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1

Too Few Breast Cancer Patients Getting Radiation After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Too Few Breast Cancer Patients Getting Radiation After Mastectomy: Study More than a third with ' ... 17, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mastectomy Radiation Therapy TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many ...

2

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer Skye H. Cheng) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who Using gene expression profiles to develop prediction tree models effectively identifies breast cancer

West, Mike

3

Vanderbilt study finds more breast cancer patients opting for mastectomy  

Cancer.gov

Far more breast cancer patients are choosing to undergo mastectomy, including removal of both breasts, instead of choosing breast conservation surgery even when they have early stage disease that is confined to one breast, a Vanderbilt study shows.

4

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

5

Mastectomy for management of breast cancer in Ibadan, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Modified radical mastectomy remains the standard therapeutic surgical operation for breast cancer in most parts of the world. This retrospective study reviews mastectomy for management of breast cancer in a surgical oncology division over a ten year period. Methods We reviewed the case records of consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy at the Surgical Oncology Division, University College Hospital (UCH) Ibadan between November 1999 and October 2009. Results Of the 1226 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients over the study period, 431 (35.2%) patients underwent mastectomy making an average of 43 mastectomies per year. Most patients were young women, premenopausal, had invasive ductal carcinoma and underwent modified radical mastectomy as the definitive surgical treatment. Prior to mastectomy, locally advanced tumors were down staged in about half of the patients that received neo-adjuvant combination chemotherapy. Surgical complication rate was low. The most frequent operative complication was seroma collection in six percent of patients. The average hospital stay was ten days and most patients were followed up at the surgical outpatients department for about two years post-surgery. Conclusions There was low rate of mastectomy in this cohort which could partly be attributable to late presentation of many patients with inoperable local or metastatic tumors necessitating only palliative or terminal care. Tumor down-staging with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy enhanced surgical loco-regional tumor control in some patients. The overall morbidity and the rates of postoperative events were minimal. Long-term post-operative out-patients follow-up was not achieved as many patients were lost to follow up after two years of mastectomy. PMID:24354443

2013-01-01

6

Achieving autologous breast reconstruction for breast cancer patients in the setting of post-mastectomy radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Breast cancer is now associated with long-term disease-free and overall survival, and in the setting of mastectomy, long term\\u000a psycho-sexual health becomes an important consideration. To this end, breast reconstruction has been shown to significantly\\u000a improve quality of life for mastectomy patients. With adjuvant radiotherapy often required in the setting of breast reconstruction,\\u000a it is unclear what interaction the two

Namrata S. Anavekar; Warren M. Rozen; Cara M. Le Roux; Mark W. Ashton

2011-01-01

7

Predictors of Contralateral Breast Cancer in Patients With Unilateral Breast Cancer Undergoing Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) reduced the risk of contralateral breast cancer in unilateral breast cancer patients, it was difficult to predict which patients were most likely to benefit from the procedure. The objective of this study was to identify the clinicopathologic factors that predict contralateral breast cancer and thereby inform decisions regarding performing CPM in unilateral breast cancer patients. METHODS A total of 542 unilateral breast cancer patients who underwent CPM at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from January 2000 to April 2007 were included in the current study. A logistic regression analysis was used to identify clinicopathologic factors that predict contralateral breast cancer. RESULTS Of the 542 patients included in this study, 25 (5%) had an occult malignancy in the contralateral breast. Eighty-two patients (15%) had moderate-risk to high-risk histologic findings identified at final pathologic evaluation of the contralateral breast. Multivariate analysis revealed that 3 independent factors predicted malignancy in the contralateral breast: an ipsilateral invasive lobular histology, an ipsilateral multicentric tumor, and a 5-year Gail risk ?1.67%. Multivariate analysis also revealed that an age ?50 years at the time of the initial cancer diagnosis and an additional ipsilateral moderate-risk to high-risk pathology were independent predictors of moderate-risk to high-risk histologic findings in the contralateral breast. CONCLUSIONS The findings indicated that CPM may be a rational choice for breast cancer patients who have a 5-year Gail risk ?1.67%, an additional ipsilateral moderate-risk to high-risk pathology, an ipsilateral multicentric tumor, or an ipsilateral tumor of invasive lobular histology. PMID:19172584

Yi, Min; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Arun, Banu K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Babiera, Gildy V.; Hwang, Rosa F.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Yang, Wei; Hunt, Kelly K.

2015-01-01

8

Risk of recurrence after treatment of early breast cancer with skin-sparing mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Skin-sparing mastectomy, combined with immediate breast reconstruction, has become increasingly popular. However, there are\\u000a no published long-term data to support its oncologic safety. Our purpose was to evaluate the long-term oncologic risk of skin-sparing\\u000a mastectomy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: The records of all patients who had undergone treatment of T1 or T2 breast cancer by mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction,\\u000a and who

Stephen S. Kroll; Mark A. Schusterman; Helen E. Tadjalli; S. Eva Singletary; Frederick C. Ames

1997-01-01

9

Researchers find that Angelina Jolie's preventive mastectomy raised awareness, but not knowledge of breast cancer risk  

Cancer.gov

Angelina Jolie heightened awareness about breast cancer when she announced in May 2013 that she had undergone a preventive double mastectomy, but a new study by the University of Maryland School of Public Health reveals that despite widespread awareness of Jolie's story, most Americans could not correctly answer questions about breast cancer risk.

10

"Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

2011-01-01

11

[Mastectomy incisions and biopsy technics in view of subsequent reconstructive surgery in breast cancer].  

PubMed

Patients are referred to departments for plastic surgery increasingly frequently for breast reconstruction following mastectomy for cancer of the breast. Successful results depend greatly on the primary mastectomy carried out by surgeons without experience in reconstruction. It is particularly important that the incisions are suitably placed so that the final result can be satisfactory. Our material consists of 119 patients who had been submitted to unilateral mastectomy for cancer of the breast at least one year previously. One fifth of the patients had hypertrophic breasts. The unequal distribution of weight following unilateral mastectomy is followed by such considerable discomfort from the remaining breast that this alone makes a reduction plastic operation necessary. Simultaneously, reconstruction is carried out on the side of the mastectomy. As the method of reconstruction, introduction of silicone prosthesis were carried out in 110 patients. Nine patients were, in addition, submitted to more complicated plastic flap procedures. The postoperative course was uncomplicated in 112 patients (94%). Reoperation proved necessary on seven occasions; in four patients on account of haematoma formation and rupture of the wound in three patients. In four patients, the prosthesis had to be renewed on account of rupture during the subsequent years. Guidelines for placing the incisions at the primary mastectomy are suggested to facilitate successful reconstruction. Finally, a suitable biopsy technique is described. PMID:2781648

Kiil, J; Kiil, J

1989-07-24

12

Penn researchers find contralateral prophylactic mastectomy offers limited gains to life expectancy for breast cancer patients:  

Cancer.gov

Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), a procedure that removes the unaffected breast in patients with cancer in one breast, provides only a modest increase in life expectancy, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

13

[Therapy and prognosis of small breast cancers. Comparison of subcutaneous mastectomy procedures with ablatio mammae].  

PubMed

A retrospective clinical study included 1283 patients with breast cancer. 307 of 762 tumours with known diameter (mm) were classified as stage pT1 (TNM, 70). Four groups were formed to compare the prognosis in subgroups of pT1 cancers: 0-5 mm (n = 22), 6-9 mm (n = 22), 10 mm (n = 53) and 11-20 mm (n = 210). A comparison of three types of surgery was made: Radical subcutaneous mastectomy (12), bilateral modified subcutaneous mastectomy (10, 11), and modified radical mastectomy (Auchincloss, 3). Both forms of subcutaneous mastectomy were combined with adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the side of the tumour. In this trial, patients were younger at diagnosis than usually stated in the literature. Small breast cancers had the same localisation and histology as large ones. Axillary lymph node metastases were identified from a tumour diameter of 6 mm upwards. Bilateral tumours were seen in 2 of 22 patients with tumours less than or equal to 5 mm. Multifocal growth was observed also in the same size range. Histologically different simultaneous invasive unilateral cancers were seen starting at a diameter of 8 mm of the larger tumour. Systemic metastases were observed in tumours of 10 mm in diameter. Local recurrences occurred in breast cancers with a diameter of 2 mm and more. There were no recurrences in the area of the nipple or areola in pT1 cancers. Small breast cancers did not appear to be biologically different from larger lesions. No prognostic subgroups of pT1 were evident beyond the established TNM staging. Disease-free survival was not significantly different between the three surgical approaches. Local recurrence was significantly less frequent after breast-conserving surgery. A negative influence of local recurrence on the prognosis was observed to a similar extent irrespective of the type of surgery. The concept of "minimal breast cancer" suggesting ablative surgery for a heterogeneous group of preinvasive and small invasive lesions is outdated. The different forms of subcutaneous mastectomy are a therapeutic alternative in the context of breast-conserving surgery of small infiltrating breast cancers. Especially the modified subcutaneous mastectomy (Beller) combines a good cosmetic result without prognostic impairment and with a potential reduction of the risc of contralateral breast cancer. Further potential applications include prophylactic treatment of high-risk patients with preinvasive lesions. PMID:2286314

Kieback, D G; Beller, F K; Nitsch, C D; Krieg, V; Nienhaus, H; Niedner, W E

1990-10-01

14

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... done using tattoo ink. However, in some cases, skin grafts may be taken from the groin or abdomen and attached to the breast to create an areola ( 2 ). Skin-sparing mastectomy that preserves a woman's own nipple ...

15

Univ. of Md. study reports young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival with breast-conservation therapy as mastectomy:  

Cancer.gov

Young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates with a lumpectomy and radiation treatment, known as breast-conservation therapy, as with mastectomy, a new study conducted at the University of Maryland has found.

16

Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available\\u000a studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study\\u000a was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This\\u000a randomized

Xiao-Mei Li; Hong Yan; Kai-Na Zhou; Shao-Nong Dang; Duo-Lao Wang; Yin-Ping Zhang

2011-01-01

17

Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords “contralateral breast cancer” and “contralateral prophylactic mastectomy”. These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

2015-01-01

18

Better contralateral breast cancer risk estimation and alternative options to contralateral prophylactic mastectomy.  

PubMed

The incidence of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has increased among women with breast cancer, despite uncertain survival benefit and a declining incidence of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Patient-related reasons for undergoing CPM include an overestimation of the risk of CBC, increased cancer worry, and a desire to improve survival. We summarize the existing literature on CBC risk and outcomes and the clinical benefit of CPM among women with unilateral breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of developing a secondary cancer in the contralateral breast. Published studies were retrieved from the MEDLINE database with the keywords "contralateral breast cancer" and "contralateral prophylactic mastectomy". These include observational studies, clinical trials, survival analyses, and decision models examining the risk of CBC, the clinical and psychosocial effects of CPM, and other treatment strategies to reduce CBC risk. Studies that have evaluated CBC risk estimate it to be approximately 0.5% annually on average. Patient-related factors associated with an increased risk of CBC include carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, young age at breast cancer, and strong family history of breast cancer in the absence of a BRCA1/2 mutation. Although CPM reduces the risk of CBC by approximately 94%, it may not provide a significant gain in overall survival and there is conflicting evidence that it improves disease-free survival among women with breast cancer regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Therefore, alternative strategies such as the use of tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, which reduce the risk of CBC by approximately 50%, should be encouraged for eligible women with ER-positive breast cancers. Future research is needed to evaluate the impact of decision and educational tools that can be used for personalized counseling of patients regarding their CBC risk, the uncertain role of CPM, and alternative CBC risk reduction strategies. PMID:25678823

Davies, Kalatu R; Cantor, Scott B; Brewster, Abenaa M

2015-01-01

19

Mastectomy  

MedlinePLUS

Breast removal surgery; Subcutaneous mastectomy; Total mastectomy; Simple mastectomy; Modified radical mastectomy ... circle around the nipple) in place. Total or simple mastectomy: The surgeon cuts breast tissue free from ...

20

Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

Mahmood, Usama, E-mail: usama.mahmood@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koshy, Matthew [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Cellular and Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-08-01

21

The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

Deutsch, Melvin [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)], E-mail: deutschm@upmc.edu; Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2008-03-15

22

Analysis of selected factors influencing seroma formation in breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of the work was to analyze the impact of selected factors on the incidence of seroma formation in breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy. Material and methods One hundred and fifty breast cancer patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. All patients had mastectomy performed using the same operative technique with electrocoagulation. The amount of seroma formed after surgery and its duration were correlated with selected demographic, clinical and pathological parameters. Results The cumulative total seroma volume collected by the end of treatment was higher and the overall time of seroma treatment was longer in patients over the age of 60 years (p = 0.001 and p = 0.001 respectively). Duration of seroma was significantly longer in obese patients (p = 0.036). The cumulative total seroma volume collected by the end of treatment was higher and the overall time of seroma treatment was longer in patients who had over 130 ml of lymph drained during the first 24 postoperative hours (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001 respectively). Additionally, longer duration of seroma was observed in patients with pathological stage I and II according to TNM-UICC (p = 0.042) and in patients with ? 1200 g weight resected of mammary gland (p = 0.05). Conclusions Age and obesity are important prognostic factors influencing seroma formation in breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy. The amount of lymph formed during first postoperative day may have predictive value in assessing cumulative total seroma volume collected during treatment and its overall duration. PMID:23515419

Jaworski, Rados?aw; Irga, Ninela; Kruszewski, Janusz Wies?aw; Jaskiewicz, Janusz

2012-01-01

23

[The first mastectomy for breast cancer in America: Aguascalientes, México, 1777].  

PubMed

In this paper we present the first evidence of a mastectomy for breast cancer in America, performed in Aguascalientes, Mexico, in the eighteenth century. This intervention was recorded in an anonymous ex-voto in which Mrs. Josefa Peres Maldonado thanks the Black Christ of Encino and the Immaculate Conception or Virgin of the village for the good results obtained. The French physician and surgeon Peter Maille performed the operation with the help of friars of the convent-hospital San Juan de Dios. We review the history of the surgical treatment of breast cancer, the pictorial structure of the document, the surgical technique proposed by the Royal College of Surgeons (New Spain) at the time, and the association between this event and its time as an example of the impact that the Age of Enlightenment had in New Spain. PMID:25275850

López Y de la Peña, Xavier A

2014-01-01

24

Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment of Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy: A Meta-Analysis.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study is to investigate the clinical efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in treating breast cancer patients after mastectomy. We searched EMBASE, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Chinese Biomedical Database, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and PubMed to collect randomized controlled trials of TCM in treatment of breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Quality of the methodology was assessment in accordance with Cochrane 4.2.2 Handbook. All patients were divided into two groups: TCM group (TCM only or TCM plus conventional treatment) and control group (conventional treatment only). Effects of TCM on short-term clinical outcome, long-term survival rate, and incidence of adverse reaction were compared between the two groups. Twenty-nine studies were included in this meta-analysis, involving a total of 3142 breast cancer patients. Meta-analyses showed that TCM could improve short-term treatment efficacy (Z = 7.67, RR = 1.59, 95 % cl [1.41-1.80], P < 0.00001), extend 3-year (Z = 5.47, RR = 1.26, 95 % cl [1.16-1.37], P < 0.00001) and 5-year (Z = 5.53, RR = 1.17, 95 % cl [1.11-1.24], P < 0.00001) survival, reduce the incidence of adverse reactions in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. TCM provides beneficial and complementary effects in the treatment of breast cancer patients after mastectomy. PMID:25398591

Wang, Wei; Xu, Lin; Shen, Chaoyan

2014-11-15

25

Comparison of psychological aspects and patient satisfaction following breast conserving surgery, simple mastectomy and breast reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to assess and compare the psychological outcome and satisfaction of patients whom underwent wide local excision, mastectomy alone and mastectomy with breast reconstruction. A total of 577 patients had different types of operations for primary breast cancer (254 (44%) had wide local excision, 202 (35%) had simple mastectomy and 121 (21%) had breast reconstruction).

S. K. Al-Ghazal; L. Fallowfield; R. W. Blamey

2000-01-01

26

Surgical Procedures for Breast Cancer - Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Therapy (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... the future. Women with a very strong family history of breast cancer, such as family members in every ... with: Ashkenazi Jewish heritage A personal or family history of ovarian cancer A daughter, sister, or mother who ...

27

Five-year results of a randomized clinical trial comparing total mastectomy and segmental mastectomy with or without radiation in the treatment of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1976 the authors began a randomized trial to evaluate breast conservation by a segmental mastectomy in the treatment of State I and II breast tumors less than or equal to 4 cm in size. The operation removes only sufficient tissue to ensure that margins of resected specimens are free of tumor. Women were randomly assigned to total mastectomy, segmental

Bernard Fisher; Madeline Bauer; Richard Margolese; Roger Poisson; Yosef Pilch; Carol Redmond; Edwin Fisher; Norman Wolmark; Melvin Deutsch; Eleanor Montague; Elizabeth Saffer; Lawrence Wickerham; Harvey Lerner; Andrew Glass; Henry Shibata; Peter Deckers; Alfred Ketcham; Robert Oishi; Ian Russell

1985-01-01

28

Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Surgical Department of Oncology Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University from March to November 2009. A total of 120 breast cancer patients who received Personal Controlled Analgesia (PCA) following surgery (mastectomy) were randomly allocated to two groups, an intervention group and a control group (60 patients in each group). The intervention group accepted music therapy from the first day after radical mastectomy to the third admission to hospital for chemotherapy in addition to the routine nursing care, while the control group received only routine nursing care. Pain scores were measured at baseline and three post-tests using the General Questionnaire and Chinese version of Short-Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the change in the Pain Rating Index (PRI-total) score from baseline. Music therapy was found to reduce the PRI-total score in the intervention group significantly compared with the control group with a mean difference (95% CI) of -2.38 (-2.80, -1.95), -2.41 (-2.85, -1.96), and -1.87 (-2.33, -1.42) for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd post-tests, respectively. Similar results were found for Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scores. The findings of the study provide some evidence that music therapy has both short- and long-term positive effects on alleviating pain in breast cancer patients following radical mastectomy. PMID:21537935

Li, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Na; Dang, Shao-Nong; Wang, Duo-Lao; Zhang, Yin-Ping

2011-07-01

29

Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy  

PubMed Central

The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status. According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

2012-01-01

30

Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline.  

PubMed

The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers' websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

2014-01-01

31

The Incidence of Occult Nipple-Areola Complex Involvement in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving a Skin-Sparing Mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Surgical treatment of breast cancer traditionally has included resection of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), in the belief that this area had a significant probability of containing occult tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the true incidence of NAC involvement in patients who underwent a skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and to determine associated risk factors.Methods: A retrospective chart

Christine Laronga; Bonnie Kemp; Dennis Johnston; Geoffrey L. Robb; S. Eva Singletary

1999-01-01

32

Risk of locoregional recurrence by receptor status in breast cancer patients receiving modern systemic therapy and post-mastectomy radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed differences in locoregional outcome based on receptor status combinations in a cohort of stage II–III breast cancer\\u000a patients treated with modern trimodality therapy. Medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients receiving post-mastectomy\\u000a radiation (PMRT) between 1\\/1999 and 12\\/2009 were reviewed. Rate of local regional recurrence (LRR) was estimated by the method\\u000a of cumulative incidence allowing for competing risks.

J. E. Panoff; J. Hurley; C. Takita; I. M. Reis; W. Zhao; V. Sujoy; C. R. Gomez; M. Jorda; L. Koniaris; J. L. Wright

2011-01-01

33

The evolution of mastectomies in the oncoplastic breast surgery era  

PubMed Central

Over time, surgical techniques have advanced to the point where oncological safety and aesthetic outcomes are the pillars of contemporary breast surgery. Variations of mastectomy came up and started allowing the oncological safety and the possibility of an immediate breast reconstruction. Nowadays the association between plastic surgical techniques and mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction is one of the best alternatives to treat breast cancer and also improved overall aesthetic outcomes and favors the achievement of contralateral breast symmetry. “Oncoplastic mastectomy” is a feasible term and can be routinely used. PMID:25083466

Manconi, Andrea; da Costa Viera, Rene Aloísio; Michelli, Rodrigo Augusto Depieri; Matthes, Angelo do Carmo Silva

2013-01-01

34

Bilateral breast reconstruction with bipedicle transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap for simultaneous delayed and immediate breast reconstruction after therapeutic modified radical mastectomy and prophylactic nipple sparing mastectomy.  

PubMed

Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rate is increasing worldwide recently due to better understanding of genetic and hereditary breast cancer. The evolution of mastectomy technique from modified radical mastectomy to nipple sparing mastectomy with immediate or delayed breast reconstruction is also a potential cause of increasing mastectomy rate. This case report presents a young woman who had breast cancer at very young age then she decided for CPM due to her sister and mother are also breast cancer victim. We report clinical course and immediate outcome of the oncologic and reconstructive surgery in this case. PMID:25083498

Sattaratnamai, Ajaree; Lohsiriwat, Visnu

2014-02-01

35

Simultaneous Chest Wall Reconstruction after Sternectomy and Modified Radical Mastectomy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer with Solitary Sternal Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Bone is the most common metastatic organ in patients with breast cancer. The most significant clinical symptom of bone metastasis is pain which reduces quality of life in cancer patients. We report a case of chest wall reconstruction after partial sternal resection for solitary sternal metastasis and modified radical mastectomy in a patient with locally advanced breast cancer. The sternal defect was reconstructed with a 2 mm thick Gore-Tex patch. Postoperative pain was acceptable and the patient was discharged without any complications. The patient received the endocrine and bisphosphonate therapy combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. No recurrence or complications were observed during a follow-up period of 36 months. We describe our good surgical management results of sternal metastatic lesion in a patient with locally advanced breast cancer. We suggest that simultaneous sternectomy is a safe and curative surgical method for a solitary sternal metastasis when no evidence of systemic spread is noted. PMID:23346177

Kang, Hyun Jong; Lee, Song Am; Park, Kyoung Sik; Yang, Jung-Hyun

2012-01-01

36

Quality of life of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with radical mastectomy or breast-conserving procedures: results of EORTC trial 10801  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1980 the EORTC-BCCG initiated a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing modified radical mastectomy (MRM) with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in stage I and II breast cancer. The main endpoint of the trial was survival. A brief quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of two multi-item scales (body image and fear of recurrence) and two single items (satisfaction with treatment and

D Curran; J. P van Dongen; N. K Aaronson; G Kiebert; I. S Fentiman; F Mignolet; H Bartelink

1998-01-01

37

Axillary Lymph Node Status, But Not Tumor Size, Predicts Locoregional Recurrence and Overall Survival After Mastectomy for Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the significance of axillary lymph node status and tumor size for predicting locoregional recurrence (LRR) and overall survival after mastectomy for breast cancer and to discuss the utility of postmastectomy radiation therapy. Summary Background Data Patients with locally advanced breast cancer require multimodality treatment combining chemotherapy (and/or hormonal therapy), surgery, and radiation. Randomized trials have demonstrated that postmastectomy radiation reduces LRR, but no overall survival benefit has been established. Methods Criteria for accrual to the Alabama Breast Cancer Project (1975–1978) were female gender and T2–3 breast cancer with M0 status. Patients underwent a radical or a modified radical mastectomy. Node-positive patients received adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil chemotherapy or adjuvant melphalan. Patients were evaluated for LRR and overall survival based on the number of positive axillary lymph nodes and (in N0 patients) pathologic tumor size. Significance was determined using chi-square analysis. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by log-rank analysis. Results After median follow-up of 15 years, neither type of surgery nor chemotherapy was shown to affect locoregional disease-free or overall survival. LRR rates were higher and overall survival rates were lower in patients with nodal involvement, while tumor size was not shown to significantly affect these rates. Conclusions Patients with axillary lymph node metastases may benefit from postmastectomy radiation, but the use of postmastectomy radiation in N0 patients is not supported when it is based on tumor size alone. PMID:12724640

Beenken, Samuel W.; Urist, Marshall M.; Zhang, Yuting; Desmond, Renee; Krontiras, Helen; Medina, Heriberto; Bland, Kirby I.

2003-01-01

38

Factors Affecting Informed Decision-Making in Women with Increased Breast Cancer Risk or DCIS Pursuing Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy.  

PubMed

Despite lack of survival benefit, an increasing number of women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) opt for removal of the unaffected breast in addition to the breast with known pathology, i.e. contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Little is known about women's decision-making processes that contribute to this rising trend, particularly for DCIS. Further obscuring the decision is the highly variable terminology used to discuss breast cancer pathologies and treatments. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors impacting risk comprehension and decision-making related to increased risk for breast cancer or DCIS. We conducted a retrospective and prospective pilot study to evaluate women's perceived contralateral breast cancer risk, health literacy, numeracy, and comprehension of terms used in genetics and breast cancer. Clinical data such as breast MRI, genetic testing, family history, and breast cancer risk derived from predictive models were also collected. Women with DCIS and those high-risk for development of invasive breast cancer were eligible, and 68 patients participated. Of the cohort, 33 (48.5%) women considered pursuing CPM and 11 (16.2%) underwent CPM. Anxiety about cancer recurrence was the top reason for considering CPM. Undergoing CPM was significantly associated with plastic surgery consultation, increased 10-year breast cancer risk, genetic counseling, and genetic testing. The consideration of CPM was also associated with higher incomes. Numeracy, health and genetic literacy, and terminology scores were not significant predictors of CPM. Lastly, 83.8% of respondents stated DCIS qualified as breast cancer, but only 39.7% of patients correctly defined DCIS. When asked to interpret the phrase "indolent lesion of epithelial origin" (new terminology advocated to replace "DCIS"), 27.9% of respondents believed it referred to cancer, 47.1% did not, and 23.5% were unsure. Patients commonly thought "lesion" meant "skin wound" or "sore". Decision-making related to DCIS remains complex. Although CPM has not shown a survival advantage and can have significant complications, CPM rates continue to rise. Recognizing patients' knowledge of risk communication and terminology is vital to support shared and informed surgical decisions. PMID:25834156

Valente, J; Stybio, T; Hyde, S; Lipscomb, J; Gillespie, T W

2015-04-01

39

Recurrence and mortality dynamics for breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy according to estrogen receptor status: different mortality but similar recurrence.  

PubMed

(Cancer Sci 2010; 101: 826-830) The purpose was to ascertain whether the recurrence risk patterns for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (P) and ER-negative (N) breast cancer support the ER-related clinical divergence suggested by the observed different mortality patterns and gene expression profiles. Both recurrence and death were considered in a series of 771 patients undergoing mastectomy. ER status was available for 539 patients. The hazard rates for recurrence and mortality throughout 15 years of follow-up were assessed. The recurrence dynamics displays a bimodal pattern for both ERP and ERN tumors with comparable peak timings. The two curves cross during the 3rd year. By contrast, the mortality dynamics are definitely different for ERP and ERN tumors: during the early follow-up period ERN patients have their highest mortality risk, while ERP patients have their lowest mortality risk. The two curves cross during the 5th year. In spite of the different mortality dynamics, the recurrence dynamics do not demonstrate a major distinction in timing between ERP and ERN breast cancers, suggesting that the metastasis development process following mastectomy is apparently similar for both ER categories. The observed differences in the mortality risk are plausibly attributable to ER-related factors influencing the clinical course from recurrence to death. These clinical findings apparently contradict the occurrence of two different types of breast cancer, notwithstanding the distinct epidemiological, clinical, and molecular features linked to ERP and ERN tumors, although ER levels may concur to establish the event risk levels. PMID:20132222

Demicheli, Romano; Biganzoli, Elia; Ardoino, Ilaria; Boracchi, Patrizia; Coradini, Danila; Greco, Marco; Moliterni, Angela; Zambetti, Milvia; Valagussa, Pinuccia; Gukas, Isaac D; Bonadonna, Gianni

2010-03-01

40

Prophylactic Mastectomy in BRCA1\\/2 Mutation Carriers and Women at Risk of Hereditary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Experiences at the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  BRCA1\\/2 mutation carriers and women from a hereditary breast(\\/ovarian) cancer family have a highly increased risk of developing\\u000a breast cancer (BC). Prophylactic mastectomy (PM) results in the greatest BC risk reduction. Long-term data on the efficacy\\u000a and sequels of PM are scarce.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  From 358 high-risk women (including 236 BRCA1\\/2 carriers) undergoing PM between 1994 and 2004, relevant data on the

Bernadette A. M. Heemskerk-Gerritsen; Cecile T. M. Brekelmans; Marian B. E. Menke-Pluymers; Albert N. van Geel; Madeleine M. A. Tilanus-Linthorst; Carina C. M. Bartels; Murly Tan; Hanne E. J. Meijers-Heijboer; Jan G. M. Klijn; Caroline Seynaeve

2007-01-01

41

Factors Associated With Local Recurrence After Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the incidence of local recurrence (LR) and factors associated with it in a population of patients who underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and immediate reconstruction for invasive carcinoma. Summary Background Data The efficacy of SSM has been challenged by concerns about increased risks of LR. Methods A consecutive series of 173 patients (176 cancers) with invasive carcinoma underwent SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (June 1986 to December 1997). Data were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank statistic test, and the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Mean patient age was 47 ± 9 years (27% were 40 or younger). The AJCC stages were 1 = 43%, 2 = 52%, and 3 = 5%. Thirty percent of tumors were poorly differentiated. With a median follow-up of 73 months, the LR rate was 4.5%. The mean local relapse-free interval was 26 months. Seventy-five percent of patients who presented with LR developed distant metastases and died of disease within a mean of 21 months. On univariate analysis, factors associated with higher LR rate were tumor stage 2 or 3, tumor size larger than 2 cm, node-positive disease, and poor tumor differentiation. Actuarial 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 98%, 94%, and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with decreased survival were advanced stage, presence of LR, and absence of hormone therapy. LR was a highly significant predictor of tumor-related death. Conclusions There is a low incidence of LR after SSM, and it is associated with advanced disease at presentation. LR is an independent risk factor for tumor-related death. PMID:12035037

Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Vasconez, Luis O.; Fix, R. Jobe; Heslin, Martin J.; Beenken, Samuel W.; Bland, Kirby I.; Urist, Marshall M.

2002-01-01

42

Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

Garg, Amit K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: joh@mdanderson.org; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meric-Bernstam, Funda [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hahn, Karin [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-12-01

43

The implication of hot spots on bone scans within the irradiated field of breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy followed by radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To analyze the implication of abnormal hot spots in the irradiated field of patients treated with mastectomy followed by radiotherapy\\u000a for breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We reviewed 1842 consecutive bone scans performed on 292 patients treated with a modified radical mastectomy and followed\\u000a by radiotherapy. If abnormal hot spots at the irradiated sites were detected in the bone scans, we evaluated further

Won Park; Seung Jae Huh; Jung Hyun Yang; Seok Jin Nam; Jeong Han Kim; Joon Young Choi; Sook Young Woo; Hae Young Kim; Jae Myoung Noh; Jung Il Ryu

2008-01-01

44

Breast Cancer: Early Detection  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

45

Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

2012-01-01

46

Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-07-01

47

The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series  

SciTech Connect

Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

Yu, Edward, E-mail: edward.yu@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Suzuki, Hiromichi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Younus, Jawaid [Department of Medical Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Elfiki, Tarek [Department of Medical Oncology, Windsor Regional Cancer Centre, Windsor, Ontario (Canada); Stitt, Larry [Epidemiology Biostatistics, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Center, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

2012-02-01

48

Relationship between quality of life and mood in long-term survivors of breast cancer treated with mastectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to compare the mood and quality of life (QOL) of breast cancer survivors with those observed in low-risk\\u000a breast cancer screening patients. A group of long-term stage I–III breast cancer survivors (n=60) was compared with low-risk breast cancer screening patients (n=93) on measures of depression, anxiety, and QOL. Patients without a previous psychiatric history were studied. Although

M. A. Weitzner; C. A. Meyers; Karla K. Stuebing; Angele K. Saleeba

1997-01-01

49

Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Perin, Tiziana [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Quitadamo, Daniela [Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Massarut, Samuele [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Carbone, Antonino [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

2012-06-01

50

Value of an intraoperative real time tissue perfusion assessment system following a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy for advanced breast cancer?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Standard surgical approach for advanced breast cancer is a modified radical mastectomy with a periareolar elliptical incision. Here a unique surgical approach is presented utilizing intraoperative real time tissue perfusion technology. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 65-year old African American female was diagnosed with grade 3 papillary carcinoma on biopsy of a palpable 3.7 cm left breast mass at 12 o’clock position. Pathology showed a T2N0M0 invasive ductal carcinoma, triple negative disease, with clear margins. Patient opted for naturopathic treatment. Six months later, cancer recurred at the local site; the patient persisted with natural remedies. Nine months later, the mass had progressed to 14.5 cm with smaller adjacent nodules and nodular thickening of breast with no metastatic disease. Patient received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Ten months later, patient underwent a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy given the persistent pectoral muscle involvement of this mass. DISCUSSION An elliptical incision was made in the superior aspect of the breast wall at least 6 cm above the areola. After tumor removal, the skin edges were approximated. It was decided preoperatively to use the SPY Elite™ system to assess perfusion of the flap edges. Angiography with indocyanine green showed poor perfusion of the inferior flap and an additional 2 cm of skin was resected. Final pathology showed that all margins were clear of disease and patient recovered well from surgery. CONCLUSION This case study shows that an individualized approach resulted in an optimal outcome for the patient. The infrequent procedure of a nipple-sparing radical mastectomy was done in coordination with SPY Elite™ to achieve good wound healing. PMID:24394860

Popiel, Brenten; Gupta, Digant; Misra, Subhasis

2013-01-01

51

Columbia study finds many women do not undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy:  

Cancer.gov

Despite the benefits, only a small minority of women, regardless of age, are opting for immediate reconstructive breast surgery after undergoing mastectomy for treatment of breast cancer, according to data presented at the 2011 CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-10, 2011.

52

MD Anderson study finds side effects, complications, and mastectomy are more likely after partial breast irradiation:  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation (WBI), according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

53

Non-Cancerous Breast Conditions  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

54

Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

Nagar, Himanshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mittendorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, Tse-Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-11-01

55

Stanford researchers find that breast cancer patients with bilateral mastectomy don’t have better survival rates  

Cancer.gov

The first-ever direct comparison of breast cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy.

56

Georgetown researchers examine nipple sparing mastectomy cases and find no recurrent or new cancers:  

Cancer.gov

A new study suggests some women needing a lumpectomy or mastectomy to treat their breast cancer have another potential option that is safe and effective, say researchers at Georgetown. They say the procedure known as a nipple sparing mastectomy is also a viable surgical option for women who choose to have their breasts removed because of their increased risk of developing the disease.

57

Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Wang Rui [Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Macdonald, Shannon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Smith, Barbara [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2011-11-01

58

[Progress in immediate breast reconstruction with skin sparing mastectomy].  

PubMed

Skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) and subcutaneous mastectomy (SCM) are recent techniques. They are always associated with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). Their safety from an oncologic point of view and indications are of great concern. In early breast cancer, SSM and SCM are associated with the same risk of local recurrence as a modified radical mastectomy, when correctly indicated. This has been validated by numerous studies. In these non-randomised studies, overall survival cannot be evaluated. Such techniques can now be validated in the oncologic setting when correctly indicated and when decision-making is always concerted and multidisciplinary. Skin-sparing techniques are obviously associated with better cosmetic results than secondary reconstructions. Thus SSM with IBR are ideally indicated for ductal carcinoma in situ, pure infiltrating or mixed carcinomas requiring mastectomy without subsequent radiotherapy. The selection criterion of no postoperative radiotherapy allows the right candidates to be chosen for SSM. But often this criterion cannot be obtained preoperatively. In such cases, performing a two-step operation could be a good option. The interval between operations can be used by the patient to obtain more information and to make a mature decision regarding her choice of treatment. It seems essential to be able to offer every patient SSM with IBR which are validated standardised indications. Such is not the case everywhere in France today. The organisation of primary care through professional networks should provide us with an opportunity to fulfil these needs. PMID:17950977

Garbay, J-R; Saouma, S; Marsiglia, H

2008-04-01

59

Immediate reconstruction following nipple-sparing mastectomy: one option for young breast cancer patients with early stage disease  

PubMed Central

The article entitled “Application of immediate breast reconstruction with silicon prosthetic implantation following bilateral mammary gland excision in treatment of young patients with early breast cancer” published in Journal of Thoracic Disease, examined the oncologic and cosmetic outcomes of the aforementioned procedures. We aimed to describe the unique circumstances of young breast cancer patients with early stage disease and highlight the multitude of surgical treatment and reconstructive options available to these patients. PMID:23825742

Yang, Rachel L.; Kelz, Rachel R.

2013-01-01

60

The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fasola, Carolina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin, E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-03-15

61

Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

Wang Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

2011-07-15

62

The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Lin, Hui-Yi [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chuong, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Acs, Geza [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

2013-03-01

63

Presentation, treatment, and outcome of local recurrence after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The local recurrence (LR) rate with skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been reported as comparable to the LR rate after conventional mastectomy. However, limited data are available on the prognostic significance and management of LR following SSM.\\u000aMethods: A prospective database maintained at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified 437 SSMs

Lisa A. Newman; Henry M. Kuerer; Kelly K. Hunt; Stephen S. Kroll; Frederick C. Ames; Merrick I. Ross; Barry W. Feig; S. Eva Singletary

1998-01-01

64

Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

65

Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2?/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER?/PR?/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER?/PR?/HER 2?, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR risks in contemporary practice.

Truong, Pauline T., E-mail: ptruong@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Sadek, Betro T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lesperance, Maria F. [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Alexander, Cheryl S. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2014-01-01

66

Decision Making about Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among BRCA1/2 Noncarriers with Newly-diagnosed Breast Cancer: Examining Cognitive, Emotional, and Sociodemographic Influences.  

PubMed

Pre-surgical BRCA1/2 genetic testing provides valuable risk information to guide a newly-diagnosed breast cancer patient's decision about whether to have a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) to reduce her future risk of cancer in her unaffected breast. Although BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers face a much lower objective ten-year risk of developing contralateral disease (approximately 3-10%) as compared to the risk of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (27-37%), some noncarriers still choose to undergo a CPM. The psychosocial factors that motivate this decision are not well understood and warrant investigation. Thus, as part of a prospective study of pre-surgical BRCA1/2 testing, we examined the frequency and psychosocial correlates of the decision to undergo a CPM among newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients who were identified as BRCA1/2 mutation noncarriers. Self-report questionnaire data from 90 BRCA1/2 noncarriers (median age = 43 years, range = 29-59) were analyzed. A sizeable minority of the BRCA1/2 noncarriers (24.4%) chose to undergo a CPM after learning their mutation status (compared to 88% of the 8 BRCA1/2 carriers in the sample). Both bivariate and multivariable analyses indicated that perceiving that one's physician had recommended CPM (OR = 11.17, P = 0.007), perceiving greater risk for contralateral breast cancer (OR = 6.46, P = 0.02), and perceiving greater pros of CPM (OR = 1.37, P = 0.004) were all significantly associated with noncarriers' decision to undergo CPM. However, factors including age, Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity, breast cancer-related distress, perceived cons of CPM, and decisional conflict regarding CPM were not related to the CPM decision (all ps > 0.05). Results demonstrate that although noncarriers' decision making regarding CPM was unrelated to sociodemographic and emotional factors, their cognitive perceptions of contralateral disease risk, surgical benefits, and physician recommendations were particularly important. Future studies should examine the content of patient-physician communication regarding CPM and hereditary risk in greater detail, and explore how these conversations shape and interact with women's past experiences, emotions, and beliefs to influence their cancer prevention decisions. PMID:25834155

Hamilton, J G; Salerno, M; Amoroso, K; Sheehan, M; Harlan, Fleischut M; Glogowski, E; Siegel, B; Arnold, A G; Salo-Mullen, E E; Hay, J; Offit, K; Robson, M E

2015-04-01

67

Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

Selz, Jessica, E-mail: chaumontjessica@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Le Scodan, Romuald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)

2012-12-01

68

High Body Mass Index and Young Age Are not Associated with Post-Mastectomy Pain Syndrome in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background Surgery is usually the first treatment for breast cancer which is followed by some complications such as chronic pain. Post mastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) is a common complication among breast cancer survivors and is considered as a chronic neuropathic pain in the side of surgery which persists more than three months. The exact mechanisms and related risk factors of the chronic pain after breast surgery are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of body mass index (BMI) and age with PMPS. Methods In this case-control study, a total of 122 women were assessed; of these, 61 women were diagnosed with PMPS and selected as cases and 61 pain-free patients were selected as controls. The demographic and clinical characteristics of participants were collected through questionnaires and medical record of patients. Logistic regression model was used to determine the association of BMI and age with PMPS, adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. Results No significant differences were found in means of weight (68.02±8.80 vs. 68.67±11.82, p=0.726), BMI (26.38±3.28 vs. 27.10±6.03, p=0.410), and age (46.34±11.67 vs. 48.54±12.57, p=0.319) between those with PMPS and those not reporting PMPS. A non-significant slight increase in odds ratio of PMPS was observed in obese category compared to normal weight category [OR=1.152 (95% CI 0.405-3.275), p=0.908], but after adjusting the confounding factors, the risk of pain development was attenuated in obese subjects [OR=0.748 (95% CI 0.228-2.459), p=0.633]. Also, non-significant decrease in odds ratios of PMPS was found in 20-39 y, 40-49 y, and 50-59 y ages categories compared to oldest age category [adjusted OR= 0.781 (95% CI 0.213-2.866), p=0.576; adjusted OR=0.485 (95% CI 0.152- 1.554), p=0.183; adjusted OR=0.735 (95% CI 0.206-2.627), p=0.628; respectively]. Conclusion In contrast with some observational studies, present study showed that high BMI and younger age might not be associated with increased risk of PMPS development. Further research is necessary to determine the main risk factors and directionality and causal mechanisms for associations of these risk factors with chronic pain after mastectomy.

Shahbazi, Roghayeh; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Hashemian, Morteza; Abbasi, Mehrnaz; Jalali, Saba; Homayounfar, Reza; Davoodi, Sayed Hossein

2015-01-01

69

For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54?months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

2014-01-01

70

Post-mastectomy radiotherapy can improve survival in breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with four or more positive nodes but not in one to three positive nodes  

PubMed Central

Introduction This retrospective study investigated the clinical value of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in female Chinese breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with positive axillary lymph nodes after mastectomy. Methods We performed an analysis of clinical pathological data from 221 female Chinese breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger treated between 1998 and 2007. Patients were diagnosed with positive axillary lymph nodes and underwent mastectomy. PMRT was delivered to 92 patients. Results The median follow-up was 61 months. The 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) were 84.1%, 65.2%, 61.4%, and 77.2%, respectively. Univariate survival analysis (P=0.003) and multivariate analysis (P<0.001) both suggested that PMRT is an independent prognostic factor of LRFS. PMRT positively affected LRFS (P=0.003), but had no significant impact on DMFS (P=0.429), DFS (P=0.146), and OS (P=0.750). PMRT improved LRFS (P=0.001), DFS (P=0.017), and OS (P=0.042) in patients with four or more positive nodes, but no survival benefit was observed in patients with one to three positive nodes (P>0.05). Conclusion PMRT can improve survival in breast cancer patients aged 35 years or younger with four or more positive nodes but not in those with one to three positive nodes. PMID:25328402

Wu, Sangang; Li, Qun; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayuan; Li, Fengyan; Lin, Qin; He, Zhenyu

2014-01-01

71

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

72

Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

Matsunuma, Ryoichi, E-mail: r-matsunuma@nifty.com [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Fujikane, Tomoko [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Bioinformatics Group, Genome Center of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Genomics, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Gomi, Naoya [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Horii, Rie [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Akiyama, Futoshi [Division of Pathology, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Iwase, Takuji [Department of Surgery, Breast Oncology Center, Cancer Institute Hospital of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-01

73

Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising in reconstruction mammoplasty capsule of saline filled breast implant after radical mastectomy for breast cancer: an unusual case presentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) of the breast represents 0.04–0.5% of malignant lesions of the breast and accounts for 1.7–2.2% of extra-nodal NHL. Most primary cases are of B-cell phenotype and only rare cases are of T-cell phenotype. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma typically seen in children and young adults with the breast being one

Mona RY Bishara; Cathy Ross; Monalisa Sur

2009-01-01

74

Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Short-term Morbidity in Patients Undergoing Mastectomy With and Without Breast Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

IMPORTANCE Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) is increasingly being used in patients with breast cancer, and evidence-based reports related to its independent effects on morbidity after mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction are limited. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of NC on 30-day postoperative morbidity in women undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate breast reconstruction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS All women undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate breast reconstruction from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2011, at university and private hospitals internationally were analyzed using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2005-2011 databases. Patients who received NC were compared with those without a history of NC to estimate the relative odds of 30-day postoperative overall, systemic, and surgical site morbidity using model-wise multivariable logistic regression. EXPOSURE Neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Thirty-day postoperative morbidity (overall, systemic, and surgical site). RESULTS Of 85 851 women, 66 593 (77.6%) underwent mastectomy without breast reconstruction, with 2876 (4.3%) receiving NC; 7893 patients were excluded because of missing exposure data. The immediate breast reconstruction population included 19 258 patients (22.4%), with 820 (4.3%) receiving NC. After univariable analysis, NC was associated with a 20% lower odds of overall morbidity in the group undergoing mastectomy without breast reconstruction (odds ratio [OR], 0.80; 95% CI, 0.71-0.91) but had no significant effect in the immediate breast reconstruction group (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.23). After adjustment for confounding, NC was independently associated with lower overall morbidity in the group undergoing mastectomy without breast reconstruction (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.51-0.73) and the immediate tissue expander reconstruction subgroup (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.30-0.84). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with decreased odds of systemic morbidity in 4 different populations: complete sample (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71), mastectomy without breast reconstruction (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.48-0.72), any immediate breast reconstruction (OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.37-0.88), and the tissue expander subgroup (OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.23-0.72). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our study supports the safety of NC in women undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate breast reconstruction. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is associated with lower overall morbidity in the patients undergoing mastectomy without breast reconstruction and in those undergoing tissue expander breast reconstruction. In addition, the odds of systemic morbidity were decreased in patients undergoing mastectomy with and without immediate breast reconstruction. The mechanisms behind the protective association of NC remain unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:25133469

Abt, Nicholas B.; Flores, José M.; Baltodano, Pablo A.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Abreu, Francis M.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Manahan, Michele A.; Stearns, Vered; Makary, Martin A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

2015-01-01

75

Do Women with Breast Cancer Overestimate Their Risk for Cancer in the Unaffected Breast?  

MedlinePLUS

... the Unaffected Breast? The full report is titled “Perceptions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction With Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Among ... included questions related to decision making, knowledge, risk perception, and breast cancer worry. What did the researchers ...

76

What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

77

Oncoplastic surgery in a Japanese patient with breast cancer in the lower inner quadrant area: partial mastectomy using horizontal reduction mammoplasty.  

PubMed

We report the results of oncoplastic surgery in a Japanese patient with early breast cancer. Her breasts were ptotic, and her lesion was considered to be suitable for breast-conserving surgery. Oncoplastic surgery involving partial resection of the gland and a horizontal-type mammoplasty was performed. The technique was easy to perform, and the cosmetic outcome was excellent. PMID:21188565

Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Mizoguchi, Tadao; Ishigami, Sumiya; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Ueno, Shinichi; Natsugoe, Shoji

2014-05-01

78

Generation of voxelized breast phantoms from surgical mastectomy specimens  

PubMed Central

Purpose: In the research and development of dedicated tomographic breast imaging systems, digital breast object models, also known as digital phantoms, are useful tools. While various digital breast phantoms do exist, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic high-resolution model suitable for simulating three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities. The primary goal was to design a model capable of producing simulations with realistic breast tissue structure. Methods: The methodology for generating an ensemble of digital breast phantoms was based on imaging surgical mastectomy specimens using a benchtop, cone-beam computed tomography system. This approach allowed low-noise, high-resolution projection views of the mastectomy specimens at each angular position. Reconstructions of these projection sets were processed using correction techniques and diffusion filtering prior to segmentation into breast tissue types in order to generate phantoms. Results: Eight compressed digital phantoms and 20 uncompressed phantoms from which an additional 96 pseudocompressed digital phantoms with voxel dimensions of 0.2 mm3 were generated. Two distinct tissue classification models were used in forming breast phantoms. The binary model classified each tissue voxel as either adipose or fibroglandular. A multivalue scaled model classified each tissue voxel as percentage of adipose tissue (range 1%–99%). Power spectral analysis was performed to compare simulated reconstructions using the breast phantoms to the original breast specimen reconstruction, and fits were observed to be similar. Conclusions: The digital breast phantoms developed herein provide a high-resolution anthropomorphic model of the 3D uncompressed and compressed breast that are suitable for use in evaluating and optimizing tomographic breast imaging modalities. The authors believe that other research groups might find the phantoms useful, and therefore they offer to make them available for wider use. PMID:23556909

Michael O’Connor, J.; Das, Mini; Dider, Clay S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

79

Extreme oncoplasty: breast conservation for patients who need mastectomy.  

PubMed

Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

2015-01-01

80

Extreme Oncoplasty: Breast Conservation for Patients Who Need Mastectomy  

PubMed Central

Extreme oncoplasty is a breast conserving operation, using oncoplastic techniques, in a patient who, in most physicians' opinions, requires a mastectomy. These are generally large, greater than 5 cm multifocal or multicentric tumors. Many will have positive lymph nodes. Most will require radiation therapy, even if treated with mastectomy. Sixty-six consecutive patients with multifocal, multicentric, or locally advanced tumors that spanned more than 50 mm were studied (extreme cases). All patients underwent excision and oncoplastic reconstruction using a standard or split wise pattern reduction and immediate contralateral surgery for symmetry. All received postexcisional standard whole breast radiation therapy with a boost to the tumor bed. The extreme cases were compared with 245 consecutive patients with unifocal or multifocal tumors that spanned 50 mm or less (standard cases). All extreme patients were advised to have a mastectomy; all sought a breast conserving second opinion. Diagnostic evaluation included digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and PET-CT (if invasive). Standard cases did extremely well. No ink on tumor was achieved 96% of the time among 245 patients. The median tumor size was 21 mm (mean 23 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 88.6% of patients. Seventeen (6.9%) standard patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and only one patient (0.4%) was converted to mastectomy. With 24 months of median follow-up, three patients (1.2%) experienced local recurrence. For extreme cases, no ink on tumor was achieved 83.3% of the time, which is comparable to published positive margin rates after standard lumpectomy. The median tumor size was 62 mm (mean 77 mm). Margins equal or greater than 1 mm were achieved in 54.5% of patients. Six (9.1%) extreme patients underwent re-excision to achieve wider margins and four patients (6.1%) were converted to mastectomy. With a follow-up of 24 months, one patient (1.5%) experienced a local recurrence. Extreme oncoplasty is a promising new concept. It allows successful breast conservation in selected patients with greater than 5 cm multifocal/multicentric tumors. It may be useful in patients with locally advanced tumors following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. From a quality of life point of view, it is a better option than the combination of mastectomy, reconstruction, and radiation therapy. Long-term data on recurrence and survival are not available, using this approach. Based on historical data, it is expected the local recurrence will be somewhat higher but that there will be little or no impact on survival. PMID:25583035

Silverstein, Melvin J; Savalia, Nirav; Khan, Sadia; Ryan, Jessica

2015-01-01

81

The history of mastectomy.  

PubMed

The mastectomy that is performed today is a procedure born from hundreds of years of discoveries, inventions, and amendments to existing surgical techniques. The reasons for performing this extreme surgery have changed as well, ranging from unilateral breast removal to allow greater upper limb functionality to bilateral removal of the breasts or breast tissue in individuals predisposed to breast cancer or in individuals who have already been diagnosed. The additions of surgical tools and anesthetics to the field of medicine further transformed the surgical field in general and had a large impact on the mastectomy. William Halsted's radical mastectomy served as the basis of most future breast removal techniques, and it the method recognized today as the "radical mastectomy." Most radical surgeries are currently used for prophylaxis, whereas less invasive lumpectomies have eclipsed breast removal surgeries as of the latter half of the 20th century. PMID:21679589

Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Mirzayan, Nadine; Shirak, Michelle; Steinberg, Ashley; Shoja, Mohammadali M

2011-05-01

82

Breast reconstruction after mastectomy among Department of Defense beneficiaries by race  

PubMed Central

Background Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction increased approximately 20% between 1998 and 2008 in the United States and has been found to improve body image, self-esteem and quality of life. These procedures, however, tend to be less common among minority women, which may be due to variations in healthcare access. The Department of Defense (DoD) provides equal healthcare access, thereby affording an exceptional environment to assess whether racial variations persist when access to care is equal. Methods Linked DoD cancer registry and medical claims data were used. The receipt of reconstruction was compared between white (n=2,974) and black women (n=708) who underwent mastectomies to treat incident, histologically-confirmed, breast cancer diagnosed from 1998 to 2007. Results During the study period, post-mastectomy reconstruction increased among both black (27.3% to 40.0%) and white (21.8% to 40.6%) female breast cancer patients. Receipt of reconstruction did not vary significantly by race (odds ratio: 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.76-1.15). Reconstruction decreased significantly with increasing age, tumor stage and receipt of radiotherapy and was significantly more common in more recent years, among active servicewomen, Tricare Prime (HMO) beneficiaries and women whose sponsor was an officer. Conclusion The receipt of reconstruction did not vary by race within this equal access health system, indicating that the racial disparities reported in previous studies may have partially been due to variations in healthcare access. Additional research to determine why a large proportion of breast cancer patients do not undergo reconstruction might be beneficial, particularly because these procedures have been associated with non-cosmetic benefits. PMID:24965236

Enewold, Lindsey; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Zahm, Shelia H.; Poudrier, Jill; Anderson, William; Shriver, Craig D.; Zhu, Kangmin

2014-01-01

83

Breast cancer treatment and chemoprevention.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To outline modern principles of surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic treatment of breast cancer, and to review preliminary data on breast cancer prevention. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted from 1966 to the beginning of 1999; most of the studies reviewed are randomized clinical trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Breast conservation surgery should be offered to all women with early breast cancer because studies demonstrate survival rates equivalent to those with mastectomy. If mastectomy is chosen, breast reconstruction should be offered. Most women with breast cancer are treated systemically with either chemotherapy or tamoxifen, or both, and mortality is substantially reduced. Data indicating that tamoxifen prevents breast cancer are promising; more studies with both tamoxifen and raloxifene are under way. All women should be strongly encouraged to enter clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS: Because many issues face women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, they often seek out family physicians as advisors to help negotiate a complex treatment path. The possibility of preventing breast cancer will undoubtedly raise questions among family members of women with breast cancer that should appropriately be answered and referred, if necessary, by family physicians. PMID:10463092

Kotwall, C. A.

1999-01-01

84

A false positive fluorodeoxyglucose lymphadenopathy in a patient with pulmonary carcinoid tumor and previous breast reconstruction after bilateral mastectomy.  

PubMed

We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a positive fluorodeoxyglucose integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/TC) mammary chain lymphadenopathy and carcinoid tumor of the left lower lobe who had a previous bilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer. She underwent a right muscle sparing mini-thoracotomy and mammary chain lymphadenectomy; the final histopathology showed granulomatous reaction to silicone. PMID:23420332

Billè, Andrea; Girelli, Lara; Leo, Francesco; Pastorino, Ugo

2014-03-01

85

Fifteen-year results of a randomized prospective trial of hyperfractionated chest wall irradiation versus once-daily chest wall irradiation after chemotherapy and mastectomy for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the results of a Phase III clinical trial that investigated whether a hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) schedule could reduce the risk of locoregional recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with chemotherapy and mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1989, 200 patients with clinical Stage III noninflammatory breast cancer were enrolled in a prospective study investigating neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the 179 patients treated with mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 108 participated in a randomized component of the trial that compared a dose-escalated, hyperfractionated (twice-daily, b.i.d.) chest wall RT schedule (72 Gy in 1.2-Gy b.i.d. fractions) with a once-daily (q.d.) schedule (60 Gy in 2-Gy q.d. fractions). In both arms of the study, the supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex were treated once daily to 50 Gy. The median follow-up period was 15 years. Results: The 15-year actuarial locoregional recurrence rate was 7% for the q.d. arm and 12% for the b.i.d. arm (p = 0.36). The rates of severe acute toxicity were similar (4% for q.d. vs. 5% for b.i.d.), but moist desquamation developed in 42% of patients in the b.i.d. arm compared with 28% of the patients in the q.d. arm (p = 0.16). The 15-year actuarial rate of severe late RT complications did not differ between the two arms (6% for q.d. vs. 11% for b.i.d., p = 0.54). Conclusion: Although the sample size of this study was small, we found no evidence that this hyperfractionation schedule of postmastectomy RT offered a clinical advantage. Therefore, we have concluded that it should not be further studied in this cohort of patients.

Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org; Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oswald, Mary Jane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Perkins, George H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Domain, Delora [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, Tse-Kuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Singletary, S. Eva [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thomas, Eva [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buzdar, Aman U. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McNeese, Marsha D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2006-07-15

86

OPRM1 receptor as new biomarker to help the prediction of post mastectomy pain and recurrence in breast cance.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Short--term post--surgical recovery is complicated by many factors, including imbalanced inflammatory and immune response, acute pain associated with functional impairment, and chronic post--mastectomy pain (CPMP), developed by about 25--60% of patients. Opioids, most common drugs used for treatment of cancer pain, are immunosuppressive, and therefore, they might directly and/or indirectly influence long--term cancer recurrence. Moreover, they also produce endocrinopathy, which consists primarily of hypothalamic--pituitary--gonadal axis or hypothalamic--pituitary--adrenal axis dysfunction. The interindividual variability in both CPMP and opioid response is believed to be largely underlined by genetic variability in the gene locus for ?--opioid receptor (OPRM1) that modulates opioid pharmacodynamics. For this reason, OPRM1 genotype may play a key role both in short--term post--mastectomy outcome and in long--term follow up, becoming a new biomarker for breast cancer recurrence in patients suffering from chronic post--mastectomy pain managed by opioid therapy. Hence OPRM1 might be used in near future to customize the opioid therapy, avoiding not only opioid side effects but also the disease progression. In this review we evaluate the literature state of the art on this topic and possible steps towards obtaining the safest individualized post--mastectomy analgesic therapy. Therefore, a personalized pain treatment strategy might be useful to both manage pain and control cancer disease progression. PMID:25300626

De Gregori, M; Diatchenko, L; Belfer, I; Allegri, M

2014-10-10

87

BREAST CANCER 4. BREAST CANCER  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER 29 4. BREAST CANCER 4.1. SUMMARY The average number of new cases diagnosed each year was 2,965 in women and 20 in men. Breast cancer was the most common cancer in women in Ireland breast cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 in 12 for women and 1 in 1,621 for men and was slightly higher

Paxton, Anthony T.

88

REPORTS Efficacy of Bilateral Prophylactic Mastectomy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutation Carriers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In women with a family history of breast cancer, bilateral pro- phylactic mastectomy is associated with a decreased risk of subsequent breast cancer of approximately 90%. We ex- amined the association between bilat- eral prophylactic mastectomy and breast cancer risk in women at high risk for breast cancer who also had mu- tations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Methods:

Lynn C. Hartmann; Thomas A. Sellers; Daniel J. Schaid; Thomas S. Frank; Cheryl L. Soderberg; Diana L. Sitta; Marlene H. Frost; Clive S. Grant; John H. Donohue; John E. Woods; Shannon K. McDonnell; Catherine Walsh Vockley; Amie Deffenbaugh; Fergus J. Couch; Robert B. Jenkins

89

Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

Yang, P.S., E-mail: psyang@kfsyscc.or [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, C.F. [Department of Research, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, B.L. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y. [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, C.W. [Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-01

90

Deciding between Mastectomy and Lumpectomy  

MedlinePLUS

... Reports Careers & Opportunities View Careers & Opportunities Job Listing & Internships Affiliate Jobs Media Center View Media Center Press ... visit the Breast Cancer Research section . Risks and Benefits of Mastectomy Versus Lumpectomy Plus Radiation Therapy There ...

91

Breast reconstruction following mastectomy: II. Marital characteristics of patients seeking the procedure.  

PubMed

Information is presented from a clinical study of 65 women and a psychometric study of 85 women. All had had mastectomies because of breast cancer and were reconstruction patients at Duke Hospital. Women seeking breast reconstruction did not exhibit characterological problems. Relatively few were in psychiatric treatment, and previous research had established the presence of positive rather than negative self-images. The marriages of women seeking this surgical procedure were positively and the women viewed their marriages as a chief source of support. Considerable satisfaction was expressed about husbands being supportive, although husbands were also viewed as poor listeners and, at times, as unable to communicate effectively. Most women were satisfied with various aspects of their sexual lives. A small percentage of the women reported problematic marriages. Various factors, related to the presence of conflict in the marriage and the ability of the husband to understand his wife, may account for the distress evidenced in these marriages. Such factors, of course, are present in any problematic marriage; it remains to be demonstrated whether these problems were caused or exacerbated by the woman's mastectomy and decision to seek breast reconstruction. PMID:7458173

Clifford, E; Clifford, M; Georgiade, N G

1980-11-01

92

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... shun) therapy uses high-energy X-rays to kill the cancerous cells. Chemotherapy (say: kee-mo-THER- ... medicine that travels throughout the entire body and kills cancer cells. Back Continue Living With Breast Cancer ...

93

What Is Breast Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a malignant tumor that starts ... The remainder of this document refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in ...

94

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include Age - the ... the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested. Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through ...

95

Half versus full vacuum suction drainage after modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer- a prospective randomized clinical trial[ISRCTN24484328  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Suction drains are routinely used after modified radical mastectomy and are an important factor contributing to increased hospital stay as the patients are often discharged only after their removal. Amongst various factors that influence the amount of postoperative drainage, the negative suction pressure applied to the drain has been reported to be of great significance. While a high negative

Chintamani; Vinay Singhal; JP Singh; Anju Bansal; Sunita Saxena

2005-01-01

96

Prognostic Significance of the Number of Positive Lymph Nodes in Women With T1-2N1 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy: Should Patients With 1, 2, and 3 Positive Lymph Nodes Be Grouped Together?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine whether patients with 1, 2, or 3 positive lymph nodes (LNs) have similar survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2003. We identified 10,415 women with T1-2N1M0 breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy with no adjuvant radiation, with at least 10 LNs examined and 6 months of follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier method and log–rank test were used for survival analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 92 months. Ten-year overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were progressively worse with increasing number of positive LNs. Survival rates were 70%, 64%, and 60% (OS), and 82%, 76%, and 72% (CSS) for 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs, respectively. Pairwise log–rank test P values were <.001 (1 vs 2 positive LNs), <.001 (1 vs 3 positive LNs), and .002 (2 vs 3 positive LNs). Multivariate analysis showed that number of positive LNs was a significant predictor of OS and CSS. Hazard ratios increased with the number of positive LNs. In addition, age, primary tumor size, grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status, race, and year of diagnosis were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our study suggests that patients with 1, 2, and 3 positive LNs have distinct survival outcomes, with increasing number of positive LNs associated with worse OS and CSS. The conventional grouping of 1-3 positive LNs needs to be reconsidered.

Dai Kubicky, Charlotte, E-mail: charlottedai@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)] [Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

2013-04-01

97

breast cancer  

E-print Network

Summary Among 288 breast cancer patients (118 with bilateral disease and 165 with diagnosis before 40 years of age), we identified 26 families with a history of breast cancer, including a minimum of three first- or second-degree relatives. Complete pedigrees with verified malignancy data from the Finnish cancer registry were constructed for 22 families. The median age at breast cancer diagnosis of the young probands (breast cancer at a younger age (median age 54 years) than the relatives of the older (bilateral) probands (median age 60 years). Standard life-table methods were used to compare the risk of breast cancer in the family members with that of the general population. Among the relatives of the young probands, the increased breast cancer risk occurred in the early post-menopausal period, whereas the risk estimate for the relatives of the bilateral probands closely followed that of the general population. In both groups, however, those family members reaching the age of 80 years had a cumulative probability of over 50 % of developing breast cancer. The standard life-table method proved useful when assessing the age-specific risk for familial breast cancer, taking into account numerous family members as well as their age at disease onset. This kind of analysis can be performed in populations for which reliable cancer registry data are available. It provides a useful tool for selecting individuals for imaging and mutation screening, counselling and experimental chemoprevention programmes.

unknown authors

98

From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy  

PubMed Central

Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

2013-01-01

99

Is Mastectomy Superior to Breast-Conserving Treatment for Young Women?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine whether modified radical mastectomy (MRM) improves outcomes compared with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) in young women. Methods and Materials: Women aged 20-49 years, diagnosed with early breast cancer between 1989 and 1998, were identified. Management with BCT or MRM was compared for local (L), locoregional (LR), and distant relapse-free survival (DRFS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) by age group (20-39 years, 40-49 years). The analysis was repeated for patients considered 'ideal' candidates for BCT: tumor size {<=}2 cm, pathologically negative axillary nodes, negative margins, and no reported ductal carcinoma in situ. Results: A total of 1,597 women received BCT, and 801 had MRM. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, the outcomes (L, LR, BCSS) were worse for the younger age group; however, the outcomes were not statistically different by type of local treatment. For women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' for BCT, those treated with BCT had slightly lower LRFS compared with those treated with MRM (p = 0.3), but DRFS and BCSS were similar. Conclusions: A difference in LRFS at 10 years potentially favored MRM among women aged 20-39 years considered 'ideal' BCT candidates but was not statistically significant and did not translate into a noticeable difference in DRFS or BCSS. Our data suggest that young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

Coulombe, Genevieve [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada) and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: styldesl@bccancer.bc.ca; Speers, Caroline B.A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), Vancouver, BC (Canada); Aquino-Parsons, Christina [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bernstein, Vanessa [Systemic Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Truong, Pauline T. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Keyes, Mira [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Radiation Therapy Program, BCCA, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2007-04-01

100

Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time.

Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

2015-01-01

101

6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

102

Learning about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

103

Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... your family. First-degree relatives include your parents, siblings and children. Another sign of a risk of ... has had the disease. Many people have parents, siblings or children who have had breast cancer without ...

104

Are Minimally Invasive Techniques for Ablation of Breast Cancer Ready for “Prime Time”?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current enthusiasm for minimally invasive techniques must be measured against the gold standard results available from segmental mastectomy (lumpectomy, tylectomy, partial mastectomy), a relatively simple and effective operation with minimal morbidity and good cosmetic results in the hands of an accomplished breast surgeon, especially for mammographically detected, small, invasive breast cancers. Frozen section control of margins can be done at

Edward M. Copeland; Kirby I. Bland

2004-01-01

105

Breast Cancer Surgery Now Often Involves Fewer Lymph Nodes  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast Cancer Surgery Now Often Involves Fewer Lymph Nodes 2010 ... Preidt Friday, April 3, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Mastectomy FRIDAY, April 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Compared ...

106

Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic  

MedlinePLUS

... here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer - Metaplastic Breast Cancer - Metaplastic This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer - Metaplastic. Use the menu below to choose the Overview section to ...

107

Contralateral Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Breast cancer survivors constitute about 25% of the growing population of cancer survivors in the US. Contralateral breast cancer is the most common second cancer in women with primary breast cancer. With increasing cure rates comes increasing concern

108

Lifestyle changes for prevention of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer among women. Lifestyle changes are shown to be important in the prevention of breast cancer. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, and vitamin and mineral use are key factors influencing the risk of breast cancer among women. Because these factors are related to each other, it is difficult to assess their individual roles in breast cancer. Some of these factors are alterable, meaning that women can decrease their risk for breast cancer by changing their behavior. Breast cancer is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity among women. Therefore, it is logical to try to find ways to decrease the risk of developing breast cancer. Lifestyle changes seem to be an easy, effective, and economical way to help prevention breast cancer. In women with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who are under radiotherapy treatment after undergoing a mastectomy, lifestyle changes are still very important. Some factors, such as smoking cessation and prevention of weight gain, may improve the long-term survival chances of these patients. Therefore, ways to increase women’s knowledge about the role of lifestyle changes in the prevention of breast cancer and in the survival of patients with diagnosed breast cancer should be considered and studied.

Hashemi, Seyed Hesam Bani; Karimi, Samieh; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

2014-01-01

109

Bilateral synchronous male breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Bilateral synchronous breast cancer is extremely rare. A 75-year-old man presented with a right breast mass, which ulcerated and a lump in the left breast. Right breast examination revealed a breast ulcer 7×10cm with everted edges and complete nipple destruction. The left breast showed a hard lump measuring 4×5cm in the nipple-areolar area, unattached to skin, or underlying structure. There was no palpable axillary lymph node bilaterally. A wedge biopsy of right breast ulcer and excision of the left breast lump confirmed bilateral invasive ductal carcinoma - Grade 2 tumor in both breasts. He had bilateral simple mastectomy and chemotherapy; defaulted for 18 months during treatment, and re-presented with bilateral tumor recurrence. The importance of this case report is to create more awareness that breast cancer can occur in males just as in females, though the incidence is rare in males. Early presentation and compliance with treatment modality provide a better outcome. PMID:25737181

Nwashilli, Nnamdi J.; Ugiagbe, Ezekiel E.

2015-01-01

110

Stages of Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... IIIA Stage IIIB Stage IIIC Stage IV After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find ... bone cancer . The following stages are used for breast cancer: This section describes the stages of breast cancer . ...

111

Nipple-sparing mastectomy and immediate free-flap reconstruction in the large ptotic breast.  

PubMed

Because of increased risk for nipple necrosis, many surgeons believe large ptotic breasts to be a relative contraindication to nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). A retrospective review was performed on 85 consecutive patients who underwent NSM with 141 immediate perforator free-flap breast reconstructions. We analyzed the subset of patients with large ptotic breasts, defined as cup size C or greater, sternal notch to nipple distance greater than 24 cm and grade 2 or 3 breast ptosis. Of the 85 patients, 19 fit the inclusion criteria. Breast cup size ranged from 34C to 38DDD. There was 1 case of nipple necrosis in the patient with previous breast radiation (5%), 1 hematoma (5%), and no flap losses. Five (26%) patients underwent subsequent mastopexy or breast reduction, a mean of 6.6 months after the primary procedure. We demonstrate that NSM and free-flap breast reconstruction can be safely and reliably performed in selected patients. PMID:22964678

Schneider, Lisa F; Chen, Constance M; Stolier, Alan J; Shapiro, Richard L; Ahn, Christina Y; Allen, Robert J

2012-10-01

112

Rare chondrosarcoma of the breast treated with quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy: A case report  

PubMed Central

Breast chondrosarcoma is a rare sarcoma that mainly occurs in females >50 years old. To the best of our knowledge, only 16 cases were reported in the literature prior to 2013 and all patients were surgically treated by mastectomy, with or without lymphadenectomy, which was occasionally preceded by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, the literature does not report the benefit of mastectomy compared with a more conservative surgery. The present study reports a novel case of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma of the breast. A 63-year-old female patient presented with a neoplasm localized in the upper-outer quadrant of the right breast. The palpable lesion with sharp margins was a firm parenchymatous mass, which was confirmed by ultrasonography and mammography. The patient underwent conservative quadrantectomy instead of mastectomy, followed by post-surgical chemotherapy. A positron emission tomography scan performed five months subsequent to the surgery revealed no remnants of the disease. The patient underwent a strict clinical and instrumental follow-up, and two and half years after surgery, there are no signs of recurrent disease. In conclusion, the present case is currently one of the two cases in which a more conservative quadrantectomy was performed, instead of mastectomy. This surgical approach did not lead to metastasis and resulted in a good follow-up for the patient. PMID:25663866

PASTA, VITTORIO; SOTTILE, DANIELA; URCIUOLI, PAOLO; DEL VECCHIO, LUCA; CUSTURERI, FILIPPO; D’ORAZI, VALERIO

2015-01-01

113

Breast Cancer -- Male  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

114

Breast reconstruction with TRAM flap after subcutaneous mastectomy for injected material (siliconoma).  

PubMed

Many patients throughout the world have had breast augmentation using injectable materials. In the Far East, an adulterated impure silicone has been used by non-medical persons and unlicensed 'cosmetic surgeons' as well as by licensed physicians. The injected material usually causes a granulomatous reaction, tenderness, erythema, pain or discomfort and even skin necrosis. Eventually, the injected breast becomes very hard and develops a distorted contour. Previous treatment was by subcutaneous mastectomy with immediate or delayed reconstruction using a silicone prosthesis. The results of this were often unsatisfactory. We obtained more satisfactory results in 11 patients who had the siliconoma removed by subcutaneous mastectomy and the breast reconstructed with a de-epithelialised TRAM flap. PMID:11355989

Lai, Y L; Weng, C J; Noordhoff, M S

2001-06-01

115

Breast cancer therapies weighed  

SciTech Connect

Even as the National Institutes of Health came under fire last week for giving short shrift to women in the institute's basic and clinical research programs, the report of a recent NIH consensus conference points up the need for more research on how to treat early breast cancer. Although the experts were able to agree on the best surgical treatment for women with early breast cancer, they couldn't resolve the more controversial issue of whether the patients should subsequently receive systemic treatment - chemotherapy or hormone therapy - to prevent recurrence of their disease. The panel reaffirmed that the removal of the lump and nearby lymph nodes, followed by irradiation, is just as effective as a mastectomy. But then came the contentious question: should women with early breast cancer, especially those without detectable lymph node metastases, receive drug therapy to prevent recurrence of the disease Currently, 70% of such cancers are successfully treated with surgery and radiation alone. For this reason, about 2 years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical alert saying that addition treatment with drugs or hormones is a credible therapeutic option worthy of careful attention for all early stage patients. This pronouncement engendered a storm of criticism. A consensus panel concluded that in cases where tumors are 1 centimeter or less in diameter and no lymph nodes are affected, the likelihood of recurrence is so small that the benefits of adjuvant therapy would be insignificant. But for the patients with larger tumors, the panel concluded that the decision is an individual one that depends on personal preferences and a variety of prognostic factors that can help to indicate whether a woman is at high risk of having a recurrence and should therefore have adjuvant therapy.

Holden, C.

1990-06-29

116

International study finds advanced post-mastectomy breast reconstruction improves women's psychosocial and sexual well-being:  

Cancer.gov

After a mastectomy, women who undergo breast reconstruction with tissue from their own abdomen experience significant gains in psychological, social, and sexual well-being as soon as three weeks after surgery.

117

Landmark Trials Affecting the Surgical Management of Invasive Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Significant progress has been made in the surgical management of breast cancer. Historically, women with invasive breast cancer underwent a Halsted radical mastectomy; morbid procedure removing the breast, underlying muscle and regional lymph nodes. In contemporary practice, the majority of women diagnosed with early stage invasive breast cancer can now be managed with breast conserving therapy to include a segmental mastectomy followed by radiation. Axillary lymph nodes are routinely assessed by sentinel lymph node biopsy. Axillary lymph node dissection is reserved for patients with documented nodal metastasis, however, here too progress has been made as a population of low risk patients has been identified in whom a complete dissection is not required even in the setting of a positive sentinel lymph node. This chapter details the landmark clinical trials that have guided the surgical management of breast cancer. PMID:23464699

Black, Dalliah M.

2014-01-01

118

Skin Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction is a recent major advance in breast recon- struction after radical glandular mastectomy. This study intended to asses its preliminary results in our patients with regards to oncologic safety and aesthetic quality. Patients and methods: Twenty-eight patients with, early-stage invasive breast cancer, diffuse ductal in-situ carcinoma and large phylloids tumors were operated upon by

OMAYA NASSAR

2002-01-01

119

Male Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

120

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female)  

E-print Network

--22000000 22 Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female) Breast cancer (female

Paxton, Anthony T.

121

Examining the relationship between inflammatory markers and menopausal status in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment  

E-print Network

Research studies have examined predictors of how women respond to chemotherapy.Research Protection Program. In the first study, data were collected before chemotherapy andresearch. In examining breast cancer patients after mastectomy and assigning them to different adjuvant chemotherapy

Ma, Nicolle Christina

2011-01-01

122

How breast cancer treatment decisions are made by women in North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although equally effective, women in rural midwestern states choose modified radical mastectomy (MRM) over breast conservation surgery for early stage breast cancer. This study assessed treatment decisions by the women of North Dakota.Methods: Surveys were sent to women treated for early stage breast cancer from 1990 through 1992. Separate surveys were sent out to surgeons in the state. The

Douglas Stafford; Robert Szczys; Ricky Becker; Julie Anderson; Susan Bushfield

1998-01-01

123

Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense Melissa Etheridge promotes breast cancer awareness CSI Breast Cancer Blogroll Being Cancer Debbie's Cancer Women with Cancer Breast Cancer Resources Breast Cancer Alltop Breast Cancer Sisterhood Europa Donna

Espinosa, Horacio D.

124

Oncoplastic breast surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap for Paget's disease.  

PubMed

Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with Paget's disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap in two patients. In these two patients, who were diagnosed as having Paget's disease with a restricted intraductal component in the central area of their non-ptotic breast, we performed oncoplastic surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap. Neither of the two patients received contralateral surgery to produce symmetrical breasts. The observation period ranged from 6 to 12 months, and the bilateral breast volumes and inframammary lines were symmetric. OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap was successfully performed in two patients with Paget's disease. PMID:23925716

Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arigami, Takaaki; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

2014-09-01

125

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

Risks of Breast Cancer Screening Key Points for This Section Screening tests have risks. The risks of breast cancer screening tests include ... risk of dying from cancer . The risks of breast cancer screening tests include the following: Finding breast cancer ...

126

Recurrences and second primary breast cancers in older women with initial early-stage disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The association between common breast cancer therapies and recurrences and second primary breast cancers in older women is unclear, although older women are less likely to receive common therapies.\\u000aMETHODS: Women aged >or=65 years who were diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer and who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) from 1990 to 1994 were identified from

Ann M. Geiger; Soe Soe Thwin; Timothy L. Lash; Diana S. M. Buist; Marianne N. Prout; Feifei Wei; Terry S. Field; Marianne Ulcickas Yood; Floyd J. Frost; Shelley M. Enger; Rebecca A. Silliman

2007-01-01

127

Rates of breast cancer surgery in Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10: retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Surgery is a common and important component of breast cancer treatment. We assessed the rates of breast cancer surgery across Canada from 2007/08 to 2009/10. Methods We used hospital and day surgery data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information to assemble a cohort of women who had undergone breast cancer surgery. We identified the index surgical procedure and subsequent surgical procedures performed within 1 year for each woman included in the analysis. We calculated the crude mastectomy rate for each province, and we calculated the adjusted mastectomy rate for select jurisdictions using a logistic regression model fitted using age, neighbourhood income quintile and travel time. Results In total, 57 840 women underwent breast cancer surgery during the study period. Among women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, the crude mastectomy rate was 39%. Adjusted rates for mastectomy varied widely by province (26%–69%). The rate of re-excision within 1 year for women who had breast-conserving surgery as their index procedure was 23% and varied by province in terms of frequency and type (mastectomy or repeat breast-conserving surgery). Among women who underwent mastectomy for unilateral invasive breast cancer, 6% also underwent contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, and 7% had immediate breast reconstruction following surgery. Of mastectomy procedures, 20% were performed as day surgery; for breast-conserving surgery, 70% were performed as day surgery. Interpretation There is substantial interprovincial variation in surgical care for breast cancer in Canada. Further research is needed to better understand such variation, and continued monitoring should be the focus of quality initiatives. PMID:25077125

Wagar, Brandon; Bryant, Heather; Hewitt, Maria; Wai, Elaine; Dabbs, Kelly; McFarlane, Anne; Rahal, Rami

2014-01-01

128

Psychological outcomes of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer outside a clinical trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To assess outside a clinical trial the psychological outcome of different treatment policies in women with early breast cancer who underwent either mastectomy or breast conservation surgery depending on the surgeon's opinion or the patient's choice. To determine whether the extent of psychiatric morbidity reported in women who underwent breast conservation surgery was associated with their participation in a randomised

L J Fallowfield; A Hall; G P Maguire; M Baum

1990-01-01

129

Clinical outcomes of percutaneous drainage of breast fluid collections following mastectomy with expander-based breast reconstruction  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE To determine clinical outcomes of patients who underwent imaging-guided percutaneous drainage of breast fluid collections following mastectomy and breast reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS Retrospective review included all consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous drainage of fluid collections following mastectomy with tissue expander-based reconstruction between January 2007 and September 2012. A total of 879 mastectomies (563 patients) with expander-based breast reconstruction were performed during this period. 28 patients (5%) developed fluid collections, which led to 30 imaging-guided percutaneous drainage procedures. The median follow up time was 533 days. Patient characteristics, surgical technique, microbiology analysis, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS The mean age was 51.5 years (range 30.9 to 69.4 years) and the median time between breast reconstruction and drainage was 35 days (range 4 to 235 days). Erythema and swelling were the most common presenting symptoms. The median volume of fluid evacuated at the time of drain placement was 70 mL. Drains were left in place for a median 14 days (range 6 to 34 days). Microorganisms were detected in the fluid in 12 of 30 drainage procedures, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common microorganism. No further intervention was needed in 21 of 30 drainage procedures (70%). However, surgical intervention (removal of expanders) was needed following 6 (20%) drainages, and additional percutaneous drainage procedures were performed following 3 (10%) drainages. CONCLUSION Percutaneous drainage is an effective means of treating post operative fluid collections after expander-based breast reconstruction and can obviate the need for repeat surgery in most cases. PMID:23810309

2015-01-01

130

Palmar fasciitis with polyarthritis syndrome in a patient with breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome often associated with ovarian and pancreatic\\u000a cancers, and rarely lung and breast cancers. A 39-year-old patient with breast cancer underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy,\\u000a radical mastectomy, and radiation therapy. Subsequently, the patient developed PFPAS coinciding with progression of the breast\\u000a cancer. The rheumatological symptoms were severe causing significant distress and handicap.

Kavya Krishna; Abdulraheem Yacoub; Laura F. Hutchins; Patrick M. Kortebein

2011-01-01

131

Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, two prophylactic surgeries that may be performed to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at very high risk; the situations in which they may be considered; and nonsurgical options.

132

Immunological responses of breast cancer patients to behavioral interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports the results of an 18-month study of immune system and psychological changes in stage 1 breast cancer patients provided with relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback training. Thirteen lymph node negative patients who had recovered from a modified radical mastectomy were randomly assigned to either an immediate treatment or a delayed treatment control group. Multiple pre-post psychological measures

Barry L. Gruber; Stephen P. Hersh; Nicholas R. S. Hall; Lucy R. Waletzky; John F. Kunz; Joann K. Carpenter; Karan S. Kverno; Sharlene M. Weiss

1993-01-01

133

Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Male Patients with Early Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mastectomy with axillary dissection is still the most commonly recommended procedure for male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate our experience in 32 male patients with early breast cancer who underwent sentinel lymph node bi- opsy (SLNB) and axillary dissection only in cases of me- tastases in the sentinel lymph node (SLN). The median age

ORESTE GENTILINI; EDUARDO CHAGAS; CONCETTA DE CICCO; GIUSEPPE RENNE; ENRICO CASSANO

134

Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue from breast cancer patients: association with phenotypes that are common in hereditary breast cancer.  

PubMed

Lobular inflammation (lobulitis) has been demonstrated in benign breast tissue adjacent to in situ and invasive breast cancers and, more recently, in nonneoplastic tissue from prophylactic mastectomy specimens for hereditary high-risk breast carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of lobulitis in benign breast tissue of patients with breast cancer and associated clinicopathologic features. We reviewed nonneoplastic breast tissue sections from 334 patients with invasive breast carcinoma to study lobulitis in normal breast tissue and to correlate its presence with clinicopathologic features of the associated tumor. Clinical information (age, menopausal status, and follow-up), tumor characteristics (type, grade, size, lymph node status, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor, HER2), and survival were recorded. Characteristics of women with and without lobulitis were cross-classified with categories of clinical, pathologic, and histologic characteristics, and differences in distributions were tested in univariate and multivariate analysis. Lobulitis was found in 26 (8%) of 334 patients. The lymphocytic infiltrate was predominantly T-cell type. In a multivariate model, lobulitis in patients with breast cancer was significantly associated with younger age, triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2)-negative cancers, and medullary phenotypes. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue, away from tumor, is associated with clinicopathologic features more commonly seen in hereditary breast cancer. PMID:24157064

Gulbahce, H Evin; Vanderwerf, Steve; Blair, Cindy; Sweeney, Carol

2014-01-01

135

Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

136

Coping after Mastectomy: Antecedents and Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psychological well-being following mastectomy is a concern of rehabilitation psychologists as the life expectancy of women treated for breast cancer is increasing. Well-being can be threatened by stress that these women may suffer from the diagnosis of cancer and amputation of a significant body part. A study was conducted to examine the…

Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

137

Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

2014-01-01

138

Cancer Basics  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

139

Primary cardiac sarcoma after breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumours carrying poor prognosis. Postradiation sarcoma has been reported in patients with breast, cervical and head and neck cancers. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with stage IIA breast cancer diagnosed in 1997, submitted to mastectomy, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy. Pulmonary metastasis were detected in 2008 and treated with chemotherapy and hormonotherapy, being in complete remission since August 2009. She was admitted in December 2009 with a 3-week history of fever, dyspnoea, polyarthralgias and leg oedema. An echocardiography showed a mass in the left atrium. She was submitted to a surgical tumour resection and the histology revealed a sarcoma of intermediate degree of differentiation. Chemoradiation therapy was started and she remains alive after 3?years, without tumour regrowth or metastasis. This case is a therapeutic challenge, because the previous therapies for breast cancer hampered the options for extra chemoradiation therapy. PMID:23608855

Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Sandra; Marques, Irene; Marques, Franklim

2013-01-01

140

LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP OF BREAST CONSERVING THERAPY IN INFLAMMATORY BREAST CANCER PATIENTS TREATED WITH NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY  

PubMed Central

Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. Currently, multimodality treatment is recommended, but the optimal surgical management has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the long-term outcomes of utilizing breast conserving therapy in IBC patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). 24 patients with IBC were treated from 2002 to 2006. NAC was initiated with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel. In addition, HER2/neu positive patients received trastuzumab while HER2/neu negative patients received bevacizumab. Clinical response was assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) prior to surgery and pathologic response following surgery. A partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy and/or axillary lymph node dissection or a modified radical mastectomy was performed based on the surgeon's recommendations and patient's preference. All patients received adjuvant radiation. Of the 24 patients, 7 (29%) underwent a partial mastectomy and 17 (71%) underwent a mastectomy. The overall survival rate for partial mastectomy and for mastectomy patients was 59% and 57% (p-value= 0.49), respectively, at a median follow-up of 60 months (range 48-92 months). Breast conserving therapy can be considered in a selected group of patients who demonstrate a good response to NAC. PMID:25264634

Bonev, Valentina; Evangelista, Maristella; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Su, Min-Ying; Lane, Karen; Mehta, Rita; Butler, John; Hsiang, David

2015-01-01

141

Immediate breast reconstruction with subpectoral implantation after transaxillary subcutaneous mastectomy for siliconoma.  

PubMed

Immediate breast reconstruction on 14 patients suffering from breast hardening after augmentation mammaplasty by injection of silicone gel was performed. Transaxillary subcutaneous mastectomy was done followed by insertion of a double-lumen prosthesis into the subpectoralis plane. The result was greatly influenced by the amount of injected silicone gel. The patient was carefully observed after surgery, and the prosthesis was immediately removed when abnormal skin changes became apparent. Seven cases had no hardening on either side and 1 case had hardening on one side, 3 cases had hardening on both sides and 1 case on one side, 2 cases had the prosthesis removed from both sides and 2 cases from one side. All other cases with hardening or prosthesis removal, except one with removal from both sides, were subsequently reconstructed after more than three months. PMID:2728996

Megumi, Y

1989-01-01

142

The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2011: Results of a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the second most frequent malignancy in Korean women, with a continuously increasing incidence. The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through an online registration program. The aim of the present study was to report the fundamental facts on Korean breast cancer in 2011, and to analyze the changing patterns in clinical characteristics and breast cancer management in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, including the total number of cases, age, stage, and type of surgery, for the year 2011 were collected from 84 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey. Additional data relating to the changing patterns of breast cancer in Korea were collected from the online breast cancer registry database and analyzed. According to nationwide survey data, a total of 16,967 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. The crude incidence of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 67 cases per 100,000 women. Analysis of the survey and registry data gave equivalent results in terms of age distribution, stage, and type of surgery. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women (51.3%) was higher than that of premenopausal women (48.7%) with breast cancer. The incidence of stage 0 and stage I breast cancer increased continuously over the last 10 years (56.3% in 2011), and breast conserving surgery (65.7%) was performed more frequently than total mastectomy (33.8%). The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 8-fold. We conclude that the clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed over the past 10 years in Korea, and surgical management has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:25013429

Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Lee, Hun Jae; Lee, Jung Sun; Youn, Hyun Jo; Park, Heung Kyu; Noh, Dong-Young

2014-01-01

143

Breast cancer in the elderly.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer in the elderly has attracted considerable interest in recent years for three main reasons. Firstly, information concerning the profile (clinical and biological) of the disease in the geriatric population is scarce; secondly, the number of patients is increasing, and thirdly there are conflicting data regarding the actual effectiveness of the different treatments. The present review attempts to outline the specific characteristics of this malignancy in the elderly in terms of histological pattern, stage at diagnosis, and outcome. The feasibility of standard therapies (mastectomy/lumpectomy, axillary clearance, and radio-therapy) in the elderly is carefully analysed, and compared to the efficacy of less aggressive procedures. The use of tamoxifen as a primary treatment, instead of surgery, is critically reconsidered, as well as its use as an adjuvant therapy. Finally, the effectiveness of systemic therapy in advanced disease is also discussed. Images Figure PMID:7494769

Bellet, M.; Alonso, C.; Ojeda, B.

1995-01-01

144

CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... CDC.gov . Vital Signs Share Compartir Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast Cancer ... Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National Program of Cancer ...

145

Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... structures. Targeted therapy uses medicine to attack the gene changes in cancer cells. Hormone therapy is an example of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or systemic: Local ...

146

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives

unknown authors

147

Breast Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is breast cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the breast, it is called breast cancer. The breast is made up of three main parts: glands, ducts, and connective tissue. Sometimes, breast cells become abnormal and grow faster than normal cells. These extra cells form a mass called a tumor. Some tumors are “benign, ” or not cancerous. Other tumors are “malignant, ” meaning they are cancerous and have the ability to spread to other parts of the breast and body and disrupt normal functions in those areas. Breast Cancer Breast cancer claims the lives of thousands of women in the United States each year. Learn basic information about breast cancer and how to prevent and recognize it. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of cancer deaths, and it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Each year, approximately 190,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,000 women die from the disease. 1 What puts me at greater risk? Several factors may affect your risk of developing breast cancer, including: ? Getting older ? Not having children, or having your first child later in life ? Starting your first menstrual period at an early age ? Beginning menopause at a late age ? Having a personal history of breast cancer or certain benign breast diseases, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia ? Having close family relatives (such as a mother, sister, father, or daughter) who have had breast cancer ? Having a genetic condition, such as certain mutations in your BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes ? Having been treated with radiation therapy to the breast or chest ? Being overweight, particularly after menopause ? Using hormone replacement therapy for a long time ? Using oral contraceptives ? Drinking alcohol ? Being physically inactive

unknown authors

148

Hereditary breast cancer and family cancer syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary breast cancer (HBC) shows extant clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Clinically one finds the onset of breast cancer at an early age, an excess of bilaterality, and patterns of multiple primary cancer such as combinations of breast and ovarian carcinoma in the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome. In addition to HBOC, one sees a variety of putative breast cancer-prone genotypes

Henry T. Lynch; Jane Lynch; Theresa Conway; Patrice Watson; Jean Feunteum; Gilbert Lenoir; Steven Narod; Robert Fitzgibbons

1994-01-01

149

For Women Facing a Breast Biopsy  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

150

Rehabilitation of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During 1996, 184,300 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. Although 44,300 women died of breast cancer [1], three fourths\\u000a of those women diagnosed will be cancer survivors. Breast cancer at presentation is a unique disease due to its insidious\\u000a onset. It often presents without warning, on a mammogram, on self-examination, or on physician examination. The disease affects\\u000a more young women

Krystina Kiel; Paula Kopp

151

MD Anderson Cancer Center study reports many advanced breast cancer patients do not receive recommended treatment:  

Cancer.gov

Radiation after a mastectomy for women with advanced breast cancer saves lives, but almost half of these patients do not receive it. The study's results indicate that treatments that have proven their life-saving potential in clinical trials may not be available to many patients.

152

Breast Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... lower your risk of cancer. NCI's Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool uses a woman's risk factors to estimate ... it is very important to have a cancer risk assessment and counseling about the different ways to prevent ...

153

Breast Cancer Trends  

MedlinePLUS

... Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2010, featuring prevalence of comorbidity and impact on survival among persons with lung, colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer. Cancer 2013. Note: Hispanic origin is not ...

154

Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series  

PubMed Central

Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget’s disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

2014-01-01

155

Oncoplastic breast surgery for centrally located breast cancer: a case series.  

PubMed

Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with centrally located breast cancer (CLBC) and Paget's disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy and immediate volume replacement on patients with non-ptotic and/or small breasts, and volume reduction surgery for patients with ptotic breasts, as reported in Western countries. Japanese encounters are described in this report as a case series. PMID:25083497

Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

2014-02-01

156

Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast

Petersen, Jennifer

2004-01-01

157

General Information about Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Childhood (for information about childhood breast cancer) Health history can affect the risk of developing breast cancer. ... for breast cancer include the following: A family history ( first-degree relative , such as mother, daughter, or ...

158

Sexuality After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... on choosing a partner or having children, a diagnosis of breast cancer can be especially difficult. Sexual impact of surgery ... Relationship issues are also important because the cancer diagnosis can be ... But breast cancer can be a growth experience for couples – especially ...

159

Breast Cancer and Autism  

PubMed Central

Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister’s company. Amy’s life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy’s risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy’s level of autism reveals marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction. She exhibits a total lack of development of spoken language, with no attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture. During the visit, she occupies herself with repetitive motor mannerisms. Susan believes that Amy struggles with overstimulation from tactile input. Therefore, she is combative with health-care providers and intolerant of invasive devices. Susan has an intimate understanding of Amy’s ability to communicate her needs and wants through nonverbal changes. RECURRENCE Approximately 2 months ago, Amy began favoring her right arm and appeared to be in pain when participating in various activities. Susan became aware of Amy’s pain issues by noticing that her posture was slightly altered and she was carrying herself differently. Further investigation with a CT scan showed concern for local disease recurrence involving the axillary lymph nodes. No distant metastases were seen. The standard of care for this diagnosis is surgical resection and consideration of radiation therapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (NCCN, 2012). Susan does not want Amy to undergo further surgery and believes radiation would be too difficult to maneuver. The next best option would be a medical approach with chemotherapy as the main modality. DIFFICULT DECISIONS If treatment is pursued, the advanced practitioner will need to perform regular examinations and prescribe and monitor chemotherapy. The delivery of therapy, requiring frequent blood draws and IV access, will be a challenge for the health-care staff. The APN is apprehensive about the ability to accomplish these tasks safely given Amy’s limited capacity to participate. The APN is also concerned with how treatment will affect Amy’s life. The APN may have her own individual conflict of morals to contend with, given the limited understanding of the patient vs. nontreatmen

Radcliff, Lisa

2013-01-01

160

Creencias y opiniones acerca del tratamiento quirúrgico del cáncer de mama Beliefs and opinions about breast cancer surgical treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study tries to identify psychological factors which contribute to explain why many women with breast cancer still undergo mastectomy. However, scientific evidence show that it is not the only valid treatment. Women preferences and their perceptions of surgical interventions consequences are analyzed. 459 women were interviewed, 180 were surgical cases and 135 new cases of breast cancer. Also,

Carmen Regina; Victoria García-Viniegras; Maritza González Blanco; Hugo Alexis; Cantero Ronquillo; Armando Seuc Jo; María Josefa Cintero

2010-01-01

161

What Is Gallbladder Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

162

What Causes Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

163

Radiation Exposure and Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

164

Contralateral Risk-Reducing Mastectomy: Review of Risk Factors and Risk-Reducing Strategies  

PubMed Central

Rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy have increased substantially over the last decade. Surgical oncologists are often in the frontline, dealing with requests for this procedure. This paper reviews the current evidence base regarding contralateral breast cancer, assesses the various risk-reducing strategies, and evaluates the cost-effectiveness of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy. PMID:25692038

Basu, N. N.; Barr, L.; Ross, G. L.; Evans, D. G.

2015-01-01

165

Maxillofacial metastasis from breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Metastatic tumors to paranasal sinuses are exclusively rare. In this paper, we report acase of breast carcinoma metastasizing to the right maxilla. The metastasis occurred 5 years after radical mastectomy and presented as a primary sinonasalmass. The diagnosis was confirmed with histopathologic andimmunohistochemical examination however the patient died before starting any specific treatment because of tumor bleeding.

Namad, Tariq; Benbrahim, Zineb; Najib, Rajae; Mohammed, Afif; Baggar, Soufiane; Bouyahia, Nezar; Arifi, Samia; Mellas, Nawfel

2014-01-01

166

Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-03

167

TCGA Proteomics: Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

168

Living Beyond Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... with Young Patients Diagnosed with Cancer Kristin N. Smith, a patient navigator at Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive ... with young patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Ms. Smith is the speaker for our webinar, Fertility and ...

169

Less invasive treatment associated with improved survival in early stage breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Patients with early stage breast cancer who were treated with lumpectomy plus radiation may have a better chance of survival compared with those who underwent mastectomy, according to a study from Duke Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute. The study, which appears online Jan. 28, 2013, in the journal CANCER, raises new questions as to the comparative effectiveness of breast-conserving therapies such as lumpectomy, where only the tumor and surrounding tissue is surgically removed.

170

University of Michigan study finds most women who have double mastectomy don't need it  

Cancer.gov

About 70 percent of women who have both breasts removed following a breast cancer diagnosis do so despite a very low risk of facing cancer in the healthy breast, new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds. Recent studies have shown an increase in women with breast cancer choosing this more aggressive surgery, called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, which raises the question of potential overtreatment among these patients.

171

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project Breast cancer is  

E-print Network

International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) Project NEED Breast cancer is emerging as a uniquely on molecularly- driven research and to design models that adequately serve the study of breast cancer risk scientists and public health experts is dedicated to research on the primary prevention of breast cancer

Ginzel, Matthew

172

BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

2008-03-19

173

Metastatic Breast Cancer Network  

MedlinePLUS

... 15 QUESTIONS you may be asking about a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer. Click HERE . Our favorite short videos on HOW ... nonprofit advocacy group for those living with metastatic breast cancer Home | About Us | ... | Get Involved | Donate | Contact Us | Join Us | Terms & Policies

174

Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... be embarrassed to say anything. This can delay diagnosis. So, breast cancers may be found later in men. If it ... is a women’s disease, right? No, it’s not. Breast cancer can happen to anyone. Don’t let the surprise of the diagnosis distract you from the seriousness of this disease. ...

175

[An original oncoplastic reduction mammaplasty technique for breast cancers with high risk of incomplete excision].  

PubMed

Oncoplastic reduction mammaplasty (ORM), like breast-conserving treatments for cancer, has a risk of incomplete excision, and sometimes requires complementary mastectomy. In that case difficulties may occur due to skin shortness induced by recent surgery. Review of bibliography brings evidence that some factors are predictive of incomplete excision. When a patient has one or more of these factors, surgeon should anticipate complementary mastectomy. Horizontal ORM should be reminded for they allow secondary mastectomy in a horizontal way to be performed. An adaptation of the inverted T pattern is proposed, also permitting mastectomy in a horizontal way. These solutions allow neither to alter skin healing nor to compromise the future breast reconstruction. PMID:24582294

Baratte, A; Koch, A; Mathelin, C

2014-03-01

176

Mesorectum localization as a special kind of rectal metastasis from breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer can metastasize to other organs following initial treatment. Bones, liver, and the lung are the most common sites of breast cancer metastases. The digestive tract, on the other hand, is rarely involved. The incidence of mesorectal metastasis (a special category of rectal metastases) from breast cancer has not been described before. The case reported herein concerns a 68-year-old woman who underwent mastectomy. A pelvic mass with no symptoms was subsequently identified by computed tomography in the patient. We ultimately confirmed that this mass was a metastasis from breast cancer located in the mesorectum using surgical exploration and pathology results.

Xue, Fan; Liu, Zhong-Lin; Zhang, Qing; Kong, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Wen-Zhi

2015-01-01

177

[Recent advances in radiotherapy for breast cancer].  

PubMed

Radiotherapy for breast cancer has been performed as adjuvant lymph node irradiation after radical operation, irradiation for chest wall relapse, and palliative treatment for bone, lung and brain metastases. However, attention has been paid to irradiation of the breast as a conservative treatment. The role of radiotherapy in breast conservative treatment is to reduce local relapse after shrinkage of operation, and to enhance the cosmetic outcome. The indications of this treatment, technique of irradiation, effects and side effects of irradiation, and risk of radiation-induced cancer were discussed. In Japan, we have experience with this treatment. Breast conservation treatment and modified mastectomy showed the same results in local control and survival. Sometimes the cure and most cases of relief of complaints are attained for recurrent or advanced breast cancer by radiotherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy by 192-Ir showed high local control of uncontrollable tumor by external irradiation. And hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy is also effective for superficial (less than 3 cm in depth) tumor. Even in patients with lung and or brain metastases, radiotherapy sometimes showed complete remission for years. The standard method of radiotherapy for bone and brain metastases is 30 Gy/2 wks, and the symptom relief rate is over 80%. Oncologists should be made aware of the high complaint relief rate by radiotherapy. PMID:7993109

Yamashita, T; Furukawa, M; Aoki, M; Kitahara, T; Ogata, H; Sekiguchi, K

1994-12-01

178

Can Gallbladder Cancer Be Prevented?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

179

Infections in People with Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

180

Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

181

pynk : Breast Cancer Program for Young Women  

PubMed Central

Consider this scenario: A 35-year-old recently married woman is referred to a surgeon because of a growing breast lump. After a core biopsy shows cancer, she undergoes mastectomy for a 6-cm invasive lobular cancer that has spread to 8 axillary nodes. By the time she sees the medical oncologist, she is told that it is too late for a fertility consultation, and she receives a course of chemotherapy. At clinic appointments, she seems depressed and admits that her husband has been less supportive than she had hoped. After tamoxifen is started, treatment-related sexuality problems and the probability of infertility contribute to increasing strain on the couple’s relationship. Their marriage ends two years after the woman’s diagnosis. Six years after her diagnosis, this woman has completed all treatment, is disease-free, and is feeling extremely well physically. However, she is upset about being postmenopausal, and she is having difficulty adopting a child as a single woman with a history of breast cancer. Could this woman and her husband have been offered additional personalized interventions that might have helped them better cope with the breast cancer diagnosis and the effects of treatment? Compared with their older counterparts, young women with breast cancer often have greater and more complex supportive care needs. The present article describes the goals, achievements, and future plans of a specialized interdisciplinary program—the first of its kind in Canada—for women 40 years of age and younger newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The program was created to optimize the complex clinical care and support needs of this population, to promote research specifically targeting issues unique to young women, and to educate the public and health care professionals about early detection of breast cancer in young women and about the special needs of those women after their diagnosis. PMID:23443036

Ali, A.; Warner, E.

2013-01-01

182

Breast cancer stem cells  

PubMed Central

Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarize what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically. PMID:23986719

Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

2013-01-01

183

Treatment Options by Stage (Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... Dictionary Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment of inflammatory breast cancer may include the ...

184

Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

185

Enchondroma on bone scan in a patient with breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 45-year-old postmenopausal woman with breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. She remained clinically well for two years but then complained of pain in the left upper arm during a routine follow-up visit with her physician. A roentgenogram of the left proximal humerus showed a densely sclerotic, nonhomogeneous, 2 x 6 cm lesion with stippled calcification,

E. S. McCrea; G. S. Johnston

1984-01-01

186

Screening for Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context Breast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available. Objectives To review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities. Data Sources and Study Selection English-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta-analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed. Data Synthesis All major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities on screening mammograms do not have breast cancer with variability based on such factors as age of the woman and assessment category assigned by the radiologist. Studies comparing full-field digital mammography to screen film have not shown statistically significant differences in cancer detection while the impact on recall rates (percentage of screening mammograms considered to have positive results) was unclear. One study suggested that computer-aided detection increases cancer detection rates and recall rates while a second larger study did not find any significant differences. Screening clinical breast examination detects some cancers missed by mammography, but the sensitivity reported in the community is lower (28% to 36%) than in randomized trials (about 54%). Breast self-examination has not been shown to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality, but it does increase the number of breast biopsies performed because of false-positives. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are being studied for screening women at high risk for breast cancer but are not recommended for screening the general population. Sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging in high-risk women has been found to be much higher than that of mammography but specificity is generally lower. Effect of the magnetic resonance imaging on breast cancer mortality is not known. A balanced discussion of possible benefits and harms of screening should be undertaken with each woman. Conclusions In the community, mammography remains the main screening tool while the effectiveness of clinical breast examination and self-examination are less. New screening modalities are unlikely to replace mammography in the near future for screening the general population. PMID:15755947

Elmore, Joann G.; Armstrong, Katrina; Lehman, Constance D.; Fletcher, Suzanne W.

2011-01-01

187

Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer Or Other Cancers  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-07-01

188

Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... develop cancer. Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of breast cancer? These resources address the diagnosis or management of breast cancer and may include treatment providers. Gene Review: BRCA1 ...

189

Primary breast cancer in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Objectives With respect to breast cancer in the elderly, to define “old” in the context of comorbidity and physiologic rather than chronologic age. In addition, after discussion of factors influencing decisions regarding screening, stage at presentation and treatment decisions, to present an approach to the treatment of primary breast cancer in the elderly, taking into account quality of life, expected outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Data sources A review of the medical literature from 1980 to 1996, using the MEDLINE database and 2 relevant studies from The Henrietta Banting Breast Centre Research Programme at Women’s College Hospital, Toronto. Study selection A large number of breast cancer studies that might provide a better understanding of primary breast cancer in the elderly. Data synthesis The studies reviewed demonstrated that the annual incidence of breast cancer increases with age, along with a longer life expectancy for women. There appears to be a delay in presentation for elderly women with breast cancer, related in part to patient and physician knowledge. Biennial mammography and physical examination are effective in women aged 50 to 74 years, but compliance with screening recommendations decreases with age. Although treatment goals are the same for women of all ages, most treatment decisions are based on studies that seldom include women over 65 years of age. Physicians tend to underestimate life expectancy and older women are less likely to seek information. Breast conserving surgery, partial mastectomy and even axillary dissection can be carried out under local anesthesia with little physiologic disturbance, but unless axillary dissection is required to make a treatment decision, it may be foregone in clinically node-negative elderly women. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the elderly is not yet well established; tamoxifen is the usual adjuvant systemic therapy given to older women. For those who are truly infirm, tamoxifen alone can be considered. Studies to date do not clarify whether breast cancer in older women runs a more or less favourable course. However, locoregional recurrence appears to decrease with age. Deaths from competing causes are a confounding issue. Conclusions It is imperative to develop a coherent strategy for the treatment of primary breast cancer in the elderly that takes into account functional status and quality of life. Clinical trials must include older women and there must be good clinical trials designed specifically for older women. PMID:9336523

Lickley, H. Lavina A.

1997-01-01

190

Coordinated prophylactic surgical management for women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations have a substantially increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer compared with the general population. Therefore, prophylactic mastectomy (PM) and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) have been proposed as risk-reduction strategies for BRCA1\\/2 mutation carriers. We aimed to assess the feasibility of coordinated PM and BSO in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. METHODS: High risk women

Larissa I Batista; Karen H Lu; Elisabeth K Beahm; Banu K Arun; Diane C Bodurka; Funda Meric-Bernstam

2008-01-01

191

Complications and patient satisfaction following expander\\/implant breast reconstruction with and without radiotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To compare the rates of complications and patient satisfaction among breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy and tissue expander\\/implant reconstruction with and without radiotherapy.Methods and Materials: As part of the Michigan Breast Reconstruction Outcome Study (MBROS), breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy with reconstruction were prospectively evaluated with respect to complications, general patient satisfaction with reconstruction, and esthetic satisfaction. Included

Editha A Krueger; Edwin G Wilkins; Myla Strawderman; Paul Cederna; Sherry Goldfarb; Frank A Vicini; Lori J Pierce

2001-01-01

192

PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2015-02-23

193

Surgery for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... as swelling of the arm and chest ( lymphedema ). Lymph node surgery To find out if the breast cancer ... nodes are checked in 2 major ways. Axillary lymph node dissection: In this operation, about 10 to 40 ( ...

194

Types of Breast Cancers  

MedlinePLUS

... staged and treated like any other invasive cancer. Phyllodes tumor This very rare breast tumor develops in ... for these tumors include phylloides tumor and cystosarcoma phyllodes . These tumors are usually benign but on rare ...

195

Breast Cancer Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... Prosthesis • Chemotherapy and Side Effects • Radiation Therapy and Side Effects ©2013 Susan G. Komen ® Item No. KOMEED024000 12/13 You are not alone If you need breast cancer surgery, remember there are many women who have ...

196

Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any ...

197

Breast and Gynecologic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials and the evaluation of new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and new technologies to identify premalignant

198

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

199

Use of serial carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 15.3 assays in detecting relapses in breast cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the utility of CEA and CA 15.3 for early diagnosis of recurrence, serial serum determinations of both antigens were performed in 1023 patients (follow-up: 1–10 years, mean 6.2 years) with primary breast cancer (CA 15.3 in 533 cases) and no evidence of residual disease (NED) after radical treatment (radical mastectomy or simple mastectomy and radiotherapy). 246 patients developed

Rafael Molina; Gabriel Zanón; Xavier Filella; Ferran Moreno; Judith Jo; Montserrat Daniels; Maria L. Latre; Nuria Giménez; Jaume Pahisa; Martín Velasco; Antonio M. Ballesta

1995-01-01

200

Contralateral breast cancer adjacent to a fibroadenoma: report of a case.  

PubMed

A 64-year-old woman noticed a lump of the right breast and consulted our outpatient clinic. She had undergone multiple excisional biopsies of fibroadenomas in both breasts and mastectomy for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the left breast. After completing 5 years of treatment with adjuvant tamoxifen, she had undergone screening with annual physical examinations and occasional computed tomography. She was declared recurrence-free 13 years after breast cancer surgery, although lumps were detected in the right breast, probably due to fibroadenomas. Mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the lump was irregularly shaped, 2 cm in diameter, and adjacent to a fibroadenoma with macrocalcification. Two axillary lymph nodes were enlarged and suggestive of metastasis. A core needle biopsy revealed IDC of the right breast. She underwent a right partial mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. The IDC was 2 cm in diameter, of nuclear grade 2, and adjacent to a 0.7-cm fibroadenoma with a macrocalcification. The margins of the IDC close to the fibroadenoma were clearly demarcated by the fibrous capsule of the fibroadenoma. Four axillary lymph nodes were positive for metastasis. In the present case the presence of fibroadenoma might have interfered with the early detection of the contralateral IDC. The history of multiple excisions of fibroadenomas and mastectomy for breast cancer suggests an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer for the patient's entire life; therefore, regular annual follow-up, such as physical examinations and mammography, is recommended. PMID:24998964

Iwamoto, Miki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shinya; Yamashita, Kouji; Yanagihara, Keiko; Kurita, Tomoko; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Kanazawa, Yoshikazu; Uchida, Eiji

2014-01-01

201

Human Breast Cancer Histoid  

PubMed Central

Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

2011-01-01

202

Treatment of Early Breast Cancer: A Report after Ten Years of a Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

A controlled clinical trial has been carried out to compare radical mastectomy with wide excision (extended tylectomy) in the treatment of early breast cancer. Only patients aged 50 and over were included and 370 entered the trial during a period of 10 years. Postoperative radiotherapy was given in each case. In patients with clinically involved axillary nodes there was a

Hedley Atkins; J. L. Hayward; D. J. Klugman; A. B. Wayte

1972-01-01

203

Positive effect of tamoxifen as part of adjuvant chemo-endocrine therapy for breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective randomised multicentre clinical study was undertaken for 2 years and 3 months from November 1982, with the aim of examining the significance of using a combination of ftorafur (FT) and tamoxifen (TAM) for post-operative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Patients had either stage II or stage IIIa disease, were age 75 or below and had undergone radical mastectomy.

J Uchino; N Samejima; T Tanabe; H Hayasaka; M Mito; Y Hata; K Asaishi

1994-01-01

204

Viruses and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

2010-01-01

205

Breast implant foreign body reaction mimicking breast cancer recurrence on FDG PET/CT.  

PubMed

A woman with bilateral breast cancer treated with bilateral mastectomies, implant reconstructions, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy underwent FDG PET/CT imaging. Imaging demonstrated sternal, nodal, and lung lesions which were stable or slowly increasing, as well as a parasternal chest wall mass which was enlarging much more rapidly and was excised. Pathology of the chest wall mass demonstrated only benign soft tissue with fat necrosis and foreign body giant cell reaction, without evidence of malignancy or implant rupture. This case demonstrates how a benign FDG-avid foreign body reaction, induced by an intact breast prosthesis, could easily be mistaken for malignancy. PMID:23640240

Ulaner, Gary A; D'Andrea, Gabriella; Cody, Hiram S

2013-06-01

206

Randomized Trial of Drain Antisepsis After Mastectomy and Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Background In this two-site randomized trial, we investigated the effect of antiseptic drain care on bacterial colonization of surgical drains and infection after immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction. Methods With IRB approval, we randomized patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction to drain antisepsis (treatment) for one side, with standard drain care (control) for the other. Antisepsis care included both: 1) chlorhexidine disc dressing at drain exit site(s), and 2) irrigation of drain bulbs twice daily with dilute sodium hypochlorite solution. Cultures were obtained from bulb fluid at one week and at drain removal, and from the subcutaneous drain tubing at removal. Positive cultures were defined as ?1+ growth for fluid and >50 CFU for tubing. Results Cultures of drain bulb fluid at one week (the primary endpoint) were positive in 9.9% of treatment sides (10/101) versus 20.8% (21/101) of control sides (p=0.02). Drain tubing cultures were positive in 0 treated drains versus 6.2% (6/97) of control drains (p=0.03). Surgical site infection occurred within 30 days in 0 antisepsis sides versus 3.8% (4/104) of control sides (p = 0.13), and within 1 year in 3/104 (2.9%) of antisepsis sides versus 6/104 (5.8%) of control sides (p = 0.45). Clinical infection occurred within one year in 9.7% (6/62) of colonized sides (tubing or fluid) versus 1.5% (2/136) of non-colonized sides (p = 0.03). Conclusions Simple and inexpensive local antiseptic interventions with a chlorhexidine disc and hypochlorite solution reduce bacterial colonization of drains, and reduced drain colonization was associated with fewer infections. PMID:25096386

Degnim, Amy C.; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Brahmbhatt, Rushin D.; Peled, Anne Warren; Loprinzi, Margie; Pavey, Emily S.; Boughey, Judy C.; Hieken, Tina J.; Jacobson, Steven; Lemaine, Valerie; Jakub, James W.; Irwin, Chetan; Foster, Robert D.; Sbitany, Hani; Cyr, Michel Saint; Duralde, Erin; Ramaker, Sheri; Chin, Robin; Sieg, Monica; Wildeman, Melissa; Scow, Jeffrey S.; Patel, Robin; Ballman, Karla; Baddour, Larry M.; Esserman, Laura J.

2015-01-01

207

Breast Cancer Detection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

2000-01-01

208

Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2012-11-14

209

Influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on radiotherapy for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a standard treatment option for patients with locally advanced operable breast cancer and is increasingly used in early breast cancer. Initial randomized trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy established equivalency to adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival, but they also demonstrated improved rates of breast conservation and the ability to modify the risk of locoregional recurrence after a favorable response to chemotherapy. High-quality nonrandomized data have helped to tailor radiotherapy treatment recommendations after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Results from an ongoing phase 3 randomized trial (NSABP B-51/RTOG 1304) will help to clarify the value of locoregional radiotherapy for patients with clinical N1 disease that becomes node negative after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:25727554

Garg, Amit K; Buchholz, Thomas A

2015-05-01

210

Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials  

Cancer.gov

Programs and Projects Breast Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Ongoing Phase I/II Prevention Trials Funded and Monitored by the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group (BGCRG) Principal Investigator Funding Mechanism Title of Award

211

Breast Cancer and the Environment  

MedlinePLUS

... Reports Activities Meetings Browse History Print Print Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach Released: ... With more than 230,000 new cases of breast cancer expected to be diagnosed in the United States ...

212

Breast Cancer in Young Women  

MedlinePLUS

... Podcasts Health-e-Cards Web Badges Infographics Twitter Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... lower your risk. What Is CDC Doing about Breast Cancer in Young Women? CDC works with public, non- ...

213

Your Body After Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... only a few short weeks elapsed between her breast cancer diagnosis and her hair falling out from chemotherapy. “I ... Good Feel Better workshop after her mother’s third breast cancer diagnosis. Women can also find wigs and other products ...

214

Life After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... the appointment to lend support. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Emotional effects of treatment The last day of ... build up to your past schedule. When breast cancer treatment begins, many people think that their last day ...

215

What Are the Key Statistics about Gallbladder Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

216

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Eye Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

217

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

218

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

219

What Are the Key Statistics for Eye Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

220

What Are the Key Statistics about Stomach Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

221

Ablation and Other Local Therapy for Kidney Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

222

MD Anderson study finds majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients benefit from radiation after lumpectomy  

Cancer.gov

For the majority of older, early-stage breast cancer patients, radiation therapy following breast conserving surgery may help prevent the need for a later mastectomy, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The findings, published in the journal Cancer, are contrary to current national treatment guidelines, which recommend that older women with early stage, estrogen-positive disease be treated with lumpectomy followed by estrogen blocker therapy alone -- and forgo radiation therapy post-surgery.

223

Psychological Processes in Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is a process that has a profound psychological impact on one in nine American women and their families. Despite pervasive depression in women during breast cancer surgery and treatment, a woman's psychological state before breast cancer is one of the best predictors of adjustment to the disease one year after surgery. Successful adjustment is found in women who

Renee Royak-Schaler

1992-01-01

224

Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-12-01

225

Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-03-10

226

Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-19

227

Breast magnetic resonance imaging and its impact on the surgical treatment of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast MRI focuses on the detection of multifocality, multicentricity, and bilaterality of newly diagnosed breast cancer. A retrospective study was carried out on 833 patients that were diagnosed and treated for breast cancer between January 2002 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups: those that had a presurgery breast MRI and those that did not. The two groups were compared on the basis of the several parameters. The aim of the study was to determine whether the use of MRI in breast cancer screening changes the initial treatment decision. In 18% of the patients, MRI revealed a multifocal or a multicentric unilateral breast cancer, a bilateral tumour, or a larger cancer than initially diagnosed. Most of these patients underwent a second-look breast ultrasound, with or without an additional biopsy. The percentage of mastectomies did not increase as a result of an MRI exam. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used more often and the percentage of reoperations decreased when an MRI was performed. PMID:24864145

Tsina, Georgia; Simon, Philippe

2014-01-01

228

Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer: management and literature review.  

PubMed

Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer is a very rare clinical entity. We describe an extremely rare case of breast cancer metastasis to the rectus abdominis muscle. Our patient, who had undergone a left modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer four years ago, presented with a painful abdominal mass. Computed tomography scans showed a rim-enhancing mass with central hypoatennuation within the sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle. A Fine needle aspiration biopsy was initially performed and the findings were suggestive of malignancy. The muscle lesion was then resected and the histopathological analysis showed metastasis of breast cancer. Through our review of the literature, we found that only two cases of rectus abdominis muscle metastasis from breast cancer have been reported so far. This case highlights the need to rule out muscle metastatic lesions in patients with history of breast cancer presenting with these clinical and imaging characteristics. Differentiation from primary sarcoma is of paramount importance. Skeletal muscle metastases usually indicate an advanced disease associated with poor prognosis. Treatment should be individualized depending on the patient's clinical condition. PMID:25159186

Salemis, Nikolaos S

2015-01-01

229

Male mastectomy: an oncoplastic solution to improve aesthetic appearance.  

PubMed

Mastectomy for breast cancer in men typically results in an unsatisfactory aesthetic appearance due to loss of the normal male chest contour. In this article we present two case studies and a new oncoplastic surgical technique that has given excellent aesthetic results for this challenging problem. PMID:23642792

Schaverien, M V; Scott, J R; Doughty, J C

2013-12-01

230

Biomarkers for breast cancer.  

PubMed

Molecular biomarkers for breast cancer are of several types. Risk biomarkers are those associated with increased cancer risk and include mammographic abnormalities, proliferative breast disease with or without atypia, family clustering and inherited germ-line abnormalities. Surrogate endpoint biomarkers are tissue, cellular or molecular alterations that occur between cancer initiation and progression. These biomarkers are utilized as endpoints in short-term chemoprevention trials. Prognostic biomarkers provide information regarding outcome irrespective of therapy, while predictive biomarkers provide information regarding response to therapy. Candidate prognostic biomarkers for breast cancer include elevated proliferation indices such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); ER and PR overexpression; markers of oncogene overexpression such as c-erbB-2, TGF-a and EGFr; indicators of apoptotic imbalance including overexpression of bcl-2 and an increased bax/bcl-2 ratio; markers of disordered cell signaling such as p53 nuclear protein accumulation; alteration of differentiation signals such as overexpression of c-myc and related proteins; loss of differentiation markers such as TGF-b II receptor and retinoic acid receptor; and alteration of angiogenesis proteins such as VEGF overexpression. As our knowledge regarding molecular biomarkers for breast cancer increases, prognostic indices will be developed that combine the predictive power of individual molecular biomarkers with specific clinical and pathologic factors. PMID:12145573

Beenken, S W; Bland, K I

2002-08-01

231

Patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors associated with treatment of early-stage breast cancer among Asian American women in California  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical guidelines recommend breast conserving surgery (BCS) with radiation as a viable alternative to mastectomy for treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Yet, Asian Americans (AA) are more likely than other groups to have mastectomy or omit radiation after BCS. Methods We applied polytomous logistic regression and recursive partitioning (RP) to analyze factors associated with mastectomy, or BCS without radiation, among 20,987 California AAs diagnosed with stage 0–II breast cancer from 1990–2007. Results The percentage receiving mastectomy ranged from 40% among US-born Chinese to 58% among foreign-born Vietnamese. Factors associated with mastectomy included tumor characteristics such as larger tumor size, patient characteristics such as older age and foreign birthplace among some AA ethnicities, and additional factors including hospital (smaller hospital size, not NCI cancer center, low socioeconomic status (SES) patient composition, and high hospital AA patient composition) and neighborhood characteristics (ethnic enclaves of low SES). These hospital and neighborhood characteristics were also associated with BCS without radiation. Through RP, the highest mastectomy subgroups were defined by tumor characteristics such as size and anatomic location, in combination with diagnosis year and nativity. Conclusions Tumor characteristics and, secondarily, patient, hospital and neighborhood factors, are predictors of mastectomy and omission of radiation following BCS among AAs. Impact By focusing on interactions among patient, hospital, and neighborhood factors in the differential receipt of breast cancer treatment, our study identifies subgroups of interest for further study, and translation into public health and patient-focused initiatives to ensure that all women are fully informed about treatment options. PMID:22402290

Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Press, David J.; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Shema, Sarah J.; Le, Gem M.; Kurian, Allison W.

2012-01-01

232

MD Anderson researchers find that APBI is associated with more mastectomies, toxicities, complications, compared to traditional radiation  

Cancer.gov

Accelerated partial breast irradiation brachytherapy, the localized form of radiation therapy growing increasingly popular as a treatment choice for women with early-stage breast cancer, is associated with higher rate of later mastectomy, increased radiation-related toxicities and post-operative complications, compared to traditional whole breast irradiation.

233

Breast cancer imaging devices.  

PubMed

Conventional mammography is a screening procedure constrained by low specificity in the detection of breast cancer. Approximately 40% of women undergoing mammography screening have dense breast tissue, and conventional mammographic imaging has a sensitivity range of only 50%-85% for malignant lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now recommended for breast cancer screening in high-risk patients. However, approximately 15% of patients cannot tolerate MRI. These are the clinical situations in which positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma (BSG) camera systems fulfill a need for primary breast cancer imaging. Because breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among women, many nuclear medicine imaging techniques are essential in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disease. Nuclear medicine surgical techniques consist of sentinel lymph node localization and the use of radiolabeled seeds for intraoperative localization of nonpalpable breast cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the PEM Flex Solo II scanner, which has the capability for stereotactic biopsy, with an array of pixelated lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT), and a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm. Clear PEM is a scanner in development with cerium-doped LYSO (LYSO:Ce) crystals, multipixel avalanche photodiodes, depth of interaction measurement with a resolution of 1.3 mm. The Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera is a BSG device approved by the FDA with stereotactic biopsy guidance capability, a pixelated array of sodium iodide crystals, PS-PMTs, and an extrinsic spatial resolution of 6 mm at 3 cm from the camera. GE has just received clearance from the FDA for a molecular breast imaging camera, the Discovery NM 750 b, with pixelated cadmium zinc telluride crystals, semiconductor photoelements and an extrinsic resolution of 3.5 mm at 3 cm. The Society of Nuclear Medicine has issued guidelines for BSG camera image interpretation recommendations and clinical indications. Different crystals and camera architectures are under investigation to further improve resolution for both PEM and BSG imaging. PMID:21440698

Moadel, Renee M

2011-05-01

234

Breast Cancer Statistics  

Cancer.gov

The maps show a pattern of elevated mortality rates for female breast cancer extending from the Mid-Atlantic through the Northeastern states has persisted for many years. Established risk factors are believed to be largely responsible, but the remaining reasons are unknown.

235

Breast Cancer and Fatigue  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Fatigue is a common and disabling symptom in breast cancer patients and survivors. A rather nebulous concept, fatigue overlaps with sleepiness and depressed mood. In this chapter, we cover methods for assessing fatigue; describe the occurrence of fatigue before, during and after initial treatment; present possible underlying mechanisms of fatigue; and, enumerate approaches to its treatment. PMID:18769530

Bardwell, Wayne A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

2008-01-01

236

Cialis (Tadalafil) Does Not Prevent Erectile Dysfunction in Prostate Cancer Patients  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope ...

237

Sexuality and body image in younger women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer has the potential to be most devastating to the sexual function and self-esteem of premenopausal women. Nevertheless, not one study has systematically compared the impact of breast cancer treatment on sexual issues across age groups. Research shows that younger women with breast cancer have more severe emotional distress than older cohorts. In a group of patients seeking sexual rehabilitation in a cancer center, younger couples were more distressed, but also had the best prognosis with treatment. In theory, loss of a breast or poor breast appearance would be more distressing to women whose youth gives them high expectations for physical beauty. Seeking new dating relationships after breast cancer treatment is a special stressor for single women. Potential infertility also may impact on a woman's self-concept as a sexual person. Systemic treatment disrupts sexual function by causing premature menopause, with estrogen loss leading to vaginal atrophy and androgen loss perhaps decreasing sexual desire and arousability. Research on mastectomy versus breast conservation across all ages of women has demonstrated that general psychological distress, marital satisfaction, and overall sexual frequency and function do not differ between the two treatment groups. Women with breast conservation do rate their body image more highly and are more comfortable with nudity and breast caressing. There is some evidence that breast conservation offers more psychological "protection" for younger women. Research on the impact of breast reconstruction is sparse, but reveals similar patterns. Future studies should use rigorous methodology and focus on the impact of premature menopause and the effectiveness of sexual rehabilitation for younger women. PMID:7999462

Schover, L R

1994-01-01

238

Breast Cancer Among Asian Women  

Cancer.gov

A study of breast cancer among Asian populations, including mainland China, Hong Kong, and Malaysia, with the aim of identifying distinct molecular alterations in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, and examining the associations of these molecular changes with risk factors (genetic and environmental), breast tissue composition and density, and breast cancer subtypes.

239

Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chen, C.-J. [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Joy [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2007-09-01

240

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

241

Cyclin E Expression in Operable Breast Cancer Quantified Using Real-Time RT-PCR: A Comparative Study with Immunostaining  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The main purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cyclin E expression levels in operable breast cancer patients determined using real-time RT-PCR and immuno- staining. The prognostic relevance of cyclin E was also investigated. Methods: Specimens of invasive ductal breast cancer tissues obtained from 124 women during radical mastectomy were analyzed. Results: Of the tumor samples, 40.3 and

Piotr Potemski; Elzbieta Pluciennik; Andrzej K. Bednarek; Renata Kusinska; Dorota Jesionek-Kupnicka; Grazyna Pasz-Walczak; Cezary Watala; Radzislaw Kordek

2006-01-01

242

Quality of Life Influenced by Primary Surgical Treatment for Stage I-III Breast Cancer—Long-Term Follow-Up of a Matched-Pair Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Breast-conserving therapy has been demonstrated to be just as safe and a less disruptive experience compared with mastectomy for surgically manageable breast cancer. There is, however, no agreement in the literature about the impact of these procedures on several important aspects of quality of life (QOL). The purpose of the present study is to compare the long-term impact of

W. Janni; D. Rjosk; Th. Dimpfl; K. Haertl; B. Strobl; F. Hepp; A. Hanke; F. Bergauer; H. Sommer

2001-01-01

243

Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-02-05

244

[Breast cancer surgery].  

PubMed

The surgery for breast cancer is frequently the first step in a multi-disciplinary care. It allows for local control, but also to establish crucial prognostic factor indicating potential adjuvant therapy. The current trend s towards de-escalation of surgical treatment for reducing the functional and aesthetic morbidity. At the local level, this de-escalation has been made possible by performing most often breast conservative surgery because of the development of oncoplastic techniques, but also because of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At the axillary level, the reduction of morbidity has been made possible by the advent of the sentinel node biopsy which is more and more indicated year after year. PMID:24579336

Delpech, Yann; Barranger, Emmanuel

2013-12-01

245

Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

2014-11-04

246

Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byeong-Woo, E-mail: bwpark@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-01

247

Breast Cancer Risk in American Women  

MedlinePLUS

... a woman drinks, the greater her risk of breast cancer. Reproductive and menstrual history : Women who had their first ... and Genetic Testing Diethylstilbestrol (DES) and Cancer Mammograms Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk Understanding Breast Changes: A Health Guide for ...

248

Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... are different types of treatment for men with breast cancer. Different types of treatment are available for men ... standard treatment are used to treat men with breast cancer: Surgery Surgery for men with breast cancer is ...

249

Breast and Ovarian Cancers  

PubMed Central

Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression. Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups of proteoglycans, the transmembrane syndecans and the lipid-anchored glypicans. Both families of proteoglycans have been implicated in cellular responses to growth factors and morphogens, including many now associated with tumor progression. PMID:22205677

Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E.; Couchman, John R.

2012-01-01

250

Breast Cancer Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

2014-01-01

251

Breast Cancer and Bone Loss  

MedlinePLUS

... of treatment is based on the type of breast cancer and other factors. Surgery is used to remove cancerous tissue in ... more serious condition of osteoporosis develops. What can breast cancer ... treatment, other factors that increase risk include a personal or family ...

252

Reproduction and breast cancer risk.  

PubMed

Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

2014-12-01

253

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

254

[Long-term survival of a patient with esophageal metastasis from breast cancer treated with esophagectomy].  

PubMed

Esophageal metastasis from breast cancer is rarely observed. We encountered a case of long-term survival after esophageal metastasis from breast cancer that was treated with esophagectomy. A 79-year-old woman developed dysphagia 26 years after radical mastectomy. Endoscopic examination revealed stenosis at the mid-thoracic esophagus. An esophageal biopsy led to a diagnosis of undifferentiated cancer. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a massive tumor in the esophagus, but no distant metastases. Esophagectomy was performed with the suspicion of primary or metastatic esophageal cancer. Histopathologically, the excised tumor was an adenocarcinoma, which had histopathological features similar to that of the breast cancer. Accordingly, the adenocarcinoma was diagnosed as esophageal metastasis of the breast cancer. The patient is still alive 8 years after the esophagectomy. PMID:25731410

Kawabata, Ryohei; Kimura, Yutaka; Kawase, Tomono; Kamigaki, Shunji; Yamamura, Jun; Nakamura, Yukio; Munakata, Satoru; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ohzato, Hiroki

2014-11-01

255

Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2011-12-07

256

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno  

E-print Network

Histology of Breast Cancer Metastasis Theresa Reno 11/18/08 #12;Hanahan and Weinberg, Cell 2000 Cancer: 6 Hallmarks #12;Breast Anatomy and Histology Normal Breast Histology - H&E Stain Ross and Pawlina;Breast Cancer Types of Breast Cancer: - Ductal Carcinoma in situ - Lobular Carcinoma in situ

Gleeson, Joseph G.

257

CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER  

E-print Network

male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Women with HBOC tend to developCANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Liu, Xiaole Shirley

258

Fusion genes in breast cancer  

E-print Network

in breast cancer support the model that there are few commonly mutated genes, and many genes which are mutated much less frequently. Two genes stand out as often mutated in breast cancer across all subtypes: T P53 and PIK3C A. PIK3CA has been reported... distinguish between histologically similar tumours which are molecularly different (Rouzier et al., 2005). Gene expression profiling suggests that the different subtypes of breast cancer vary widely, harbouring different gene alterations and responding...

Batty, Elizabeth

2012-02-07

259

The genetics of breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast cancer is the commonest cancer affecting women. A family history of breast cancer increases a woman's lifetime risk of developing the disease. Most of the genetic risk is due to low-risk and moderate-risk susceptibility alleles rather than high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these two tumour suppressor genes only account for about 2% of all breast

Alexandra J. Murray

2010-01-01

260

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

261

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

262

Oxidative stress in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was undertaken to evaluate the place of oxidative stress on breast cancer. Lipid peroxidation as evidenced\\u000a by malondialdehyde (MDA) and the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase\\u000a (GPx) were estimated in tissues of 10 fibroadenoma and 40 breast cancer patients. Lipid peroxidation in breast cancer tissues\\u000a was enhanced compared to nonmalignant

Faruk Tas; Hasan Hansel; Ahmet Belce; Sennur Ilvan; Andac Argon; Hakan Camlica; Erkan Topuz

2005-01-01

263

Coping with Cancer in Everyday Life  

MedlinePLUS

... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Coping With Cancer in Everyday Life Download Printable Version [ ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

264

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

265

Breast-feeding may reduce breast-cancer risk.  

PubMed

A case control study of 6000 women with breast cancer and about 8000 women with cancer living in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin found that younger women who breast feed are at a 20% lower risk of developing breast cancer before menopause than those who have never breast fed or have breast fed only briefly. The younger a woman was when she first breast fed, the less likely she was to develop premenopausal breast cancer. The length of total time a woman breast fed in her life was inversely related to the risk of developing breast cancer before menopause. For example, if a woman breast feeds for 4-12 months, the risk of developing breast cancer in premenopausal women is reduced 11% when compared to women who breast feed for less than 3 months and those who do not breast feed. The risk can be reduced by about 25%, if women breast feed for at least 2 years. Neither young age nor long duration of total time breast feeding appeared to influence the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause, however. One hypothesis is that breast feeding suppresses the production of ovarian hormones which may be associated with breast cancer. Since most breast cancer cases in the US are postmenopausal, the reduction in breast cancer cases would be rather small, however. Another study of about 90,000 US nurses found no relationship between breast feeding and breast cancer. The lack of a relationship may have been due to the fact that the nurses were much less likely to breast feed at a young age since they had a high educational level. Further, breast feeding practices have changed in the last 20-30 years from feeding every 4 hours to feeding on demand. In India most rural women breast feed, beginning when they are young. They even practice communal breast feeding, which allows women to work outside their homes. PMID:12179188

1994-04-30

266

Menopause after breast cancer: a survey on breast cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the younger age and the ever wider use of adjuvant chemotherapy and antiestrogens, menopausal symptoms are a frequent cause of concern for breast cancer patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of menopausal symptoms, and to explore the attitudes toward Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) or other treatments and the willingness to take oestrogen in breast cancer patients. Methods: A

Nicoletta Biglia; Marilena Cozzarella; Franca Cacciari; Riccardo Ponzone; Riccardo Roagna; Furio Maggiorotto; Piero Sismondi

267

Survival following locoregional recurrence after breast conservation therapy for cancer.  

PubMed Central

We postulated that locoregional recurrence after limited surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer might be associated with an additional survival hazard, similar to that of a second primary tumor with the same extent of local and regional disease. Using this hypothesis we examined the likely resultant effect on survival. Our calculations indicated that no statistically significant survival deficit due to such recurrence would be detectable until a randomized controlled trial comparing breast conservation with mastectomy had monitored more than 10,000 patients for more than 10 years. A simple mathematical model predicted 5-year survival rates in a cohort of patients treated with breast conservation of 75%, compared to 83% in those without locoregional recurrence. From the date of locoregional recurrence, a 61% 5-year survival rate was predicted, compared to 83% if no hazard was associated with locoregional recurrence. These predictions were compared with the actuarial survival rates of 499 patients with unilateral breast cancer, 49 of whom had developed locoregional recurrence. From the date of initial treatment, the 5-year survival rate of those whose disease recurred was 79%, compared to 88% for those without locoregional recurrence (p = 0.19). The actuarial 5-year survival rate from the date of locoregional recurrence was 63%. The similarity between the patient data and the predictions of the mathematical model indicates that locoregional failure after breast conservation therapy may result in reduced survival. The lack of a significant survival deficit in our cohort or in controlled trials comparing breast conservation therapy with mastectomy is compatible to the small size of the overall effect. PMID:2198001

Stotter, A; Atkinson, E N; Fairston, B A; McNeese, M; Oswald, M J; Balch, C M

1990-01-01

268

Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

2013-01-01

269

Breast cancer statistics and markers.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25313729

Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

2014-01-01

270

Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-02-17

271

Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-11-20

272

Early breast cancer.  

PubMed

Adoption of urbanised lifestyles together with changes in reproductive behaviour might partly underlie the continued rise in worldwide incidence of breast cancer. Widespread mammographic screening and effective systemic therapies have led to a stage shift at presentation and mortality reductions in the past two decades. Loco-regional control of the disease seems to affect long-term survival, and attention to surgical margins together with improved radiotherapy techniques could further contribute to mortality gains. Developments in oncoplastic surgery and partial-breast reconstruction have improved cosmetic outcomes after breast-conservation surgery. Optimum approaches for delivering chest-wall radiotherapy in the context of immediate breast reconstruction present special challenges. Accurate methods for intraoperative assessment of sentinel lymph nodes remain a clinical priority. Clinical trials are investigating combinatorial therapies that use novel agents targeting growth factor receptors, signal transduction pathways, and tumour angiogenesis. Gene-expression profiling offers the potential to provide accurate prognostic and predictive information, with selection of best possible therapy for individuals and avoidance of overtreatment and undertreatment of patients with conventional chemotherapy. Short-term presurgical studies in the neoadjuvant setting allow monitoring of proliferative indices, and changes in gene-expression patterns can be predictive of response to therapies and long-term outcome. PMID:19394537

Benson, John R; Jatoi, Ismail; Keisch, Martin; Esteva, Francisco J; Makris, Andreas; Jordan, V Craig

2009-04-25

273

Inappropriate Halsted mastectomy and patient volume in Italian hospitals.  

PubMed Central

To study whether Halsted mastectomy was used only when properly indicated, a prospective survey was undertaken on the process of care of 985 breast cancer patients seen consecutively at 62 general hospitals in Northern and Central Italy. Overall, 79% of Halsted mastectomies were performed inappropriately. The procedure was less likely to be performed on more educated patients and, other factors considered, on those seen at hospitals with larger volume. We conclude that the measurement of utilization of a surgical procedure for which only a few appropriate indications exist may help identify important relationships between hospital characteristics and quality of surgical care. PMID:8259814

Grilli, R; Mainini, F; Penna, A; Bertolini, G; Scorpiglione, N; Torri, V; Liberati, A

1993-01-01

274

Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-10-15

275

Bisphosphonates in Metastatic Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bone is the most common site of metastatic involvement in breast cancer. About 20–30% of patients with breast cancer have osseous metastases as the first site of metastatic disease and about 60–70% of patients will develop metastases to the bone during the course of their disease. Although bone metastases have usually only limited impact on overall survival, they cause significant

Peter Schmid; Kurt Possinger

2003-01-01

276

Surgical Management for Early-Stage Bilateral Breast Cancer Patients in China  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC) patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014. Results A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5%) suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC), and 296 (2.0%) suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC). Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC. Conclusions Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options. PMID:25874699

Xue, Jing-yan; Quan, Chen-lian; Tan, Yu-long; Liu, Guang-yu; Shao, Zhi-min; Wu, Jiong

2015-01-01

277

Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-05

278

CDC Vital Signs: Cancer Screenings: Colorectal Cancer and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... cdc.gov/vitalsigns www http://www.cdc.gov/cancer 36% Only 36% of uninsured adults aged 50– ... 74 are up-to-date with mammography screening. Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Breast Cancer 22M 22 million ...

279

Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... certain breast conditions. Obesity is also a risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. # # # Related NCI Materials and Web pages: Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk Fact Sheet What ...

280

Galectin-3 as a Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P?=?0.001). Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation. PMID:25254965

Zhang, Hao; Liang, Xi; Duan, Chao; Liu, Caigang; Zhao, Zuowei

2014-01-01

281

Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.  

PubMed

Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

2007-09-01

282

Oncoplastic surgery for Japanese patients with breast cancer of the lower pole.  

PubMed

This report presents the results of oncoplastic surgery in three Japanese patients with breast cancer lesions involving the lower pole of the breast. Their breasts were ptotic, and their lesions were considered to be suitable for breast conservation surgery. There were treated with partial mastectomy resection using vertical-scar mammaplasty, with reduction surgery and recentralization of the nipple-areola complex. Two patients underwent a mirror-image biopsy on the contralateral breasts to determine the symmetry. The remaining patient had periareolar incision mastopexy without reduction added for the contralateral breast. A large surgical margin was used to remove excessive skin and parenchymal tissue. Ideal symmetry was achieved by performing reduction and/or mastopexy on the contralateral breast. PMID:21922380

Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Mizoguchi, Tadao; Ishigami, Sumiya; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Ueno, Shinichi; Natsugoe, Shoji

2011-10-01

283

Genetic risk of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Several cutting-edge strategies are being used to evaluate candidate genetic risk factors for breast cancer. These include linkage analysis for mapping out BRCA1 and BRCA2, mutational screening of candidate risk genes like CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 and PALB2, which are associated with an intermediate level of breast cancer risk. Genome-wide association studies have revealed several low-penetrance breast cancer risk alleles. The predisposition factors are associated with different levels of breast cancer risk. Relative to control population, the risk in patients harboring high-risk BRCA1 and 2 mutations is over 10-fold, with intermediate penetrance genes 2 to 4-fold and with low penetrance alleles less than 1.5-fold. Overall, these factors account for about 25% of the genetic risk for breast cancer. In the remainder, genetic factors to contribute to the risk of breast cancer remain unknown and are a subject of current investigation. With discovery and validation of newer and clinically relevant predisposition factors, additional breast cancer risk categories may be recognized. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing allows identification of individuals at increased risk of breast cancer who are offered risk-reducing interventions. Targeted therapies are being developed that may refine management of patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further genome-wide studies are required to identify clinically relevant molecular factors that will allow more accurate and widely applicable genetic risk stratification. Current efforts in discovery, validation and qualification of molecular markers of breast cancer risk offer considerable promise in the future to develop more accurate breast cancer risk assessment along with development of more effective chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:20046159

Nasir, A; Shackelford, R E; Anwar, F; Yeatman, T J

2009-12-01

284

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Breast Cancer Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Thomas Buchholz, M.D.MD Anderson Cancer CenterUniversity of TexasHouston, TX Nancy Davidson, M.D.University of Pittsburgh Cancer InstituteUniversity of Pittsburgh Cancer CentersPittsburgh, PA Members William

285

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER DETECTION USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING Hong Guo, Qing Zhang and Asoke K. Nandi, Feature Extraction, Classification, Breast Cancer Diagnosis. Abstract: Breast cancer diagnosis have been investigated by different machine learning methods. This paper proposes a new method for breast cancer

Fernandez, Thomas

286

[Oncoplastic breast surgery in Denmark.  

PubMed

With improved survival rates after breast cancer treatment, more attention is drawn to improve the cosmetic outcome after surgical treatment of breast cancer. In this process the oncoplastic breast surgery was conceived. It supplements the traditional surgical treatments (mastectomy and breast conserving surgery) with increased focus on individualized therapy. The ambition is to obtain the best possible cosmetic outcome without compromising recurrence rates and survival. This article provides an overview of the current oncoplastic breast surgery treatment offered in Denmark. PMID:25353999

Klit, Anders; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Siersen, Hans Erik; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Christiansen, Peer; Kroman, Niels

2014-10-27

287

RO4929097 and Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2014-06-30

288

Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2015-03-03

289

Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-10-29

290

Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2015-03-06

291

Breast Tissue Composition and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Breast density, as assessed by mammography, reflects breast tissue composition. Breast epithelium and stroma attenuate x-rays more than fat and thus appear light on mammograms while fat appears dark. In this review, we provide an overview of selected areas of current knowledge about the relationship between breast density and susceptibility to breast cancer. We review the evidence that breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, the histological and other risk factors that are associated with variations in breast density, and the biological plausibility of the associations with risk of breast cancer. We also discuss the potential for improved risk prediction that might be achieved by using alternative breast imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound. After adjustment for other risk factors, breast density is consistently associated with breast cancer risk, more strongly than most other risk factors for this disease, and extensive breast density may account for a substantial fraction of breast cancer. Breast density is associated with risk of all of the proliferative lesions that are thought to be precursors of breast cancer. Studies of twins have shown that breast density is a highly heritable quantitative trait. Associations between breast density and variations in breast histology, risk of proliferative breast lesions, and risk of breast cancer may be the result of exposures of breast tissue to both mitogens and mutagens. Characterization of breast density by mammography has several limitations, and the uses of breast density in risk prediction and breast cancer prevention may be improved by other methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance or ultrasound tomography. PMID:20616353

Martin, Lisa J.; Bronskill, Michael; Yaffe, Martin J.; Duric, Neb; Minkin, Salomon

2010-01-01

292

Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-09

293

Metastatic Breast Cancer Presenting as a Subconjunctival Mass  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common primary source of orbital metastasis. Metastasis occurs through hematogenous spread and predominantly involves the choroid. We present a case of a metastatic subconjunctival mass associated with primary breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of its kind. A 41-year-old woman presented with complaints of conjunctival injection and a foreign body sensation in the left eye. She had a history of breast cancer and had been treated 2 years previously with modified radical mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Slit-lamp examination showed a cystic mass under the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, associated with dilated overlying conjunctival vessels. An excisional biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Positron emission tomography examination for systemic malignancy revealed multiple systemic metastasis. Metastatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subconjunctival lesions, and ophthalmic manifestations can play an important role in the detection of metastatic spread of a known primary breast cancer. PMID:24744803

Park, Young Min; Park, Jong Ho; Lee, Seung Uk

2014-01-01

294

Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a subconjunctival mass.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common primary source of orbital metastasis. Metastasis occurs through hematogenous spread and predominantly involves the choroid. We present a case of a metastatic subconjunctival mass associated with primary breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of its kind. A 41-year-old woman presented with complaints of conjunctival injection and a foreign body sensation in the left eye. She had a history of breast cancer and had been treated 2 years previously with modified radical mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Slit-lamp examination showed a cystic mass under the temporal bulbar conjunctiva, associated with dilated overlying conjunctival vessels. An excisional biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Positron emission tomography examination for systemic malignancy revealed multiple systemic metastasis. Metastatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subconjunctival lesions, and ophthalmic manifestations can play an important role in the detection of metastatic spread of a known primary breast cancer. PMID:24744803

Park, Young Min; Park, Jong Ho; Lee, Seung Uk; Lee, Jong Soo

2014-03-01

295

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

1998-01-01

296

HISTONE LYSINE DEMETHYLASES IN BREAST CANCER  

PubMed Central

Histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) have been recently discovered in mammals and have been nicknamed “erasers” for their ability to remove methyl groups from histone substrates. In cancer cells, KDMs can activate or repress gene transcription, behaving as oncogenes or tumor suppressors depending upon the cellular context. In order to investigate the potential role of KDMs in Breast Cancer (BC), we queried the Oncomine database and determined that the expression of KDMs correlates with BC prognosis. High expression of KDM3B and KDM5A is associated with a better prognosis (no recurrence after mastectomy p=0.005 and response to docetaxel p=0.005); conversely, KDM6A is overexpressed in BC patients with an unfavorable prognosis (mortality at 1 year, p=8.65E-7). Our findings suggest that KDMs could be potential targets for BC therapy. Further, altering the interactions between KDMs and Polycomb Group genes (PcG) may provide novel avenues for therapy that specifically targets these genes in BC. PMID:23266085

Paolicchi, Elisa; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, William L; Green, Jeffrey E; Danesi, Romano

2013-01-01

297

Dormancy in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Tumor dormancy describes a prolonged quiescent state in which tumor cells are present, but disease progression is not yet clinically apparent. Breast cancer is especially known for long asymptomatic periods, up to 25 years, with no evidence of the disease, followed by a relapse. Factors that determine the cell’s decision to enter a dormant state and that control its duration remain unclear. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in understanding how tumor cells circulating in the blood interact and extravasate into secondary sites and which factors might determine whether these cells survive, remain dormant, or become macrometastases. The mechanisms of tumor cell dormancy are still not clear. Two different hypotheses are currently discussed: tumor cells persist either by completely withdrawing from the cell cycle or by continuing to proliferate at a slow rate that is counterbalanced by cell death. Because dormant disseminated tumor cells may be the founders of metastasis, one hypothesis is that dormant tumor cells, or at least a fraction of them, share stem cell-like characteristics that may be responsible for their long half-lives and their suggested resistance to standard chemotherapy. Therefore, knowledge of the biology of tumor cell dormancy may be the basis from which to develop innovative targeted therapies to control or eliminate this tumor cell fraction. In this review, we discuss biological mechanisms and clinical implications of tumor dormancy in breast cancer patients. PMID:24367205

Banys, Malgorzata; Hartkopf, Andreas D; Krawczyk, Natalia; Kaiser, Tatjana; Meier-Stiegen, Franziska; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

2012-01-01

298

Epigenetics and Breast Cancers  

PubMed Central

Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Er?) dimers wherein the ligand ER? dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-?-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5?-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ER? dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ER? dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

2012-01-01

299

Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Ductal and Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer

2015-02-26

300

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

301

The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.  

PubMed

The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 ?g/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 ?g/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 ?g Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content in defatted tissue and oil from such tissues and thereby contribute towards our knowledge on aluminium and any role in breast cancer. PMID:23870171

House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

2013-10-01

302

General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Key Points for This Section Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells ...

303

Leptomeningeal metastases in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Central nervous system (CNS) metastasis from breast cancer may be characterized as either parenchymal brain metastasis (BM) or leptomeningeal (LM) metastasis. BM are much more common (about 80% of all CNS metastases), and have been more extensively studied than LM. CNS metastasis in breast cancer has been associated with reduced overall survival, with the shortest survival generally observed in cases of LM. Here, we review the epidemiology, prognostic factors, diagnostic tools, currently available treatments, and potential future therapies for LM from breast cancer. PMID:23593536

Scott, Brian J; Kesari, Santosh

2013-01-01

304

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

1998-01-01

305

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

1998-01-01

306

Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities  

MedlinePLUS

... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

307

Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer Treatment  

MedlinePLUS

... breast cancer stops working Lifestyle changes after breast cancer treatment You can't change the fact that you ... the long term. Some people even start during cancer treatment. Making healthier choices For many people, a diagnosis ...

308

Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study  

SciTech Connect

Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

Khanfir, Kaouthar, E-mail: kaouthar.khanfir@rsv-gnw.ch [Hopital de Sion, CHCVs, Sion (Switzerland); Kallel, Adel [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Villette, Sylviane [Centre Rene Huguenin, Paris (France); Belkacemi, Yazid [CHU Henri Mondor, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Vautravers, Claire [Centre George Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Nguyen, TanDat [Institut Jean Gaudinot, Reims (France); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Li Yexiong [Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Boersma, Liesbeth [Maastricht University Medical Center (MAASTRO clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philip [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Goldberg, Hadassah [Western Galilee Hospital-Nahariya, Nahariya (Israel); Vees, Hansjorg [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Senkus, Elzbieta [Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut [Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-04-01

309

Stem cell and tissue engineering in breast reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer worldwide is the most common cancer in women with incidence rate varying from geographic areas. Guidelines for management of breast cancer have been largely established and widely used. Mastectomy is one of the surgical procedures used treating breast cancer. Optionally, after mastectomy, appropriately selected patients could undergo breast reconstruction to create their breast contour. Many techniques have been used for breast reconstructive surgery, mainly implant-based and autologous tissue reconstruction. Even with highly-experienced surgeon and good-quality breast and autologous substitute tissue, still there could be unfilled defect after mastectomy with reconstruction. Stem cell, in particular, adipose-derived stem cell residing within fat tissue, could be used to fill the imperfection providing optimal breast shape and natural feeling of fat tissue. However, whether surgical reconstruction alone or in combination with stem cell and tissue engineering approach be used, the ultimate outcomes are patient safety first and satisfaction second. PMID:25083496

Lohsiriwat, Visnu

2014-01-01

310

Pre-operative thrombotic complications of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: Implications for immediate breast reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Introduction Thrombotic complications arising during the treatment of breast cancer can impact the breast reconstruction pathway. We set out to review the details of cases of thromboembolism occurring during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and peri-operatively to study the impact of the event and its management on subsequent breast reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of seven patients who had experienced a thrombotic event during their treatment of breast cancer between 2008 and 2012, who then proceeded to breast reconstruction. We recorded size and grade of tumour, neoadjuvant chemotherapeutic regimen, details of port insertion, planned reconstruction, thrombotic event and its management and the surgery performed and outcome. Results: All patients received chemotherapy via central venous access and went on to present with local symptomatic thrombosis. They were managed with anticoagulant regimens at the time of mastectomy and reconstruction, which were unique for each patient. The results revealed delays to surgery and modifications to planned reconstruction. Discussion: The majority of patients developing thrombotic complications go on to achieve successful reconstruction. There is significant variation in the anticoagulation management in this patient group. Identification of optimal anticoagulant regimes and the possibilities for prophylaxis may prove key in informing surgeons when planning the reconstructive process. Conclusion: An awareness of the effects of thrombotic events in this patient group is important in terms of developing an understanding of its impact on the performance of reconstruction, on the management of anticoagulation peri-operatively and on monitoring for post-operative complications.

Richards, K.; Forouhi, P.; Johnston, A.; Malata, C.M.

2014-01-01

311

Breast cancer surgery and diagnosis-related groups (DRGs): patient classification and hospital reimbursement in 11 European countries.  

PubMed

Researchers from eleven countries (i.e. Austria, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and Sweden) compared how their DRG systems deal with breast cancer surgery patients. DRG algorithms and indicators of resource consumption were assessed for those DRGs that individually contain at least 1% of all breast cancer surgery patients. Six standardised case vignettes were defined and quasi prices according to national DRG-based hospital payment systems were ascertained. European DRG systems classify breast cancer surgery patients according to different sets of classification variables into three to seven DRGs. Quasi prices for an index case treated with partial mastectomy range from €577 in Poland to €5780 in the Netherlands. Countries award their highest payments for very different kinds of patients. Breast cancer specialists and national DRG authorities should consider how other countries' DRG systems classify breast cancer patients in order to identify potential scope for improvement and to ensure fair and appropriate reimbursement. PMID:23218742

Scheller-Kreinsen, David; Quentin, Wilm; Geissler, Alexander; Busse, Reinhard

2013-10-01

312

Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast

Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

2011-01-01

313

Ras activation in human breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic ras mutations are infrequent in breast cancer but Ras may be pathologically activated in breast cancer by overexpression of growth factor receptors which signal through Ras. Using a highly sensitive, coupled enzymatic assay, we measured Ras activation in 20 breast cancers, two fibroadenomas, and seven normal breast samples. Ras was highly activated compared to benign tissue in 11 of

Friederike C. von Lintig; Anna D. Dreilinger; Nissi M. Varki; Anne M. Wallace; Darren E. Casteel; Gerry R. Boss

2000-01-01

314

About Breast Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast CFR includes lifestyle, medical history, and family history data collected from more than 55,000 women and men from 14,000 families with and without breast cancer. The Breast CFR began recruiting families in 1996, and all participants are followed up 10 years after recruitment to update personal and family histories and expand recruitment if new cases have occurred since baseline.

315

Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24575835

Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

2014-11-01

316

Mouse models of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. This malignancy is a complex disease, which is defined by an intrinsic heterogeneity on the histopathological and molecular level as well as response to therapy and outcome. In addition to classical histopathological features, breast cancer can be categorized into at least five major subtypes based on comprehensive gene expression profiling: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, ERBB2-positive, and normal-like breast cancer. Genetically engineered mouse models can serve as tools to study the molecular underpinnings for this disease. Given the genetic complexity that drives the initiation and progression of individual breast cancer subtypes, it is evident that certain models can reflect only particular aspects of this malignancy. In this book chapter, we will primarily focus on advances in modeling breast cancer at defined stages of carcinogenesis using genetically engineered mice. We will discuss the ability as well as shortcomings of these models to faithfully recapitulate the spectrum of human breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25636464

Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Schmidt, Jeffrey W; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

2015-01-01

317

Triiodothyronine and breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

2014-01-01

318

Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2013-05-07

319

Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?  

MedlinePLUS

... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

320

Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress  

MedlinePLUS

... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

321

Paying for Breast Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... other federal laws. State efforts to ensure private health insurance coverage of mammography Many states require that private ... self-insured employer plans should check with their health insurance administrator to see what breast cancer early detection ...

322

[Maternity after breast cancer treatment].  

PubMed

Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-W?odarz, Izabela

2015-01-01

323

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

A fact sheet that describes hormone therapy (including antiestrogens, LH-RH agonists, aromatase inhibitors, and SERMs) and its role in preventing and treating breast cancer. Includes information about possible side effects.

324

Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... women, especially for those who started their periods early (before age 12) or reached menopause late (after age 55). Breast cancer is more common among women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy ...

325

Cholesterol and breast cancer pathophysiology.  

PubMed

Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes, thus impacting upon membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. In addition, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected because 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors (LXR), resulting in a reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides a rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

Nelson, Erik R; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P

2014-12-01

326

The TAILORx Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for Treatment (Rx), or TAILORx, which will examine whether a molecular test can assign women with early-stage breast cancer to the most appropriate and effective treatment.

327

Metals and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

2014-01-01

328

Metals and breast cancer.  

PubMed

Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D; Storchan, Geoffrey B; Parodi, Daniela A; Martin, Mary Beth

2013-03-01

329

Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-08

330

Targeting autophagy in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

2014-01-01

331

Brain metastases in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Brain metastases are less common than bone or visceral metastases in patients with breast cancer. The overall prognosis of breast cancer patients with brain metastases remains poor, and these metastases are less responsive to systemic therapies. Brain metastasis is associated with a reduced quality of life due to progressive neurologic impairments. Recently, a trend of increased incidence of brain metastases in breast cancer has been noted. Reasons for this increased incidence include the more frequent use of sensitive detection methods such as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and increased awareness of brain metastasis among patients and clinicians. Adjuvant and systemic therapy with drugs that have a low blood-brain barrier penetrance can lead to an increased risk of brain metastases in breast cancer patients. Molecular subtype is a predictive factor for overall survival after developing brain metastases. Patients who do not have a poor prognosis based on previously identified prognostic factors should be treated with radiation therapy to control symptoms. Whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic irradiation and surgery are tools for the local treatment of brain metastases. Novel molecular target therapy, including HER2-targeted therapy, has demonstrated an antitumor effect on brain metastases. In this review, we provide a practical algorithm for the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases. This review provides an overview of the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, prognostic factors and current and potential future management strategies of breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:25320339

Niikura, Naoki; Saji, Shigehira; Tokuda, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji

2014-12-01

332

Primary systemic therapy for operable breast cancer.  

PubMed

Eighty-eight patients presenting with operable breast cancer of 4 cm or greater in diameter (T2, T3, N0, N1, M0) have received primary systemic therapy. Response was assessed following 12 weeks of systemic therapy by linear regression analysis of changes in tumour volume. Definitive locoregional surgery (mastectomy n = 82, wide local excision n = 6) was performed on completion of systemic therapy (3-6 months). Response was observed in 24 (39%) of the 61 patients who received endocrine therapy; all 24 had tumours with an oestrogen receptor (ER) concentration of greater than or equal to 20 fmol mb-1 cytosol protein. Cytotoxic therapy was reserved for patients with tumours of ER concentration less than 20 fmol mg-1 cytosol protein (n = 27) or when endocrine therapy had failed (n = 20). Response was observed in 34 patients (72%). The overall survival rate at 3 years was 86%, with 81% remaining free from local relapse. We propose that the treatment policy outlined in this paper should now be tested against orthodox management by controlled randomised trial. PMID:1827031

Anderson, E D; Forrest, A P; Hawkins, R A; Anderson, T J; Leonard, R C; Chetty, U

1991-04-01

333

Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Patient Section Who Are Interventional Radiologists? Multimedia Insurance Coverage IR Treatments Abdominal aortic aneurysms Angiography Angioplasty and stent placement Cancer - bone Cancer - breast Cancer - kidney Cancer - liver Cancer - lung ...

334

Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer Family Registry (Breast CFR) and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (Colon CFR) were established by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a unique resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

335

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming  

E-print Network

Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer. In 2004, breast cancer caused 519,000 deaths worldwide. In order to reduce the cancer deaths and thereby

Ludwig, Simone

336

Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Key words Abstract Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25% of all new cases of cancer. Most BC are sporadic while 5-10% are estimated to be due to an inherited predisposition. Autosomal dominant alterations in two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are likely to account for most familial cases of early-onset BC and\\/or ovarian cancer

Thierry Philip

2004-01-01

337

Utility of C-erbB-2 in tissue and in serum in the early diagnosis of recurrence in breast cancer patients: comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 15.3  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the utility of c-erbB-2, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA 15.3 in the early diagnosis of recurrence, serial serum determinations of these antigens were performed in 200 patients (follow-up 1-4 years, mean 2.2 years) with primary breast cancer and no evidence of residual disease (NED) after radical treatment (radical mastectomy or simple mastectomy and radiotherapy). Eighty-nine patients developed metastases

R Molina; J Jo; G Zanón; X Filella; B Farrus; M Muñoz; ML Latre; J Pahisa; M Velasco; P Fernandez; J Estapé; AM Ballesta

1996-01-01

338

Microarray Profiling in Breast Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. It arises from a variety of genetic, epigenetic, and chromosomal alterations.\\u000a The traditional prognostic and predictive factors in breast cancer mainly focus on the clinical–pathological parameters, which\\u000a are unable to reveal the diverse molecular alterations of breast cancer and are imprecise in predicting breast cancer progression\\u000a and clinical outcomes. In recent

Yong Qian; Xianglin Shi; Vincent Castranova; Nancy L. Guo

339

Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation  

PubMed Central

Purpose Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the ?2 test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%–5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%–4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%–1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40–0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18–0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%–3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%–1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28–0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast-preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer. PMID:24268788

Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01

340

Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the ?{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone. In all patients, brachytherapy showed a higher postoperative infection risk (16.5% vs 9.9% after lumpectomy alone vs 11.4% after EBRT, P<.001); higher incidence of breast pain (22.9% vs 11.2% vs 16.7%, P<.001); and higher incidence of fat necrosis (15.3% vs 5.3% vs 7.7%, P<.001). Conclusions: In this study era, brachytherapy showed lesser breast preservation benefit compared with EBRT. Suitability criteria predicted differential absolute, but not relative, benefit in patients with invasive cancer.

Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ying [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2014-02-01

341

Cyclophosphamide With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2015-02-20

342

Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Info on Their Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many Breast Cancer Patients Lack Info on Their Cancer Problem more ... 2015) Monday, January 26, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Breast Cancer Health Disparities Talking With Your Doctor MONDAY, Jan. ...

343

Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

2003-01-01

344

Effect of mammography screening on surgical treatment for breast cancer in Norway: comparative analysis of cancer registry data  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the effect of mammography screening on surgical treatment for breast cancer. Design Comparative analysis of data from Norwegian cancer registry. Setting Mammography screening, Norway (screening of women aged 50-69 was introduced sequentially from 1996 to 2004). Participants 35?408 women aged 40-79 with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ treated surgically from 1993 to 2008. Main outcome measures Rates of breast surgery (mastectomy plus breast conserving treatment) and rates of mastectomy for three age groups of women: 40-49, 50-69, and 70-79. Changes in rates from pre-screening period (1993-5) to introduction of screening phase (1996-2004) and then to screening period (2005-8) are presented as hazard ratios in invited and non-invited women. Results The annual rate for breast surgery from the pre-screening period (1993-5) to screening period (2005-8) in Norway increased by 70% (hazard ratio 1.70, 95% confidence interval 1.62 to 1.78), from 180 to 305 per 100?000 women in the invited age group (50-69 years). In the younger, non-invited age group (40-49 years), however, the increase was only 8% (1.08, 1.00 to 1.16), from 133 to 144 per 100?000 women per year, whereas in the older, non-invited age group (70-79 years) the rate decreased by 8% (0.92, 0.86 to 1.00), from 227 to 214 per 100?000 women per year. The rates for mastectomy decreased similarly from the pre-screening period to screening period in invited and non-invited women. From the pre-screening period to the introduction phase of screening (1996-2004), however, the annual mastectomy rate in women aged 50-69 invited to screening increased by 9% (1.09, 1.03 to 1.14), from 156 to 167 per 100?000 women, and in the younger non-invited women declined by 17% (0.83, 0.78 to 0.90), from 109 to 91 per 100?000 women. In consequence, the mastectomy rate was 31% (1.31, 1.20 to 1.43) higher in the invited than in the non-invited younger age group. Conclusions Mammography screening in Norway was associated with a noticeable increase in rates for breast cancer surgery in women aged 50-69 (the age group invited to screening) and also an increase in mastectomy rates. Although over-diagnosis is likely to have caused the initial increase in mastectomy rates and the overall increase in surgery rates in the age group screened, the more recent decline in mastectomy rates has affected all age groups and is likely to have resulted from changes in surgical policy. PMID:21914765

2011-01-01

345

Bone Mineral Density and Risk of Breast Cancer Differences by Family History of Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have suggested that bone mineral density (BMD) is related to risk of breast cancer in elderly women. This study investigated whether the level of breast cancer risk associated with BMD in women with a positive family history of breast cancer is different from that in women without a family history of breast cancer. Radial and calcaneus BMD were

Frances Leslie Lucas; Jane A. Cauley; Roslyn A. Stone; Steven R. Cummings; Molly T. Vogt

346

Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

2015-03-10

347

What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis  

MedlinePLUS

... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

348

Breast cancer and fertility preservation  

PubMed Central

Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

2014-01-01

349

Skin Lesions after Prophylactic Mastectomy and Immediate Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Summary: Metastatic breast carcinoma can mimic benign cutaneous lesions. Breast surgeons should be aware of skin manifestations to be able to distinguish them and set a proper therapeutic strategy. A clinical case of cutaneous lesion after breast cancer is presented. A 41-year-old woman with a history of left breast cancer underwent a prophylactic right nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast implant reconstruction. After surgery, she attended our service due to a right periareolar rash resistant to medical treatment, accompanied by cutaneous induration and fixed axillary adenopathy. A differential diagnosis of skin metastases was considered. Cutaneous metastases should be the first diagnosis of skin lesions in oncological patients due to the implications in terms of treatment and prognosis. However, differential diagnoses have to be discussed. PMID:25289276

Melonio, Isabelle; Fréneaux, Paul; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred; Rouzier, Roman; Malhaire, Caroline; Mallon, Peter; Reyal, Fabien

2013-01-01

350

Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

351

Lipid biology of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

2014-01-01

352

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

353

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

354

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

355

Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... 1007–1014. [PubMed Abstract] Nechuta S, Paneth N, Velie EM. Pregnancy characteristics and maternal breast cancer risk: a ... 195. [PubMed Abstract] Kelsey JL, Gammon MD, John EM. Reproductive factors and breast cancer. Epidemiologic Reviews 1993; ...

356

Older women, breast cancer, and social support  

E-print Network

in older women with breast cancer: what do we know? What doWhat is happening? Are Findings Age differences in reactions to the breast cancerbreast cancer diagnosis and its subsequent treatment on older women [50]. What

Yoo, Grace J.; Levine, Ellen G.; Aviv, Caryn; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

2010-01-01

357

Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men Hormone therapy ... fatigue, and pain at the injection site. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and anti-androgens LHRH ...

358

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

359

BRCA1 and Breast Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two-part animation explains the role of the BRCA1 protein in DNA repair and the development of breast cancer. BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor, and mutations in the BRCA1 gene can lead to breast cancer and other forms of cancer. Part 1 of the animation, Â?The function of BRCA1,Â? provides an overview of how the BRCA1 protein functions in healthy cells to detect and repair DNA damage. Part 2, Â?Mutations in BRCA1 Can Cause Cancer,Â? explains how individuals who inherit a single mutated copy of BRCA1 are at an increased risk of cancer, and how cancer develops when the second copy of BRCA1 becomes mutated. Animation is closed captioned. Run times of each animation part: approximately 1 minute 15 seconds.

2010-11-18

360

Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

361

Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2014-03-17

362

Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2013-10-07

363

Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry  

PubMed Central

The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

2011-01-01

364

Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

Tatl?, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Ba?sorgun, Cumhur ?brahim; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol

2013-01-01

365

Ten genes for inherited breast cancer.  

PubMed

Inherited breast cancer is associated with germline mutations in ten different genes in pathways critical to genomic integrity. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations confer very high risks of breast and ovarian cancer. p53 and PTEN mutations lead to very high breast cancer risks associated with rare cancer syndromes. Mutations in CHEK2, ATM, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1, and PALB2 are associated with doubling of breast cancer risks. In addition, biallelic mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and PALB2 cause Fanconi anemia. The convergence of these genes in a shared role reveals underlying biology of these illnesses and suggests still other breast cancer genes. PMID:17292821

Walsh, Tom; King, Mary-Claire

2007-02-01

366

Older women, breast cancer, and social support  

E-print Network

Maly RC (1999) Coping with breast cancer in later life: thecoping mediates the effect of optimism on distress: a study of women with early stage breast cancer.breast cancer from racial/ ethnic minority communities are more likely to utilize religious and spiritual faith as an important coping

Yoo, Grace J.; Levine, Ellen G.; Aviv, Caryn; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

2010-01-01

367

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

Ginzel, Matthew

368

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.  

E-print Network

Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

369

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter  

E-print Network

Bay Area Breast Cancer SPORE Newsletter Special Interest Articles: ·Hormone receptor negative breast cancer: Improving the effectiveness of chemotherapy by targeting immune cells Page 1, cont. Page 6 (article from Breast Cancer Connections) Page 8 Editor: Karla Kerlikowske, MD Professor of Medicine

Walter, Peter

370

Perceptions of breast cancer across the lifespan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The risk of developing breast cancer increases with advancing age. There is evidence to suggest that delayed help-seeking for breast cancer symptoms is associated with poorer survival and that older women are more likely to delay in seeking help for such symptoms. This study examined age differences in beliefs regarding breast cancer and intentions to seek medical care for

Elizabeth A Grunfeld; Myra S Hunter; Amanda J Ramirez; Michael A Richards

2003-01-01

371

Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema -- For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms ...

372

Can we prevent breast cancer?  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004-2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14-42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48-52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

Saadat, Sabiha

2008-07-01

373

Transdermal or Oral Telapristone Acetate in Treating Patients Undergoing Mastectomy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

2015-01-16

374

Breast Cancer Organization of Screening Programs  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Breast Cancer: Mortality Rates | Screening

375

Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

2014-06-16

376

Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

2010-10-01

377

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer  

E-print Network

Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer · UCSF's second highest ethnic group of breast cancer patients is Asian American compared to African Americans nationally. · The breast cancer rate for Asian

Mullins, Dyche

378

Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention  

SciTech Connect

The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

Jordan, V.C. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01

379

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

1998-01-01

380

Tamoxifen Therapy for Breast Cancer and Endometrial Cancer Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Tamoxifen is effective in treating breast cancer, reduces breast cancer incidence among high-risk women, and is associated with increased endometrial cancer risk. This study was designed to examine the possible modifying effects of endometrial cancer risk factors on the tamoxifen- endometrial cancer association. Methods: We conducted a case-control study of endometrial cancer (324 case patients and 671 individually matched

Leslie Bernstein; Dennis Deapen; James R. Cerhan; Stephen M. Schwartz; Jonathan Liff; Jeffrey A. Perlman; Leslie Ford

1999-01-01

381

Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

Yadav, Budhi S. [Department of Radiotherapy, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)], E-mail: drbudhi@gmail.com; Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder [Department of Radiotherapy, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)

2009-04-01

382

Immunohistochemical reactions of primary neuroendocrine breast cancer.  

PubMed

We performed immunohistochemical analysis of neuroendocrine breast cancer. The significance of this approach to differential diagnosis of this cancer form by detection of specific markers is demonstrated. The incidence of diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer has increased 8-fold over 5 years. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is responsible for 3.4% of all breast cancer cases. The disease is significantly more incident in patients over 60. Neuroendocrine breast cancer is characterized by high expression of neuron-specific enolase (100%) and chromagranin A (57%). The data indicate that irrespective of the location, macroscopic picture, and immunohistochemical profile of cytokeratins and steroid hormones, breast cancer is characterized by clear-cut expression of neuroendocrine markers in different combinations. Immunohistochemical detection of these markers makes it possible to detect the hormone-secreting elements and evaluate their role in the tumor pool, which is essential for the differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine breast cancer, including studies of puncture biopsy specimens. PMID:25567197

Kirillina, M P; Loskutova, K S; Innokent'eva, A S; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

2015-01-01

383

Job Authority and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Using the 1957–2011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of women’s job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others’ pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which women’s occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions. PMID:25506089

Pudrovska, Tetyana

2014-01-01

384

Hormonal prevention of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Breast cancer prevention can be provided by using SERMs or aromatase inhibitors depending on the ovarian status, with a global risk reduction of 50 to 60%. Prophylactic annexectomy offered to reduce ovarian risk in BRCA mutation carriers also lowers breast cancer risk by 50%. Main side effects include deep vein thrombosis for SERMs, hot flushes and joint pain (although less frequently than initially suspected) with aromatase inhibitors. Other strategies based on progesterone, insulin or prolactin signaling modulation may be offered in the future. Criteria for candidate selection remain to be established. PMID:24997772

Thomin, Anne; Friszer, Stéphanie; Fajac, Anne; Daraï, Émile; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

2014-07-01

385

[Systemic sclerosis in a patient suffering from breast cancer].  

PubMed

Scleroderma is the general disease of the connective tissue, which can be characterized by the proliferation of the connective tissue and fibrosis. According to the results of international studies scleroderma is frequently accompanied by neoplastic diseases, among which the most often occurring is the neoplastic pathology of the breast and the lungs. In May 2007, in the case of our 40-year-old woman patient the histological examination of the tumor we noticed in the left breast verified invasive carcinoma. In December 2007, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy she had a left mastectomy and then she was given postoperative irradiation, hormone therapy and trastuzumab (Herceptin) treatment, which was suspended in December 2008 due to oedema and fibrosis all over the body. In May 2009 she first visited the immunology outpatient department of our clinic, where we started her examination because of our suspicion of scleroderma and her cutaneous fibrosis symptoms, which was established on the basis of the examinations (immunoserology, body plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, capillary microscopy, barium swallow) and her symptoms. She was given a conservative therapy (pentoxyphylline, amlodipine, nitroglycerin). Scleroderma arising after the neoplastic process of the breast is usually much more progressive than the primary disease. International reports also show a close correlation between breast cancer and the development of scleroderma, but its exact mechanism is not yet clear. PMID:22403762

Szabolcsi, Orsolya; Nagy-Toldi, Annamária; Zeher, Margit; Végh, Judit

2012-03-01

386

Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

2014-07-07

387

Stressors in breast cancer post-treatment: a qualitative approach.  

PubMed

With the increasing effectiveness of breast cancer treatment, the scientific interest in investigating the quality of life of survivors has increased. However, research addressing the post-treatment period is still scarce. The aim of this study was to identify the stressors present in the lives of women in the one to five years post-diagnosis period. The sample was composed of 16 women assisted at a specialized mastectomy rehabilitation service. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. The results indicate conflicts with self-image and alteration in the feeling of autonomy, fear in relation to the evolution of the condition, feelings of guilt about the disorder generated in the family, experience of disturbing social situations and a desire to return to their professional occupation. These results reveal the existence of stressors in this phase and the importance of support offered by psychosocial rehabilitation services for this population. PMID:20922314

da Silva, Gisele; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio

2010-01-01

388

Autonomy and reason: treatment choice in breast cancer.  

PubMed

The practice of offering choice to those women with breast cancer for whom either breast conserving surgery or mastectomy would be equally beneficial has come to be seen as an important aspect of medical care. As well as improving satisfaction with treatment, this is seen as satisfying the ethical principle of respect for autonomy. A number of studies, however, show that women are not always comfortable with such choice, preferring to leave treatment decisions to their surgeons. A question then arises as to the extent that these women can be seen as autonomous or as exercising autonomy. This paper argues, however, that the understanding of autonomy which is applied in current approaches to breast cancer care does not adequately support the exercise of autonomy, and that the clinical context of care means that women are not able to engage in the kind of reasoning that might promote the exercise of autonomy. Where respect for autonomy is limited to informed consent and choice, there is a danger that women's interests are overlooked in those aspects of their care where choice is not appropriate, with very real, long-term consequences for some women. Promoting the exercise of autonomy, it is argued, needs to go beyond the conception of autonomy as rational individuals making their own decisions, and clinicians need to work with an understanding of autonomy as relational in order to better involve women in their care. PMID:22995006

Twomey, Mary

2012-10-01

389

NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR), real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non malignant breast lesions and cancerous tissues. In particular, the NUCKS overexpression in ADH and DCIS indicates a significant role of this protein in neoplastic progression. PMID:19664271

Drosos, Yiannis; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Østvold, Anne Carine; Grundt, Kirsten; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Havaki, Sophia; Kollia, Panagoula; Kittas, Christos; Marinos, Evangelos; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki

2009-01-01

390

Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age.

Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cristofanilli, Massimo [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Domain, Delora [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Singletary, S. Eva [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sahin, Aysegul A. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

2008-10-01

391

Everolimus and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer That Has Progressed or Recurred on Everolimus and Exemestane Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2014-12-02

392

Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

2011-07-08

393

Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

2014-02-10

394

Polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid plus locoregional and pelvic radiotherapy versus chemotherapy with CMF as adjuvants in operable breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In this study, patients with operable breast cancer T2 or T3, treated by mastectomy + axillary dissection and with invaded axillary nodes (N+), were randomized to receive either: 1) postoperative locoregional and pelvic radiotherapy (RX) and Poly(A).Poly(U) (AU), 60 mg IV once a week for 6 weeks, or 2) CMF (cyclophosphamide 100 mg\\/sqm P.O. on days 1–14, methotrexate 40

J. Lacour; A. Laplanche; T. Delozier; J. Berlie; N. Mourali; J. P. Julien; C. De Gislain; M. Namer; J. C. Petit; V. Denis; M. Luboinski

1991-01-01

395

A patient with breast cancer and paraneoplastic cerebellar syndrome associated with anti-Purkinje cell antibodies: Response to CMF chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 41-year-old lady underwent a left mastectomy and axillary clearance in 1992, for T2N0 breast cancer. She remained well until December 1995, when she presented with a rapidly progressive cerebellar ataxia. Full investigations for metastatic disease were negative. A clinical diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration was confirmed by a high titre of anti-Purkinje cell antibodies. She was treated with cyclophosphomide,

M. Faris; J. Abraham; P. Barrett-Lee

1998-01-01

396

[Postmastectomy syndrome after the radical treatment of the breast cancer with the preservation of the intercostal nerve].  

PubMed

Postmastectomy syndrome often follows the radical surgery o? the breast cancer. The intersection of the branches of the intercostal nerve is an infrequent cause of the postmastectomy syndrome development. We studied the long-term follow up results in 30 patients after radical mastectomy by Madden with preservation of the branches of the intercostal nerve on the level of Th1-Th3. The method demonstrated the decrease of the postmastectomy syndrome and the improvement of quality of life. PMID:23996035

Iarygin, M L; Obmanov, I V; Iarygin, L M; Khokhlov, A A; Shmyrev, V I

2013-01-01

397

Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

2012-01-01

398

Does Life Expectancy Affect Treatment of Women Aged 80 and Older with Early Stage Breast Cancers?  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Data are needed on how life expectancy affects treatment decisions among women ?80 years with early stage breast cancer. METHODS We used the linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare claims dataset from 1992–2005 to identify women aged ?80 newly diagnosed with lymph node negative, estrogen receptor positive tumors, ?5 centimeters. To estimate life expectancy, we matched these women to women of similar age, region, and insurance, not diagnosed with breast cancer. We examined 5-year mortality of matched controls by illness burden (measured with the Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) using Kaplan-Meier statistics. We examined treatments received by estimated life expectancy within CCI levels. We further examined factors associated with receipt of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS). RESULTS Of 9,932 women, 39.6% underwent mastectomy, 30.4% received BCS plus radiotherapy, and 30.0% received BCS alone. Estimated 5-year mortality was 72% for women with CCIs of 3+, yet 38.0% of these women underwent mastectomy and 22.9% received radiotherapy after BCS. Conversely, estimated 5-year mortality was 36% for women with CCIs of 0 and 26.6% received BCS alone. Age 80–84, urban residence, higher grade, recent diagnosis, mammography use, and low comorbidity, were factors associated with receiving radiotherapy after BCS. Among women with CCIs of 3+ treated with BCS, 36.9% underwent radiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS Many women aged ?80 with limited life expectancies receive radiotherapy after BCS for treatment of early stage breast cancers while many in excellent health do not. More consideration needs to be given to patient life expectancy when considering breast cancer treatments. KEY WORDS: Breast cancer, older women, treatment, life expectancy, radiation PMID:22368726

Schonberg, Mara A.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Ngo, Long; Silliman, Rebecca A.; McCarthy, Ellen P.

2011-01-01

399

Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-02-03

400

Mechanisms involved in breast cancer liver metastasis.  

PubMed

Liver metastasis is a frequent occurrence in patients with breast cancer; however, the available treatments are limited and ineffective. While liver-specific homing of breast cancer cells is an important feature of metastasis, the formation of liver metastases is not random. Indeed, breast cancer cell factors contribute to the liver microenvironment. Major breakthroughs have been achieved recently in understanding breast cancer liver metastasis (BCLM). The process of liver metastasis consists of multiple steps and involves various factors from breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment. A further understanding of the roles of breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment is crucial to guide future work in clinical treatments. In this review we discuss the contribution of breast cancer cells and the liver microenvironment to liver metastasis, with the aim to improve therapeutic efficacy for patients with BCLM. PMID:25779135

Ma, Rui; Feng, Yili; Lin, Shuang; Chen, Jiang; Lin, Hui; Liang, Xiao; Zheng, Heming; Cai, Xiujun

2015-12-01

401

[Breast cancer in the elderly].  

PubMed

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. The elderly comprise a large part of the breast cancer population, and there are important specific considerations for this population. Late diagnosis and substandard local and systemic therapies are frequent, which is only partially "compensated" by a more indolent tumour behaviour due to the increasing likelihood according to age of potentially hormone sensitive tumour status. Endocrine treatment remains a key component of systemic treatment in both advanced and early setting. However chemotherapy is a valid option, with interest strengthened by proven efficacy in adjuvant setting for aggressive phenotypes, better management of side effects and attempts to develop predictive index for toxicity. The recently reported laboratory studies on potential mechanisms for resistance to endocrine therapies that involve crosstalk between growth factor signalling pathways and hormonal receptors stimulate also new therapeutic approaches. PMID:18511367

Gutierrez, Maya; Ben Abid, Fatma; Ousbane, Amale; Gazzah, Anas; Debled, Marc; Girre, Véronique; Brain, Etienne G C

2008-05-28

402

Sexuality After Breast Cancer: Need for Guideline  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical experiences have revealed that patients with breast cancer experience various sexual problems following their treatment. Breast cancer negatively impacts the sexual life of the afflicted couples, and as a traumatic event can influence women’s psychosexual functioning and intimate relationship. This review focuses on sexuality after breast cancer and on a growing need for bio-psycho-social guidelines for breast cancer treatment. Methods This study aims to review the literature on management, psychological outcomes and sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. Results Although the benefits of the current treatment strategies are well established, many cancer survivors are at risk for developing psycho physiological symptoms including sexual dysfunction. Cancer and treatment-related factors can influence sexual functioning. We review current treatment-related side effects on sexual functioning such as desire, arousal and orgasm in breast cancer patients. Despite the impact of medical treatment on survival of patients with breast cancer, no satisfactory steps have been taken towards improving sexual functioning of these patients. Conclusion Breast cancer affects many aspects of sexuality, including changes in physical functioning and in the perception of feminity. Sexual dysfunction following breast cancer should be diagnosed and managed as a systematic approach with multidisciplinary inputs. Healthcare professionals should assess the effects of medical and surgical treatment on the sexuality of breast cancer survivors.

Vaziri, Sh; Lotfi Kashani, F

2012-01-01

403

Par(-4)oxysm in Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Summary Women suffering from breast cancer often succumb to incurable recurrent disease resulting from therapy-resistant cancer cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Alvarez and colleagues identify downregulation of the tumor suppressor Par-4 as the key determinant in apoptosis evasion that leads to tumor recurrence in breast cancer. PMID:23845436

Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Hebbar, Nikhil; Rangnekar, Vivek M.

2013-01-01

404

Breast cancer risk assessments to barrier contraception exposure. A new approach.  

PubMed

(Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). The risk prediction models for breast cancer remain unsatisfactory. The existing models of breast cancer risk assessment have failed to consider (calculate) the exposure to condom use, defined as the major risk factor of breast cancer. All the models, including the NCI-Gail model, are based on the so-called "known" breast cancer risk factors, such as, menarche, age at first birth, parity, OC pills, diet, physical activity, age at menopause, number of breast biopsies, family history, ethnicity (race), age and other. The commonest predictions of the models has been that "All women are at risk of breast cancer," which is deemed as a patently incorrect assessment. The risk assessments have served for identification and recruitment of women at "elevated risk" of breast cancer both for therapeutic randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and for implementing a possible clinical policy of "prophylactic" mastectomy and other prior surgical interventions. However, the models have raised questions lately about their adequacy and practical usefulness, because of the use of "weak" and inadequate risk factors. This study presents the results of a new approach and alternative model and results to the risk assessment of breast cancer, by calculating the exposure to barrier contraceptive practice (condom use and withdrawal practice) along with the factors of parity, age and other (non-barrier) birth-control methods, within a 5-year time period and the life span 20-54 years of age, by employing the Bayes' Probability Theorem. Key words: Breast cancer, Risk Assessment, New Approach, Bayes' Theorem, Parity, Condom Risk Factor, Primary prevention. PMID:19736543

Gjorgov, N A

2009-07-01

405

Perioperative variables associated with surgical site infection in breast cancer surgery.  

PubMed

Despite the fact that breast operations are usually categorized as clean procedures, higher surgical site infection (SSI) rates are reported. This study aimed to determine the perioperative variables related to SSI in breast cancer patients. Medical records of breast cancer patients undergoing surgery between January 2005 and August 2007 at a university based hospital were reviewed. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative clinical data from 199 patients were extracted and analysed. Overall, the SSI rate was 19.1% (38 cases). SSI was associated with a high body mass index (P=0.001), history of diabetes mellitus (P<0.0001), smoking (P<0.0001), or active skin disorders (P<0.0001). Other SSI-related variables included a tumour at an advanced clinical stage (P=0.003) and neoadjuvant therapy (P=0.003). Breast-conserving operations were less frequently associated with SSI than were radical procedures (mastectomy alone and mastectomy followed by immediate reconstruction) (P=0.0001). PMID:22054593

Angarita, F A; Acuna, S A; Torregrosa, L; Tawil, M; Escallon, J; Ruíz, Á

2011-12-01

406

Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

2015-02-05

407

Breast Cancer Family Registries Publications  

Cancer.gov

Le Calvez-Kelm F, Lesueur F, Damiola F, Vallee M, Voegele C, Babikyan D, Durand G, Forey N, McKay-Chopin S, Robinot N, Nguyen-Dumont T, Thomas A, Byrnes GB, Breast Cancer Family Registry T, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Andrulis IL, John EM, Tavtigian SV.

408

Targeting Src in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical benefit of blocking oncogenic pathways in breast cancer and other malignancies has validated this approach and ushered in the era of molecularly targeted therapeutics. Src and its family members make up the largest group of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. In laboratory models, these proteins have been shown to play a critical role in cellular growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, and

R. S. Finn

2008-01-01

409

Breast Cancer Research at NASA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

1998-01-01

410

Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

411

Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)  

Cancer.gov

Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

412

The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial  

Cancer.gov

A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

413

Posttraumatic Stress Among Women With Breast Cancer and Their Daughters: Relationship With Daughters' Breast Cancer Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) in women with breast cancer, perceived risk of cancer in these women's daughters, and daughters' PTS related to their mothers' breast cancer were tested for relationships to daughters' breast self-examination (BSE) and mammography activity. Daughters' mammography frequency was related to her own PTS, but not to her perceived risk or her mothers' PTS. In contrast, daughters

Bret A. Boyer; Roseanne K. Cantor

2005-01-01

414

Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer.  

PubMed

The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) for all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%. It is concluded that high-dose radiation therapy without mastectomy is an effective means of controlling local-regional tumor in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3621108

Sheldon, T; Hayes, D F; Cady, B; Parker, L; Osteen, R; Silver, B; Recht, A; Come, S; Henderson, I C; Harris, J R

1987-09-15

415

Biorepositories for the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial  

Cancer.gov

The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) has a serum and lymphocyte bank with specimens on more than 90% of the 33,000 women in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) and Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR). They also have tumor blocks on the majority of the breast cancers that have occurred in women on these studies.

416

Oestrogens, Oestrogen Receptors and Breast Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tamoxifen has been the endocrine treatment of choice for all stages of oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer for 20 years and the first chemical therapeutic to be tested to reduce the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women. It is now clear that the oestrogen receptor is proving to be an invaluable target for the treatment and chemoprevention of breast

D. J Bentrem; P Gaiha; V. C Jordan

2003-01-01

417

Review Epidemiology of Contralateral Breast Cancer 1  

E-print Network

Two to 11 % of women diagnosed with breast cancer will develop contralateral breast cancer in their lifetime. Women with a first primary are at a 2–6-fold increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer compared with the risk in the general population of women developing a first primary cancer. The incidence rate of contralateral breast cancer varies from four to eight per 1000 person-years. To assess the risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer among women with a first primary breast cancer, the epidemiological literature concerning these factors was reviewed and summarized. Studies have shown that a family history of breast cancer, an early age at initial diagnosis, and a lobular histology of the first primary breast cancer increase the risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. Although chemotherapy and tamoxifen therapy may reduce this risk, there are inconsistent results regarding the effects of radiotherapy and the effects of reproductive, environmental and other factors. Additional analytical studies addressing all potential risk factors associated with the development of contralateral breast cancer are necessary in view of the increasing incidence and survival of women with a first primary.

Yue Chen; Wendy Thompson; Robert Semenciw; Yang Mao

418

Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.  

PubMed

An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:25489714

Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

2015-01-01

419

Risk Factors Associated with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema in the WHEL Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lymphedema is a significant health problem faced by a large percentage of breast cancer survivors. The Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) Study has a unique data set collected after the completion of breast cancer treatment, which allowed a focused analysis of risk factors for breast cancer-related lymphedema. Methods Participant characteristics, treatment modalities, and health behaviors were examined as potential predictors of lymphedema among breast cancer survivors with univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Results Lymphedema status was assessed for 83% of the study cohort (2431 of the 2917 WHEL participants). Among these respondents, 692 (28.5%) women reported yes to either a physician’s diagnosis of lymphedema or a question on arm/hand swelling. When compared to other participants, women with lymphedema were diagnosed at a younger age, more likely to have a higher body mass index, had a larger tumor size, had more lymph nodes removed, more likely to have a mastectomy with radiation therapy, and more likely to have chemotherapy. In the final multivariate-adjusted model, body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 (p<0.01), the removal of 11 or more lymph nodes (p<0.01), and breast cancer surgery plus radiation therapy (p<0.01) showed a strong independent association with developing breast cancer-related lymphedema. Conclusions The results of this study highlight the importance of educating breast cancer survivors about the modifiable risk factors (e.g., body mass index) associated with the development of lymphedema. Implications for Cancer Survivors Breast cancer survivors at risk for lymphedema may benefit from interventions aimed at achieving or maintaining a healthy body weight. PMID:23212606

Dominick, Sally A.; Madlensky, Lisa; Natarajan, Loki; Pierce, John P.

2012-01-01

420

Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program  

Cancer.gov

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP), a joint effort co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is the next phase of a program that began with the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers (BCERC) in 2003. The BCERP supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

421

Tuberculosis of the breast masquerading as breast cancer  

PubMed Central

A 57-year-old female from Ghana was found to have fungating breast lesion and treated for breast cancer with empirical chemotherapy in her home country. On presentation to our breast surgical department in the UK, triple assessment and core biopsy showed the fungating mass to be a caseating granuloma in keeping with Tuberculosis infection. PMID:24960741

Peiris, L; Alam, N; Agrawal, A

2012-01-01

422

Molecular Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Prognosis: Coexpression of c-erbB-2 and p53  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the prognostic significance of molecular biomarkers, particularly c-erbB-2 and p53, through study of prospective clinical data and archival breast cancer tissues for women accrued to the Alabama Breast Cancer Project. Summary Background Data Defining molecular abnormalities in breast cancer is an important strategy for early detection, assessment of prognosis, and treatment selection. Evidence is strong that selective biomarkers, including c-erbB-2 and p53, have prognostic significance in breast cancer. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic significance of coexpression of biomarkers. Methods Study patients were those accrued to the Alabama Breast Cancer Project (1975–1978) who had archival breast cancer tissues available for analysis. Criteria for entrance into the Alabama Breast Cancer Project were T1–3 breast cancer with M0 status. Age, nodal status, and histologic grade were also documented. Patients were randomized to radical versus modified radical mastectomy, and node-positive patients were also randomized to adjuvant chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil [CMF]) versus melphalan. Archival breast cancer tissues were studied for c-erbB-2, TGF-?, p53, cathepsin D, bcl-2, and estrogen and progesterone receptor expression using immunohistochemistry. Survival curves were developed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analysis was performed using the log-rank test, multivariate analysis using a rank regression model. Results Three hundred eleven patients were accrued to the Alabama Breast Cancer Project, and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues for 90 patients were available for immunohistochemical analysis of molecular biomarkers. Univariate analysis showed nodal status, c-erbB-2 expression, and p53 expression to have prognostic significance. Coexpression of c-erbB-2 and p53 was also found to have prognostic significance by the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis showed T stage, nodal status, c-erbB-2 expression, and p53 expression to have independent prognostic significance. Conclusions These data suggest that c-erbB-2 and p53 expression in breast cancer have prognostic significance. After median follow-up of 16 years, coexpression of c-erbB-2 and p53 may have more prognostic significance than traditional prognostic factors such as T stage and nodal status. Prospective study of large numbers of patients with breast cancer is encouraged to validate these findings. PMID:11323501

Beenken, Samuel W.; Grizzle, William E.; Crowe, D. Ralph; Conner, Michael G.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Sellers, Marty T.; Krontiras, Helen; Urist, Marshall M.; Bland, Kirby I.

2001-01-01

423

Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity  

MedlinePLUS

... Right to Know Campaign Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

424

Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide With or Without Trastuzumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

2012-12-12

425

Body image investment in breast cancer patients undergoing reconstruction: Taking a closer look at the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised.  

PubMed

Breast cancer and its treatment can significantly affect a woman's body image. As such, it would be useful to understand the importance or value these patients place on their appearance. We evaluated the factor structure of the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised (ASI-R), a measure of body image investment, with a sample of 356 breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy and breast reconstruction. Using confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses, we found that a three-factor model demonstrated an improvement in fit over the original two-factor structure of the ASI-R. These factors were named Appearance Self-Evaluation, Appearance Power/Control, and Appearance Standards and Behavior. The three aforementioned factors demonstrated acceptable internal consistency reliabilities. Our findings have implications for the use of the ASI-R in an oncology setting, specifically for breast cancer patients undergoing reconstruction. PMID:25600137

Chua, Alicia S; DeSantis, Stacia M; Teo, Irene; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

2015-03-01

426

Cancer stem cells in breast cancer.  

PubMed

There is increasing evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a critical role in breast cancer initiation, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. It is thought that they are either generated from normal mammary stem/progenitor cells or from mammary epithelial cells by epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Breast CSCs are characterized by the activation of stemness-related pathways, such as the Notch and Wnt pathways, and by the expression of certain stem cell markers, such as CD44, EpCAM and ALDH1. CSCs form a minor population, whose proportion depends on various factors, including environmental conditions. Since CSCs are highly resistant to chemotherapy, additional treatment of breast cancer patients with CSC-specific drugs, such as salinomycin and gamma-secretase inhibitors which target the Wnt or Notch pathway, respectively, will be required. Interestingly, an equilibrium seems to exist between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells, and there are indications that CSCs can be recruited from non-stem cancer cells. As a consequence, it may be necessary to combine a therapy targeting CSCs with common chemotherapy that targets the bulk tumor to avoid the regeneration of CSCs. PMID:23468411

Dittmer, Jürgen; Rody, Achim

2013-07-01

427

FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

2015-03-02

428

[A case of malignant phyllodes tumor after surgery for breast cancer].  

PubMed

A 63-year-old woman underwent breast-conserving resection and axillary lymph node dissection for bilateral breast cancer in December 2008. Histopathological diagnosis for the right breast cancer was t=1.3 cm, n=1/29, estrogen receptor (ER) (+), progesterone receptor (PgR) (+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2) (-), and that for the left breast cancer was t=1.8 cm, n=9/28, ER (+), PgR (+), and HER2 (-). She was administered adjuvant chemotherapy (4 courses of fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide [FEC 100] and 4 courses of docetaxel[DTX], 75 mg/m²), letrozole, and bilateral radiation therapy for the remaining breast tissue. She noticed a mass in the left breast in December 2013. Fine-needle aspiration cytology and core-needle biopsy indicated a malignant phyllodes tumor or stromal sarcoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed the accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) only in the mass. The tumor enlarged rapidly to more than 5 cm during the pre-operative period. In January 2014, the patient underwent left mastectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was malignant phyllodes tumor in the left breast, with a tumor diameter of 7 cm, and negative margins. Presently, 6 months after the operation, the patient is alive without recurrence. PMID:25731378

Hashimoto, Tadayoshi; Okishiro, Masatsugu; Ishida, Tomo; Sato, Yasufumi; Morimoto, Yoshihiro; Kusama, Hiroki; Matsushita, Katsunori; Kimura, Kei; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Nitta, Kanae; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Takeno, Atsushi; Sakisaka, Hideki; Nakahira, Shin; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Egawa, Chiyomi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Oku, Kazuko; Goto, Takayoshi; Nagano, Teruaki; Nakatsuka, Shinichi

2014-11-01

429

Perspectives of breast cancer thermotherapies.  

PubMed

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

430

Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies  

PubMed Central

In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

Alphandéry, Edouard

2014-01-01

431

Relevance and efficacy of breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers above 60 years: a national cohort study.  

PubMed

Annual MRI and mammography is recommended for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers to reduce breast cancer mortality. Less intensive screening is advised ?60 years, although effectiveness is unknown. We identified BRCA1/2 mutation carriers without bilateral mastectomy before age 60 to determine for whom screening ?60 is relevant, in the Rotterdam Family Cancer Clinic and HEBON: a nationwide prospective cohort study. Furthermore, we compared tumour stage at breast cancer diagnosis between different screening strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60. Tumours >2 cm, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases at detection were defined as "unfavourable." Of 548 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60 years in 2012, 395 (72%) did not have bilateral mastectomy before the age of 60. Of these 395, 224 (57%) had a history of breast or other invasive carcinoma. In 136 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we compared 148 breast cancers (including interval cancers) detected ?60, of which 84 (57%) were first breast cancers. With biennial mammography 53% (30/57) of carcinomas were detected in unfavourable stage, compared to 21% (12/56) with annual mammography (adjusted odds ratio: 4·07, 95% confidence interval [1.79-9.28], p?=?0.001). With biennial screening 40% of breast cancers were interval cancers, compared to 20% with annual screening (p?=?0.016). Results remained significant for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and first breast cancers separately. Over 70% of 60-year old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers remain at risk for breast cancer, of which half has prior cancers. When life expectancy is good, continuation of annual breast cancer screening of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers ?60 is worthwhile. PMID:24789418

Saadatmand, Sepideh; Vos, Janet R; Hooning, Maartje J; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Koppert, Linetta B; de Bock, Geertruida H; Ausems, Margreet G; van Asperen, Christi J; Aalfs, Cora M; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Piek, Marianne; Seynaeve, Caroline; Verhoef, Cornelis; Rookus, Matti; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M

2014-12-15

432

Muscle-Sparing TRAM Flap Does Not Protect Breast Reconstruction from Post-Mastectomy Radiation Damage Compared to DIEP Flap  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Radiation to free flaps following immediate breast reconstruction has been shown to compromise outcomes. We hypothesized that irradiated muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (MS FTRAM) flaps experience less fat necrosis than irradiated deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. METHODS We performed a retrospective study of all consecutive patients undergoing immediate, autologous, abdominal-based free flap breast reconstruction with MS FTRAM or DIEP flaps over a 10-year period at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Irradiated flaps (external-beam radiation therapy) after immediate breast reconstruction were compared to non-irradiated flaps. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential associations between patient, tumor, and reconstructive characteristics and surgical outcomes. RESULTS A total of 625 flaps were included in the analysis: 40 (6.4%) irradiated vs. 585 (93.6%) non-irradiated. Mean follow-up for the irradiated vs. non-irradiated flaps was 60.0 months and 48.5 months, respectively (p=0.02). Overall complication rates were similar for both the irradiated and non-irradiated flaps. Irradiated flaps (i.e., both DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps) developed fat necrosis at a significantly higher rate (22.5%) than the non-irradiated flaps (9.2%; p=0.009). There were no differences in fat necrosis rates between the DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps in both the irradiated and non-irradiated groups. CONCLUSIONS Both DIEP and MS FTRAM flap reconstructions had much higher rates of fat necrosis when irradiated. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that immediate breast reconstruction with an MS FTRAM flap does not result in a lower rate of fat necrosis than reconstruction with a DIEP flap. PMID:24469158

Garvey, Patrick B.; Clemens, Mark W.; Hoy, Austin E.; Smith, Benjamin; Zhang, Hong; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Butler, Charles E.

2014-01-01

433

Oncogene amplification in breast cancer.  

PubMed Central

To refine the analysis of gene amplification in breast cancer, the authors have developed sensitive methods that can be used to screen nucleic acid prepared from a variety of sources. In their analysis, Southern hybridization and DNA dot-blot analysis were used to screen 49 breast cancer DNAs for Myc, Neu, and Int-2 gene amplification. The analysis detected minimal one extra gene copy) as well as expanded (two or more extra gene copies) gene amplifications, and in addition, distinguished between gene amplification and aneuploidy as the cause of extra gene copies. These quantitative methods were adapted to patient specimens routinely available in the anatomic pathology laboratory, including fresh tumor tissue, tumor nuclei discarded during estrogen receptor analysis, and paraffin blocks. One minimal gene amplification was found in three cases of intraductal cancer. Of 25 cases of nonmetastatic invasive cancer, 28% had at least one extra Myc gene, whereas 24% had Neu, and 21% had Int-2 gene amplification. Of 21 cases of metastatic invasive cancer, 43% had Myc, 43% had Neu, and 40% had Int-2 gene amplification. Among the nonmetastatic cancers, 47% had one, 12% had two, and 4% had three amplified genes. Within the metastatic cancers, 48% had one, 28% had two, and 5% had three amplified genes. Our data suggest relationships between tumor progression and both incidence and size of Myc, Neu, and Int-2 gene amplification. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1849359

Donovan-Peluso, M.; Contento, A. M.; Tobon, H.; Ripepi, B.; Locker, J.

1991-01-01

434

Trends in Post-mastectomy Reconstruction: A SEER Database Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives This study was performed to investigate recent trends and factors associated with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) using a large population-based registry. We hypothesized that rates of IBR have increased since passage of the Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998. Methods The SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database was used to evaluate Stage I–III breast cancer (BC) patients who underwent total mastectomy from 1998–2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to study predictors of IBR. Results Of 112,348 patients with BC treated by mastectomy, 18,001 (16%) had IBR. Rates of IBR increased significantly from 1998–2008 (p<0.0001). Use of IBR significantly decreased as patient age increased (p<0.0001), as stage increased (p<0.0001), and as the number of positive lymph nodes increased (p<0.0001). Estrogen receptor +/progesterone receptor + (ER+/PR+) patients had significantly higher IBR rates than ER?/PR? patients (p<0.0001). IBR was used in 3615 of 25,823 (14.0%) of patients having post-mastectomy radiation (XRT) and in 14,188 of 86,513 (16.4%) of those not having XRT (p<0.0001). Conclusions The utilization of IBR has increased significantly over the last decade. IBR was found to be significantly associated with age, race, geographical region, stage, ER, grade, LN status, and XRT (p<0.0001). PMID:23861196

Lang, Julie E.; Summers, Danielle E.; Cui, Haiyan; Carey, Joseph N.; Viscusi, Rebecca K.; Hurst, Craig A.; Waer, Amy L.; Ley, Michele L B.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vijayasekaran, Aparna

2014-01-01

435

Unique Presentations of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer: A Case Series  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women. Unlike IDC, which typically metastasizes to the lung, liver or bone, ILC has been found to metastasize to GI tract, peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Nonspecific symptomology may be considered secondary to other diseases and this can delay the definite diagnosis and treatment of metastatic disease. Knowledge of the pattern of disease spread is essential for accurate diagnosis and early initiation of systemic treatment, thus avoiding unnecessary interventions. We are reporting three unique cases of metastatic ILC presenting with wide range of symptoms. Case Presentations: Case A: 69-year-old female presented with recurrent jaundice. Case B: 77-year-old female with the past medical history of right breast ILC seven years ago status post right radical mastectomy with chemotherapy, presented with anemia. Case C: 56-year-old female presented with bright red blood per rectum. Conclusion: A high level of suspicion is needed for metastatic breast cancer in patients with history of ILC, regardless of disease free interval. Since it frequently metastasizes to unusual sites and presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms. PMID:25598762

Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Ayub, Samia; Mohindra, Ramesh; Ayub, Zunaira; Ahad, Abdul

2014-01-01

436

Inflammatory Breast Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... or appear pitted, like the skin of an orange (called peau d'orange ). These symptoms are caused by the buildup of ... erythema (redness), edema (swelling), and a peau d’orange appearance and/or abnormal breast warmth, with or ...

437

Body image disturbance and surgical decision making in egyptian post menopausal breast cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background In most developing countries, as in Egypt; postmenopausal breast cancer cases are offered a radical form of surgery relying on their unawareness of the subsequent body image disturbance. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of breast cancer surgical choice; Breast Conservative Therapy (BCT) versus Modified Radical Mastectomy (MRM); on body image perception among Egyptian postmenopausal cases. Methods One hundred postmenopausal women with breast cancer were divided into 2 groups, one group underwent BCT and the other underwent MRM. Pre- and post-operative assessments of body image distress were done using four scales; Breast Impact of Treatment Scale (BITS), Impact of Event Scale (IES), Situational Discomfort Scale (SDS), and Body Satisfaction Scale (BSS). Results Preoperative assessment showed no statistical significant difference regarding cognitive, affective, behavioral and evaluative components of body image between both studied groups. While in postoperative assessment, women in MRM group showed higher levels of body image distress among cognitive, affective and behavioral aspects. Conclusion Body image is an important factor for postmenopausal women with breast cancer in developing countries where that concept is widely ignored. We should not deprive those cases from their right of less mutilating option of treatment as BCT. PMID:19678927

Shoma, Ashraf M; Mohamed, Madiha H; Nouman, Nashaat; Amin, Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Ibtihal M; Tobar, Salwa S; Gaffar, Hanan E; Aboelez, Warda F; Ali, Salwa E; William, Soheir G

2009-01-01