breast cancer. PMID:23593536

  2. Advances in the management of localized breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chagpar, Anees B

    2004-05-01

    Over the last few decades, there have been unprecedented advances in the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer. Surgical principles have shifted away from the Halstedian concept of radical surgery towards more cosmetic breast-conserving procedures, and advances have been made in terms of oncologic and plastic surgical techniques for those opting for mastectomy and reconstruction. Sentinel lymph node biopsy has revolutionized the evaluation of patients' nodal status and has become widely accepted as "state of the art." Medical oncology has made tremendous advances and is no longer relegated to the patients with metastatic disease. It is well accepted that chemotherapy may play a role even in patients with small tumors. Certainly the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for downsizing tumors and making them amenable for breast conservation is also widely accepted. The advent of anthracyclines and, more recently, taxane-based regimens has had a substantial impact on the management of breast cancer. In addition, newer hormonal therapies such as the aromatase inhibitors have rivaled the classic cornerstone of tamoxifen. Radiation therapy has evolved from the era of cobalt-based therapy to newer, less morbid, techniques. In addition to advances in external beam radiation, the concept of accelerated partial breast irradiation and intraoperative radiation therapy is evolving and continues to be the focus of research endeavors. The unparalleled advances in the management of breast cancer in the fields of surgical, medical, and radiation oncology over the last half century continue today with ongoing research and clinical trials. As we enter the new millennium, breast cancer management will continue to evolve. PMID:15152445

  3. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  4. Improving outcomes in breast cancer for low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Yip, C H; Buccimazza, I; Hartman, M; Deo, S V S; Cheung, P S Y

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women world-wide. Incidence rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are lower than in high income countries; however, the rates are increasing very rapidly in LMICs due to social changes that increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates in LMICs remain high due to late presentation and inadequate access to optimal care. Breast Surgery International brought together a group of breast surgeons from different parts of the world to address strategies for improving outcomes in breast cancer for LMICs at a symposium during International Surgical Week in Helsinki, Finland in August 2013. A key strategy for early detection is public health education and breast awareness. Sociocultural barriers to early detection and treatment need to be addressed. Optimal management of breast cancer requires a multidisciplinary team. Surgical treatment is often the only modality of treatment available in low-resource settings where modified radical mastectomy is the most common operation performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy require more resources. Endocrine therapy is available but requires accurate assessment of estrogen receptors status. Targeted therapy with trastuzumab is generally unavailable due to cost. The Breast Health Global Initiative guidelines for the early detection and appropriate treatment of breast cancer in LMICs have been specifically designed to improve breast cancer outcomes in these regions. Closing the cancer divide between rich and poor countries is a moral imperative and there is an urgent need to prevent breast cancer deaths with early detection and optimal access to treatment. PMID:25398564

  5. Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

  6. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Papa, V; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A; Giuffrida, D; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G B; Brand, R; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0.95 + 0.68, P less than 0.001) and in six normal specimens obtained from reduction mammoplasty (0.84 +/- 0.78, P less than 0.001). The insulin receptor content in breast cancer tissues was also higher than in any normal tissue investigated including liver (Pezzino, V., V. Papa, V. Trischitta, A. Brunetti, P.A. Goodman, M.K. Treutelaar, J.A. Williams, B.A. Maddux, R. Vigneri, and I.D. Goldfine, 1989. Am. J. Physiol. 257:E451-457). The insulin receptor in breast cancer retained its ability to both bind insulin and undergo insulin-induced tyrosine kinase activation. Immunostaining of the specimens revealed that the insulin receptor was present in malignant epithelial cells, but was not detected in stromal and inflammatory cells. Univariant analysis revealed that the insulin receptor content of the tumors correlated positively with tumor size (P = 0.014), histological grading (P = 0.030), and the estrogen receptor content (P = 0.035). There were no significant correlations between insulin receptor content and the age, body weight, menopausal status, and nodal involvement of the patients. These studies indicate, therefore, that the insulin receptor content is increased in breast cancers and raise the possibility that the insulin receptor may have a role in the biology of these tumors. Images PMID:2243127

  7. Pattern of weight changes in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yaw, Yong Heng; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Mun, Chan Yoke; Hashim, Zailina; Yusof, Rokiah Mohd; Othman, Zabedah; Saibul, Nurfaizah; Weay, Yong Heng

    2010-01-01

    This study describes weight changes experienced by Malaysian women with breast cancer. Women with breast cancer (n=368) were recruited from eight hospitals and four breast cancer support groups in Peninsular Malaysia. Current weight was measured and weight at the time of diagnosis and a year preceding diagnosis were based on self-reports. Change in weight was determined from the year preceding breast cancer diagnosis to study entry (time 1), at the time of diagnosis to study entry (time 2) and from a year preceding breast cancer diagnosis to the time of diagnosis (time 3). Current body mass index, at a year preceding diagnosis and at the time of diagnosis were determined. Waist circumference was also measured. The sample comprised 57% Malay, 34% Chinese and 9.8% Indian women. The mean age of the women was 54 ∓ 9.04 years and over 80% were post-menopausal. Majority of the women were in stage I and stage II breast cancer at the time of diagnosis. The most common treatments received by these women were chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and mastectomy. Overweight and obesity were prevalent in over 40% of the survivors at all three periods. Significant weight changes were observed during time 1 (-0.74 ∓ 4.78kg, p< 0.001), time 2 (2.73 ∓ 8.06kg, p< 0.001) and time 3 (3.47 ∓ 7.53kg, p< 0.001). At time 1, almost 50% showed no changes in their weight. At time 2, nearly two-thirds had gained weight and at time 3, 69% had gained weight, abdominal obesity was observed in nearly two-thirds of the women at study entry. A significant difference in weight change among age groups was observed in time 2 and time 3. All ethnic groups had significant weight change in time 1 and time 2. Significant weight gain was observed in relation to body mass index prior to diagnosis, at diagnosis and at study entry. However, no significant difference in weight change by educational level, family history of cancer and cancer stages were observed in all 3 periods. In conclusion, significant weight gain was evident in this sample of women after diagnosis of breast cancer and treatment. Women with breast cancer should be encouraged to maintain normal body mass index and waist circumference through appropriate diet and regular physical activity which may help to reduce their risk of recurrence, secondary cancer and metastasis. PMID:21338193

  8. [Patient education and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Arfé, Emmanuelle; Bombail, Marie

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic education program set up at the Institut Universitaire du Cancer (University Cancer Institute) in Toulouse accompanies the treatment pathway of breast cancer patients. It includes nine collective workshops. From work organization to application, professionals and patients are closely involved. PMID:26455624

  9. Comparison of oncological safety between nipple sparing mastectomy and total mastectomy using propensity score matching

    PubMed Central

    Seki, T; Okabayashi, K; Murata, T; Matsumoto, A; Takahashi, M; Hayashida, T; Kitagawa, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introdcution Although nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) has attracted increased recognition as an alternative to traditional mastectomy approaches, its oncological safety is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the local recurrence rate between NSM and total mastectomy (TM). Methods Between 2003 and 2013, 121 and 557 patients with stage 0–III breast cancer underwent NSM and TM respectively. Multivariate Cox regression and propensity score models were used to compare the two groups. Results There was no significant difference in the five-year local recurrence rate between the NSM and TM groups (7.6% vs 4.9%, p=0.398). In multivariate analysis, NSM was not a risk factor for local recurrence (hazard ratio: 1.653, 95% confidence interval: 0.586–4.663, p=0.343). Propensity score matching found similar five-year local recurrence free survival rates between the two groups (92.3% vs 93.7%, p=0.655). Conclusions Our results suggest that NSM may provide oncological safety comparable with mastectomy for carefully selected patients. PMID:26263938

  10. Immediate breast reconstruction with anatomical implants following mastectomy: The radiation perspective.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Merav; Granot, Hila; Gelernter, Ilana; Scheflan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Immediate implant-based breast reconstruction followed by postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) is controversial because of the risk of compromised treatment plans and concerns regarding cosmetic outcomes. We evaluated the effects of immediate direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants on the quality of PMRT delivered by 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). In this retrospective, single-institution study, patients who had undergone reconstruction with direct anatomic implant, performed by a single surgeon, received 3D-CRT between 2008 and 2013. For each patient, 2 plans (including or excluding internal mammary nodes [IMN]) were created and calculated. The primary end point was the dose distribution among reconstructed breasts, heart, lungs, and IMNs, and between right and left breasts. Of 29 consecutive patients, 11 received right-sided and 18 received left-sided PMRT to a total dose of 50Gy. For plans excluding IMN coverage, mean Dmean for right and left reconstructed breasts was 49.09Gy (98.2% of the prescribed dose) and 48.51Gy (97.0%), respectively. For plans including IMNs, mean Dmean was 49.15Gy (98.3%) for right and 48.46Gy (96.9%) for left reconstructed breasts; the mean IMN Dmean was 47.27Gy (right) and 47.89Gy (left). Heart Dmean was below 1.56Gy for all plans. Mean total lung volume receiving a dose of ≥ 20Gy was 13.80% to 19.47%. PMRT can be delivered effectively and safely by 3D-CRT after direct-to-implant breast reconstruction with anatomical implants, even if patients require IMN treatment. PMID:26923467

  11. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  12. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  13. Association of breast cancer risk loci with breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Buring, Julie E; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham G; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J; Joshi, Amit D; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-12-15

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend  = 2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes  = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF  = 1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend  = 6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes  = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes  = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  14. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  15. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

  16. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  17. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  18. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  19. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... proven. Studies look at things like smoking, diet, chemicals, and types of birth control pills. Talk to your provider if you are interested in joining a clinical trial for breast cancer prevention.

  20. Serum lipid-bound sialic acid as a marker in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K; Katopodis, N; Fracchia, A A; Stock, C C

    1982-11-01

    The reliability of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) as a marker in breast cancer was evaluated in 78 normal subjects, 106 patients with benign breast disease, 64 patients with primary operable breast cancer, and 61 patients with recurrent metastatic breast cancer. LSA levels were determined before and after mastectomy and during chemotherapy in selected patients to determine the value of LSA in monitoring therapy and predicting response. LSA levels greater than 20 mg/dl were not seen in normal subjects but were present in patients with benign breast disease (13%), primary breast cancer (47%) and recurrent metastatic breast cancer (62%). LSA levels decreased after initiation of chemotherapy and remained low in patients clinically disease-free. Recurrences were associated with elevated LSA in patients failing chemotherapy or endocrine ablative surgery. LSA measurements appeared to be of limited value in the detection of breast cancer but serial measurements may be useful in assessing disease progression and identifying patients resistant to therapy. PMID:7116306

  1. Primary systemic therapy for operable breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, E. D.; Forrest, A. P.; Hawkins, R. A.; Anderson, T. J.; Leonard, R. C.; Chetty, U.

    1991-01-01

    Eighty-eight patients presenting with operable breast cancer of 4 cm or greater in diameter (T2, T3, N0, N1, M0) have received primary systemic therapy. Response was assessed following 12 weeks of systemic therapy by linear regression analysis of changes in tumour volume. Definitive locoregional surgery (mastectomy n = 82, wide local excision n = 6) was performed on completion of systemic therapy (3-6 months). Response was observed in 24 (39%) of the 61 patients who received endocrine therapy; all 24 had tumours with an oestrogen receptor (ER) concentration of greater than or equal to 20 fmol mb-1 cytosol protein. Cytotoxic therapy was reserved for patients with tumours of ER concentration less than 20 fmol mg-1 cytosol protein (n = 27) or when endocrine therapy had failed (n = 20). Response was observed in 34 patients (72%). The overall survival rate at 3 years was 86%, with 81% remaining free from local relapse. We propose that the treatment policy outlined in this paper should now be tested against orthodox management by controlled randomised trial. PMID:1827031

  2. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

  3. Accessibility of breast and cervical cancer services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Despite the fact that Malaysia has good treatment centers for reproductive cancer, mortality rates from breast and cervical cancer are high because of a lack of early detection. Breast cancer mortality rates have risen since 1985, while cervical cancer mortality rates declined from 1985 to 1993 and then increased in 1997. There is no standardized cancer registry, so incidence and mortality rates are likely to be higher than reported. In 1995, the government launched its first nationwide cancer prevention campaign and stressed breast self-examination and yearly examination by a medical professional for woman aged 20 years and above. The same year, eligibility for pap smears was extended to all women who have been or are sexually active and are aged 20-65 years. Between 1993 and 1996, 35% of the breast cancer cases presented at stage 3 or 4, and 93% of these women had a lump of a mean size of 5.3 cm. Cultural taboos prevent women from examining their own bodies, and women fear their husbands will leave them if they have a mastectomy. Malay women also deny themselves preventive care, and sometimes physicians and nurses deny Pap smears to unmarried women. Women are not empowered with the knowledge they need to seek preventive screenings, and older women are difficult to reach with information because they are unlikely to visit maternal-child health or family planning clinics. Malaysia needs to institute a standardized cancer registry and to conduct research that will address the barriers faced by women. PMID:12294552

  4. Risk Factors of the Invasive Breast Cancer Locoregional Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liubota, R. V.; Zotov, A. S.; Vereshchako, R. I.; Liubota, I. I.; Zaychuk, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the research was to estimate the frequency of the locoregional breast cancer recurrence appearance, the recurrence-free period continuance, and the 3- and 5-year survival depending on the scope of the surgical intervention, menstrual profile, and histological and molecular-biologic characteristics of the primary tumor. Patients and Methods. Among 218 patients with a breast cancer, 99 patients had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 119 underwent radical mastectomy (RME); all patients had regional lymphatic nodes dissection. The size and the primary tumor differentiation degree, metastasis presence in the regional lymph nodes, ER expression, PR, and Her/2neu were assessed as the prognostics factors. Results. It was defined that the locoregional recurrence appearance frequency in patients with BCS turned out to be 13%, and in patients after RME it turned out to be 9%; the recurrence-free period continuance was 53 8 months and 56 10 months, respectively. Conclusions. The locoregional cancer recurrence frequency is higher in women with the menstrual function being preserved at the moment of the primary tumor detection than in postmenopausal patients and also in patients having the hyperexpression of the Her/2neu. The ipsilateral cancer recurrence decreases the 3-year survival by 7,1% and the 5-year one by 20,3%, respectively. PMID:26339643

  5. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions: In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer.

  6. Imaging changes after breast reconstruction with fat grafting - Retrospective study of 90 breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Lubna; Reeves, Helen Rosemarry; Kumar, Dileep; Alozairi, Ous; Bhaskar, Pudhupalayam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the breast imaging changes after fat grafting and its impact on cancer follow up. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study conducted on patients who underwent fat grafting for breast reconstruction. We reviewed mammographic and ultrasound images of patients. Fisher’s exact test was used to analyze results. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: A total of ninety patients with breast cancer had fat grafting. Fifty eight patients for defects following post mastectomy reconstruction and 32 for wide local excision defects. The mean follow up was 37.4 months. Benign lumps were identified in 23/90 cases (25 percent). Mammograms were reported as BI-RADS I in 21/32 cases (72 percent) and BI-RADS II in 8/32 cases (28 percent). BI-RADs III score was reported in two patients on further follow up imaging, both were re-classified as BI-RADS II after biopsy. A total of eight patients (8.9 percent) required biopsy. No local recurrences or new cancers were observed in any patients. Conclusion: Our study suggests radiological changes after fat grafting are almost always benign with no adverse outcome on cancer follow up.

  7. Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Krontiras, Helen; Pisu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Racial disparities in breast cancer treatment among Medicare beneficiaries have been documented. This study aimed to determine whether racial disparities exist among white and black female Medicare beneficiaries in Alabama, an economically disadvantaged U.S. state. Methods: From a linked dataset of breast cancer cases from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry and fee-for-service claims from Medicare, we identified 2,097 white and black females, aged 66 years and older, who were diagnosed with stages 13 breast cancer from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2002. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to determine whether there were racial differences in initiating and completing National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice guideline-specific treatment. Results: Sixty-two percent of whites and 64.7% of blacks had mastectomy (p=0.27); 34.6% of whites and 30.2% of blacks had breast conserving surgery (BCS) (p=0.12). Among those who had BCS, 76.8% of whites and 83.3% of blacks started adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.33) and they equally completed adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.29). For women with tumors over 1 centimeter, whites and blacks were equally likely to start (16.1% of whites and 18.3% of black; p=0.34) and complete (50.6% of whites and 46.3% of black; p=0.87) adjuvant chemotherapy. There were still no differences after adjusting for confounders using GEE. However, differences were observed by area-level socioeconomic status (SES), with lower SES residents more likely to receive a mastectomy (odds ratio [OR]=1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.011.57) and initiate radiation after BCS (OR=2.24; 95% CI: 1.283.93). Conclusions: No racial differences were found in guideline-specific breast cancer treatment or treatment completion, but there were differences by SES. Future studies should explore reasons for SES differences and whether similar results hold in other economically disadvantaged U.S. states. PMID:24350590

  8. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  9. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  10. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26285906

  11. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  12. Ten-Year Recurrence Rates in Young Women With Breast Cancer by Locoregional Treatment Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A. Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach.

  13. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  14. Breast Cancer: subgroups specific blood-biomarkers for early / predictive diagnosis and personalized treatment — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Breast-conserving lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be an alternative strategy, competitive to mastectomy, in preventing mortality caused by breast cancer. However, besides negative short-term effects (blood flow disturbances, painful erythema, etc.) breast irradiation causes severe long-term side-effects (leucopenia, anemia, breast edema, fibrosis, increase of angiosarcoma, leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes). Therefore, the identification of individual susceptibility to radiation and improved patient-specific radiotherapy planning are highly desirable for personalised treatment in breast cancer. Why early and predictive diagnosis is crucial for long-term outcomes of breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among women with an average incidence rate of 10-12 per 100 women. In 2005, breast cancer led to 502,000 deaths worldwide. Advanced stages of breast cancer lead to the development of metastasis predominantly in the lymph nodes, bone, lung, skin, brain, and liver. Although breast-MRI is currently the most sensitive diagnostic tool for breast imaging, its specificity is limited resulting in a negative impact for surgical management in approximately 9 % of cases. Early diagnosis has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial, enabling significantly enhanced therapy efficiency and possibly full recovery.

  15. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  16. Utilization of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Varies in the Treatment of Women with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Onesti, Jill K.; Single, Richard M.; Engel, Jessica M.; James, Ted A.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Barney, Tom; McCahill, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has made it possible for some women to be successfully treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT ) who were initially considered ineligible. Factors related to current practice patterns of NAC use are important to understand particularly as the surgical treatment of invasive breast cancer has changed. The goal of this study was to determine variations in neoadjuvant chemotherapy use in a large multi-center national database of patients with breast cancer. Methods We evaluated NAC use in patients with initially operable invasive breast cancer and potential impact on breast conservation rates. Records of 2871 women ages 18-years and older diagnosed with 2907 invasive breast cancers from January 2003 to December 2008 at four institutions across the United States were examined using the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO) database. Main outcome measures included NAC use and association with pre-operatively identified clinical factors, surgical approach (partial mastectomy [PM] or total mastectomy [TM]), and BCT failure (initial PM followed by subsequent TM). Results Overall, NAC utilization was 3.8%l. Factors associated with NAC use included younger age, pre-operatively known positive nodal status, and increasing clinical tumor size. NAC use and BCT failure rates increased with clinical tumor size, and there was significant variation in NAC use across institutions. Initial TM frequency approached initial PM frequency for tumors >30-40mm; BCT failure rate was 22.7% for tumors >40mm. Only 2.7% of patients undergoing initial PM and 7.2% undergoing initial TM received NAC. Conclusions NAC use in this study was infrequent and varied among institutions. Infrequent NAC use in patients suggests that NAC may be underutilized in eligible patients desiring breast conservation. PMID:24376822

  17. New trends in breast cancer surgery: a therapeutic approach increasingly efficacy and respectful of the patient

    PubMed Central

    FRANCESCHINI, G.; SANCHEZ, A. MARTIN; DI LEONE, A.; MAGNO, S.; MOSCHELLA, F.; ACCETTA, C.; MASETTI, R.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has undergone continuous and profound changes over the last 40 years. The evolution from aggressive and mutilating treatment to conservative approach has been long, but constant, despite the controversies that appeared every time a new procedure came to light. Today, the aesthetic satisfaction of breast cancer patients coupled with the oncological safety is the goal of the modern breast surgeon. Breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the gold standard approach for patients with early stage breast cancer and the recent introduction of “oncoplastic techniques” has furtherly increased the use of breast-conserving procedures. Mastectomy remains a valid surgical alternative in selected cases and is usually associated with immediate reconstructive procedures. New surgical procedures called “conservative mastectomies” are emerging as techniques that combine oncological safety and cosmesis by entirely removing the breast parenchyma sparing the breast skin and nipple-areola complex. Staging of the axilla has also gradually evolved toward less aggressive approaches with the adoption of sentinel node biopsy and new therapeutic strategies are emerging in patients with a pathological positivity in sentinel lymph node biopsy. The present work will highlight the new surgical treatment options increasingly efficacy and respectful of breast cancer patients. PMID:26712068

  18. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  19. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  20. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. )

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  1. Breast Cancer Subtype is Associated With Axillary Lymph Node Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhen-Yu; Wu, San-Gang; Yang, Qi; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess whether breast cancer subtype (BCS) as determined by estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 can predict the axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. Patients who received breast conserving surgery or mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection were identified from 2 cancer centers. The associations between clinicopathological variables and axillary lymph node involvement were evaluated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. A total of 3471 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 53.0% had axillary lymph node metastases at diagnosis. Patients with hormone receptor (HR)?/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)? subtype had a higher grade disease and the lowest rate of lymphovascular invasion. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that BCS was significantly associated with lymph node involvement. Patients with the HR?/HER2? subtype had the lowest odds of having nodal positivity than those with other BCSs. HR+/HER2? (odds ratio [OR] 1.651, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3492.021, P?Breast cancer subtype can predict the presence of axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. HR?/HER2? is associated with a reduced risk of axillary lymph node metastasis compared to other BCSs. Our findings may play an important role in guiding axillary treatment considerations if further confirmed in larger sample size studies. PMID:26632910

  2. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  3. Can Cancer of the Esophagus Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... advised because of the high risk that an adenocarcinoma is either already present (but was not found) ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

  4. Quality of Online Information to Support Patient Decision-Making in Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Jordan G.; Tucholka, Jennifer L.; Steffens, Nicole M.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer patients commonly use the internet as an information resource. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of online information available to support patients facing a decision for breast surgery. Methods Breast cancer surgery-related queries were performed (Google and Bing), and reviewed for content pertinent to breast cancer surgery. The DISCERN instrument was used to evaluate websites’ structural components that influence publication reliability and ability of information to support treatment decision-making. Scores of 4/5 were considered “good”. Results 45 unique websites were identified. Websites satisfied a median 5/9 content questions. Commonly omitted topics included: having a choice between breast conservation and mastectomy (67%) and potential for 2nd surgery to obtain negative margins after breast conservation (60%). Websites had a median DISCERN score of 2.9 (range 2.0–4.5). Websites achieved higher scores on structural criteria (median 3.6 [2.1–4.7]), with 24% rated as “good”. Scores on supporting decision-making questions were lower (2.6 [1.3–4.4]), with only 7% scoring “good”. Conclusion Although numerous breast cancer-related websites exist, most do a poor job providing women with essential information necessary to actively participate in decision-making for breast cancer surgery. Providing easily-accessible, high-quality online information has the potential to significantly improve patients’ experiences with decision-making. PMID:26417898

  5. Morbidity and Mortality Following Breast Cancer Surgery in Women

    PubMed Central

    El-Tamer, Mahmoud B.; Ward, B Marie; Schifftner, Tracy; Neumayer, Leigh; Khuri, Shukri; Henderson, William

    2007-01-01

    Background: Most reports on postoperative (OP) morbidity and mortality following breast cancer surgery (BCS) are limited by relatively small sample size resulting in a lack of national benchmarks for quality of care. This paper reports the 30-day morbidity and mortality following BCS in women using a large prospective multi-institutional database. Methods: The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Patient Safety in Surgery, prospectively collected inpatient and outpatient 30 day postoperative morbidity and mortality data on patients undergoing surgery at 14 university and 4 community centers. Using the procedure CPT code, the database was queried for all women undergoing mastectomy (MT) or lumpectomy with an axillary procedure (L-ANP). Morbidity and mortality were categorized as mortality, wound, cardiac, renal, pulmonary, and central nervous system. Logistic regression models for the prediction of wound complications were developed. Preoperative variables having bivariate relationships with postoperative wound complications with P ≤ 0.20 were submitted for consideration. Results: We identified 1660 and 1447 women who underwent MT and l-ANP, respectively. The mean age was 55.9 years. The majority of procedures were under general anesthesia. The 30-day postoperative mortality for MT and l-ALNP were 0.24% and 0%, respectively. The most frequent morbid complication was wound infection, more commonly occurring in the mastectomy (4.34%) group versus the lumpectomy group (1.97%). Cardiac and pulmonary complications occurred infrequently in the mastectomy group (cardiac: MT, 0.12%; and pulmonary: MT, 0.66%). There were no cardiac or pulmonary complications in the lumpectomy group. CNS morbidities were rare in both surgical groups (MT, 0.12%; and l-ALNP, 0.07%). Development of a UTI was more common in women who underwent a mastectomy (0.66%) when compared with women that had a lumpectomy (0.14%). The only significant predictors of a wound complication were morbid obesity (BMI >30), having had a MT, low preoperative albumin and hematocrit greater than 45%. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality rates following BCS in women are low, limiting their value in assessing quality of care. Mastectomy carries higher complication rate than l-ANP with wound infection being the most common. PMID:17457156

  6. Clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leis, H P

    1975-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in women, and 6% will develop it during their normal life expectancy. There is a group who have a high risk of developing breast cancer. The recent improvement in cure rates seems to be jue chiefly to earlier diagnosis rather than to improved methods of therapy. The physician, by careful periodic breast examinations and by the judicious use of diagnostic aids such as mammography and thermography, especially in the high risk group, has a golden opportunity to pick up cancer in a localized stage where the prognosis for cure with appropriate therapy is excellent. A tentative diagnosis of breast cancer (Table XI) can be made with a fair degree of accuracy by taking a careful history, utilizing and combining available statistics about the frequency, median age, characteristic symptom complexes of the common breast lesions and factors related to a high mammary carcinoma risk, and by a systematic and thorough breast examination supplemented with diagnostic aids when appropriate. However, biopsy and histologic examination is mandatory in all patients with a) true, three dimentional, dominant lumps even if diagnostic aids are negative except for cysts which can be safely aspirated under controlled conditions; b) suspicious lesions found by diagnostic aids even though there are no clinical findings; c) serous, serosanguineous, bloody, or watery nipple discharge; and d) other signs of cancer, i.e. eczema of the nipple, axillary adenopathy, etc., in order to determine with absolute accuracy whether the lesion is benign or malignant. PMID:168376

  7. Successful laparoscopic investigation and resection of solitary colonic metastasis from breast cancer (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Hisatsugu; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Tanaka, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis to gastrointestinal tract from breast cancer is an uncommon situation. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who had a mastectomy for solid-tubular carcinoma of the breast 16?years ago and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for metastatic ovarian tumours 5?years ago, was incidentally found to have colonic metastatic tumour detected by positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) during follow-up. After identifying a definite location of the tumour in the ascending colon under laparoscopic investigation, laparoscopy-assisted partial colectomy was successfully performed. Histopathology of the resected specimen showed it to be metastasis from solid-tubular carcinoma of the breast. We should be aware that breast cancer can metastasise to the gastrointestinal tract even after the long interval from initial therapy. An index of high suspicion and detailed assessment is mandatory to make a correct diagnosis and following less invasive surgical treatment. PMID:23152180

  8. Successful laparoscopic investigation and resection of solitary colonic metastasis from breast cancer (with video).

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hisatsugu; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Tanaka, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis to gastrointestinal tract from breast cancer is an uncommon situation. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who had a mastectomy for solid-tubular carcinoma of the breast 16 years ago and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for metastatic ovarian tumours 5 years ago, was incidentally found to have colonic metastatic tumour detected by positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) during follow-up. After identifying a definite location of the tumour in the ascending colon under laparoscopic investigation, laparoscopy-assisted partial colectomy was successfully performed. Histopathology of the resected specimen showed it to be metastasis from solid-tubular carcinoma of the breast. We should be aware that breast cancer can metastasise to the gastrointestinal tract even after the long interval from initial therapy. An index of high suspicion and detailed assessment is mandatory to make a correct diagnosis and following less invasive surgical treatment. PMID:23152180

  9. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  10. Multimodal approach in the therapy of stage III female breast cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Shanta, V.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Sastry, D.V.; Menon, R.

    1985-02-01

    One thousand thirty-seven female breast cancers were treated at the Cancer Institute (WIA), Madras, between 1965 and 1978. Five hundred twenty-one of them (ie, just over 50%) were in stage III, with extensive local disease, unsuitable for surgery ab initio. Four hundred twelve of them (group A) received radiation therapy (RT) initially and 109 (group B) a combination of radiation and chemotherapy (CT). In 68% of the former and 77% of the latter the tumours became resectable after this preliminary treatment. Radical mastectomy in group A and Patey's mastectomy in group B were performed. The material in these two groups was similar. The five-year survival NED in group A was 45%, and in group B 64.61%. Adequate surgery following RT and CT seemed essential to improve survival. The impact of added chemotherapy (CT) was mainly felt in the node-positive cases.

  11. A Retrospective Study Evaluating the Impact of Preoperative Breast MRI on Surgical Decision-Making in Young Patients (≤50 Years) with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Som D.; Hodgson, Nicole; Lovrics, Peter J.; Dhamanaskar, Kavita; Minuk, Terry; Chambers, Shelley; Sussman, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a more sensitive diagnostic test for detecting invasive breast cancer than mammography or breast ultrasound. Breast MRI may be particularly useful in younger premenopausal women with higher density breast tissue for differentiating between dense fibroglandular breast tissue and breast malignancies. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of preoperative breast MRI on surgical decision-making in young women with breast cancer. METHODS A retrospective review of patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer and age of ≤50 years was performed. All patients underwent physical examination, preoperative mammogram, breast ultrasound, and bilateral breast MRI. Two breast cancer surgeons reviewed the preoperative mammogram report, breast ultrasound report, and physical examination summary and were asked if they would recommend a lumpectomy, a quandrantectomy, or a mastectomy. A few weeks later, the two surgeons were shown the same information with the breast MRI report and were asked what type of surgery they would now recommend. In each case, MRI was classified by two adjudicators as having affected the surgical outcome in a positive, negative, or neutral fashion. A positive impact was defined as the situation where breast MRI detected additional disease that was not found on physical examination, mammogram, or breast ultrasound and led to an appropriate change in surgical management. A negative impact was defined as the situation where breast MRI led the surgeon to recommend more extensive surgery, with less extensive disease actually found at pathology. No impact was defined as the situation where MRI findings did not alter surgical recommendations or outcomes. RESULTS Of 37 patients whose charts were reviewed, five patients were deemed to be ineligible due to having received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, having previous breast implants, or having had their tumor fully excised during biopsy. In total, 32 patients met the inclusion criteria of this study and were appropriate for analysis. The median age of our study patient population was 42 years. The pathologic diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma in 91% (29/32) of patients and invasive lobular carcinoma in 9% (3/32) of patients. For surgeon A, clinical management was altered in 21/32 (66%) patients, and for surgeon B, management was altered in 13/32 (41%) patients. The most common change in surgical decision-making after breast MRI was from breast-conserving surgery to a mastectomy. Mastectomy rates were similar between both surgeons after breast MRI. After reviewing the pathology results and comparing them with the breast MRI results, it was determined that breast MRI led to a positive outcome in 13/32 (41%) patients. Breast MRI led to no change in surgical management in 15/32 (47%) patients and resulted in a negative change in surgical management in 4/32 (13%) patients. Bilateral breast MRI detected a contralateral breast cancer in 2/32 (6%) patients. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative breast MRI alters surgical management in a significant proportion of younger women diagnosed with breast cancer. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to help determine if this change in surgical decision-making will result in improved local control. PMID:27226720

  12. Strategies for managing breast cancer risk after the menopause.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ruth; Harvie, Michelle; Howell, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Postmenopausal women in Western societies are conscious of breast cancer as a potential cause of death and ill health, which they wish to avoid with the advice of their doctors. Yet many factors that predispose women to the development of cancer will have been laid down before the menopause, in their genetic makeup or during their adolescent years. Even in middle age it is important to take account of the intrinsic level of risk, and to give women advice tailored to their own individual risk level. This results from their family history, previous diseases such as benign breast disease, and previous treatment for breast cancer or Hodgkin's disease. For those at the highest level of risk, strategies will include regular screening, prophylactic mastectomy, and the use of chemoprevention agents, such as tamoxifen. These women should avoid hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and control their menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis through the use of other agents now available - venlafaxine for menopausal symptoms and bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. Raloxifene is an agent under trial that may be valuable for breast cancer control as well as for osteoporosis. Women at standard population risk will require less robust preventive strategies, which will include screening and lifestyle modification. Their decisions regarding HRT should now be modified by recent evidence of associated risks. Recent studies show that tibolone causes less mammographic density and has a lower relative risk of breast cancer than combined estrogen/progestogen preparations. There is limited evidence that controlling obesity, participating in exercise and adopting a diet low in fats and high in fruit and vegetables will alter risk at this age. These precautions will, however, reduce the risk of other diseases common in this age group, such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alcohol, even in small amounts, is a risk factor for breast cancer. Given the cardioprotective effect of moderate alcohol intake, advice on alcohol must reflect the individual relative risk of cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Personal risk assessment is relevant for all women. Screening and a healthy lifestyle are worthwhile approaches for all, with the more aggressive approaches such as chemoprevention and prophylactic surgery reserved for those who have substantially elevated levels of risk. Once the menopause has passed, screening is probably the most effective evidence-based tool for breast cancer control by early diagnosis. PMID:15330677

  13. The risk of contralateral breast cancer in daughters of women with and without breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Narod, S A; Kharazmi, E; Fallah, M; Sundquist, K; Hemminki, K

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to estimate the 15-year and lifetime risks of contralateral breast cancer in breast cancer patients according to the age of diagnosis of the first cancer and the history of breast cancer in the mother. The risks of contralateral breast cancer were estimated for all 78,775 breast cancer patients in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database (age at diagnosis of first breast cancer <70 years). The risk of experiencing a contralateral breast cancer within 15 years of diagnosis was 8.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.1-8.7%] for women with an unaffected mother, was 12% (95%CI: 11-13%) for a woman with a mother with unilateral breast cancer and was 13% (95%CI: 9.5-17%) for women with a mother with bilateral breast cancer. In early-onset diagnosed women (<50 years) with an unaffected mother, the risk of contralateral breast cancer until age 80 was 23% (95%CI: 20-26%) and for late-onset (50-69 years) diagnosed women it was 17% (95%CI: 14-21%). In a woman with a mother with an early-onset unilateral breast cancer, risk of contralateral breast cancer by age 80 was 35% (95%CI: 25-46%). Women with a mother with early-onset bilateral breast cancer had 31% (95%CI: 12-67%) lifetime risk of contralateral breast cancer. The risk of contralateral breast cancer is higher for daughters of breast cancer patients than for daughters of women without breast cancer. Maternal cancer history and age at onset of first breast cancer in women should be taken into account when counseling breast cancer patients about their risk of contralateral breast cancer. PMID:25920602

  14. Enchondroma on bone scan in a patient with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, E.S.; Johnston, G.S.

    1984-08-01

    A 45-year-old postmenopausal woman with breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. She remained clinically well for two years but then complained of pain in the left upper arm during a routine follow-up visit with her physician. A roentgenogram of the left proximal humerus showed a densely sclerotic, nonhomogeneous, 2 x 6 cm lesion with stippled calcification, the appearance of which was most consistent with a mature enchondroma or bone infarct. Because metastatic breast cancer was also a possibility, a technetium Tc 99m methyldiphosphonate (MDP) bone scan was done, revealing diffuse uptake in the left proximal humeral lesion, without any other area of involvement. Although radiologically the lesion appeared benign and stable, the history of breast cancer, abnormal bone scan, and pain could not be ignored, and open surgical bone biopsy was done. From deep within the lesion at the core of the metaphysis of the proximal left humerus, the surgeon removed an enchondroma, but found no evidence of metastatic disease. Follow-up MDP bone scans after six months and four years were unchanged.

  15. Genomic profiling of breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent advances in the application of advanced genomic technologies towards the identification of biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. Recent findings Advances in high-throughput genomic profiling such as massively parallel sequencing have enabled researchers to catalogue the spectrum of somatic alterations in breast cancers. These tools also hold promise for precision medicine through accurate patient prognostication, stratification, and the dynamic monitoring of treatment response. For example, recent efforts have defined robust molecular subgroups of breast cancer and novel subtype-specific oncogenes. In addition, previously unappreciated activating mutations in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have been reported, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. Genomic profiling of cell-free tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells has been used to monitor disease burden and the emergence of resistance, and such ‘liquid biopsy’ approaches may facilitate the early, noninvasive detection of aggressive disease. Finally, single-cell genomics is coming of age and will contribute to an understanding of breast cancer evolutionary dynamics. Summary Here, we highlight recent studies that employ high-throughput genomic technologies in an effort to elucidate breast cancer biology, discover new therapeutic targets, improve prognostication and stratification, and discuss the implications for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25502431

  16. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  17. Breast cancer and fertility preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

  18. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  19. Medical Prevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, Johannes; Dieterich, Max; Gerber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is the most common cancer of women in Western Europe and North America. Effective strategies of medical prevention could reduce the burden of breast cancer mortality. The best evidence for a risk reduction exists for hormonal agents such as tamoxifen and raloxifene (22–72%) or aromatase inhibitors (50–65%). However, the severity of side effects and the lack of evidence for an improved survival compromise the risk/benefit balance. In this review the results of chemoprevention studies, including new treatment approaches, are summarized with critical discussion of their use in clinical practice. PMID:25759621

  20. Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. Early breast cancer in the elderly: assessment and management considerations.

    PubMed

    Albrand, Gilles; Terret, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common tumour in the elderly and management of early disease in particular is a major challenge for oncologists and geriatricians alike. The process should begin with the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), which should be undertaken before any decisions about treatment are made. The important role of co-morbidities and their effect on life expectancy also need to be taken into account when making treatment decisions. The primary treatments for early breast cancer are surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and adjuvant systemic therapy. Unfortunately, lack of a specific literature relating to early breast cancer in the elderly means formulating an evidence-based approach to treatment in this context is difficult. We have developed a new approach based on the CGA and comprehensive oncological assessment. This approach facilitates the development of an individualized oncogeriatric care plan and follow-up based on several considerations: the average patient's life expectancy at a given age; the patient's co-morbidities, level of dependence, and the impact of these considerations on diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as life expectancy; and the potential benefit-risk balance of treatment. In the elderly patient with breast cancer, the standard primary therapy is surgical resection (mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy). While node dissection is a major component of staging and local control of breast cancer, no data are available to guide decision-making in women aged >70 years. Primary endocrine therapy (tamoxifen) should be offered to elderly women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer only if they are unfit for or refuse surgery. Trials are needed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of aromatase inhibitors as primary therapy for infirm older patients with ER-positive tumours. Breast irradiation should be recommended to older women with a life expectancy >5 years, particularly those with large tumours, positive lymph nodes or negative hormone receptors. Adjuvant hormone therapy remains a reasonable therapeutic option in elderly women with positive hormone receptor tumours. Aromatase inhibitors have demonstrated a better toxicity profile and effectiveness as adjuvant therapy than tamoxifen in young postmenopausal women but have not been specifically studied in the elderly population. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer has been established by meta-analysis and numerous randomized trials but, again, women aged > or = 70 years have rarely been included in such trials. At present, it is difficult to provide a validated recommendation for use of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with breast cancer. There are no follow-up recommendations specifically for elderly patients after treatment of early breast cancer. However, American Society of Clinical Oncology breast cancer surveillance guidelines suggest physician office visits every 3-6 months for 3 years, followed by visits every 6-12 months for 2 years, then annually. Women taking aromatase inhibitors should also undergo bone mineral density measurement every 2 years. The new approach to assessment and management of early breast cancer in the elderly outlined in this article should be considered an intermediate step because additional evidence to support clinical practice is still needed. Bearing this in mind, physicians should encourage enrollment of elderly breast cancer patients in clinical trials. PMID:18184027

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. Nonclinical factors associated with surgery received for treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Satariano, E R; Swanson, G M; Moll, P P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Women diagnosed with early breast cancer have had the opportunity to receive breast-conserving surgical treatment, which reduces the physical and psychological morbidity heretofore associated with breast removal. METHODS. Nonclinical factors associated with women receiving partial mastectomies with radiation (P + R) compared with modified radical mastectomies without radiation (MOR) were examined in 2238 Black and White women diagnosed, in 1985 through 1987, with early-stage breast cancer in the metropolitan Detroit area. RESULTS. Age at diagnosis and size of hospital were the strongest predictors of type of surgery received, with younger women (less than 55 years of age) and women treated in larger hospitals (more than 500 beds) more than twice as likely to receive P + R. Stratifying on race, age at diagnosis remained the strongest predictor for White women, followed by hospital size. Among Black women, hospital size was more strongly associated with surgery received than was age. CONCLUSIONS. Younger women and women undergoing treatment at large hospitals are more likely to receive the breast-conserving P + R. Black women treated in small hospitals appear to be particularly unlikely to receive P + R. PMID:1739146

  6. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  7. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  8. Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158409.html Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study The BRCA1 ... that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, ...

  9. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  10. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tatlı, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

  11. Experiences of Syrian women with breast cancer regarding chemotherapy: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nizamli, Frial; Anoosheh, Monireh; Mohammadi, Essa

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of Syrian women with breast cancer regarding their chemotherapy. A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used for the data collection and analysis of the perspectives of women with breast cancer in Syria. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 17 women who underwent chemotherapy after mastectomy in a chemotherapy center in Latakia between June and October 2010. Four main themes emerged from the study: psychological discomfort (negative emotion, body image, and depressive symtoms), physical problems (acute consequences of chemotherapy and general aspects of chemotherapy), social dysfunction (social isolation and lack of marriage opportunites), and failure in the family role (mother role and sexual relationship). Understanding the experiences of women with breast cancer regarding chemotherapy enables nurses to devise appropriate strategies to provide better support and care to patients in order to improve their quality of life. PMID:22039884

  12. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  13. Multicenter breast cancer collaborative registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product.The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  14. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Castadot, Pierre; MacDermed, Dhara; Vandekerkhove, Christophe; Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  15. Breast Cancer: Comparative Effectiveness of Positron Emission Mammography and MR Imaging in Presurgical Planning for the Ipsilateral Breast1

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Kathleen S.; Schilling, Kathy; Tartar, Marie; Pisano, Etta D.; Larsen, Linda Hovanessian; Narayanan, Deepa; Ozonoff, Al; Miller, Joel P.; Kalinyak, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the performance of positron emission mammography (PEM), as compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, including the effect on surgical management, in ipsilateral breasts with cancer. Materials and Methods: Four hundred seventy-two women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were offered breast-conserving surgery consented from September 2006 to November 2008 to participate in a multicenter institutional review board–approved, HIPAA-compliant protocol. Participants underwent contrast material–enhanced MR imaging and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PEM in randomized order; resultant images were interpreted independently. Added biopsies and changes in surgical procedure for the ipsilateral breast were correlated with histopathologic findings. Performance characteristics were compared by using the McNemar test and generalized estimating equations. Results: Three hundred eighty-eight women (median age, 58 years; age range, 26–93 years; median estimated tumor size, 1.5 cm) completed the study. Additional cancers were found in 82 (21%) women (82 ipsilateral breasts; median tumor size, 0.7 cm). Twenty-eight (34%) of the 82 breasts were identified with both PEM and MR imaging; 21 (26%) breasts, with MR imaging only; 14 (17%) breasts, with PEM only; and seven (8.5%) breasts, with mammography and ultrasonography. Twelve (15%) cases of additional cancer were missed at all imaging examinations. Integration of PEM and MR imaging increased cancer detection—to 61 (74%) of 82 breasts versus 49 (60%) of 82 breasts identified with MR imaging alone (P < .001). Of 306 breasts without additional cancer, 279 (91.2%) were correctly assessed with PEM compared with 264 (86.3%) that were correctly assessed with MR imaging (P = .03). The positive predictive value of biopsy prompted by PEM findings (47 [66%] of 71 cases) was higher than that of biopsy prompted by MR findings (61 [53%] of 116 cases) (P = .016). Of 116 additional cancers, 61 (53%) were depicted by MR imaging and 47 (41%) were depicted by PEM (P = .043). Fifty-six (14%) of the 388 women required mastectomy: 40 (71%) of these women were identified with MR imaging, and 20 (36%) were identified with PEM (P < .001). Eleven (2.8%) women underwent unnecessary mastectomy, which was prompted by only MR findings in five women, by only PEM findings in one, and by PEM and MR findings in five. Thirty-three (8.5%) women required wider excision: 24 (73%) of these women were identified with MR imaging, and 22 (67%) were identified with PEM. Conclusion: PEM and MR imaging had comparable breast-level sensitivity, although MR imaging had greater lesion-level sensitivity and more accurately depicted the need for mastectomy. PEM had greater specificity at the breast and lesion levels. Eighty-nine (23%) participants required more extensive surgery: 61 (69%) of these women were identified with MR imaging, and 41 (46%) were identified with PEM (P = .003). Fourteen (3.6%) women had tumors seen only at PEM. © RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.10100454/-/DC1 PMID:21076089

  16. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. Ten genes for inherited breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire

    2007-02-01

    Inherited breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in ten different genes in pathways critical to genomic integrity. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations confer very high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. p53 and PTEN mutations lead to very high breast cancer risks associated with rare cancer syndromes. Mutations in CHEK2, ATM, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1, and PALB2 are associated with doubling of breast cancer risks. In addition, biallelic mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and PALB2 cause Fanconi anemia. The convergence of these genes in a shared role reveals underlying biology of these illnesses and suggests still other breast cancer genes. PMID:17292821

  18. Management of pregnancy associated breast cancer with chemotherapy in a developing country☆

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Emmanuel A.; Ewemade, Festus

    2015-01-01

    Context Although breast cancer is a common cancer, Pregnancy associated breast cancer is uncommon. Adjuvant chemotherapy administered intrapartum has been resolved to be safe from the second trimester. Objective To review cases of pregnancy associated breast cancer managed with adjuvant intrapartum chemotherapy. Patients and method Gravid patients diagnosed with breast cancer had chemotherapy administered by a slow infusion protocol at 3 weekly interval from the second trimester till 4 weeks to expected date of delivery. Obstetric scans were done to monitor fetal growth and development. Requisite surgery was carried out intrapartum and postpartum. Results There were three cases of pregnancy associated breast cancer Age range 32–33 years, mean 32.5 years. Two cases presented in the second trimester while one presented in the third trimester. The second case had overt metastatic disease and was grave in respiratory distress. Histology showed invasive lobular carcinoma in two cases and extensive intraductal carcinoma with invasive component in the third. Immunohistochemistry showed triple negative in the first case and hormone positive in the third case. Wide local excision was done for a 3 cm lump in the first case and mastectomy postpartum in the third case. but had no surgery. Doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide was administered three weekly from the second trimester up to 32 weeks and continued postpartum. Taxanes was administered afterwards. The grave clinical state of the second case was markedly improved with the first cycle of chemotherapy instituted. All cases had spontaneous vaginal delivery with good apgar scores. Children had normal developmental milestones. First case with breast conservation is clinically disease free, the second case demised postpartum from disease progression while the third had a mastectomy and is on cue for radiotherapy. Conclusion Adjuvant intrapartum chemotherapy had a successful outcome with birth of normal babies with normal developmental milestones in our miniseries. PMID:26610198

  19. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  20. Partial breast irradiation as second conservative treatment for local breast cancer recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel . E-mail: jean-michel.hannoun-levi@fccc.edu; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Ellis, Steve; Teissier, Eric; Alzieu, Claude; Lallement, Michel; Cowen, Didier

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Mastectomy is the treatment of reference for local relapse after breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to document the feasibility and the results of associating lumpectomy with partial breast irradiation by interstitial brachytherapy (IB) as local treatment for an isolated ipsilateral BC local recurrence (LR). Methods and materials: Between 1975 and 1996 at Marseille and Nice Cancer Institutes, 4026 patients received lumpectomy and radiotherapy (RT) (50-80 Gy) for a localized breast cancer of which 473 presented a LR. Among these patients, 69 (14.6%) received a second lumpectomy followed by IB, which delivered 30 Gy (Nice, n = 24) or 45-50 Gy (Marseille, n = 45) with 3 to 8 {sup 192}Ir wires in 1 or 2 planes on the 85% isodose. Results: Median age at LR was 58.2 years, median follow-up since primary BC was 10 years, and median follow-up after the second conservative treatment was 50.2 months (range, 2-139 months). Immediate tolerance was good in all cases. Grade 2 to 3 long-term complications (LTC) according to IB dose were 0%, 28%, and 32%, respectively, for 30 Gy, 45 to 46 Gy, and 50 Gy (p 0.01). Grade 2 to 3 LTC according to total dose were 4% and 30%, respectively, for total doses (initial RT plus IB) {<=} 100 Gy or >100 Gy (p = 0.008). Logistic regression showed that the only factor associated with Grade 2 to 3 complications was higher IB doses (p = 0.01). We noted 11 second LRs (LR2), 10 distant metastases (DM), and 5 specific deaths. LR2 occurred either in the tumor bed (50.8%) or close to the tumor bed (34.3%) or in another quadrant (14.9%). Kaplan-Meier 5-year freedom from (FF) LR2 (FFLR2), FFDM, and DFS were 77.4%, 86.7%, and 68.9%, respectively. Overall 5-year survival (OS) was 91.8%. Univariate analysis showed the following factors associated with a higher FFLR2: (1) number of wires used for IB (3-4 vs. 5-8 wires, p = 0.006), (2) IB doses (30-45 Gy vs. 46-60 Gy, p = 0.05), (3) number of planes (1 vs. 2, p = 0.05), (4) interval between primary breast cancer and LR (< 36 months vs. {>=}36 months, p = 0.06). Multivariate analysis showed two factors associated with better local control: (1) number of wires (5-8 wires, p = 0.013) and (2) interval between primary breast cancer and LR {>=}36 months (p = 0.039). The multivariate analysis showed two factors associated with better FFDM: (1) absence of initial axilla involvement (p 0.019) and (2) relapse in a different location (p = 0.04). These two factors were also associated with a higher OS. Conclusion: Our experience showed that second conservative treatments for local relapse were feasible and gave results comparable to standard mastectomy. We recommend delivering IB doses of at least 46 Gy in 2 planes when initial radiotherapy delivered 50 Gy. The study gives enough information to encourage a Phase III trial that compares radical mastectomy to conservative procedures for localized breast cancer recurrences.

  1. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  2. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-01-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  3. Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul

    2013-04-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast (NECB) is an extremely rare variant of breast cancer having aggressive clinicopathological behaviour and poor prognosis. A 62 years old woman presented with a painless lump in the left breast. Microscopic and immunohistochemical evaluation of the core-tissue biopsy and of the mastectomy specimen revealed moderately-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast. She was labeled as a case of primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast after an infallible exclusion of any concomitant lesion elsewhere in the body. Modified radical mastectomy with level II axillary clearance, chemoradiotherapy and Famoxifen have led to an uneventful 5-year survival till the last follow-up. PMID:23552540

  4. Anatomy of the nipple and breast ducts.

    PubMed

    Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Urban, Cícero; Vallejo, André

    2016-02-01

    Over time, variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nipple sparing mastectomy (NSM) procedures have strongly increased in frequency and have become one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer, also improving overall aesthetic outcomes and the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. The nipple areola-complex (NAC) must be considered the identity of the breast concerning self-esteem of patients. This paper will remind the main anatomical topics around the nipple and breast ducts. PMID:26855906

  5. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-29

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. [Cancer in ectopic breast tissue].

    PubMed

    Røikjer, Johan; Lindmark, Ida; Knudsen, Thor

    2015-06-15

    Two different forms of ectopic breast tissue exist in human beings: supernumerary and aberrant. Both forms are usually seen alongside the milk lines, which extend from the upper limbs to the inguinal region where they give rise to mammary glands, areolas and nipples. Although ectopic- and orthotopic breast tissue are placed in different areas of the body, they still share the same ability to undergo pathological degeneration. The focus of this case report is to shed light on this unusual form of breast cancer, and raise the level of awareness in cases with lumps located in the milk lines. PMID:26101129

  9. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  10. DNA damage and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer D; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is intimately related to the accumulation of DNA damage, and repair failures (including mutation prone repair and hyperactive repair systems). This article relates current clinical categories for breast cancer and their common DNA damage repair defects. Information is included on the potential for accumulation of DNA damage in the breast tissue of a woman during her lifetime and the role of DNA damage in breast cancer development. We then cover endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage, types of DNA damage repair and basic signal transduction pathways for three gene products involved in the DNA damage response system; namely BRCA1, BRIT1 and PARP-1. These genes are often considered tumor suppressors because of their roles in DNA damage response and some are under clinical investigation as likely sources for effective new drugs to treat breast cancers. Finally we discuss some of the problems of DNA damage repair systems in cancer and the conundrum of hyper-active repair systems which can introduce mutations and confer a survival advantage to certain types of cancer cells. PMID:21909479

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  12. Breast cancer in older women.

    PubMed

    Kimmick, G; Muss, H B

    1997-05-01

    More than 50% of breast cancers are diagnosed in women aged 65 years or older, a quickly growing segment of the population. Healthy older women should be offered state-of-the-art screening and treatment for breast cancer, including mammography, surgery, radiation therapy, and adjuvant therapy for early stage tumors. Clinical trials focusing on the role of adjuvant treatment in older women with breast cancer are of chief importance. The optimal treatment for older women with life-threatening, comorbid conditions may be primary treatment with tamoxifen or adjuvant therapy with tamoxifen alone after definitive surgery. Outside the clinical trials setting, metastatic disease should be treated similarly in all age groups. PMID:9115451

  13. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  14. [Breast cancer in clinical stage III. Multidisciplinary treatment].

    PubMed

    Molina-Esquivel, J; Vargas Sandoval, G; García Siller, I; Velázquez López, J; Soto de León, M

    1991-12-01

    The results of treatments applied to 142 patients with breast carcinoma stage III, in the Oncology Service from 1965 to 1974 are as follows: successive cycles of treatments were applied: irradiation with X-rays of 280 Kv-20 mA for ulcerated tumors or Cobalt 60 for non-ulcerated tumors, using a dose of 5,500 rad in eight weeks. Subsequently, in cases of residual neoplasia, mastectomy was used or an extra dose of 1,500 to 3,000 rad. Later, at the first sign of the spread of carcinoma, hormonal therapy was given and then chemotherapy. Survival rate after five years was as follows: 41.54% of patients survived and 58.45% died from the cancer. PMID:1819540

  15. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Domain, Delora; Singletary, S. Eva; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age.

  16. Transdermal or Oral Telapristone Acetate in Treating Patients Undergoing Mastectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  17. Job Authority and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2014-01-01

    Using the 19572011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of womens job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which womens occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions. PMID:25506089

  18. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Tailoring communication in consultations with women from high risk breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Lobb, E A; Butow, P N; Meiser, B; Barratt, A; Gaff, C; Young, M A; Kirk, J; Suthers, G K; Tucker, K

    2002-08-27

    This multicentre study examined the influence of patient demographic, disease status and psychological variables on clinical geneticists/genetic counsellors (consultants) behaviours in initial consultations with women from high-risk breast cancer families. One hundred and fifty-eight women completed a pre-clinic self-report questionnaire. The consultations were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and coded. Consultants did not vary their behaviour according to women's expectations. However, significantly more aspects of genetic testing were discussed with women who were affected with breast cancer (P<0.001), screening and management with unaffected women (P=0.01) and breast cancer prevention with younger women (P=0.01). Prophylactic mastectomy was discussed more frequently with women with medical and allied health training (P=0.02), and prophylactic oophorectomy with women affected with breast cancer (P=0.03), those in non-professional occupations (P=0.04) and with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer (P<0.001). Consultants used significantly more behaviours to facilitate understanding with women who were in non-professional occupations (P=0.04); facilitated active patient involvement more with women affected with breast cancer (P<0.001) and used more supportive and counselling behaviours with affected women (P=0.02). This study showed that patient demographics were more likely to predict consultants' communication behaviours than the woman's psychological status. Methods to facilitate assessment of psychological morbidity are needed to allow more tailored communication. PMID:12189544

  20. Family history of breast cancer and all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ellen T.; Milne, Roger L.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Sangaramoorthy, Meera; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Goodwin, Pamela J.; OMalley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Friedlander, Michael L.; Giles, Graham G.; Whittemore, Alice S.; West, Dee W.; John, Esther M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although having a family history of breast cancer is a well established breast cancer risk factor, it is not known whether it influences mortality after breast cancer diagnosis. Methods Subjects were 4,153 women with first primary incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2000, and enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry through population-based sampling in Northern California, USA; Ontario, Canada; and Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Cases were oversampled for younger age at diagnosis and/or family history of breast cancer. Carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 were excluded. Cases and their relatives completed structured questionnaires assessing breast cancer risk factors and family history of cancer. Cases were followed for a median of 6.5 years, during which 725 deaths occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate associations between family history of breast cancer at the time of diagnosis and risk of all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis, adjusting for established prognostic factors. Results The hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.84-1.15) for having at least one first- or second-degree relative with breast cancer, and 0.85 (95% CI=0.70-1.02) for having at least one first-degree relative with breast cancer, compared with having no such family history. Estimates did not vary appreciably when stratified by case or tumor characteristics. Conclusions Family history of breast cancer is not associated with all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis for women without a known germline mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Therefore, clinical management should not depend on family history of breast cancer. PMID:19034644

  1. Characterization of Korean Male Breast Cancer Using an Online Nationwide Breast-Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Young; Lee, Se Kyung; Lee, Jeong Eon; Park, Hyung Seok; Lim, Seung Taek; Jung, Yongsik; Ko, Byung Kyun; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to review the characteristics and the survival rate in male breast cancer (MBC) patients in Korea over a 31-year period. Additionally, we analyzed the overall survival (OS) rate of a group of MBC matched to females with breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 400 Korean patients who were treated for MBC from 1978 to 2009. Patient demographics and clinical information were routinely documented throughout the study period. Survival and prognostic factors were evaluated. Each MBC patient was matched with 5 female breast cancer (FBC) patients based on 7 characteristics and we compared the OS rates between the 2 groups. For MBC cases, the median follow-up was 72 months and the 5-year OS rate was 85.9%. In univariate analyses, the prognostic factors influencing OS were age (more than 60 years, P <0.001), tumor size (>2 cm, P = 0.007), and having a negative progesterone receptor (PR) status (P = 0.042). Only the age (P = 0.028) and tumor size (P = 0.024) were significant prognostic factors for OS in multivariate analysis. After matching, we had 260 male patients matched to 1300 female patients for analysis. Compared with cases among females, the rate of mastectomy was higher among MBC cases and tumors, which were almost invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs), were more likely to be located in the central part of the breast. For MBC cases, the percentage of adjuvant radiation therapy was low compared with female cases. The primary hormone therapy agent used was tamoxifen. The 5-year OS rates were similar in MBC compared with FBC (91.0% vs. 92.6%, P = 0.300). We found that only the age (more than 60 years) and tumor size were independent prognostic factors of survival in MBC. The prognosis for MBC is similar to that for FBC given similar stage and hormone-receptor status. PMID:27100414

  2. Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samavat, Hamed; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    There is currently accumulating evidence that endogenous estrogens play a critical role in the development of breast cancer. Estrogens and their metabolites have been studied in both pre- and postmenopausal women with more consistent results shown in the latter population, in part because of large hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and far fewer studies having been performed in premenopausal women. In this review we describe in detail estrogen metabolism and associated genetic variations, and provide a critical review of the current literature regarding the role of estrogens and their metabolites in breast cancer risk. PMID:24784887

  3. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC, particularly among these subsets of patients.

  4. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  5. Risk of contralateral breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a 30-year semi-prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Basu, N N; Ingham, S; Hodson, J; Lalloo, F; Bulman, M; Howell, A; Evans, D G

    2015-12-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer after primary breast cancer. Risk reduction strategies are discussed after assessment of risk factors for developing contralateral breast cancer. We assessed potential risk factors that could be of use in clinical practice, including the novel use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) testing. 506 BRCA1 and 505 BRCA2 mutation carriers with a diagnosis of breast cancer were observed for up to 30 years. The risk of a contralateral breast cancer is approximately 2-3% per year, remaining constant for at least 20 years. This was similar in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Initial breast cancer before age 40-years was a significant risk factor, which was more pronounced in BRCA1 patients. The effect of risk-reducing oophorectomy on contralateral breast cancer risk may be overestimated because of bias. No significant association was found between overall breast cancer risk SNP score and contralateral breast cancer development. Young mutation carriers, particularly those with BRCA1 mutations, who develop breast cancer have a significantly higher risk of developing contralateral breast cancer, remaining constant for over 20 years. Contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy should be considered in this group, in particular as there is a survival benefit. Caution is advised when counselling women considering risk-reducing oophorectomy as, after accounting for statistical bias, the associated risk reduction was found to be non-significant, and potentially smaller than has been previously reported. SNP testing did not add any further discriminatory information when assessing contralateral breast cancer risk. PMID:26239694

  6. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  7. Skeletal manifestations of treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  8. Misdiagnosed male breast cancer with an unknown primary tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEN-WU; CHEN, LANG; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

    2014-01-01

    Compared with female breast cancer, male breast cancer (MBC) has an extremely low morbidity, later staging and fewer breast tissues. The lumps are easier to invade in the center and the majority of the cases are positive for metastatic lymph node, with the typical clinical manifestation as a painless mass in partial breast. MBC with an unknown primary tumor is rare and is often prone to misdiagnosis, resulting in a delay in correct treatment. Such a case is extremely significant for clinical reference. The current study presents a 58-year-old male who developed a painless mass in the left armpit and received armpit mass biopsy and pathological examination which showed glandular cancer, with a high possibility of mammary primary tumor. The patient was administered four cycles of paclitaxel plus oxaliplatin chemotherapy. However, three months later, the patient identified novel disseminated lymph nodes in the left armpit. The initial pathological section and paraffin blocks were re-examined and the patient was finally diagnosed with breast invasive ductal carcinoma based on the metastases pathology and immunohistochemical examination. No breast mass was found on physical examination of the patient and the tumor markers, including cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen, were normal. No primary tumors were observed in the mammography and PET-CT and the primary tumor was not found following the left breast modified radical mastectomy. PMID:24959243

  9. Outpatient mastectomy: clinical, payer, and geographic influences.

    PubMed Central

    Case, C; Johantgen, M; Steiner, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine (1) the use of outpatient services for all surgical breast procedures for breast cancer and (2) the influence of payer and state on the use of outpatient services for complete mastectomy in light of state and federal length-of-stay managed care legislation. DATA SOURCES: Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project representing all discharges from hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers for five states (Colorado, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York) and seven years (1990-96). STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal, cross-sectional analyses of all women undergoing inpatient and outpatient complete mastectomy (CMAS), subtotal mastectomy (STMAS), and lumpectomy (LUMP) for cancer were employed. Total age-adjusted rates and percentage of outpatient CMAS, STMAS, and LUMP were compared. Independent influence of state and HMO payer on likelihood of receiving an outpatient CMAS was determined from multivariate models, adjusting for clinical characteristics (age < 50 years, comorbidity, metastases, simple mastectomy, breast reconstruction) and hospital characteristics (teaching, ownership, urban). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 1993, 1 to 2 percent of CMASs were outpatient in all states. By 1996, 8 percent of CMASs were outpatient in Connecticut, 13 percent were outpatient in Maryland, and 22 percent were outpatient in Colorado. In comparison, LUMPs were 78 to 88 percent outpatient, and by 1996, 43 to 72 percent of STMASs were outpatient. In 1996, women were 30 percent more likely to receive an outpatient CMAS in New York, 2.5 times more likely in Connecticut, 4.7 times more likely in Maryland, and 8.6 times more likely in Colorado compared to New Jersey. In addition, women with Medicare, Medicaid, or private commercial insurance were less likely to receive an outpatient CMAS compared to women with an HMO payer. CONCLUSIONS: LUMP is an outpatient procedure, and STMAS is becoming primarily outpatient. CMAS, while still primarily inpatient, is increasingly outpatient in some states. Although clinical characteristics remain important, the state in which a woman receives care and whether she has an HMO payer are strong determinants of whether she receives an outpatient CMAS. PMID:11666108

  10. Genetic testing by cancer site: breast.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Chittenden, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Women in the United States have a 12% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Although only about 5% to 10% of all cases of breast cancer are attributable to a highly penetrant cancer predisposition gene, individuals who carry a mutation in one of these genes have a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer, as well as other cancers, over their lifetime compared with the general population. The ability to distinguish those individuals at high risk allows health care providers to intervene with appropriate counseling and education, surveillance, and prevention-with the overall goal of improved survival for these individuals. This article focuses on the identification of patients at high risk for breast cancer and provides an overview of the clinical features, cancer risks, causative genes, and medical management for the most clearly described hereditary breast cancer syndromes. Newer genes that have also been implicated in familial breast cancer are also briefly reviewed. PMID:22846731

  11. Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size News » Filed under: Breast Cancer Report: Breast Cancer Death Rates Down 34% Since 1990 Article date: ... American Cancer Society finds that death rates from breast cancer in the United States have dropped 34% since ...

  12. Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

  13. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  14. Religion as an empowerment context in the narrative of women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadati, Ahmad Kalateh; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Gharibi, Vahid; Fard, Mahmood Exiri; Ebrahimzadeh, Najmeh; Tahmasebi, Sedigeh

    2015-06-01

    This paper aims at exploring women's meaningful perception, semantic understanding, and their experiences of breast cancer in a religion context. Accordingly, eight women who had one of their breasts completely removed by surgery (mastectomy) were studied by narrative interviews. In this narrative interview, participants told their life stories since the beginning of disease. Findings showed that religious concepts have a heightened role in the interpretation and understanding of disease, coping strategies, and gaining new concepts for life and death. Two main themes discovered in this research were fatalism on the one hand, and the hope and empowerment on the other. Despite the intrinsic conflict between these two concepts, religion, as a specific cultural and epistemological context, reconciles them; in a way, these polar concepts form a unitary structure of meaning and activity. In this structure, semantic coherence and concrete experience leads women with breast cancer to a new meaningful system, which shapes a new path for living well. PMID:25008190

  15. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria. PMID:21067536

  16. Testosterone and breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Glaser, R; Dimitrakakis, C

    2015-11-01

    Testosterone (T) is the most abundant biologically active hormone in women. Androgen receptors (AR) are located throughout the body including the breast where T decreases tissue proliferation. However, T can be aromatized to estradiol (E2), which increases proliferation and hence, breast cancer (BCA) risk. Increased aromatase expression and an imbalance in the ratio of stimulatory estrogens to protective androgens impacts breast homeostasis. Recent clinical data supports a role for T in BCA prevention. Women with symptoms of hormone deficiency treated with pharmacological doses of T alone or in combination with anastrozole (A), delivered by subcutaneous implants, had a reduced incidence of BCA. In addition, T combined with A effectively treated symptoms of hormone deficiency in BCA survivors and was not associated with recurrent disease. Most notably, T+A implants placed in breast tissue surrounding malignant tumors significantly reduced BCA tumor size, further supporting T direct antiproliferative, protective and therapeutic effect. PMID:26160683

  17. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  18. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. [Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tassin, S; Bragard, I; Thommessen, M; Pitchot, W

    2011-01-01

    In occidental countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women. In the last 30 years, the therapeutical progresses have improved the prognosis and the survival rate. However, despite this hope of recovering, women continue to face the fear of death and vulnerability. Moreover, treatments can induce cognitive, emotional and behavioral reactions in patients but also in their relatives. Therefore, the treatments are associated with physical and psychosocial dysfunctioning influencing quality of life. PMID:21826969

  20. Benefits, risks, and safety of external beam radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay C; Mutter, Robert W; Halyard, Michele Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common and complex disease often necessitating multimodality care. Breast cancer may be treated with surgical resection, radiotherapy (RT), and systemic therapy, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapies, or a combination thereof. In the past 50 years, RT has played an increasingly significant role in the treatment of breast cancer, resulting in improvements in locoregional control and survival for women undergoing mastectomy who are at high risk of recurrence, and allowing for breast conservation in certain settings. Although radiation provides significant benefit to many women with breast cancer, it is also associated with risks of toxicity, including cardiac and pulmonary toxicity, lymphedema, and secondary malignancy. RT techniques have advanced and continue to evolve dramatically, offering increased precision and reproducibility of treatment delivery and flexibility of treatment schedule. This increased sophistication of RT offers promise of improved outcomes by maintaining or improving efficacy, reducing toxicity, and increasing patient access and convenience. A review of the role of radiation therapy in breast cancer, its associated toxicities and efforts in toxicity reduction is presented. PMID:25977608