Sample records for breast cancer mastectomy

  1. Genomic Prediction of Locoregional Recurrence After Mastectomy in Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Skye H. Cheng; Cheng-Fang Horng; Mike West; Erich Huang; Jennifer Pittman; Mei-Hua Tsou; Holly Dressman; Chii-Ming Chen; Stella Y. Tsai; James J. Jian; Mei-Chin Liu; Joseph R. Nevins; Andrew T. Huang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to explore gene expression profiles that are associated with locoregional (LR) recurrence in breast cancer after mastectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 94 breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy between 1990 and 2001 and had DNA microarray study on the primary tumor tissues were chosen for this study. Eligible patient should have no evidence of

  2. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-06-10

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  3. Present status of endoscopic mastectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Okumura, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Simiya; Nerome, Yasuhito; Takezaki, Toshiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy is now being used for breast cancer surgery. Though it is used for mastectomy, lymph node dissection, and breast reconstruction, its prime use is for mastectomy. Because an incision can be placed inconspicuously in the axillary site, a relatively large incision can be created. A retractor with an endoscope, CO2, and an abrasion device with the endoscope are used for operation space security. It is extremely rare that an endoscope is used for lymph node dissection. For breast reconstruction, it may be used for latissimus muscle flap making, but an endoscope is rarely used for other reconstructions. Endoscopic mastectomy is limited to certain institutions and practiced hands, and it has not been significantly developed in breast cancer surgery. On the other hand, endoscopic surgery may be used widely in breast reconstruction. With respect to the spread of robotic surgery, many factors remain uncertain. PMID:26078919

  4. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients’ choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer who were treated by bilateral or unilateral mastectomy (BM or UM) at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between Jan. 2002 and Dec. 2010. In the BM group, only those with unilateral breast cancer who chose CPM were included in the analysis. Results: When compared with the UM group, the following factors were found to be associated with BM: younger age, pre-menopausal, a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, BRCA mutation, more breast biopsies, history of breast augmentation, having MRI study within 6 months before the surgery, more likely to have reconstruction and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and fewer had neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy/radiation. When patients with bilateral breast cancer were excluded, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated younger patients with negative nodes, SLNB as the only nodal surgery and positive family history were significant factors predicting CPM and immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders or implants. Conclusion: Younger age, lower TN stage, requiring only SLNB and high risk family history predict contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Tissue expander/implant-based reconstructions were more frequently chosen by patients with BM.

  5. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in association with intra operative radiotherapy (ELIOT): a new type of mastectomy for breast cancer treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Yves Petit; Umberto Veronesi; Roberto Orecchia; Alberto Luini; Piercarlo Rey; Mattia Intra; Florence Didier; Stefano Martella; Mario Rietjens; Cristina Garusi; Francesca De Lorenzi; Giovanna Gatti; Maria Elena Leon; Chiara Casadio

    2006-01-01

    Summary\\u000a Background  Breast-conserving surgery has become the standard approach for about 80% of patients treated for primary breast cancer in\\u000a most centres. However, mastectomy is still required in case of multicentric and\\/or large tumours or where recurrences occur\\u000a after conservative treatment. When a total mastectomy is performed, the removal of the nipple areola complex (NAC) is a strongly\\u000a debated issue. In

  6. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Roje, Zdravko; Roje, Zeljka; Jankovi?, Stipan; Ninkovi?, Milomir

    2010-03-01

    Results of our analysis show as that breast reconstruction become a standard part of the care of female patients with breast cancer We will analyse the factors that are important for the primary or secondary breast reconstruction after mastectomy, and also take a closer look on the most recent scientific advances on breast reconstruction and on the protocols regarding them. The breast is the most common site of cancer in Croatia women. Breast cancer is the first leading cause of cancer death among women today. The incidence of female breast cancer in Croatia estimates that approximately 2.200 news cases of female breast will be diagnosed every year. We retrospectively analysed data of 101 female patients undergoing reconstructive surgery for breast reconstruction after mastectomy at Division of Plastic Surgery and Burns, University Hospital Center Split and University Clinic of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Innsbruck, Austria, between 1998 and 2008. For the purpose of outcome assessment, we performed the tree different type of questionnaire: (1) Personal/medical profile (Table 1), (2) Aesthetic assessment (Table 2), and (3) Psychosocial assessment (Table 3). The occurrence of main complications during breast reconstruction (partial necrosis of flap, hernia of donor site, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, infection rate, hemathoma and seroma formation, and extrusion of expander/implant) during hospitalisation and follow up period until 6 post operatively were analysed with respect to use different type of reconstructive methods for breast reconstruction. The difference in complication between patients groups was evaluated by chi2-test. The level of significance was set up at p = 0.05. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the time from mastectomy to breast reconstruction, due to asymmetrical data distribution. The three main variables of this study were to identify significant risk factors, asses the aesthetic outcome, and patient satisfaction with performed different methods for breast reconstruction (LD flap with or without tissue expander and implant, pedicle and free TRAM flaps, and expander /implants only. These variables determined the current guidelines for early and late breast reconstruction after mastectomy such as patient data, age and own decision, relation ship between reconstruction and radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, and finally about breast preserving operation. The result should confirm that breast reconstruction after mastectomy is justified, especially in young women, as well as how essential is team work involved in breast cancer operation and breast reconstruction after mastectomy. PMID:20402306

  7. Analysis of the Effects of Breast Reconstruction in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Jeong Min; Park, Sun Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Background Immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy and delayed breast reconstruction with post-supplementary treatment are the two types of breast reconstruction currently performed when treating breast cancer. Post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) not only reduces local recurrence but also improves overall survival. However, the complications and survival rates associated with PMRT need to be clear when determining the timing of breast reconstruction. Accordingly, we investigated the optimal timing of breast reconstruction by observing patients who underwent mastectomy followed by PMRT, based on their overall health and aesthetic satisfaction. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 21 patients who underwent breast reconstruction with PMRT between November 2004 and November 2010. We collected data regarding the various methods of mastectomy, and the modality of adjuvant therapy, such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiotherapy. Telephone interviews were conducted to study the general and aesthetic satisfaction. Results Patients who received PMRT after breast reconstruction showed a greater complication rate than those undergoing breast reconstruction after PMRT (P=0.02). Aesthetic satisfaction was significantly higher in the groups undergoing breast reconstruction after PMRT (P=0.03). Patients who underwent breast reconstruction before PMRT developed complications more frequently, but they expressed greater aesthetic satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusions It is recommended that the complication rates and aesthetic satisfaction after breast reconstruction be carefully considered when determining the optimal timing for radiotherapy. PMID:22783530

  8. "Does that Make Me a Woman?": Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, and Breast Reconstruction Decisions among Sexual Minority Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Tanenbaum, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Feminist scholars and activists writing about breast cancer care among women have highlighted the sexist and heterosexist assumptions often embedded in the medical management of breast cancer, and of mastectomy in particular. Despite these contributions, and some speculation that sexual minority women may be less interested in breast

  9. Local therapy in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with operable breast cancer: comparison of breast conservation and mastectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lori J. PierceKelly-Anne; Kelly-Anne Phillips; Kent A. Griffith; Saundra Buys; David K. Gaffney; Meena S. Moran; Bruce G. Haffty; Merav Ben-David; Bella Kaufman; Judy E. Garber; Sofia D. Merajver; Judith Balmaña; Amichay Meirovitz; Susan M. Domchek

    2010-01-01

    Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations have an elevated risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but also of developing second\\u000a primary breast cancer. BRCA1\\/2 mutation carriers with breast cancer must choose between breast conservation (BCT) and mastectomy\\u000a (M) yet data on outcomes are limited. The purpose of this study is to compare long-term outcome following BCT and M in

  10. The Prognosis of Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing number of patients with breast cancer are being offered immediate breast reconstruction (IBR). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of IBR on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. Methods We searched the electronic databases of Medline (Pubmed), ISI Web of Knowledge, Embase, and Google Scholar databases for studies reporting the overall recurrence, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) of patients after mastectomy only and mastectomy with IBR. With these data, we conducted a meta-analysis of the clinical outcomes. Results Fourteen studies, including 3641 cases and 9462 controls, matched our criteria. Relevant information was extracted from these 14 studies. There was no significant heterogeneity (P for Q-statistic > 0.10 and I2 < 25%). Patients who underwent IBR showed no increased risk of overall recurrence of breast cancer (RR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75, 1.04; P = 0.14). Furthermore, patients receiving IBR had similar DFS (RR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.08); P = 0.10) and OS (RR = 1.02; 95%CI: 0.99, 1.05; P = 0.24)) as those of control patients. Conclusion This meta-analysis provides evidence that IBR does not have an adverse effect on prognosis. These data suggest that IBR is an appropriate and safe choice for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26024490

  11. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in women with breast cancer: Trends, predictors, and areas for future research

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Michaela S.; Rosenberg, Shoshana M.; Dominici, Laura; Partridge, Ann H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed increasing rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among women with unilateral early stage breast cancer. This trend has raised concerns, given the lack of evidence for a survival benefit from CPM and the relatively low risk of contralateral breast cancer for most women in this setting. In this article, we review available data regarding the value of CPM, predictors and outcomes related to CPM, and areas for future research and potential intervention. PMID:23893127

  12. Surgical Procedures for Breast Cancer - Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer is mostly given as external beam RT, meaning that the radiation beam is generated by a ... are still involved, mastectomy may be recommended. ? Tumor location – Tumors that are in the center of the ...

  13. The Relationship between Body Esteem and Hope and Mental Health in Breast Cancer Patients after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer and its treatment, including mastectomy, can cause feelings of mutilation, depreciation in the value of the body, reduction in attractiveness, and lead to mental disorders and hopelessness. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the relationship between appreciating the body, hope and mental health in women with breast cancer after mastectomy. Materials and Methods: This study was a descriptive study of 100 breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy and referred to the Sayed Al-Shohada Medical Center in Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were selected by convenient sampling. Data gathering tools were the Body Esteem Scale (BES), Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Symptom Checklist 25 (SCL-25) mental health questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results: Most of the patients had low body esteem. There was a significant direct linear relationship between body esteem and hope and mental health. This relationship was stronger between valuing the body and hope. Conclusion: Body esteem has a significant linear relationship with hope and mental health. PMID:26009674

  14. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in pT3N0M0 breast cancer: is it needed?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maaret Helintö; Carl Blomqvist; Päivi Heikkilä; Heikki Joensuu

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: It is not been established whether breast cancer patients who have a primary tumor 5 cm or larger but no axillary nodal or distant metastases at the time of the diagnosis (pT3N0M0) benefit from post-operative radiation therapy after mastectomy.Material and methods: We identified 81 patients with T3N0M0 breast cancer out of the total of 4190 breast cancer

  15. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)], E-mail: deutschm@upmc.edu; Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima [National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Operations and Biostatistical Centers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  16. Treatment results of breast cancer patients with locoregional recurrence after mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yuri; Gong, Gyungyub; Lee, Hee Jin; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Lee, Jong Won; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang-wook; Joo, Ji Hyeon; Ahn, Seung Do

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the results of locoregional and systemic therapy in the breast cancer patients with locoregional recurrence (LRR) after mastectomy. Materials and Methods Seventy-one patients who received radiotherapy for isolated LRR after mastectomy between January 1999 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 71 patients, 59 (83.1%) underwent wide excision and radiotherapy and 12 (16.9%) received radiotherapy alone. Adjuvant hormonal therapy was given to 45 patients (63.4%). Oncologic outcomes including locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) and prognostic factors were analyzed. Results Median follow-up time was 49.2 months. Of the 71 patients, 5 (7%) experienced second isolated LRR, and 40 (56%) underwent distant metastasis (DM). The median DFS was 35.6 months, and the 3- and 5-year DFS were 49.1% and 28.6%, respectively. The median OS was 86.7 months, and the 5-year OS was 62.3%. Patients who received hormone therapy together showed better 5-year DFS and OS than the patients treated with locoregional therapy only (31.6% vs. 22.1%, p = 0.036; 66.5% vs. 55.2%, p = 0.022). In multivariate analysis, higher N stage at recurrence was a significant prognostic factor for DFS and OS. Disease free interval (?30 months vs. >30 months) from mastectomy to LRR was also significant for OS. The patients who received hormone therapy showed superior DFS and showed trend to better OS. Conclusion DM was a major pattern of failure after the treatment of LRR after mastectomy. The role of systemic treatment for LRR after mastectomy should be investigated at prospective trials. PMID:24137559

  17. Breast reconstruction options following mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Djohan, Risal; Gage, Earl; Bernard, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Breast reconstruction can help to address the disfigurement and sense of loss that often follow mastectomy. The decision whether to pursue reconstruction and the choice of reconstructive strategy are individualized decisions that must take into account the patient's body characteristics, overall health, breast cancer treatment plan, and personal preferences. Options for reconstruction broadly include placement of breast implants or use of the patient's own tissue (autologous reconstruction). Both saline-filled and silicone gel-filled implants are safe and effective options for implant-based reconstruction. Autologous reconstruction usually involves transfer of tissue from the abdomen, with recent advances allowing preservation of the abdominal muscles. Both implant-based and autologous procedures have advantages and drawbacks, and both types of reconstruction may be compromised by subsequent radiation therapy. For this and other reasons, consultation with a plastic surgeon early in treatment planning is important for women considering postmastectomy reconstruction. PMID:18457193

  18. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JANSSEN, STEFAN; HOLZ-SAPRA, EDNA; RADES, DIRK; MOSER, ALEXANDER; STUDER, GABRIELA

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords ‘nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy’, ‘whole skin mastectomy’ and ‘NAC preservation’. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0–28.4% and 0–3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0–100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient. PMID:26137086

  19. Prospective Evaluation of the Nipple Areola Complex Sparing Mastectomy for Risk Reduction and for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jamie L.; Fearmonti, Regina; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hwang, Rosa F.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kuerer, Henry M.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Crosby, Melissa A.; Baumann, Donald P.; Ross, Merrick I.; Feig, Barry W.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Hernandez, Mike; Babiera, Gildy V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological effects of mastectomy for women with breast cancer have driven treatments that optimize cosmesis while strictly adhering to oncologic principles. Although skin-sparing mastectomy is oncologically safe, questions remain regarding the use of nipple–areola complex (NAC)-sparing mastectomy (NSM). We prospectively evaluated NSM for patients undergoing mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer or risk reduction. Methods We enrolled 33 early-stage breast cancer and high-risk patient; 54 NSMs were performed. NAC viability and surgical complications were evaluated. Intraoperative and postoperative pathologic assessments of the NAC base tissue were performed. NAC sensory, cosmetic and quality of life (QOL) outcomes were also assessed. Results Twenty-one bilateral and 12 unilateral NSMs were performed in 33 patients, 37 (68.5%) for prophylaxis and 17 (31.5%) for malignancy. Mean age was 45.4 years. Complications occurred in 16 NACs (29.6%) and 6 skin flaps (11.1%). Operative intervention for necrosis resulted in 4 NAC removals (7.4%). Two (11.8%) of the 17 breasts with cancer had ductal carcinoma-in-situ at the NAC margin, necessitating removal at mastectomy. All evaluable patients had nipple erection at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Cosmetic outcome, evaluated by two plastic surgeons, was acceptable in 73.0% of breasts and 55.8% of NACs, but lateral displacement occurred in most cases. QOL assessment indicated patient satisfaction. Conclusions NSM is technically feasible in select patients, with a low risk for NAC removal resulting from necrosis or intraoperative detection of cancer, and preserves sensation and QOL. Thorough pathologic assessment of the NAC base is critical to ensure disease eradication. PMID:21979111

  20. Concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy and immediate breast reconstruction with skin expanders after mastectomy for breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Orazio Caffo; Daniela Cazzolli; Alberto Scalet; Bruno Zani; Gianni Ambrosini; Maurizio Amichetti; Daniele Bernardi; Sonia Brugnara; Gianni Ciaghi; Antonio Lucenti; Ninoo Natale; Silvio Agugiaro; Claudio Eccher; Enzo Galligioni

    2000-01-01

    Background. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) by means of skin expander is currently one of the most widely used methods of breast reconstruction in mastectomized patients. However, given that many breast cancer patients usually receive adjuvant chemotherapy, the adoption of IBR raises new questions concerning possible cumulative toxicity. The present study reports our experience in the use of concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy

  1. Breast cancer subpopulation with high risk of internal mammary lymph nodes metastasis: analysis of 2,269 Chinese breast cancer patients treated with extended radical mastectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ou Huang; Liping Wang; Kunwei Shen; Hong Lin; Zhen Hu; Guangyu Liu; Jiong Wu; Jinsong Lu; Zhiming Shao; Qixia Han; Zhenzhou Shen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  The selective treatment of internal mammary lymph nodes (IMNs) in breast cancer is controversial. The purpose of this research\\u000a was to determine the subpopulation patients with high risk of internal mammary lymph nodes metastasis who received extended\\u000a radical mastectomy without any preoperative treatment from 1956 to 2003 in China.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  1,679 Chinese patients were underwent extended radical mastectomy (ERM)

  2. Importance of revealing a rare case of breast cancer in a female to male transsexual after bilateral mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of breast carcinoma following prophylactic mastectomy is probably less than 2%. We present a 43-year-old female to male transsexual who developed breast cancer 1 year after bilateral nipple- sparing subcutaneous mastectomy as part of female to male gender reassignment surgery. In addition to gender reassignment surgery, total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (to avoid the patient from entering menopause and to eliminate any subsequent risk of iatrogenic endometrial carcinoma), colpocleisys, metoidioplasty, phalloplasty, urethroplasty together with scrotoplasty/placement of testicular prosthesis and perineoplasty were also performed. Before the sex change surgery, the following diagnostic procedures were performed: breast ultrasound and mammography (which were normal), lung radiography (also normal) together with abdominal ultrasound examination, biochemical analysis of the blood and hormonal status. According to medical literature, in the last 50 years only three papers have been published with four cases of breast cancer in transsexual female to male patients. All hormonal pathways included in this complex hormonal and surgical procedure of transgender surgery have important implications for women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy because of a high risk of possible breast cancer. PMID:23273269

  3. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline.

    PubMed

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers' websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  4. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  5. Treatment of primary breast cancer without mastectomy. The Los Angeles community experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1983, 150 women with primary breast cancer, ranging in age from 26 to 84, were treated with a breast-sparing procedure involving lumpectomy, axillary node dissection, external beam radiotherapy, and 192-iridium implant. Median follow-up to date is 46+ months, with a range of 14 to 96+ months. All surviving patients have been followed for a minimum of 24+ months. Actuarial disease-free survival projected to 8 years is 79% for the entire group, 100% for the five noninfiltrating intraductal cancer patients, 97% for the 71 Stage I patients, and 68% for the 74 Stage II patients. Eighteen of the 150 patients (12%) have developed local recurrences thus far. Five (3%) have developed second, nonbreast, primary tumors. This community-based study, examined together with other published reports of similar procedures and compared to published results following mastectomy, helps confirm lumpectomy-radiotherapy as a legitimate approach to the management of primary breast cancer. PMID:3741005

  6. The Absent Breast: Speaking of the Mastectomied Body

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lenore Manderson; Lesley Stirling

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 1 in 11 women have breast cancer at some time in their lifetime. The majority are successfully treated with surgery, then radiotherapy and\\/or chemo-therapy. Survival brings its own problems, however, including an underlying ontological problem: What is the part of the body left after a mastectomy? Women talking about their experiences of mastectomy are faced with complex referential

  7. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors can affect the choice of breast reconstruction method? What type of follow-up care and rehabilitation is needed ... breast reconstruction method? Most women can choose their type of breast reconstruction method based on what is important to them. However, ...

  8. Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy as Good as Full Breast Removal: Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_152320.html Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy as Good as Full Breast Removal: Study No differences in survival ... cancer who chose to preserve the nipple during a mastectomy had similar survival or recurrence rates to ...

  9. Clinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 3. Mastectomy or lumpectomy? The choice of operation for clinical stages I and II breast cancer (2002 update)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh Scarth; Jacques Cantin; Mark Levine

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assist women and their physicians in making the most clinically effective and personally acceptable decision regarding the choice of primary surgery for potentially curable breast cancer. Options: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS; also referred to as lumpectomy or wide local excision) or mastectomy. Outcomes: Local recurrence, disease-free survival, overall survival, cosmetic results. Evidence: Systematic computerized search of MEDLINE (1980 to

  10. Benefits and risks of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in women undergoing treatment for sporadic unilateral breast cancer: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Lee, Janie M; Gogineni, Keerthi; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Schwartz, J Sanford; Prosnitz, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The rate of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) is rising rapidly, despite limited evidence about the procedure's relative benefits and harms. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of CPM on life expectancy (LE) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) in women with sporadic unilateral breast cancer. A Markov model was developed to compare 18 hypothetical cohorts of 45-year-old women with newly diagnosed unilateral, sporadic breast cancer treated with or without CPM. The probability of developing distant metastases by American Joint Committee on Cancer stage and molecular subtype was derived from British Columbia Cancer Agency data. Additional model parameters were identified from the medical literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the impact of plausible variations in key model parameters on results. CPM improved LE in all cohorts (range 0.06-0.54 years). Stage had more effect on LE than subtype (stage I mean, 0.44 years, stage III mean, 0.11 years). However, after adjusting for quality-of-life, No CPM was favored in all cohorts. Univariate sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the most influential model parameter was the post-CPM health state utility. The preferred strategy shifted from No CPM to CPM when the post-CPM utility exceeded 0.83 (base case value 0.81). PSA indicated that LE gains and QALE decreases were stable in all cohorts. The primary determinant of survival after unilateral breast cancer is stage at diagnosis. Our results suggest that routine CPM would not improve quality-adjusted survival for the majority of women with unilateral sporadic breast cancer. PMID:26062750

  11. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: joh@mdanderson.org; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meric-Bernstam, Funda [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hahn, Karin [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  12. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  13. Isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer following mastectomy: Radiotherapeutic management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen J. Halverson; Carlos A. Perez; Robert R. Kuske; Delia M. Garcia; Joseph R. Simpson; Barbara Fineberg

    1990-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-four patients with their first, isolated local-regional recurrence of breast cancer were irradiated with curative intent. Patients who had previous chest wall or regional lymphatic irradiation were not included in the study. With a median follow-up of 46 months (range 24 to 241 months), the 5- and 10-year survival for the entire group were 43% and 26%, respectively.

  14. The Impact of Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy on Male Breast Cancer Patients-A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Edward, E-mail: edward.yu@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Suzuki, Hiromichi [Department of Internal Medicine, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Younus, Jawaid [Department of Medical Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Elfiki, Tarek [Department of Medical Oncology, Windsor Regional Cancer Centre, Windsor, Ontario (Canada); Stitt, Larry [Epidemiology Biostatistics, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Yau, Gary; Vujovic, Olga; Perera, Francisco; Lock, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Center, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.

  15. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast is removed. Research has shown lumpectomy plus radiation therapy offers the same overall survival benefit as mastectomy for early stage breast cancer. Lumpectomy (almost always followed by radiation therapy): Modified ...

  16. Partial Mastectomy and M. Latissimus Dorsi Reconstruction for Radiation-induced Fibrosis After Breast-conserving Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lans, Titia E.; Haen, Roel; Tjong Joe Wai, Rudi; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B. E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with severe complaints of radiation-induced fibrosis after breast-conserving therapy and not responding to conservative therapy, were treated by partial mastectomy and m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction. Method To determine the feasibility and outcome of this approach, a retrospective study of nine patients was carried out. Results After a mean follow-up of 46 months, eight of the nine patients experienced improvement of their complaints and shape of the breast. In only one case did the procedure fail, as evidenced by continuation of all complaints. Conclusions Partial mastectomy and m. latissimus dorsi reconstruction is the ultimate option in the treatment of radiation fibrosis. The procedure is safe with satisfying results. PMID:21165619

  17. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Perin, Tiziana [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Quitadamo, Daniela [Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Massarut, Samuele [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Carbone, Antonino [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

  18. Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16?cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

  19. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Wang Rui [Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Biostatistics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Macdonald, Shannon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Smith, Barbara [Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  20. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fasola, Carolina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); O'Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin, E-mail: matorre@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  1. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  2. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li Yexiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

  3. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R., E-mail: Eleanor.harris@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Freilich, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Lin, Hui-Yi [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chuong, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Acs, Geza [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)] [Department of Anatomic Pathology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

  4. Surgery Choices for Women With DCIS or Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Women diagnosed with DCIS or breast cancer may face a decision about which surgery to have. The choices of breast-sparing surgery, mastectomy, or mastectomy with reconstruction are explained and compared.

  5. Findings from NSABP Protocol No. B-04: comparison of radical mastectomy with alternative treatments. II. The clinical and biologic significance of medial-central breast cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Wolmark, N.; Redmond, C.; Deutsch, M.; Fisher, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Findings from 1665 women with primary breast cancer, treated at 34 NSABP institutions in Canada and the United States, have failed to demonstrate that patients with medial-central tumors had a greater probability of developing distant metastases or dying than did those with lateral tumors despite the greater incidence of internal mammary (IM) node involvement when tumors are medial-central in location. A comparison of patients with similar clinical nodal status and tumor location who were treated either by radical mastectomy (RM) or by total mastectomy plus radiation therapy (TM + RT) failed to indicate that radiation of IM nodes reduced the probability of distant treatment failure (TF) or mortality. When findings from patients having equivalent clinical nodal status and tumor location treated by TM alone or TM + RT were compared, it was found that the addition of RT failed to alter the probability of the occurrence of a distant TF or of death. This was despite the fact that in the nonradiated group two putative sources of further tumor spread, i.e., positive axillary and IM nodes, were left unremoved and untreated. The findings provide further insight into the biologic significance of the positive lymph node and confirm our prior contention that positive regional lymph nodes are indicators of a host-tumor relationship which permits the development of metastases and that they are not important investigators of distant disease.

  6. Determining the Oncological Risk of Autologous Lipoaspirate Grafting for Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gino Rigotti; Alessandra Marchi; Paolo Stringhini; Guido Baroni; Mirco Galiè; Anna Maria Molino; Anna Mercanti; Rocco Micciolo; Andrea Sbarbati

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the incidence of local and regional recurrence of breast cancer between two contiguous time windows in\\u000a a homogeneous population of 137 patients who underwent fat tissue transplant after modified radical mastectomy. Median follow-up\\u000a time was 7.6 years and the follow-up period was divided into two contiguous time windows, the first starting at the date of\\u000a the radical mastectomy

  7. Prognostic Value of Molecular Subtypes, Ki67 Expression and Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Selz, Jessica, E-mail: chaumontjessica@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise; Jouanneau, Ludivine [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Medical Statistics, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint Cloud (France); Le Scodan, Romuald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Prive Saint Gregoire, Saint Gregoire (France)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Ki67 expression and breast cancer subtypes could predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) and influence the postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) decision in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic negative lymph nodes (pN0) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: A total of 699 BC patients with pN0 status after MRM, treated between 2001 and 2008, were identified from a prospective database in a single institution. Tumors were classified by intrinsic molecular subtype as luminal A or B, HER2+, and triple-negative (TN) using estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with intrinsic subtypes and Ki67 expression, adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 56 months, 17 patients developed LRR. Five-year LRR-free survival and overall survival in the entire population were 97%, and 94.7%, respectively, with no difference between the PMRT (n=191) and no-PMRT (n=508) subgroups. No constructed subtype was associated with an increased risk of LRR. Ki67 >20% was the only independent prognostic factor associated with increased LRR (hazard ratio, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.11-15.77; P<.0215). However, PMRT was not associated with better locoregional control in patients with proliferative tumors. Conclusions: Ki67 expression but not molecular subtypes are predictors of locoregional recurrence in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes after MRM. The benefit of adjuvant RT in patients with proliferative tumors should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  8. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  9. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with DIEP flap after breast-conserving therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andree, Christoph; Munder, Beatrix; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Richrath, Philipp; Behrendt, Philipp; Köppe, Tobias; Hagouan, Mazen; Audretsch, Werner; Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Witzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Currently about 70% of women who suffer from breast cancer undergo breast-conserving therapy (BCT) without removing the entire breast. Thus, this surgical approach is the standard therapy for primary breast cancer. If corrections are necessary, the breast surgeon is faced with irritated skin and higher risks of complications in wound healing. After radiation, an implant-based reconstruction is only recommended in selected cases. Correction of a poor BCT outcome is often only solved with an additional extended operation using autologous reconstruction. Material/Methods In our plastic surgery unit, which focuses on breast reconstruction, we offer a skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomy, followed by primary breast reconstruction based on free autologous tissue transfer to correct poor BCT outcomes. Between July 2004 and May 2011 we performed 1068 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps for breast reconstruction, including 64 skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies, followed by primary DIEP breast reconstruction procedures after BCT procedures. Results In all free flap-based breast reconstruction procedures, we had a total flap loss in 0.8% (9 cases). Within the group of patients after BCT, we performed 41 DIEP flaps and 23 ms-2 TRAM flaps after skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies to reconstruct the breast. Among this group we had of a total flap loss in 1.6% (1 case). Conclusions In cases of large tumour sizes and/or difficult tumour locations, the initial oncologic breast surgeon should inform the patients of a possibly poor cosmetic result after BCT and radiation. In our opinion a skin-sparing mastectomy with primary breast reconstruction should be discussed as a valid alternative. PMID:23197233

  10. Improved overall survival after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a history of unilateral breast cancer: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk-Gerritsen, Bernadette A M; Rookus, Matti A; Aalfs, Cora M; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Collée, Johanna M; Jansen, Liesbeth; Kets, C Marleen; Keymeulen, Kristien B M I; Koppert, Linetta B; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Mooij, Thea M; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Vasen, Hans F A; Hooning, Maartje J; Seynaeve, Caroline

    2015-02-01

    Data on survival of BRCA1/2-associated primary breast cancer (PBC) patients who opt for subsequent contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy (CRRM) are scarce and inconsistent. We examined the efficacy of CRRM on overall survival in mutation carriers with a history of PBC. From a Dutch multicentre cohort, we selected 583 BRCA-associated PBC patients, being diagnosed between 1980 and 2011. Over time, 242 patients (42%) underwent CRRM and 341 patients (58%) remained under surveillance. Survival analyses were performed using Cox models, with CRRM as a time-dependent covariate. The median follow-up after PBC diagnosis was 11.4 years. In the CRRM group, four patients developed contralateral breast cancer (2%), against 64 patients (19%) in the surveillance group (p?

  11. Analysis of Senate Bill 255: Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    California Health Benefits Review Program

    2011-01-01

    treatment of patients with early stage invasive breast cancer recommends lumpectomy with radiationradiation as a treatment option for women with breast cancercancer who were treated with mastectomy or with lumpectomy with radiation treatment.

  12. Breast cancer hormone receptor assay results of core needle biopsy and modified radical mastectomy specimens from the same patients

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Gemma B.; Laudico, Adriano V.; Carnate, Jose M.; Lim, Frederick G.; Fernandez, Arnold M.; Rivera, Rona R.; Mapua, Cynthia A.; Love, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hormone receptor expression is the most important biomarker and is the cornerstone in the management of breast cancer, hence, the accuracy of its testing is critical in treatment decisions. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty consecutive patients accrued to an adjuvant hormonal therapy clinical trial between March 2003 and May 2008 were studied. Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) protein assays of tissues from MRM specimens were compared to their prior CNB ER and PR immunohistochemical assay results. Results The tumors of 146 (91.2%) out of the 160 CNB HR positive patients remained HR positive in MRM specimen assays. Estrogen receptor positivity decreased from 95% in the CNB to 81.9% in MRM specimens and PR positivity from 93.8% to 86.9%. The overall agreement between CNB and MRM specimens was 81.9% for ER and 85.6% for PR. The mean Allred scores were significantly higher in CNB than in MRM specimens – ER: 6.6 (SD 2.02) vs 4.71(SD 2.62); PR: 6.68 (SD 2.16) vs 5.99 (SD 2.68); p<0.001 and p=0.001 respectively. Conclusion Core needle biopsy specimens are associated with identification of more frequent and higher levels of tumoral hormonal receptor proteins than MRM specimens. Delayed fixation of MRM tissues likely accounted for this finding. Optimal selection of patients for hormonal therapies is dependent on tissue management strategies prior to formal hormonal receptor protein testing procedures. PMID:20299318

  13. Is mammography useful in screening for local recurrences in patients with TRAM flap breast reconstruction after mastectomy for multifocal DCIS?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Salas; Mark A. Helvie; Edwin G. Wilkins; Harold A. Oberman; Peter W. Possert; Alan M. Yahanda; Alfred E. Chang

    1998-01-01

    Background: Skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction is being used more often for the treatment of breast cancer. Mammography is not used routinely to evaluate TRAM flaps in women who have undergone mastectomy. We have identified the potential value of its use in selected patients.\\u000aMethods and Results: We report on four women who manifested

  14. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ... liver, or elsewhere. Continue Why Do People Get Breast Cancer? Any woman can get breast cancer, but doctors ...

  15. Generation of voxelized breast phantoms from surgical mastectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Michael O’Connor, J.; Das, Mini; Dider, Clay S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In the research and development of dedicated tomographic breast imaging systems, digital breast object models, also known as digital phantoms, are useful tools. While various digital breast phantoms do exist, the purpose of this study was to develop a realistic high-resolution model suitable for simulating three-dimensional (3D) breast imaging modalities. The primary goal was to design a model capable of producing simulations with realistic breast tissue structure. Methods: The methodology for generating an ensemble of digital breast phantoms was based on imaging surgical mastectomy specimens using a benchtop, cone-beam computed tomography system. This approach allowed low-noise, high-resolution projection views of the mastectomy specimens at each angular position. Reconstructions of these projection sets were processed using correction techniques and diffusion filtering prior to segmentation into breast tissue types in order to generate phantoms. Results: Eight compressed digital phantoms and 20 uncompressed phantoms from which an additional 96 pseudocompressed digital phantoms with voxel dimensions of 0.2 mm3 were generated. Two distinct tissue classification models were used in forming breast phantoms. The binary model classified each tissue voxel as either adipose or fibroglandular. A multivalue scaled model classified each tissue voxel as percentage of adipose tissue (range 1%–99%). Power spectral analysis was performed to compare simulated reconstructions using the breast phantoms to the original breast specimen reconstruction, and fits were observed to be similar. Conclusions: The digital breast phantoms developed herein provide a high-resolution anthropomorphic model of the 3D uncompressed and compressed breast that are suitable for use in evaluating and optimizing tomographic breast imaging modalities. The authors believe that other research groups might find the phantoms useful, and therefore they offer to make them available for wider use. PMID:23556909

  16. In situ breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronda S. Henry-Tillman; V. Suzanne Klimberg

    2000-01-01

    Opinion statement  The clinical expression of in situ cancer varies widely but is usually occult. Diagnosis can be made by a variety of minimally\\u000a invasive techniques. Treatment of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is patient-directed but generally requires only close followup.\\u000a Mastectomy is the gold standard for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and is associated with low recurrence rates. Breast conservation

  17. Breast cancer management in low resource countries (LRCs): Consensus statement from the Breast Health Global Initiative

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nagi S. El Saghir; Clement A. Adebamowo; Benjamin O. Anderson; Robert W. Carlson; Peter A. Bird; Marilys Corbex; Rajendra A. Badwe; Mohammad A. Bushnaq; Alexandru Eniu; Julie R. Gralow; Jay K. Harness; Riccardo Masetti; Fernando Perry; Massoud Samiei; David B. Thomas; Beatrice Wiafe-Addai; Eduardo Cazap

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) brought together international breast cancer experts to discuss breast cancer in low resource countries (LRCs) and identify common concerns reviewed in this consensus statement. There continues to be a lack of public and health care professionals' awareness of the importance of early detection of breast cancer. Mastectomy continues to be the most common treatment

  18. Are patients making high-quality decisions about breast reconstruction after mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clara N.; Belkora, Jeff; Chang, Yuchiao; Moy, Beverly; Partridge, Ann; Sepucha, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in rates of breast reconstruction after mastectomy has raised concerns about the quality of decisions about reconstruction. We sought to evaluate patient decision making about reconstruction, using a validated measure of knowledge and preferences related to reconstruction. Methods A cross-sectional survey of early-stage breast cancer survivors from four university medical centers was conducted. The survey included measures of knowledge about specific reconstruction facts, personal goals and concerns, and involvement in decision making. A multivariable linear regression model of characteristics associated with knowledge and a logistic regression model of factors associated with having reconstruction were developed. Results 84 patients participated (59% response rate). Participants answered 37.9% of knowledge questions correctly. Higher education (beta 15%, p=0.003) and having reconstruction (beta 21%, p<0.0001) were associated with higher knowledge. The goals “use your own tissue to make a breast” (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.15, 2.05) and “wake up after mastectomy with reconstruction underway” (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.30, 2.12) were associated with reconstruction. The goal “avoid putting foreign material in your body” was associated with no reconstruction (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48, 0.86). Most patients reported they mainly made the decision or made the decision with the doctor equally (93%, 95%CI 85-97%), and that their degree of involvement was about right (85%, 95%CI 75-91%). Conclusion Women treated with mastectomy in this study were not well-informed about breast reconstruction. Treatments were associated with patients' goals and concerns, however, and patients were highly involved in their decisions. Knowledge deficits suggest that breast cancer patients would benefit from interventions to support their decision making. PMID:21200195

  19. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast cancer early? The best way to find breast lumps is to do 2 things: Have regular mammograms ( ... listed below. Changes to look for in your breasts Any new lump (which may or may not be painful or ...

  20. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S., E-mail: psyang@kfsyscc.or [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jian, J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Horng, C.F. [Department of Research, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, B.L. [Department of Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y. [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chi, C.W. [Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is breast cancer treated? Surgery for breast cancer Radiation therapy for breast cancer Chemotherapy for breast cancer Hormone therapy for breast ... Topic How is breast cancer treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast ...

  2. Breast reconstruction following mastectomy: II. Marital characteristics of patients seeking the procedure.

    PubMed

    Clifford, E; Clifford, M; Georgiade, N G

    1980-11-01

    Information is presented from a clinical study of 65 women and a psychometric study of 85 women. All had had mastectomies because of breast cancer and were reconstruction patients at Duke Hospital. Women seeking breast reconstruction did not exhibit characterological problems. Relatively few were in psychiatric treatment, and previous research had established the presence of positive rather than negative self-images. The marriages of women seeking this surgical procedure were positively and the women viewed their marriages as a chief source of support. Considerable satisfaction was expressed about husbands being supportive, although husbands were also viewed as poor listeners and, at times, as unable to communicate effectively. Most women were satisfied with various aspects of their sexual lives. A small percentage of the women reported problematic marriages. Various factors, related to the presence of conflict in the marriage and the ability of the husband to understand his wife, may account for the distress evidenced in these marriages. Such factors, of course, are present in any problematic marriage; it remains to be demonstrated whether these problems were caused or exacerbated by the woman's mastectomy and decision to seek breast reconstruction. PMID:7458173

  3. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  4. Decision Making about Surgery for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clara N; Chang, Yuchiao; Adimorah, Nesochi; Belkora, Jeff; Moy, Beverly; Partridge, Ann; Ollila, David W.; Sepucha, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background Practice variation in breast cancer surgery has raised concerns about the quality of treatment decisions. We sought to evaluate the quality of decisions about surgery for early stage breast cancer by measuring patient knowledge, concordance between goals and treatments, and involvement in decisions. Study Design A mailed survey of Stage I/II breast cancer survivors was conducted at four sites. The Decision Quality Instrument measured knowledge, goals, and involvement in decisions. A multivariable logistic regression model of treatment was developed. The model-predicted probability of mastectomy was compared to treatment received for each patient. Concordance was defined as having mastectomy and predicted probability >=0.5 or partial mastectomy and predicted probability <0.5. Frequency of discussion about partial mastectomy was compared to discussion about mastectomy using chi-squared tests. Results 440 patients participated (59% response rate). Mean overall knowledge was 52.7%. 45.9% knew that local recurrence risk is higher after breast conservation. 55.7% knew that survival is equivalent for the two options. Most participants (89.0%) had treatment concordant with their goals. Participants preferring mastectomy had lower concordance (80.5%) than those preferring partial mastectomy (92.6%, p=0.001). Participants reported more frequent discussion of partial mastectomy and its advantages than of mastectomy. 48.6% reported being asked their preference. Conclusions Breast cancer survivors had major knowledge deficits, and those preferring mastectomy were less likely to have treatment concordant with goals. Patients perceived that discussions focused on partial mastectomy, and many were not asked their preference. Improvements in the quality of decisions about breast cancer surgery are needed. PMID:22056355

  5. The unsatisfactory margin in breast cancer surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han H Luu; Christopher N Otis; William P Reed; Jane L Garb; James L Frank

    1999-01-01

    Background: Surgical margin involvement with breast cancer usually results in obligatory reexcision or mastectomy. While unalterable occult host and pathologic factors may interfere with margin clearance during the initial excision, it is possible that alterations in surgical technique might increase the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory margins.Methods: Two hundred and thirty-five patients who were candidates for breast conservation therapy were identified

  6. Motivations, satisfaction, and information of immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Contant, C M; van Wersch, A M; Wiggers, T; Wai, R T; van Geel, A N

    2000-06-01

    This study evaluated patients' motivations for, and satisfaction with, the treatment and information of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with a silicone prosthesis. It studied satisfaction more deeply by relating it to the quality of life, body-image and sexual functioning. Seventy-three patients who received mastectomy, followed by IBR with a subpectoral silicone prosthesis, completed a self-report questionnaire concerning their motivations for, perceived advantages of and satisfaction with IBR, the information received, quality of life, body image, and sexual functioning. Despite the fact that 50% of the reconstructions resulted in complications or complaints, 70% of the women were satisfied with the reconstruction and only 12% would never choose IBR again. Satisfaction was strongly correlated with the need for information. The higher the patient's expectations, the higher their need for information. The most common perceived advantage of IBR was the avoidance of an external prosthesis. A majority of patients were satisfied with the breast reconstruction. However, a sizeable proportion needed more information about breast reconstruction and the use of the silicone prosthesis. To avoid too high expectations more attention should be given to possible complications and the moderate cosmetic results. PMID:10837999

  7. Breast cancer radiotherapy and cardiac risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anusheel Munshi; Kaustav Talapatra; Debanarayan Dutta

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women in the developed world and its incidence in the developing\\u000a world is on the rise. Management of breast cancer requires a multimodality approach and an integration of the services of\\u000a surgery, radiation, and medical oncology. Radiotherapy after mastectomy or breast conservation leads to reduction in local\\u000a recurrence by

  8. THE MANAGEMENT OF CANCER OF THE BREAST

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Justin J.

    1958-01-01

    Radical mastectomy is excellent only for cases of operable breast cancer in which the tumor is limited to the breast or to the nodes in the axilla. That there is metastasis to the internal mammary lymph nodes in a high proportion of cases has been “overlooked” for many years. Also it is probable that metastasis occurs to the supraclavicular lymph nodes more often than is suspected. Hence the extended radical mastectomy operation leaves much to be desired. There has been no significant improvement in recent years in the mortality rate of mammary cancer. Simple mastectomy and thorough adequate postoperative radiation therapy have much to offer. Treatment of “operable” breast cancer should be a cooperative effort of surgeon, radiation therapist and pathologist. PMID:13511211

  9. Implant Reconstruction in Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey A. Ascherman; Matthew M. Hanasono; Martin I. Newman; Duncan B. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Background: Implant reconstruction in breast cancer patients treated with radiation therapy is controversial. Prior studies are limited by older prosthetic devices, reconstructive techniques, and radiation therapy protocols. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent tissue expansion and implant breast reconstruction performed by a single sur- geon after mastectomy for breast cancer from 1996 to 2003. Complications and

  10. Second primary cancer following adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine therapy for breast cancer: A nationwide survey on 47,005 Japanese patients who underwent mastectomy from 1963–1982

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zenji Iwasa; Dennosuke Jinnai; Hiroki Koyama; Nobuaki Sasano

    1986-01-01

    Out of a total of 47,005 cases of primary breast cancer with curative surgery recorded in Japan in the 20 year period from\\u000a 1963 to 1982, 764, or 1.6 per cent had a second primary cancer occurring during the same period. The distribution of the second\\u000a site was gastric cancer in 200 (26.2 per cent), breast cancer in 200 (26.2

  11. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Cancer starts when cells begin to grow out ... get it, too. This information refers only to breast cancer in women. For information on breast cancer in ...

  12. Immediate or delayed breast reconstruction after mastectomy: what do women really want

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Belouli; P. Wyss; S. Vetter; V. E. Meyer; G. M. Beer

    2005-01-01

    Breast reconstruction, especially immediate reconstruction after mastectomy has increased over the last decades, at present being regularly offered in many centres worldwide. Despite obvious benefits and the evident oncological safety of primary breast reconstruction, the majority of women still receive a delayed procedure or even no reconstructive surgery. The objective of the present study was to determine the preference of

  13. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  14. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... I Breast Cancer Read more Upcoming Events Metastatic Breast Cancer: Understanding and Finding Clinical Trials 07/14/2015 ... consider when deciding whether to participate. Read more Breast Cancer 360: A Look at Triple-Negative Breast Cancer ...

  15. The safety parameters of the study on intraductal cytotoxic agent delivery to the breast before mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bailin; Love, Susan M.; Chen, Guoji; Wang, Jing; Gao, Jidong; Xu, Xiaozhou; Wang, Zhongzhao

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraductal administration of cytotoxic agents has been shown to inhibit the development of breast cancer in animal models. The object of this study was to demonstrate the safety of intraductal delivery cytotoxic agents in patients prior to mastectomy. This method is hopeful to be developed as a chemoprevention approach in patients with pre-malignant or non-invasive ductal lesions to prevent breast cancer which will be further developed. Methods Two drugs, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and carboplatin were administered at three dose levels (PLD: 10, 20, 50 mg and carboplatin 60, 120, 300 mg). There were five subjects in each group with 15 subjects treated with each drug once. Venous blood samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic analysis. The breast was removed surgically 2-5 days post administration and the treated ducts were marked to enable identification on pathological evaluation. Results Intraductal administration was generally well-tolerated with mild, transient breast discomfort. In the carboplatin arm, three women at the 300 mg dose experienced mild nausea and vomiting. In the PLD arm most women had mild erythema and swelling of the breast over the 72 hours following the drug administration. Patients receiving the 50 mg dose experienced local erythema until the time of surgery. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that carboplatin rapidly entered systemic circulation with an early peak time (Tmax ~30 min) with a corresponding plasma ultrafiltrate area under the curve (AUC) consistent with the Calvert Formula using estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Total plasma doxorubicin had delayed peak concentration times (Tmax >48 hours) with a linear dose response and peak concentrations substantially lower than expected from equivalent intravenous injection dosing. No doxorubicinol metabolite was detected in the plasma. Conclusions This study demonstrates that cytotoxic drugs can be safely administered into breast ducts with minimal toxicity. PMID:25400424

  16. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  17. Impact of advances in breast cancer management on reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Dobke, Marek

    2012-10-01

    An overview of advances and controversies in the management of breast cancer and their impact on plastic breast surgery is presented, including prophylactic mastectomy for women at high risk of breast cancer, size and location of the primary tumor and feasibility of breast-conserving surgery and oncoplastic approach, the management of the axilla, postmastectomy radiation and chemotherapy, emerging breast reconstructive techniques and cancer risk, and oncological follow-up and imaging of the reconstructed breast. This material should help plastic surgeons to understand multiple specialty considerations regarding breast cancer and provide comprehensive surgical care and interventions in aesthetic and reconstructive settings. PMID:23036297

  18. Breast Cancer -- Inflammatory

    MedlinePLUS

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer - Inflammatory Breast Cancer - Inflammatory This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer - Inflammatory. Use the menu below to choose the Overview section to ...

  19. Breast Cancer -- Metaplastic

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    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer - Metaplastic Breast Cancer - Metaplastic This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer - Metaplastic. Use the menu below to choose the Overview section to ...

  20. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? Screening is looking ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  1. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ...

  2. Bilateral synchronous male breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nwashilli, Nnamdi J.; Ugiagbe, Ezekiel E.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral synchronous breast cancer is extremely rare. A 75-year-old man presented with a right breast mass, which ulcerated and a lump in the left breast. Right breast examination revealed a breast ulcer 7×10cm with everted edges and complete nipple destruction. The left breast showed a hard lump measuring 4×5cm in the nipple-areolar area, unattached to skin, or underlying structure. There was no palpable axillary lymph node bilaterally. A wedge biopsy of right breast ulcer and excision of the left breast lump confirmed bilateral invasive ductal carcinoma - Grade 2 tumor in both breasts. He had bilateral simple mastectomy and chemotherapy; defaulted for 18 months during treatment, and re-presented with bilateral tumor recurrence. The importance of this case report is to create more awareness that breast cancer can occur in males just as in females, though the incidence is rare in males. Early presentation and compliance with treatment modality provide a better outcome. PMID:25737181

  3. A study of the patient factors affecting reconstruction after mastectomy for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Panieri, Eugenio; Lazarus, Dirk; Dent, David M; Hudson, Don A; Murray, Elizabeth; Werner, I Dudley

    2003-02-01

    Breast shape may be retained after surgery for breast cancer with either wide local excision (WLE) and radiotherapy or mastectomy (M) and immediate reconstruction (M+R). We determined the proportions of patients who would be suitable for these options, would accept them, and if they declined M+R their reasons for doing so. Over a 10-month period 177 women were assessed at a combined breast clinic by general and plastic surgeons and by radiation oncologists. A prospective record was made of the patient demographic data, the clinical decisions (and their reasons), and the patient choices (and their reasons). A transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was the commonest method of reconstruction. One hundred thirty-five (76%) were judged to be suitable for locoregional surgery. Of these M+R was offered to 83 patients, whereas 53 were not considered because of combinations of cosmetic considerations (31), risk factors (25), old age (13), and oncological factors (nine). Fifty-one of the 83 (61%) offered M+R declined it because they preferred a simpler procedure (34), regarded breast appearance as unimportant (15), preferred breast conservation (five), did not have a partner (three), felt that they were too old (two), or had religious reasons (two). Ultimately 69 (51%) underwent M, 34 (25%) WLE, and 32 (24%) M+R. There was no correlation between acceptance or not of M+R and age, race, employment, education level, or marital status. We conclude that many patients were suitable for M+R, but fewer than half accepted it; this decision was unrelated to age, race, employment, or marital status. PMID:12641345

  4. Clinical implications for BRCA gene mutation in breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Xu; Baosheng Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Ruihui Li; Yuehua Wang; Shaokun Zhang

    To investigate the mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and determine whether clinic-pathological factors related to BRCA gene mutation.\\u000a Mastectomy specimens from 360 breast cancers were enrolled and examined in the study. The relationship between BRCA gene mutation\\u000a and clinic-pathological factors was evaluated. Overall, 280 patients were BRCA negative and 80 got BRCA gene mutation. Triple-negative\\u000a breast cancers—i.e., breast cancers that

  5. Dedicated Cone-Beam Breast CT: Feasibility Study with Surgical Mastectomy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei Tse; Carkaci, Selin; Chen, Lingyun; Lai, Chao-Jen; Sahin, Aysegul; Whitman, Gary J.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of diagnostic breast imaging using a flat-panel detector-based cone-beam CT system. CONCLUSION Imaging of 12 mastectomy specimens was performed at 50–80 kVp with a voxel size of 145 or 290 ?m. Our study shows that cone-beam breast CT images have exceptional tissue contrast and can potentially reduce examination time with comparable radiation dose. PMID:18029864

  6. Mastectomy - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chest muscles. You may have also had breast reconstruction surgery with implants or natural tissue . ... Nov 5. [Epub ahead of print.] Riutta J. Post-mastectomy pain syndrome. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, ...

  7. Breast cancer therapies weighed

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, C.

    1990-06-29

    Even as the National Institutes of Health came under fire last week for giving short shrift to women in the institute's basic and clinical research programs, the report of a recent NIH consensus conference points up the need for more research on how to treat early breast cancer. Although the experts were able to agree on the best surgical treatment for women with early breast cancer, they couldn't resolve the more controversial issue of whether the patients should subsequently receive systemic treatment - chemotherapy or hormone therapy - to prevent recurrence of their disease. The panel reaffirmed that the removal of the lump and nearby lymph nodes, followed by irradiation, is just as effective as a mastectomy. But then came the contentious question: should women with early breast cancer, especially those without detectable lymph node metastases, receive drug therapy to prevent recurrence of the disease Currently, 70% of such cancers are successfully treated with surgery and radiation alone. For this reason, about 2 years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical alert saying that addition treatment with drugs or hormones is a credible therapeutic option worthy of careful attention for all early stage patients. This pronouncement engendered a storm of criticism. A consensus panel concluded that in cases where tumors are 1 centimeter or less in diameter and no lymph nodes are affected, the likelihood of recurrence is so small that the benefits of adjuvant therapy would be insignificant. But for the patients with larger tumors, the panel concluded that the decision is an individual one that depends on personal preferences and a variety of prognostic factors that can help to indicate whether a woman is at high risk of having a recurrence and should therefore have adjuvant therapy.

  8. Outcome of Pectoralis Major Myomammary Flap for Post-mastectomy Breast Reconstruction: Extended Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel Denewer; Ahmed Setit; Omar Farouk

    2007-01-01

    Background  In the past decade there has been an enormously expanding interest among rural Egyptian patients, relatives, and treating\\u000a oncologists in post-mastectomy reconstruction as an integral part of patient care. We introduced our technique of pectoralis\\u000a major myomammary cutaneous flap for single-stage reconstruction of large breasts, nipple, and areola.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The new technique is based on performing modified radical mastectomy in the

  9. Breastfeeding and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Breast_Cancer_042915.html Breastfeeding and Breast Cancer HealthDay News Video - April 29, ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Breastfeeding and Breast Cancer For closed captioning, click the ...

  10. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ...

  11. Conservation surgery and irradiation for the treatment of favorable breast cancer. [Gamma radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. D. Montague; A. E. Gutierrez; J. L. Barker; N. D. Tapley; G. H. Fletcher

    1979-01-01

    The results in 162 patients with clinically favorable breast cancer treated with conservation surgery and radiation therapy are presented. The surgical procedures were simple excision with and without positive microscopic margins, segmental mastectomy, and segmental mastectomy with axillary dissection. Details of the radiation techniques are described with an explanation of the modifications in technique depending on the prior surgical procedure.

  12. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  13. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer ... Breast Cancer Drug Combinations Used in Breast Cancer Drugs Used to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) ...

  14. Can Colorectal Polyps and Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ...

  15. Can Cancer of the Esophagus Be Found Early?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ...

  16. Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Ptosis: Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction Allows Full Secondary Mastopexy with Complete Nipple Areolar Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Craig A.; Sullivan, Scott K.; Stolier, Alan; Trahan, Chris; Wise, M. Whitten; Duracher, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with moderate to severe ptosis are often considered poor candidates for nipple-sparing mastectomy. This results from the perceived risk of nipple necrosis and/or the inability of the reconstructive surgeon to reliably and effectively reposition the nipple-areola complex on the breast mound after mastectomy. Methods: A retrospective review identified patients with grade II/III ptosis who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate perforator flap reconstruction and subsequently underwent a mastopexy procedure. The mastopexies included complete, full-thickness periareolar incisions with peripheral undermining around the nipple-areola complex to allow for full transposition of the nipple-areola complex relative to the surrounding skin envelope. Results: Seventy patients with 116 nipple-sparing mastectomies met inclusion criteria. The most common complications were minor incisional dehiscence (7.7 percent) and variable degrees of necrosis in the preserved breast skin (3.4 percent) after the initial mastectomy. There were no cases of nipple-areola complex necrosis following the secondary mastopexy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that full mastopexy, including a complete full-thickness periareolar incision and nipple-areola complex repositioning on the breast mound, can be safely performed after nipple-sparing mastectomy and perforator flap breast reconstruction. The underlying flap provides adequate vascular ingrowth to support the perfusion of the nipple-areola complex despite complete incisional interruption of the surrounding cutaneous blood supply. These findings may allow for inclusion of women with moderate to severe ptosis in the candidate pool for nipple-sparing mastectomy if oncologic criteria are otherwise met. These findings also represent a significant potential advantage of autogenous reconstruction over implant reconstruction in women with breast ptosis who desire nipple-sparing mastectomy. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:25839173

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and very aggressive disease in which cancer cells block lymph vessels ... difficult. Also, because inflammatory breast cancer is so aggressive, it can arise between scheduled screening mammograms and ...

  18. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePLUS

    After a mastectomy , some women choose to have cosmetic surgery to recreate their breast. This surgery can be ... to the breast or the new nipple. Having cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of ...

  19. Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siglin, Joshua; Champ, Colin E.; Vakhnenko, Yelena; Anne, Pramila R.; Simone, Nicole L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately one-third of all breast cancer patients experience local recurrence of their tumor after initial treatment. As initial treatment often employs the use of radiation therapy (RT), the standard of care for local breast cancer recurrence after initial breast conserving therapy has traditionally been surgical intervention with mastectomy. However, recent attempts to preserve the intact breast after recurrence with local excision have revealed a potential need for RT in addition to repeat breast conserving surgery as rates of local failure with resection alone remain high. Additionally, local recurrence following initial mastectomy and chest wall RT can be treated with reirradiation to increase local control. Repeating RT, however, in a previously irradiated area, is a complex treatment strategy, as the clinician must carefully balance maximizing treatment effectiveness while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As a result, physicians have been hesitant to treat recurrent disease with repeat RT with limited data. Results from the current literature are promising and current clinical trials are underway to explore reirradiation modalities which will provide additional information on treatment-related toxicity and outcomes. This paper will review the current literature on repeat radiation therapy for locally recurrent breast cancer. PMID:23091733

  20. Laser optoacoustic imaging of breast cancer in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander A. Oraevsky; Alexander A. Karabutov; Sergey V. Solomatin; Elena V. Savateeva; Valeri A. Andreev; Zoran Gatalica; Harbans Singh; R. Declan Fleming

    2001-01-01

    A clinical prototype of the laser optoacoustic imaging system (LOIS) was employed for breast cancer detection and localization in patients with confirmed breast cancer and scheduled for radical mastectomy. The prototype LOIS used a single optical fiber for delivery of laser pulses, an arc shaped 32-element PVDF transducer array for ultrawide-band piezoelectric detection of optoacoustic signals and a single-channel data

  1. Mastectomy -- The Surgical Procedure

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... About Breast Cancer View About Breast Cancer Facts & Statistics View Facts & Statistics What is Breast Cancer View What is Breast ... Benign Breast Conditions Warning Signs & Symptoms Breast Cancer Statistics Breast Cancer in Men Research Studies View Research ...

  2. Smoking and Breast Cancer Recurrence after Breast Conservation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Jennifer D.; Killelea, Brigid K.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Horowitz, Nina R.; Lannin, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have shown earlier recurrence and decreased survival in patients with head and neck cancer who smoked while undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether smoking status at the time of partial mastectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer affected recurrence or survival. Method. A single institution retrospective chart review was performed to correlate smoking status with patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and outcomes for patients undergoing partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. Results. There were 624 patients who underwent breast conservation surgery between 2002 and 2010 for whom smoking history and follow-up data were available. Smoking status was associated with race, patient age, and tumor stage, but not with grade, histology, or receptor status. African American women were more likely to be current smokers (22% versus 7%, P < 0.001). With a mean follow-up of 45 months, recurrence was significantly higher in current smokers compared to former or never smokers (P = 0.039). In a multivariate model adjusted for race and tumor stage, recurrence among current smokers was 6.7 times that of never smokers (CI 2.0–22.4). Conclusions. Although the numbers are small, this study suggests that smoking may negatively influence recurrence rates after partial mastectomy and radiation therapy. A larger study is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:24693439

  3. Secretory breast carcinoma in a 6-year-old girl: mastectomy with sentinel lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Tutku; Yaman Bajin, ?nci; Orhan, Diclehan; Yalçin, Bilgehan; Özgen Kiratli, Pinar; O?uz, Berna; Karnak, ?brahim

    2015-07-01

    Secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) is a rare type of breast neoplasia that was originally described in children. SBC is an indolent breast tumor with good clinical outcome and rare systemic involvement. Since, majority of studies concerning pediatric SBC have been case reports, it has been difficult to clearly elucidate the characteristics and optimal treatment strategies for SBC in children. Although treatment recommendations vary, surgical excision is the primary mode of treatment. Also, necessity of axillary and/or sentinel lymph node dissection is another matter of discussion in children. We report a 6-year-old girl who was diagnosed as SBC was reported to discuss the use of mastectomy with sentinel lymph node dissection in the treatment of this rare tumor in children. PMID:25994562

  4. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lee K. McNeely; Geraldine M. Jacobson; Dennis D. Leavitt; J. Robert Stewart

    1988-01-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35

  5. Institutional Variation in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Caprice C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hughes, Melissa E.; Edge, Stephen B.; Theriault, Richard; Wilson, John L.; Carter, W. Bradford; Blayney, Douglas W.; Niland, Joyce; Weeks, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between supply of subspecialty care and type of procedure preferentially performed for early stage breast cancer. Background Three surgical options exist for early stage breast cancer: (1) breast conserving surgery (BCS), (2) mastectomy with reconstruction (RECON), and (3) mastectomy alone. Current guidelines recommend that surgical treatment decisions should be based on patient preference if a patient is eligible for all 3. However, studies demonstrate persistent variation in the use of BCS and RECON. Methods Patients undergoing an operation for DCIS or stage I or II breast cancer at NCCN institutions between 2000 and 2006 were identified. Institutional procedure rates were determined. Spearman correlations measured the association between procedure types. Patient-level logistic regression models investigated predictors of procedure type and association with institutional supply of subspecialty care. Results Among 10,607 patients, 19% had mastectomy alone, 60% BCS, and 21% RECON. The institutional rate of BCS and RECON were strongly correlated (r = ?0.80, P = 0.02). Institution was more important than all patient factors except age in predicting receipt of RECON or BCS. RECON was more likely for patients treated at an institution with a greater supply of reconstructive surgeons or where patients live further from radiation facilities. RECON was less likely at institutions with longer waiting times for surgery with reconstruction. Conclusions Even within the NCCN, a consortium of multidisciplinary cancer centers, the use of BCS and mastectomy with reconstruction substantially varies by institution and correlates with the supply of subspecialty care. PMID:21725233

  6. Adjuvant therapy for stage II, estrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Knight; Gary M. Clark; C. Kent Osborne; William L. McGuire

    1981-01-01

    Summary The estrogen receptor (ER) assay provides information which correlates with the proliferative potential, pathology and prognosis for patients with breast cancer. A review of our natural history data correlating ER and axillary node involvement at the time of mastectomy with prognosis allows the identification of a high risk subset of patients with early recurrence and poor survival. Patients with

  7. Surgery to Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A fact sheet that describes mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, two prophylactic surgeries that may be performed to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women at very high risk; the situations in which they may be considered; and nonsurgical options.

  8. Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NYSERNet's Breast Cancer Information Clearinghouse: an Internet accessible resource for breast cancer patients and their families. Current partners represent government health agencies, hospitals, libraries, hospice and non-profit agencies.

  9. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is available from the NCI Web site . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  10. Breast Cancer: Early Detection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  11. Efficient reduction of loco-regional recurrences but no effect on mortality twenty years after postmastectomy radiation in premenopausal women with stage II breast cancer – A randomized trial from the South Sweden Breast Cancer Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrika Killander; Harald Anderson; Stefan Rydén; Torgil Möller; L. O. Hafström; Per Malmström

    2009-01-01

    PurposeTo study long term loco-regional and distant recurrence rate and survival after post-mastectomy radiotherapy in combination with oral cyclophosphamide in premenopausal women with stage II breast cancer.

  12. Nutrition and breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy J Key; Naomi E Allen; Elizabeth A Spencer; Ruth C Travis

    2003-01-01

    The major risk factors for breast cancer are hormone-related, and the only well-established diet-related risk factors for breast cancer are obesity and alcohol consumption. Obesity increases breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women by around 30%, probably by increasing serum concentrations of bioavailable oestradiol. Moderate alcohol intakes increase breast cancer risk by about 7% per alcoholic drink per day, perhaps also

  13. Contralateral Breast Symmetrisation in Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction after Unilateral Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy: The Tailored Reduction/Augmentation Mammaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Giuseppe; Barone-Adesi, Liliana; Franceschini, Gianluca; Masetti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Background In the literature on nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) with one-stage immediate implant reconstruction, contralateral symmetrisation has drawn little attention, with many surgeons still performing standard cosmetic mammaplasty procedures. However, standard implant-based mammaplasty usually does not result in proper symmetry with the mastectomy side, especially regarding breast projection, overall shape, and volume distribution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 19 consecutive patients undergoing unilateral NSM with immediate prosthetic reconstruction and contralateral simultaneous symmetrisation by using the tailored reduction/augmentation mammaplasty technique between June 2012 and August 2013. Results The average follow-up time was 13 months (range, 10-24 months). No major complications, such as infection, haematoma, and nipple-areola complex necrosis, were experienced. Conclusions Our experience suggests that simultaneous contralateral symmetrisation with tailored reduction/augmentation mammaplasty after unilateral immediate implant reconstruction after NSM facilitates durable and pleasant symmetric outcomes. PMID:26015885

  14. Nutrition and breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Hunter; Walter C. Willett

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between nutrition and breast cancer is reviewed. After several decades of study, many aspects of the role of diet in breast cancer etiology are still unclear. Results from large prospective studies do not support the concept developed from animal and ecologic evidence that dietary fat intake in mid-life is associated with breast cancer risk. Thus,

  15. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  16. Predictors that Influence Election of Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy among Women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ who are BRCA-Negative

    PubMed Central

    Elsayegh, Nisreen; Profato, Jessica; Barrera, Angelica M. Gutierrez; Lin, Heather; Kuerer, Henry M.; Ardic, Can; Litton, Jennifer K.; Tripathy, Debasish; Arun, Banu K.

    2015-01-01

    The authors retrospectively examined the contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) rate among 100 women with ductal carcinoma in situ who are BRCA negative. Of 100 women with ductal carcinoma in situ, 31 elected contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Factors associated with increased likelihood of undergoing contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) among this cohort were: family history of ovarian cancer, marital status, reconstruction, mastectomy of the affected breast, and tamoxifen use.

  17. An osteogenesis imperfecta case with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taira, Fumi; Shimizu, Hideo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Saito, Mitsue; Kasumi, Fujio

    2014-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare connective tissue disease characterized by abnormalities of type 1 collagen and an increased risk of bone fractures. Several OI cases with malignancies have been reported. Herein, we describe an OI case with breast cancer. A 36-year-old premenopausal woman with OI was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of a right breast lump. We diagnosed right breast cancer with axillary and parasternal lymph node metastasis (T2N3M0 stage IIIC). The tumor had increased in size and tumor markers were elevated after 10 months of hormone therapy. We performed a right mastectomy and axillary dissection. She subsequently received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She is currently taking trastuzumab and tamoxifen. Anesthesia is challenging in OI patients because of difficulty with airway control and intubation. We performed the mastectomy in this case without difficulty by working in cooperation with experienced anesthesiologists, orthopedists, and other medical personnel. Some OI patients reportedly have severe 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) toxicity related to dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD is the main enzyme involved in the catabolism of 5-FU. Our present case also had low DPD activity and we thus chose epirubicin and cyclophosphamide for chemotherapy. Our search of the literature yielded only two OI cases with breast cancer as of April 2011. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Japan. PMID:22038671

  18. Partial Breast Reconstruction Using Various Oncoplastic Techniques for Centrally Located Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Chun; Kim, Hong Yeul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Jeong Woo; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae; Park, Ho Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background As the breast cancer incidence has increased, breast-conserving surgery has replaced total mastectomy as the predominant procedure. However, centrally located breast cancers pose significant challenges to successful breast-conserving surgeries. Therefore, we performed partial mastectomy and oncoplastic procedures on centrally located breast cancer as a means of partial breast reconstruction. The authors examined and evaluated the functional and aesthetic usefulness of this reconstruction method. Methods From January 2007 to June 2011, 35 patients with centrally located breast cancers who underwent various oncoplastic procedures based on the breast size and resection volume. The oncoplastic procedures performed included volume displacement surgical techniques such as purse-string suture, linear suture, and reduction mammaplasty. Other oncoplastic procedures included volume replacement procedures with an adipofascial, thoracoepigastric, intercostal artery perforator, thoracodorsal artery perforator, or latissimus dorsi flap. Results Mean patient age was 49 years, and mean follow-up period was 11 months. In cases of small to moderate-sized breasts and resection volumes <50 g, volume displacement procedures were performed. In cases of resection volumes >50 g, volume replacement procedures were performed. In cases of larger breasts and smaller resection volumes, glandular reshaping was performed. Finally, in cases of larger breasts and larger resection volumes, reduction mammaplasty was performed. This reconstruction method also elicits a high patient satisfaction rate with no significant complications. Conclusions In centrally located breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery considering breast size and resection volume is safe and provides appropriate aesthetic outcomes. Therefore, our method is advisable for breast cancer patients who elect to conserve their breasts and retain a natural breast shape. PMID:25276644

  19. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Kuerer, Henry M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Lannin, Donald R. [Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School-UMDNJ and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)]. E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is discussed.

  20. Latest developments in local treatment: radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Yarnold

    2005-01-01

    involves irradiating only part of the breast after complete microscopic excision of the primary tumour. Breast cancer multifocality has been studied by serial whole-organ section- ing of mastectomies, showing that the density of tumour foci decreases with distance from the reference tumour (4). In a study of 264 specimens with primary tumours <_2cm micro- scopic diameter, 28% had non-invasive foci

  1. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing 'keyhole' mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Peyser, P. M.; Abel, J. A.; Straker, V. F.; Hall, V. L.; Rainsbury, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    The popularity of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) which preserves the breast skin envelope is increasing, but the risks and benefits of this approach are only beginning to emerge. A technique involving ultra-conservative SSM and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) has been evaluated to establish the surgical and oncological sequelae of skin conservation. Between 1994-1998, 67 consecutive patients underwent 71 SSM and expander-assisted immediate latissimus dorsi (LD) breast reconstructions (follow up, 24.1 months; range, 2-52 months). Breast resection, axillary dissection and reconstruction were performed through a 5-6 cm circular peri-areolar 'keyhole' incision. Patients were discharged 6.5 days (range, 5-15 days) after the 3.9 h (range, 3.0-5.5 h) procedure, and expansion was completed by 4.0 months (range, 0-10 months). Local recurrence occurred in 3% of breasts at risk, skin envelope necrosis occurred in 10%, and contralateral surgery was required to achieve symmetry in 14%. SSM and IBR is an oncologically safe, minimal-scar procedure which can be performed by surgeons trained in 'oncoplastic' techniques. It results in low rates of local recurrence and complication, and reduces the need for contralateral surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10932655

  2. Locoregional treatment of breast cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Toesca, Antonio; Gentilini, Oreste; Peccatori, Fedro; Azim, Hatem A; Amant, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with breast cancer during pregnancy is very demanding and it should be better performed in highly qualified and experienced centers. Referral to institutes and physicians trained in this special clinical scenario allows reducing the risk of both overtreating and undertreating the patients. Moreover, patients can receive appropriate information regarding safety of treatments without old-fashioned taboo. The purpose of the current paper is to discuss the main issues concerning surgical management and in general locoregional treatment of patients diagnosed with breast cancer and treated during gestation, focusing on those women who chose to continue their pregnancy. We cover the issues regarding type of breast surgery, radiation therapy, immediate reconstruction during mastectomy, and management of the axilla. PMID:25419205

  3. Breast Cancer Multifocality and Multicentricity and Locoregional Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Siobhan P.; Lei, Xiudong; Hsu, Limin; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Zhang, Hong; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Valero, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Background. The impact of multifocal (MF) or multicentric (MC) breast cancer on locoregional (LR) control rates is unknown. Methods. MF was defined as two or more separate invasive tumors in the same quadrant of the breast. MC was defined as two or more separate invasive tumors occupying more than one quadrant of the same breast. Patients were categorized by LR treatment: breast conservation therapy (BCT; n = 256), mastectomy (n = 466), or mastectomy plus postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT; n = 184). All patients with MC disease had mastectomy (10 patients treated with BCT for MC disease were excluded). The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to calculate 5-year LR control rate. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine independent associations of multifocality or multicentricity with LR control. Results. A total of 906 patients had either MF disease (n = 673) or MC disease (n = 233). With median follow-up of 52 months, the 5-year LR control rate was 99% for MF, 96% for MC, and 98% for unifocal tumors (p = .44). Subset analysis revealed no difference in LR control regardless of the LR treatment (p = .67 for BCT, p = .37 for mastectomy, p = .29 for mastectomy plus PMRT). There were five in-breast recurrences after BCT in the MF group. MF and MC did not have an independent impact on LR control rate on multivariate analysis. Conclusion. MF and MC disease are not independent risk factors for LR recurrence. Patients with MF and MC breast cancer had rates of LR control similar to those of their unifocal counterparts. These data suggest that BCT is a safe option for patients with MF tumors and that MF or MC disease alone is not an indication for PMRT. PMID:24136008

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Breast cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Breast cancer On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed May 2015 What is breast cancer? Breast cancer is a disease in which certain ...

  5. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 1):R6. [PubMed Abstract] Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group (EBCTCG). Relevance of breast cancer hormone receptors ... of the randomised trials. Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group. Lancet 1998; 351(9114):1451–1467. [PubMed ...

  6. Regional radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: is the issue solved?

    PubMed

    Krause, M; Petersen, C; Offersen, B V; Baumann, M

    2015-07-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is the treatment standard for breast cancer with lymph node metastases after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. The inclusion of regional lymph nodes into the treatment volumes has been a question in recent clinical trials. Their impact on treatment standards and open questions is discussed. PMID:25823431

  7. Determinants of axillary recurrence after axillary lymph node dissection for invasive breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. Voogd; R. de Boer; M. J. C. van der Sangen; R. M. H. Roumen; H. J. T. Rutten; J. W. W. Coebergh

    2001-01-01

    Aim This study was undertaken to gain insight into the risk factors for axillary recurrence among patients with invasive breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving treatment or mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Methods In a matched case–control design, 59 patients with axillary recurrence and 295 randomly selected control patients without axillary recurrence were compared. Matching factors included age, year of

  8. The Basic Facts of Korean Breast Cancer in 2012: Results from a Nationwide Survey and Breast Cancer Registry Database

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Zisun; Min, Sun Young; Yoon, Chan Seok; Jung, Kyu-Won; Ko, Beom Seok; Kang, Eunyoung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Seokwon

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Breast Cancer Society has constructed a nationwide breast cancer database through utilization of an online registration program. We have reported the basic facts about breast cancer in Korea in 2012, and analyzed the changing patterns in the clinical characteristics and management of breast cancer in Korea over the last 10 years. Data on patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer were collected for the year 2012 from 97 hospitals and clinics nationwide using a questionnaire survey, and from the online registry database. A total of 17,792 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. The crude incidence rate of female breast cancer, including invasive cancer and in situ cancer, was 70.7 cases per 100,000 women. The median age at diagnosis was 51 years, and the proportion of postmenopausal women was higher than that of premenopausal women among those diagnosed with breast cancer. The proportion of cases of early breast cancer increased continuously, and breast-conserving surgery was performed in more cases than total mastectomy in that same year. The total number of breast reconstruction surgeries increased approximately 3-fold over last 10 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all stages of breast cancer patients was extremely high. The clinical characteristics of breast cancer have changed in ways that resulted in high overall survival over the past 10 years in Korea, and the surgical management of the disease has changed accordingly. Analysis of nationwide registry data will contribute to a better understanding of the characteristics of breast cancer in Korea. PMID:26155285

  9. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism reveals marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction. She exhibits a total lack of development of spoken language, with no attempt to compensate through alternative modes of communication such as gesture. During the visit, she occupies herself with repetitive motor mannerisms. Susan believes that Amy struggles with overstimulation from tactile input. Therefore, she is combative with health-care providers and intolerant of invasive devices. Susan has an intimate understanding of Amy's ability to communicate her needs and wants through nonverbal changes. RECURRENCE Approximately 2 months ago, Amy began favoring her right arm and appeared to be in pain when participating in various activities. Susan became aware of Amy's pain issues by noticing that her posture was slightly altered and she was carrying herself differently. Further investigation with a CT scan showed concern for local disease recurrence involving the axillary lymph nodes. No distant metastases were seen. The standard of care for this diagnosis is surgical resection and consideration of radiation therapy, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (NCCN, 2012). Susan does not want Amy to undergo further surgery and believes radiation would be too difficult to maneuver. The next best option would be a medical approach with chemotherapy as the main modality. DIFFICULT DECISIONS If treatment is pursued, the advanced practitioner will need to perform regular examinations and prescribe and monitor chemotherapy. The delivery of therapy, requiring frequent blood draws and IV access, will be a challenge for the health-care staff. The APN is apprehensive about the ability to accomplish these tasks safely given Amy's limited capacity to participate. The APN is also concerned with how treatment will affect Amy's life. The APN may have her own individual conflict of morals to contend with, given the limited understanding of the patient vs. nontreatment of a potentially curative malignancy. Chemotherapy is

  10. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-03

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  12. TCGA Proteomics: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  13. Breast Cancer Screening Rates

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is easier to treat and before it is big enough to feel or cause symptoms. Having regular mammograms can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. Source for graph data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Cancer ...

  14. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  15. Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fang Fan

    \\u000a Invasive ductal carcinoma (cancer) refers to a malignant epithelial proliferation which stems from the terminal duct-lobular\\u000a unit. These tumors are so-named because of the resemblance of the tumor cells to the cells normally lining the ducts as opposed\\u000a to the lobules. These invasive epithelial tumor cells are no longer ­surrounded by a myoepithelial or basal cell layer as\\u000a in the

  16. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breasts removed, followed by radiation therapy and breast reconstruction. Her hair fell out, she lost the color ... to improve body image and appreciate a new post-cancer body. A changing body Breast cancer can ...

  17. Breast Cancer: The Orphan Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara E. Bond

    2008-01-01

    The American Cancer Society estimates that 178,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer annually. Estimates of between 1% and 5% of these women will be diagnosed with a more aggressive and less well understood form, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Women are often unaware that breast cancer can present without a lump, but with a red rash and swollen breast.

  18. The psychosocial impact of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy: prospective study using questionnaires and semistructured interviews

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mal Bebbington Hatcher; Lesley Fallowfield; Roger AHern

    2001-01-01

    AbstractObjectives: To investigate the psychosocial impact of bilateral prophylactic mastectomy for women with increased risk of breast cancer and to identify, preoperatively, risk factors for postoperative distress.Design: Prospective study using interviews and questionnaire assessments.Setting: Participants' homes throughout the United Kingdom.Participants: 143 women with increased risk of developing breast cancer who were offered bilateral prophylactic mastectomy and who accepted or declined

  19. Mesorectum localization as a special kind of rectal metastasis from breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Fan; Liu, Zhong-Lin; Zhang, Qing; Kong, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Wen-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer can metastasize to other organs following initial treatment. Bones, liver, and the lung are the most common sites of breast cancer metastases. The digestive tract, on the other hand, is rarely involved. The incidence of mesorectal metastasis (a special category of rectal metastases) from breast cancer has not been described before. The case reported herein concerns a 68-year-old woman who underwent mastectomy. A pelvic mass with no symptoms was subsequently identified by computed tomography in the patient. We ultimately confirmed that this mass was a metastasis from breast cancer located in the mesorectum using surgical exploration and pathology results. PMID:25892895

  20. Breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarize what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically. PMID:23986719

  1. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  2. CISNET: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    However, there are very limited data on the population effects of these novel cancer control approaches. Population modeling is a unique comparative effectiveness paradigm to fill this gap by translating advances from the laboratory and clinical trials to understanding their net effects on US breast cancer mortality. The CISNET Breast Working Group has collaborated over the past nine years to apply independent population models to evaluate cancer control practices and use results to inform clinical and public health guidelines.

  3. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niels Kjær Olsen; Per Pfeiffer; Lis Johannsen; H. Schroder; Carsten Rose

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk

  4. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations. PMID:25112434

  5. Breast Cancer in Canadian Women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Bryant

    2004-01-01

    HEALTH ISSUE: Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for Canadian women, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed. About 5400 women are expected to die from this disease in 2003. In 1998, a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer was about one in nine. KEY FINDINGS: A number of risk factors for breast cancer have been

  6. Breast Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in the United States (other than skin cancer). Women with breast cancer have many treatment options, including surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. A woman diagnosed with breast cancer may receive more than one type of treatment.

  7. Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for professional printing [PDF-1.1MB] Cancer Home Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Breast Cancer: Know the Risks Many things can increase the ...

  8. Early-Stage Young Breast Cancer Patients: Impact of Local Treatment on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Munck, Linda de [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Visser, Otto [Comprehensive Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willemse, Pax H.B. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Siesling, Sabine [Comprehensive Cancer Center North East, Groningen/Enschede (Netherlands); Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maduro, John H., E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In young women, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), i.e., lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy, has been associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. Still, there is insufficient evidence that BCT impairs survival. The aim of our study was to compare the effect of BCT with mastectomy on overall survival (OS) in young women with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From two Dutch regional population-based cancer registries (covering 6.2 million inhabitants) 1,453 women <40 years with pathologically T1N0-1M0 breast cancer were selected. Cox regression survival analysis was used to study the effect of local treatment (BCT vs. mastectomy) stratified for nodal stage on survival and corrected for tumor size, age, period of diagnosis, and use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 10-year OS was 83% after BCT and 78% after mastectomy, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.72). In N0-patients, 10-year OS was 84% after BCT and 81% after mastectomy and local treatment was not associated with differences in OS (HR 1.19; 95% CI, 0.89-1.58; p = 0.25). Within the N1-patient group, OS was better after BCT compared with mastectomy, 79% vs. 71% at 10 years (HR 1.91; 95% CI, 1.28-2.84; p = 0.001) and in patients treated with adjuvant hormonal therapy (HR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this large population-based cohort of early-stage young breast cancer patients, 10-year OS was not impaired after BCT compared with mastectomy. Patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes had better prognosis after BCT than after mastectomy.

  9. Sentinel lymphadenectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer may reliably represent the axilla except for inflammatory breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vered Stearns; C. Alexander Ewing; Rebecca Slack; Marie F. Penannen; Daniel F. Hayes; Theodore N. Tsangaris

    2002-01-01

    Background  After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) undergo a modified radical mastectomy or\\u000a lumpectomy with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and radiotherapy. Sentinel lymphadenectomy (SL) is accepted for axillary\\u000a evaluation in early breast cancer. We assessed the feasibility and predictive value of SL after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Eligible women received neoadjuvant therapy for LABC and were scheduled to

  10. Limited-Field Radiation Therapy in the Management of Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank A. Vicini; Larry Kestin; Peter Chen; Pamela Benitez; Neal S. Goldstein; Alvaro Martinez

    2003-01-01

    Background: Several phase III trials have demonstrated equivalent long-term survival between breast conserving surgery plus radiation therapy and mastectomy in patients with early-stage breast cancer but have not provided infor- mation on the optimal volume of breast tissue requiring post-lumpectomy radiation therapy. Therefore, we exam- ined the 5-year results of a single institution's experience with radiation therapy limited to the

  11. Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ... Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

  12. Physician practice volume and alternative surgical treatment for breast cancer in Florida.

    PubMed Central

    Luther, S L; Studnicki, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether surgeon procedure volume is related to the selection of a surgical option (mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery) for breast cancer treatment . STUDY SETTING/STUDY DESIGN: Secondary data sources were used to study surgical procedures performed for female breast cancer in Florida during the years 1997-98 in a retrospective population-based analysis. DATA EXTRACTION: Surgical procedures for female breast cancer in Florida were identified during 1997 and 1998 (N = 28,380) by combining data from the Florida Acute Hospital and Short-term Psychiatric Inpatient Data Collection and the Ambulatory Outpatient Data Collection. A total of 1,320 physicians who provided breast surgical procedures in Florida during the two-year study period were identified. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After controlling for selected patient and physician characteristics, the lowest volume surgeons were nearly twice as likely to perform mastectomies rather th an breast-conserving surgery compared with the highest volume group. Patients with Medicaid as an insurer were also nearly twice as likely to receive mastectomies. Patient demographic factors such as age, while statistically significant, were shown to be far less predictive of procedure choice. Forty-two percent of the physicians performed fewer than two surgeries on average per year. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated by lower volume physicians have a greater likelihood of receiving mastectomies than do those patients treated by higher volume physicians. PMID:16148967

  13. Epigenomics and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Breast carcinogenesis involves genetic and epigenetic alterations that cause aberrant gene function. Recent progress in the knowledge of epigenomics has had a profound impact on the understanding of mechanisms leading to breast cancer, and consequently the development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Epigenetic regulation has been known to involve three mutually interacting events – DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosomal remodeling. These processes modulate chromatin structure to form euchromatin or heterochromatin, and in turn activate or silence gene expression. Alteration in expression of key genes through aberrant epigenetic regulation in breast cells can lead to initiation, promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis, and is even implicated in the generation of drug resistance. We currently review known roles of the epigenetic machinery in the development and recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, we highlight the significance of epigenetic alterations as predictive biomarkers and as new targets of anticancer therapy. PMID:19072646

  14. Smoking and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Peggy

    2013-03-01

    The potential role of smoking in breast cancer risk has been the subject of over 100 publications, numerous scientific reviews, and animated debate. Tobacco exposure is a well-established cause of lung cancer, and is thought to account for nearly one third of all cancer deaths. Tobacco smoke contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are known to be mammary carcinogens. Although not initially thought to be a tobacco-related cancer, over the last several decades evidence has been accumulating on the role of both active smoking and secondhand smoking in the etiology of breast cancer. The human health evidence has been systematically evaluated not only by several independent researchers but also by several expert agency panels including those of the U.S. Surgeon General, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and a coalition of Canadian health agencies. Although the assessments have varied with time and across reviewers, the most recent weight of the evidence has suggested a potentially casual role for active smoking and breast cancer, particularly for long-term heavy smoking and smoking initiation at an early age. The role of secondhand smoking and breast cancer is less clear, although there has been some suggestion for an increased risk for premenopausal breast cancer. Recent studies evaluating the possible modifying role of polymorphisms in genes involved in the metabolism of tobacco products, particularly NAT2, have contributed another dimension to these assessments, although to date that evidence remains equivocal. PMID:23179580

  15. Primary breast cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lickley, H. Lavina A.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives With respect to breast cancer in the elderly, to define “old” in the context of comorbidity and physiologic rather than chronologic age. In addition, after discussion of factors influencing decisions regarding screening, stage at presentation and treatment decisions, to present an approach to the treatment of primary breast cancer in the elderly, taking into account quality of life, expected outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Data sources A review of the medical literature from 1980 to 1996, using the MEDLINE database and 2 relevant studies from The Henrietta Banting Breast Centre Research Programme at Women’s College Hospital, Toronto. Study selection A large number of breast cancer studies that might provide a better understanding of primary breast cancer in the elderly. Data synthesis The studies reviewed demonstrated that the annual incidence of breast cancer increases with age, along with a longer life expectancy for women. There appears to be a delay in presentation for elderly women with breast cancer, related in part to patient and physician knowledge. Biennial mammography and physical examination are effective in women aged 50 to 74 years, but compliance with screening recommendations decreases with age. Although treatment goals are the same for women of all ages, most treatment decisions are based on studies that seldom include women over 65 years of age. Physicians tend to underestimate life expectancy and older women are less likely to seek information. Breast conserving surgery, partial mastectomy and even axillary dissection can be carried out under local anesthesia with little physiologic disturbance, but unless axillary dissection is required to make a treatment decision, it may be foregone in clinically node-negative elderly women. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in the elderly is not yet well established; tamoxifen is the usual adjuvant systemic therapy given to older women. For those who are truly infirm, tamoxifen alone can be considered. Studies to date do not clarify whether breast cancer in older women runs a more or less favourable course. However, locoregional recurrence appears to decrease with age. Deaths from competing causes are a confounding issue. Conclusions It is imperative to develop a coherent strategy for the treatment of primary breast cancer in the elderly that takes into account functional status and quality of life. Clinical trials must include older women and there must be good clinical trials designed specifically for older women. PMID:9336523

  16. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  17. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... patient’s general health. Stages of Breast Cancer Key Points After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  18. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... patient’s general health. Stages of Breast Cancer Key Points After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  19. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is breast cancer treated? Surgery for breast cancer Radiation therapy for breast cancer Chemotherapy for breast cancer Hormone therapy for breast ... upon how long the woman has been pregnant. Radiation therapy during ... with breast cancer. Since breast-conserving surgery (BCS) needs to be ...

  20. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane Scutt; Gillian A Lancaster; John T Manning

    2006-01-01

    Introduction  It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer,\\u000a and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched\\u000a healthy women.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease

  1. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... men treated? Surgery for breast cancer in men Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men ... is breast cancer in men treated? Next Topic Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men ...

  2. A review of the surgical management of breast cancer: plastic reconstructive techniques and timing implications.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Gedge D; Magarakis, Michael; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Jacobs, Lisa K; Manahan, Michele A; Flores, Jaime I

    2010-07-01

    The oncologic management of breast cancer has evolved over the past several decades from radical mastectomy to modern-day preservation of chest and breast structures. The increased rate of mastectomies over recent years made breast reconstruction an integral part of the breast cancer management. Plastic surgery now offers patients a wide variety of reconstruction options from primary closure of the skin flaps to performance of microvascular and autologous tissue transplantation. Well-coordinated partnerships between surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and patients address concerns of tumor control, cosmesis, and patients' wishes. The gamut of breast reconstruction options is reviewed, particularly noting state-of-the-art techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various timing modalities. PMID:20217253

  3. Immediate reconstruction with implants in women with invasive breast cancer does not affect oncological safety in a matched cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Eriksen; J. Frisell; M. Wickman; E. Lidbrink; K. Krawiec; K. Sandelin

    2011-01-01

    Physicians are still concerned about the oncological safety regarding immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) in breast cancer\\u000a patients. This study aimed to evaluate possible differences between local, regional, and distant recurrences between women\\u000a having implant-based reconstruction versus women operated with mastectomy alone. Secondary aims were to evaluate time to oncological\\u000a treatment as well as disease-free and breast-cancer-specific survival. In a retrospective

  4. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer. PMID:24824552

  5. Breast Cancer and the Environment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the IOM Reports Activities Meetings Print Print Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach Released: ... With more than 230,000 new cases of breast cancer expected to be diagnosed in the United States ...

  6. Influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Amit K; Buchholz, Thomas A

    2015-05-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a standard treatment option for patients with locally advanced operable breast cancer and is increasingly used in early breast cancer. Initial randomized trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy established equivalency to adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival, but they also demonstrated improved rates of breast conservation and the ability to modify the risk of locoregional recurrence after a favorable response to chemotherapy. High-quality nonrandomized data have helped to tailor radiotherapy treatment recommendations after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Results from an ongoing phase 3 randomized trial (NSABP B-51/RTOG 1304) will help to clarify the value of locoregional radiotherapy for patients with clinical N1 disease that becomes node negative after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:25727554

  7. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Multimedia gallery Multimedia Archive Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  8. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ... postmenopausal women. Summary Report: Early Reproductive Events and Breast Cancer Workshop Introduction The Early Reproductive Events and Breast ...

  9. Photodynamic therapy of breast cancer with photosense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Oumnova, Loubov V.; Vorozhcsov, Georgiu N.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using photosensitizer Photosense (PS) in dose 0.5 mg per kg of body weight have been provided in 24 patients with breast cancer. In 22 patients with T1-T2N0M0 primary tumor was treated as the preoperative treatment, radical mastectomy has been fulfilled 7-10 days after PDT with subsequent histological examination. 2 patients had recurrencies of breast cancer with lymph node metastases after radiotherapy. Fluorescent diagnostics of tumor, accumulation of PS in tumor, adjacent tissue, skin before and during PDT was fulfilled with spectranalyzer LESA-01. We used semiconductive laser for PDT - ? = 672+2nm, P=1,5 W, interstitial irradiation 2-24 hours after PS injection has been done in light dose 150-200 J/cm3, 1-3 irradiations with interval 24-48 hours and total light dose 400-600 J/cm3 depending mostly of size and fluorescent data. Partial regression of tumor with pathomorphosis of 2-4 degrees has been found in 19 cases. Our experience shows pronounced efficacy of PDT for treating breast cancer as preoperative modality and as palliation in cases of recurrencies.

  10. BCSC Grants: Breast Cancer Delays

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home   |   Data   |   Statistics   |   Tools   |   Collaborations   |   Work with Us   |   Publications   |   About   |   Links Ongoing Collaborations CISNET ACS FAVOR Comprehensive Cancer Centers Ancillary Studies Breast Cancer

  11. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. van der Groep

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may be missed, and small families and sometimes insufficient medical records may cause

  12. Randomized Trial of Drain Antisepsis After Mastectomy and Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Degnim, Amy C.; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Brahmbhatt, Rushin D.; Peled, Anne Warren; Loprinzi, Margie; Pavey, Emily S.; Boughey, Judy C.; Hieken, Tina J.; Jacobson, Steven; Lemaine, Valerie; Jakub, James W.; Irwin, Chetan; Foster, Robert D.; Sbitany, Hani; Cyr, Michel Saint; Duralde, Erin; Ramaker, Sheri; Chin, Robin; Sieg, Monica; Wildeman, Melissa; Scow, Jeffrey S.; Patel, Robin; Ballman, Karla; Baddour, Larry M.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this two-site randomized trial, we investigated the effect of antiseptic drain care on bacterial colonization of surgical drains and infection after immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction. Methods With IRB approval, we randomized patients undergoing bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction to drain antisepsis (treatment) for one side, with standard drain care (control) for the other. Antisepsis care included both: 1) chlorhexidine disc dressing at drain exit site(s), and 2) irrigation of drain bulbs twice daily with dilute sodium hypochlorite solution. Cultures were obtained from bulb fluid at one week and at drain removal, and from the subcutaneous drain tubing at removal. Positive cultures were defined as ?1+ growth for fluid and >50 CFU for tubing. Results Cultures of drain bulb fluid at one week (the primary endpoint) were positive in 9.9% of treatment sides (10/101) versus 20.8% (21/101) of control sides (p=0.02). Drain tubing cultures were positive in 0 treated drains versus 6.2% (6/97) of control drains (p=0.03). Surgical site infection occurred within 30 days in 0 antisepsis sides versus 3.8% (4/104) of control sides (p = 0.13), and within 1 year in 3/104 (2.9%) of antisepsis sides versus 6/104 (5.8%) of control sides (p = 0.45). Clinical infection occurred within one year in 9.7% (6/62) of colonized sides (tubing or fluid) versus 1.5% (2/136) of non-colonized sides (p = 0.03). Conclusions Simple and inexpensive local antiseptic interventions with a chlorhexidine disc and hypochlorite solution reduce bacterial colonization of drains, and reduced drain colonization was associated with fewer infections. PMID:25096386

  13. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-09

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Synchronous breast and colon cancer: factors determining treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, L; Robertson, I; Khan, W; Barry, K

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman presented with synchronous breast and colonic tumours, in the absence of family history. Following multidisciplinary discussion, the patient was started on endocrine therapy for breast cancer. Initial surgical management consisted of right hemicolectomy together with segmental resection of a serosal deposit adherent to the distal ileum, for a moderately differentiated pT4NO caecal carcinoma. Three months later, right mastectomy and axillary clearance confirmed node positive invasive ductal carcinoma. The original treatment plan was to prioritise adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer postmastectomy. However, the subsequent CT finding of an enlarged, suspicious mesenteric lymph node mass on repeat staging raised concern regarding its origin. Image-guided biopsy revealed metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma and the patient was switched to a colon cancer chemotherapy regime. Following adjuvant chemotherapy for colonic carcinoma, an en-bloc surgical resection of the enlarging metastatic nodal mass was performed with clear resection margins. The patient is currently asymptomatic. PMID:23845673

  16. The utility of hyperthermia for local recurrence of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its sensitizing capabilities. Patients who suffer from superficial recurrences of breast cancer have poor clinical outcomes. Skin metastases may particularly impair the quality of life due to the physical appearance, odor and bleeding. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Nine years post-operatively, local metastases developed in the left axillary area (measuring 5 cm in diameter). Initially the tumor did not respond to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, we added hyperthermia combined with them. Eight weeks later, the tumor became nearly flat and the patient noted improved activity in her daily life. Conclusion Hyperthermia may accelerate the antitumor effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This treatment provides an alternative for unresectable breast cancer skin metastases. PMID:23017037

  17. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

  18. Inheritance of proliferative breast disease in breast cancer kindreds

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, M.H.; Cannon-Albright, L.A.; Goldgar, D.E.; Ward, J.H.; Marshall, C.J.; Schumann, G.B.; Hogle, H.; McWhorter, W.P.; Wright, E.C.; Tran, T.D.; Bishop, D.T.; Kushner, J.P.; Eyre, H.J. (Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City (United States))

    1990-12-21

    Previous studies have emphasized that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is rare and is expressed primarily as premenopausal breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, or both. Proliferative breast disease (PBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of breast cancer and appears to be a precursor lesion. PBD and breast cancer were studied in 103 women from 20 kindreds that were selected for the presence of two first degree relatives with breast cancer and in 31 control women. Physical examination, screening mammography, and four-quadrant fine-needle breast aspirates were performed. Cytologic analysis of breast aspirates revealed PBD in 35% of clinically normal female first degree relatives of breast cancer cases and in 13% of controls. Genetic analysis suggests that genetic susceptibility causes both PBD and breast cancer in these kindreds. This study supports the hypothesis that this susceptibility is responsible for a considerable portion of breast cancer, including unilateral and postmenopausal breast cancer.

  19. Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer: management and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis from breast cancer is a very rare clinical entity. We describe an extremely rare case of breast cancer metastasis to the rectus abdominis muscle. Our patient, who had undergone a left modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer four years ago, presented with a painful abdominal mass. Computed tomography scans showed a rim-enhancing mass with central hypoatennuation within the sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle. A Fine needle aspiration biopsy was initially performed and the findings were suggestive of malignancy. The muscle lesion was then resected and the histopathological analysis showed metastasis of breast cancer. Through our review of the literature, we found that only two cases of rectus abdominis muscle metastasis from breast cancer have been reported so far. This case highlights the need to rule out muscle metastatic lesions in patients with history of breast cancer presenting with these clinical and imaging characteristics. Differentiation from primary sarcoma is of paramount importance. Skeletal muscle metastases usually indicate an advanced disease associated with poor prognosis. Treatment should be individualized depending on the patient's clinical condition. PMID:25159186

  20. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  1. How Cancer Treatment Can Affect Fertility

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products ... Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

  2. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24?/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-?B, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  3. More Breast Cancer Patients Opting for Lumpectomy

    MedlinePLUS

    More Breast Cancer Patients Opting for Lumpectomy: Study Experts often recommend this breast-conserving surgery, but many with early disease ... News) -- The percentage of women with early stage breast cancer who choose to have the breast-conserving surgery ...

  4. Management of early cancer of the breast. Report on an international multicentre trial supported by the Cancer Research Campaign.

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    In the largest controlled clinical study so far undertaken on the management of early cancer of the breast in women the results of a radical regimen (simple mastectomy and radiotherapy) were compared with those of a conservative policy (simple mastectomy alone). The study included enough patients (2268) to ensure that small but significant differences between the two treatments would emerge. With a five-year follow-up there was no evidence that routine postoperative radiotherapy was harmful or that it conferred further benefit as regards survival or distant recurrence. Radiotherapy did, however, reduce the incidence of local recurrence. Neither form of treatment can counter occult disease far from the breast that is present at the time of initial treatment, which probably accounts for the high death rate from breast cancer, but the results of the study would support the view that conservative primary treatment and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy may be the treatment of choice in future. PMID:773497

  5. Spectrum of very early breast cancer in a setting without organised screening

    PubMed Central

    Bhoo-Pathy, N; Subramaniam, S; Taib, N A; Hartman, M; Alias, Z; Tan, G-H; Ibrahim, R I; Yip, C-H; Verkooijen, H M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Within a setting without organised breast cancer screening, the characteristics and survival of very early breast cancer were determined. Methods: All 4930 women diagnosed with breast cancer in University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia from 1993 to 2011 were included. Factors associated with very early presentation (stage I) at diagnosis were identified. Tumour characteristics, management patterns, and survival of very early breast cancer were described, and where appropriate, compared with other settings. Results: Proportion of women presenting with stage I breast cancer significantly increased from 15.2% to 25.2% over two decades. Factors associated with very early presentation were Chinese ethnicity, positive family history of breast cancer, and recent period of diagnosis. Within stage I breast cancers, median tumour size at presentation was 1.5?cm. A majority of stage I breast cancer patients received mastectomy, which was associated with older age, Chinese ethnicity, postmenopausal status, and larger tumours. Chemotherapy was administered in 36% of patients. Five-year age-adjusted relative survival for women with stage I breast cancer was 99.1% (95% CI: 97.6–99.6%). Conclusions: The proportion of women presenting with very early breast cancer in this setting without organised screening is increasing. These women seem to survive just as well as their counterparts from affluent settings. PMID:24736587

  6. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  7. [Breast cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Delpech, Yann; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    The surgery for breast cancer is frequently the first step in a multi-disciplinary care. It allows for local control, but also to establish crucial prognostic factor indicating potential adjuvant therapy. The current trend s towards de-escalation of surgical treatment for reducing the functional and aesthetic morbidity. At the local level, this de-escalation has been made possible by performing most often breast conservative surgery because of the development of oncoplastic techniques, but also because of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At the axillary level, the reduction of morbidity has been made possible by the advent of the sentinel node biopsy which is more and more indicated year after year. PMID:24579336

  8. Cancer risk of incremental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in electrocautery smoke for mastectomy personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electrocautery applications in surgical operations produce evasive odorous smoke in the cleanest operation rooms. Because of the incomplete combustion of electrical current in the tissues and blood vessels during electrocautery applications, electrocautery smoke (ES) containing significant unknown chemicals and biological forms is released. The potential hazards and cancer risk should be further investigated from the perspective of the occupational health of surgical staff. Methods The particle number concentration and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ES were thoroughly investigated in 10 mastectomies to estimate the cancer risk for surgical staff. The particle number concentration and gaseous/particle PAHs at the surgeons’ and anesthetic technologists’ (AT) breathing heights were measured with a particle counter and filter/adsorbent samplers. PAHs were soxhlet-extracted, cleaned, and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Abundant submicron particles and high PAH concentrations were found in ES during regular surgical mastectomies. Most particles in ES were in the size range of 0.3 to 0.5 ?m, which may potentially penetrate through the medical masks into human respiration. The average particle/gaseous phase PAH concentrations at the surgeon’s breathing height were 131 and 1,415 ng/m3, respectively, which is 20 to 30 times higher than those in regular outdoor environments. By using a toxicity equivalency factor, the cancer risk for the surgeons and anesthetic technologists was calculated to be 117?×?10-6 and 270?×?10-6, respectively; the higher cancer risk for anesthetic technologists arises due to the longer working hours in operation rooms. Conclusions The carcinogenic effects of PAHs in ES on the occupational health of surgical staff should not be neglected. The use of an effective ES evacuator or smoke removal apparatus is strongly suggested to diminish the ES hazards to surgical staff. PMID:24499532

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Chen, C.-J. [Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou Medical Center, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Ann-Joy [Department of Medical Biotechnology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

  10. Birth weight, breast cancer susceptibility loci, and breast cancer risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rulla M. Tamimi; Pagona Lagiou; Kamila Czene; Jianjun Liu; Anders Ekbom; Chung-Cheng Hsieh; Hans-Olov Adami; Dimitrios Trichopoulos; Per Hall

    2010-01-01

    Background  There is considerable evidence that birth weight is positively associated with breast cancer risk, and seven single-nucleotide\\u000a polymorphisms (SNPs) have been conclusively associated with this risk. We have hypothesized that breast cancer susceptibility\\u000a loci may have a greater influence on breast cancer risk among women with higher birth weight, who are expected to have a larger\\u000a pool of mammary stem

  11. Cyclin E Expression in Operable Breast Cancer Quantified Using Real-Time RT-PCR: A Comparative Study with Immunostaining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr Potemski; Elzbieta Pluciennik; Andrzej K. Bednarek; Renata Kusinska; Dorota Jesionek-Kupnicka; Grazyna Pasz-Walczak; Cezary Watala; Radzislaw Kordek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The main purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cyclin E expression levels in operable breast cancer patients determined using real-time RT-PCR and immuno- staining. The prognostic relevance of cyclin E was also investigated. Methods: Specimens of invasive ductal breast cancer tissues obtained from 124 women during radical mastectomy were analyzed. Results: Of the tumor samples, 40.3 and

  12. Breast-Feeding May Lower Breast Cancer Recurrence, Death

    MedlinePLUS

    Breast-Feeding May Lower Breast Cancer Recurrence, Death: Study Strongest benefit seen in most common types of tumors, ... National Cancer Institute . Previous research has found that breast-feeding is linked with a lower risk of developing ...

  13. Radiotherapy in the treatment of hereditary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Lori J; Haffty, Bruce G

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer represents approximately 5% to 10% of breast cancers and a larger portion of patients with early-onset disease. Given the relatively recent identification of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the available literature with respect to outcomes related to radiation therapy has inherent limitations with relatively small patient numbers and a lack of prospective randomized trials. There is, however, a growing body of literature describing treatment and toxicity outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery and after mastectomy for breast cancer patients who have BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Acknowledging the limitations in the available data, there does not appear to be any evidence of more severe normal tissue reactions or compromised long-term survival rates in women electing breast-conserving surgery and radiation. These studies are reviewed in this article. Outcomes related to radiation therapy in patients with variants in other breast cancer-related genes, such as p53, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, and PTEN, are even less well documented because of the paucity of data. Available reports on radiation-related outcomes in these and single nucleotide polymorphisms in radiation repair and response genes are discussed. PMID:21134653

  14. Quality of Life Influenced by Primary Surgical Treatment for Stage I-III Breast Cancer—Long-Term Follow-Up of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Janni; D. Rjosk; Th. Dimpfl; K. Haertl; B. Strobl; F. Hepp; A. Hanke; F. Bergauer; H. Sommer

    2001-01-01

    Background: Breast-conserving therapy has been demonstrated to be just as safe and a less disruptive experience compared with mastectomy for surgically manageable breast cancer. There is, however, no agreement in the literature about the impact of these procedures on several important aspects of quality of life (QOL). The purpose of the present study is to compare the long-term impact of

  15. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  16. Breast Cancer in Men: Emasculation by Association?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darrell T. Bunkley; John D. Robinson; Nelson E. Bennett; Sherilyn Gordon

    2000-01-01

    The occurrence of breast cancer in men is rare in comparison to women. Public knowledge that men can get breast cancer and of male breast self-examination are lacking. Research in the course and treatment of breast cancer in men is needed. Men generally present in more advanced stages of breast cancer than women, and have a poorer prognosis. In this

  17. Screening for breast cancer with MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth A Morris

    2003-01-01

    Breast MRI has emerged as an extremely powerful tool in breast imaging. The use of breast MRI for cancer detection has the potential to change our current algorithms in the detection of breast cancer. By being able to detect cancer that is occult on conventional imaging, such as mammography and sonography, MRI can detect early breast cancer that was previously

  18. Breast cancer susceptibility loci and mammographic density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rulla M. Tamimi; David Cox; Peter Kraft; Graham A. Colditz; Susan E. Hankinson; David J. Hunter

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recently, the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study and identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer risk. Given the high degree of heritability of mammographic density and its strong association with breast cancer, it was hypothesised that breast cancer susceptibility loci may also be associated with breast density and provide insight

  19. The genetics of breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra J. Murray

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest cancer affecting women. A family history of breast cancer increases a woman's lifetime risk of developing the disease. Most of the genetic risk is due to low-risk and moderate-risk susceptibility alleles rather than high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these two tumour suppressor genes only account for about 2% of all breast

  20. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petra van der Groep; Elsken van der Wall; Paul J. van Diest

    2011-01-01

    Background  Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast\\u000a cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11\\/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  3. CRN - Cancer Care & Treatment: Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is a disease primarily of older women. The incidence of breast cancer reaches its maximum in the ninth decade of life. It is a serious disease in older women. Care of older women is further complicated by the fact that age is not only a major risk factor for breast cancer, but also for an increased burden of co-morbid disease and functional disability.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenny E. Chu; Alison L. Allan

    \\u000a Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. While it is highly treatable during\\u000a the primary stages, the disease is often lethal if it successfully metastasizes. Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) show distinct\\u000a similarities to normal breast stem cells, have been shown to be the driving force behind primary tumorigenesis, and are postulated\\u000a to

  5. [Long-term survival of a patient with esophageal metastasis from breast cancer treated with esophagectomy].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Ryohei; Kimura, Yutaka; Kawase, Tomono; Kamigaki, Shunji; Yamamura, Jun; Nakamura, Yukio; Munakata, Satoru; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal metastasis from breast cancer is rarely observed. We encountered a case of long-term survival after esophageal metastasis from breast cancer that was treated with esophagectomy. A 79-year-old woman developed dysphagia 26 years after radical mastectomy. Endoscopic examination revealed stenosis at the mid-thoracic esophagus. An esophageal biopsy led to a diagnosis of undifferentiated cancer. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a massive tumor in the esophagus, but no distant metastases. Esophagectomy was performed with the suspicion of primary or metastatic esophageal cancer. Histopathologically, the excised tumor was an adenocarcinoma, which had histopathological features similar to that of the breast cancer. Accordingly, the adenocarcinoma was diagnosed as esophageal metastasis of the breast cancer. The patient is still alive 8 years after the esophagectomy. PMID:25731410

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  7. Impact of breast MRI on surgical treatment, axillary approach, and systemic therapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mameri, Claudia S; Kemp, Claudio; Goldman, Suzan M; Sobral, Luiz A; Ajzen, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how often breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brings additional information that influences management of patients with breast cancer concerning surgical treatment, axillary lymph node approach, and systemic therapy. From July 2004 to July 2005, 99 patients recently diagnosed with breast cancer in clinical stages 0, I, and II were prospectively evaluated about their therapeutic plans, at first based on usual protocol (physical examination, mammography and ultrasound) and next going through bilateral breast MR. Examinations were carried out at 1.5 T on five sequences of FSPGR 3D for 90 seconds (four post-gadolinium diethylenetriaminepenta acetic acid 0.16 mM/Kg). Parameters analyzed on MRI were extension of primary lesion; detection of multifocality, multicentricity, or contra lateral lesion; muscular or skin involvement; and presence of lymph node involvement. Pathologic confirmation of additional lesions was achieved by core or excisional biopsy. MRI made 69 additional findings in 53 patients. Fifty-one findings were true-positives (51/69 = 73.9%) including 16 larger single lesions; 18 cases of multifocality; 7 cases of multicentricity; 3 cases of contra lateral lesion; 5 cases of lymph node involvement (one of them involved medial thoracic chain); 1 with muscular involvement; 1 with skin involvement. MRI has changed previous management plans in 44.4% of 99 patients. We observed increase in mastectomies (26.8%) on axillary lymph node dissection (25%) and changes on systemic therapy (20.2%), all because of additional MRI true-positive findings. Breast MRI alters significantly the rate of mastectomy, the approach of axillary chain for staging, and the use of systemic therapy because of its accuracy in evaluating breast cancer local extent. PMID:18476882

  8. Regional Breast Cancer Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moshe Z. Papa; Siegal Sadetzki

    Advances in technology and the increase in screening for breast cancer that identifies tumors at earlier stages have made\\u000a it possible to destroy tumors in situ without surgery. This can also be used to treat locally advanced tumors. These locoregional\\u000a ablative techniques include minimally invasive surgical as well as noninvasive ablative modalities, new radiation technologies,\\u000a and regional chemotherapy. New developments

  9. Psychological and social adjustment to mastectomy: a two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Morris, T; Greer, H S; White, P

    1977-11-01

    A consecutive series of 160 women admitted to hospital for breast tumor biopsy was assessed prior to, and at 3, 12, and 24 months following operation for marital, sexual, interpersonal and work adjustment, depression, and personality characteristics by means of rating scales based on structures interviews and standard tests. By 2 years there wery no significant differences in social adjustment between mastectomy patients and benign breast disease controls; 70% of cancer patients were no longer stressed by mastectomy at 1 year. Factors predicting poor adjustment to mastectomy were high preoperative scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Neuroticism Scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory; deterioration in sexual adjustment was associated with biological or chronological perimenopausal status. Significantly more cancer than benign disease patients were dissatisfied with the information they received about operation and diagnosis. Implications of these findings for the care of the mastectomy patient are discussed. PMID:922679

  10. Breast cancer--patient choice of treatment: preliminary communication.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, J J; Leinster, S J; Slade, P D

    1985-01-01

    Forty patients who have undergone treatment for breast cancer (mastectomy or lumpectomy plus radiotherapy) were assessed, both preoperatively and at intervals up to one year following surgery, using tests of anxiety, depression, body satisfaction, marital adjustment, self-esteem, sociability and life change. The women were also interviewed to assess degree of concern about the disease, appearance and treatment. Wherever appropriate, patients were given a choice of treatment. Very little adverse psychosocial reaction has been found. It would appear that this is largely because most patients could opt for treatment which resulted in minimal disfigurement. PMID:3968671

  11. The Latina Breast Cancer Screening SacleBeliefs about breast cancer and breast cancer screening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelinn A. Borrayo; Patricia González; Randall Swaim; AL Marcus; Estevan Flores; Paula Espinoza

    2009-01-01

    The Latina Breast Cancer Screening (LBCS) was developed to measure Latinas’ culturally-shared health beliefs about breast cancer and breast cancer screening. A 60-item LBCS scale was tested with 288 participants and reduced to 35 items using principal components analyses. The 35-item LBCS scale and other measures were administered to a second sample of 147 participants to establish the scale’s validity

  12. Breast Cancer: Screening for a Cure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda S. Haigh

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, an estimated 275,000 women in the United States were diagnosed with breast cancer and 41,000 patients died of this disease. 1 Because breast cancer is a common disease and early stage cancers detected by mammography are more successfully treated, mam- mogram screening programs have been instrumental in reducing breast cancer mortality. The morbidity of breast cancer treatment has

  13. Psychological impact after mastectomy among Nepalese women: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, K

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women. Cancer epidemiologists have stated that breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, Nepal is not an exception. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women of Nepal after cervical cancer. A Qualitative phenomenological study was done to explore the psychological impact of women with mastectomy after diagnosis of breast cancer. In-depth study was done with ten women age ranging from 36 to 50 years. Ten women were interviewed which was recorded, and verbatim were transcribed before taking next interview. The interviews were analyzed in three stages as stated by Miles and Hubermans. Findings revealed that respondents expressed the fear of death, emotional impact of the loss of breast disfigurement, loss of femininity, fear of recurrence of disease, and concern about their family. Breast cancer and mastectomy have impact on women psychosocial state. They develop stress due to loss of body part, loss of femininity, fear of recurrence of disease, fear of cost and prolong treatment protocol. PMID:23671969

  14. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using ?2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model of survivorship care. Primary care physicians are confident in their ability to manage physical effects related to breast cancer, with the exception of lymphedema. Low confidence ratings among both groups in psychosocial aspects of care suggest an area for improvement.

  15. [Lymphoscintigraphy in the diagnosis and prognosis of post-mastectomy edema of the extremities].

    PubMed

    Miasnikova, M O; Sedov, V M; Katsev, V M; Dmitrieva, L A; Ermoshchenkova, M V

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic lymphoscintigraphy provides adequate means for in vivo contrast-enhanced examination of functional lymph collectors in the extremeties which in turn offers best advantage in diagnosing post-mastectomy edema of the arms. A comparative study was concerned with lymph flow in healthy subjects, breast cancer patients and those with post-mastectomy edema and without it after complete course of treatment. A group of risk for edema was formed. PMID:12715377

  16. Benign Breast Disease and the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn C. Hartmann; Thomas A. Sellers; Marlene H. Frost; Wilma L. Lingle; Amy C. Degnim; Karthik Ghosh; Robert A. Vierkant; Shaun D. Maloney; V. Shane Pankratz; David W. Hillman; Vera J. Suman; Jo Johnson; Cassann Blake; Thea Tlsty; Celine M. Vachon; L. Joseph Melton III; Daniel W. Visscher

    2005-01-01

    background Benign breast disease is an important risk factor for breast cancer. We studied a large group of women with benign breast disease to obtain reliable estimates of this risk. methods We identified all women who received a diagnosis of benign breast disease at the Mayo Clinic between 1967 and 1991. Breast-cancer events were obtained from medical records and questionnaires.

  17. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  18. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-20

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Cancer: One Man's Story Male Breast Cancer: One Man's Story Posted in: Risk and Prevention , Treatments and ... the American Cancer Society, an estimated 2,000 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. ...

  3. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... symptoms can mean there is a problem. What causes Breast cancer? Your genes and your hormones play a role ... synthetic form of progesterone, another female hormone) can cause breast tissue to grow faster than normal. Cancer usually appears in tissue that grows fast. hoW ...

  4. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. New concept for immediate breast reconstruction for invasive cancers: feasibility, oncological safety and esthetic outcome of post-neoadjuvant therapy immediate breast reconstruction versus delayed breast reconstruction: a prospective pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Ludovic Giacalone; Gauthier Rathat; Jean Pierre Daures; Paul Benos; David Azria; Caroline Rouleau

    2010-01-01

    Feasibility and oncological safety of post-adjuvant skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) plus immediate breast reconstruction (IBR)\\u000a cannot be evaluated by randomized trials. However, comparative study could modify guidelines for the oncosurgical treatment\\u000a of invasive breast cancer. Our study compared the feasibility, oncological safety and esthetic outcome of SSM plus latissimus\\u000a dorsi (LD) flap IBR after chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT) with the

  6. Pertuzumab: development beyond breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, Philippe; Leblanc, Julie; Goldbarg, Veronica; Wendling, Frédérique; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Pertuzumab (Perjeta®) represents the first monoclonal antibody in a new class of agents known as dimerization inhibitors. Pertuzumab was recently approved for the treatment of Human Epidermal Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and neo-adjuvant setting. This approval for first-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer was based on the results of a large randomized multicenter phase III trial showing a significant improvement in overall survival when pertuzumab was combined with trastuzumab and docetaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. In the neoadjuvant setting, dual HER2 blockade by trastuzumab and pertuzumab improved the complete pathological response rate. However, pertuzumab development was not confined to breast cancer and in the present article, we focus on pertuzumab data for solid tumors other than breast cancer, and review the biological rationale for its use, the published pre-clinical and clinical evidence, as well ongoing trials. PMID:24692675

  7. Genetic risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nasir, A; Shackelford, R E; Anwar, F; Yeatman, T J

    2009-12-01

    Several cutting-edge strategies are being used to evaluate candidate genetic risk factors for breast cancer. These include linkage analysis for mapping out BRCA1 and BRCA2, mutational screening of candidate risk genes like CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1 and PALB2, which are associated with an intermediate level of breast cancer risk. Genome-wide association studies have revealed several low-penetrance breast cancer risk alleles. The predisposition factors are associated with different levels of breast cancer risk. Relative to control population, the risk in patients harboring high-risk BRCA1 and 2 mutations is over 10-fold, with intermediate penetrance genes 2 to 4-fold and with low penetrance alleles less than 1.5-fold. Overall, these factors account for about 25% of the genetic risk for breast cancer. In the remainder, genetic factors to contribute to the risk of breast cancer remain unknown and are a subject of current investigation. With discovery and validation of newer and clinically relevant predisposition factors, additional breast cancer risk categories may be recognized. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing allows identification of individuals at increased risk of breast cancer who are offered risk-reducing interventions. Targeted therapies are being developed that may refine management of patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further genome-wide studies are required to identify clinically relevant molecular factors that will allow more accurate and widely applicable genetic risk stratification. Current efforts in discovery, validation and qualification of molecular markers of breast cancer risk offer considerable promise in the future to develop more accurate breast cancer risk assessment along with development of more effective chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:20046159

  8. Surgical Management for Early-Stage Bilateral Breast Cancer Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing-yan; Quan, Chen-lian; Tan, Yu-long; Liu, Guang-yu; Shao, Zhi-min; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the current surgical management strategy for bilateral breast cancer (BBC) patients and to assess the changes in this strategy in China. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients with early-stage BBC who underwent surgical treatment at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center between June 2007 and June 2014. Results A total of 15,337 patients with primary breast cancer were identified. Of these patients, 218 (1.5%) suffered from synchronous bilateral breast cancer (sBBC), and 296 (2.0%) suffered from metachronous bilateral breast cancer (mBBC). Patients with a lobular carcinoma component, those with estrogen receptor-positive cancer, and those with an accompanying sclerosing adenosis in the affected breast tended to develop BBC. The rates of bilateral mastectomy, breast conserving therapy, reconstruction, and combined surgeries were 86.2%, 6.4%, 3.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, for patients with sBBC and 81.1%, 4.4%, 3.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, for patients with mBBC. The interval between bilateral cancers, age at first diagnosis of breast cancer, histopathological type, and stage have significant impacts on the choice of surgery for patients with BBC. Conclusions Bilateral mastectomy was the dominant surgical management for patients with BBC in China, despite the increased application of breast reconstruction surgery observed in recent years. Bilateral prosthetic breast reconstruction was the ideal choice for patients with sBBC. Chinese surgeons should take responsibility for patient education and inform their patients about their surgical options. PMID:25874699

  9. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... men treated? Surgery for breast cancer in men Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men ... these may be used after surgery and/or radiation therapy. Regional recurrence: When breast cancer comes back in nearby lymph nodes (such as ...

  10. Family history of breast cancer and all-cause mortality after breast cancer diagnosis in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen T. Chang; Roger L. Milne; Kelly-Anne Phillips; Jane C. Figueiredo; Meera Sangaramoorthy; Theresa H. M. Keegan; Irene L. Andrulis; John L. Hopper; Pamela J. Goodwin; Frances P. O’Malley; Nayana Weerasooriya; Carmel Apicella; Melissa C. Southey; Michael L. Friedlander; Graham G. Giles; Alice S. Whittemore; Dee W. West; Esther M. John

    2009-01-01

    Although having a family history of breast cancer is a well established breast cancer risk factor, it is not known whether\\u000a it influences mortality after breast cancer diagnosis. We studied 4,153 women with first primary incident invasive breast\\u000a cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 2000, and enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry through population-based sampling\\u000a in Northern California, USA; Ontario,

  11. Galectin-3 as a Marker and Potential Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Xi; Duan, Chao; Liu, Caigang; Zhao, Zuowei

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P?=?0.001). Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation. PMID:25254965

  12. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC) is the most common hereditary form of breast and ovarian cancer. About 2% of women

  13. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-06

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  14. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-01

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  15. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Mohr, Sharif Burgette

    2012-01-01

    and breast cancer with consideration of the methodological issues. Cancer causes &and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Causesand breast cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Cancer Causes

  16. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  18. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Er?) dimers wherein the ligand ER? dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-?-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5?-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ER? dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ER? dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  19. Psychosocial problems among younger women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Crawford, Sybil; Manuel, Janeen

    2004-05-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age often have concerns less frequently faced by older women. A cross-sectional survey of 204 women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger within the past 3.5 years was conducted to examine issues particularly faced by younger women. The questionnaire included standardized measures of problems related to breast cancer (CARES) and open-ended questions asking women about their experiences. Concerns about premature menopause and pregnancy related issues, among those women for whom these issues were applicable, had the highest ratings as problems experienced by women since their diagnosis. Among all women, sexual functioning was a greater problem than lack of sexual interest, and body image was of moderate concern. Overall, relationships with partners were not a problem. In multivariate analyses, having a mastectomy was associated with greater problems with body image and interest in sex. Chemotherapy was associated with greater sexual dysfunction. Responses to open-ended questions were particularly informative and reflected the diversity of responses women have to breast cancer. Findings reinforce the need to develop interventions to help women deal with premature menopause and problems with sexual functioning following chemotherapy. PMID:15133771

  20. The ability of intra-operative perfusion mapping with laser-assisted indocyanine green angiography to predict mastectomy flap necrosis in breast reconstruction: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Munabi, Naikhoba C O; Olorunnipa, Olushola B; Goltsman, David; Rohde, Christine H; Ascherman, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    Mastectomy skin flap ischaemia leading to necrosis is a common occurrence. Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) angiography can assist to locate these poorly perfused areas intra-operatively. Our study aims to identify specific perfusion values produced by ICG angiography that accurately predict mastectomy flap necrosis. A total of 42 patients undergoing autologous or implant-based breast reconstruction had mastectomy flaps imaged using laser-assisted ICG angiography at the completion of reconstruction. Intra-operative perfusion values were correlated with postoperative skin flap outcomes. Risk factors for abnormal perfusion were recorded and analysed. A total of 62 breast reconstructions were imaged, including 48 tissue expander reconstructions, six transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps, six deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and two direct-to-implant reconstructions. Eight cases (13%) of full-thickness skin necrosis were identified postoperatively. A SPY Elite(®) value of ? 7 accurately predicted the development of flap necrosis at 88% sensitivity and 83% specificity. False-positive cases (those with perfusion values ? 7 which did not develop necrosis) were more likely to have a smoking history and/or to have had an epinephrine-containing tumescent solution used during mastectomy. Excluding patients with smoking or epinephrine use, a SPY value of ? 7 predicted flap necrosis with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 97%. Thus, these data suggest that laser-assisted ICG angiography predicts postoperative outcomes with high accuracy. In our series, a SPY value of ? 7 correlated well with mastectomy flap necrosis. Furthermore, smoking and intra-operative injections containing epinephrine should be considered when evaluating low perfusion values as they can lead to false-positive test results. PMID:24507962

  1. Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to skull base metastasis from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pavithran, K; Doval, D C; Hukku, S; Jena, A

    2001-11-01

    We describe a 44-year-old woman who presented with an isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by a skull base metastasis from breast cancer. The patient had a modified radical mastectomy followed by local radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months later she presented with difficulty in speaking. Physical examination revealed an isolated left hypoglossal nerve paralysis. The MRI scan showed a mass lesion involving the left occipital condyle extending into hypoglossal canal. PMID:11903195

  2. ``In vivo'' Dosimetry in Tangential and Axilosupraclavicular Radiation Fields for Breast Cancer Postmastectomy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Heredia A.; Ruiz, Trejo C. G.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Poitevin, Chacón M. A.; Flores, J. M. Castro; Rodríguez, M. Ponce; Ángeles, Zaragoza S. O.; Buenfil, Burgos A. E.

    2008-08-01

    This work is an "in vivo" dosimetry study for breast cancer patients, treated with external radiotherapy. Patients who have suffered a modified radical mastectomy have been included in the study. Measurements will be made with thermoluminescent dosimeters and with radiochromic films. Such dosimetry will let us know the dose distribution in the zone which the applied beams overlap and compare the measureddose with that calculated one using the Eclipse 6.5 (Varian) planning system.

  3. Radio-induced malignancies after breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are no specific recommendations for the management of breast cancer patients with germ-line p53 mutations, an exceptional genetic condition, particularly regarding postoperative radiotherapy. Preclinical data suggested that p53 mutations conferred enhanced radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo and the few clinical observations showed that Li-Fraumeni families were at a higher risk of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Methods We reviewed a cohort of patients with germ-line p53 mutations who had been treated for breast cancer as the first tumor event. We assessed their outcome and the incidence of secondary radio-induced malignancies. Results Among 47 documented Li-Fraumeni families treated from 1997 to 2007 at the Institut Gustave Roussy, 8 patients had been diagnosed with breast cancer as the first tumor event. Three patients had undergone conservative breast surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy and five patients had undergone a mastectomy (3 with postoperative radiotherapy). Thus, 6/8 patients had received postoperative radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 6 years. Median age at the diagnosis of the primary breast cancer was 30 years. The histological characteristics were as follows: intraductal carcinoma in situ (n = 3), invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 4) and a phyllodes tumor (n = 1). Among the 6 patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy, the following events had occurred: 3 ipsilateral breast recurrences, 3 contralateral breast cancers, 2 radio-induced cancers, and 3 new primaries (1 of which was an in-field thyroid cancer with atypical histology). In contrast, only one event had occurred (a contralateral breast cancer) among patients who had not received radiation therapy. Conclusions These observations could argue in favor of bilateral mastectomy and the avoidance of radiotherapy. PMID:21059199

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  5. Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Breast Cancer and Women with Disabilities Language: English Español (Spanish) ... years old, get a mammogram every two years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. And ...

  6. Positive correlation between expression level of mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase and breast cancer grade

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming plays an essential role in supporting the survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) directs serine to the metabolism of one-carbon unit and the synthesis of thymidilate as a key factor in this metabolic shift. Although the mitochondrial isoform of SHMT (SHMT2) has been proven to be a crucial factor in the serine/glycine metabolism in several cancer cell types, the expression pattern of SHMT2 and the correlation of expression level of SHMT2 and other clinicopathological parameters in clinical breast cancer remain to be explored. In this research, 76 breast cancer patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy were enrolled for immunohistochemical analysis of the expression level of SHMT2 in their cancerous breast tissues for comparison with that in matching, distant noncancerous tissues. The results showed that SHMT2 was not expressed in the distant noncancerous cells. In contrast, SHMT2 protein could be stained in all breast cancer samples at varying degrees. Higher level of SHMT2 was expressed in grade III breast cancer cells than that those in grade I–II (P<0.05). In conclusion, SHMT2 was highly expressed in breast cancer cells, and the expression level of SHMT2 was positively correlated with breast cancer grade, suggesting that SHMT2 could be a target for anticancer therapies. PMID:25999742

  7. Factors Associated With Guideline-Concordant Use of Radiotherapy After Mastectomy in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network

    SciTech Connect

    Punglia, Rinaa S. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: rpunglia@partners.org; Hughes, Melissa E. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Edge, Stephen B. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Theriault, Richard L. [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bookman, Michael A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wilson, John L. [Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard Solove Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Ottesen, Rebecca A.; Niland, Joyce C. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Weeks, Jane C. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rates and determinants of appropriate and inappropriate use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), as defined by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) practice guidelines, among women with Stage I-II breast cancer (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition). Methods and Materials: Using clinical characteristics, 1,620 consecutive patients at eight NCCN institutions who had undergone mastectomy between July 1997 and June 2002 were classified into three cohorts according to whether the guidelines (1) recommended PMRT, (2) recommended against PMRT, or (3) made no definitive PMRT recommendation. We defined the absence of PMRT in the first cohort as underuse and receipt of PMRT in the second cohort as overuse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to investigate the association of clinical and sociodemographic factors with PMRT. Results: Overall, 23.8% of patients received PMRT. This included 199 (83.6%) of 238 in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort, 58 (5.6%) of 1,029 in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort, and 127 (38.6%) of 329 in the 'consider PMRT' cohort. The only factor associated with underuse in the 'recommend PMRT' cohort was nonreceipt of chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR], 0.08; p <0.0001). In addition to tumor characteristics, the factors associated with overuse in the 'recommend against PMRT' cohort included age <50 years (OR, 2.28; p = 0.048), NCCN institution (OR, 1.04-8.29; p = 0.026), higher education (OR, 3.49; p = 0.001), and no reconstructive surgery (OR, 2.44; p = 0.019). The factors associated with PMRT in the 'consider PMRT' cohort included NCCN institution (OR, 1.1-9.01; p <0.0001), age <50 years (OR, 2.26; p = 0.041), and tumor characteristics. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concordance with definitive treatment guidelines was high. However, when current evidence does not support a definitive recommendation for PMRT, treatment decisions appear to be influenced, not only by patient age and clinical characteristics, but also by institution-specific patterns of care.

  8. Cancer risk after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Levi; L Randimbison; V-C Te; C La Vecchia

    2006-01-01

    Among women with breast cancer, we compared the relative and absolute rates of subsequent cancers in 1541 women treated with radiotherapy (RT) to 4570 women not so treated (NRT), using all registered in the Swiss Vaud Cancer Registry in the period between 1978 and 1998, and followed up to December 2002. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and the corresponding 95% confidence

  9. Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI-pathological correlation following bilateral total mastectomy

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI-pathological correlation following bilateral total, Radiotherapy, Creteil, F-94010, France Address for correspondence / reprint requests: Alain Luciani MD, PhD AP;53(4):367-75" DOI : 10.1258/ar.2012.110477 #12;2 Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: MRI

  10. Metastatic Breast Cancer to the Bladder case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Luczy?ska, El?bieta; Pawlik, Tomasz; Chwalibóg, Anna; Anio?, Joanna; Ry?, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    The main cause of mortality among patients with breast cancer is the metastatic spread of the primary tumour. The urinary bladder is considered as an unusual site for breast cancer metastasis. A patient has presented with right breast tumour and qualified for surgical treatment. After removal of the mass, an intra-operative and final pathology evaluation indicated breast invasive lobular carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given. Years later, an increase of serum CA15-3 tumour marker level was noted and physical examination revealed a lump at the mastectomy scar. A follow-up abdominal ultrasound scan demonstrated thickening of the urinary bladder wall segment, confirmed later by CT scan. A transurethral resection of bladder was performed, reaffirming a neoplastic mass, with histological assessment revealing invasive breast carcinoma. Palliative chemotherapy was given and another follow-up ultrasound scans were unremarkable. The patient is alive today. PMID:22470730

  11. Adenomyoepithelial adenosis associated with breast cancer: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Yokoi, Shigehiro; Nakazawa, Masako; Koneri, Kenji; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2013-12-01

    Adenomyoepithelial adenosis of the breast is an extremely rare type of adenosis. We herein present the case of a 35-year-old woman, who presented with a small painless hard lump and elastic soft induration of 5 cm in diameter in her left breast. Clinical examination and diagnostic workup were suggestive of a breast carcinoma, and a modified radical mastectomy and sentinel node biopsy were performed. Histopathological examination revealed adenomyoepithelial adenosis along with fibrocystic change and small invasive ductal carcinoma, slightly away from the adenosis. The presented case was thought to be initial-stage adenomyoepithelial adenosis and independently developing breast cancer. From a review of five reported cases of adenomyoepithelial adenosis, complete resection of the tumor and coexisting malignant disease may be recommended, owing to the tendency to develop breast cancer or malignant adenomyoepithelioma, or recurrence. PMID:23450635

  12. Improving outcomes in breast cancer for low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Yip, C H; Buccimazza, I; Hartman, M; Deo, S V S; Cheung, P S Y

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women world-wide. Incidence rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are lower than in high income countries; however, the rates are increasing very rapidly in LMICs due to social changes that increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality rates in LMICs remain high due to late presentation and inadequate access to optimal care. Breast Surgery International brought together a group of breast surgeons from different parts of the world to address strategies for improving outcomes in breast cancer for LMICs at a symposium during International Surgical Week in Helsinki, Finland in August 2013. A key strategy for early detection is public health education and breast awareness. Sociocultural barriers to early detection and treatment need to be addressed. Optimal management of breast cancer requires a multidisciplinary team. Surgical treatment is often the only modality of treatment available in low-resource settings where modified radical mastectomy is the most common operation performed. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy require more resources. Endocrine therapy is available but requires accurate assessment of estrogen receptors status. Targeted therapy with trastuzumab is generally unavailable due to cost. The Breast Health Global Initiative guidelines for the early detection and appropriate treatment of breast cancer in LMICs have been specifically designed to improve breast cancer outcomes in these regions. Closing the cancer divide between rich and poor countries is a moral imperative and there is an urgent need to prevent breast cancer deaths with early detection and optimal access to treatment. PMID:25398564

  13. Triiodothyronine and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

  14. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  15. Management of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Khanfir, Kaouthar, E-mail: kaouthar.khanfir@rsv-gnw.ch [Hopital de Sion, CHCVs, Sion (Switzerland); Kallel, Adel [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Villette, Sylviane [Centre Rene Huguenin, Paris (France); Belkacemi, Yazid [CHU Henri Mondor, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Vautravers, Claire [Centre George Francois Leclerc, Dijon (France); Nguyen, TanDat [Institut Jean Gaudinot, Reims (France); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Li Yexiong [Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Taghian, Alphonse G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Boersma, Liesbeth [Maastricht University Medical Center (MAASTRO clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands); Poortmans, Philip [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Goldberg, Hadassah [Western Galilee Hospital-Nahariya, Nahariya (Israel); Vees, Hansjorg [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Senkus, Elzbieta [Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk (Poland); Igdem, Sefik; Ozsahin, Mahmut [Istanbul Bilim University, Istanbul (Turkey); Jeanneret Sozzi, Wendy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-04-01

    Background: Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare breast cancer. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prognostic factors and patterns of failure, as well as the role of radiation therapy (RT), in ACC. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 2007, 61 women with breast ACC were treated at participating centers of the Rare Cancer Network. Surgery consisted of lumpectomy in 41 patients and mastectomy in 20 patients. There were 51(84%) stage pN0 and 10 stage cN0 (16%) patients. Postoperative RT was administered to 40 patients (35 after lumpectomy, 5 after mastectomy). Results: With a median follow-up of 79 months (range, 6-285), 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88%-100%) and 82% (95% CI, 71%-93%), respectively. The 5-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%). Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy was performed in 84% of cases. All patients had stage pN0 disease. In univariate analysis, survival was not influenced by the type of surgery or the use of postoperative RT. The 5-year LRC rate was 100% in the mastectomy group versus 93% (95% CI, 83%-100%) in the breast-conserving surgery group, respectively (p = 0.16). For the breast-conserving surgery group, the use of RT significantly correlated with LRC (p = 0.03); the 5-year LRC rates were 95% (95% CI, 86%-100%) for the RT group versus 83% (95% CI, 54%-100%) for the group receiving no RT. No local failures occurred in patients with positive margins, all of whom received postoperative RT. Conclusion: Breast-conserving surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with ACC breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel node biopsy might not be recommended. Postoperative RT should be proposed in the case of breast-conserving surgery.

  16. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... Differences affecting early detection of male and female breast cancers There are many similarities between breast cancer in ...

  17. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target. PMID:25427713

  18. The TAILORx Breast Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Trial Assigning IndividuaLized Options for Treatment (Rx), or TAILORx, which will examine whether a molecular test can assign women with early-stage breast cancer to the most appropriate and effective treatment.

  19. Paying for Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other federal laws. State efforts to ensure private health insurance coverage of mammography Many states require that private ... self-insured employer plans should check with their health insurance administrator to see what breast cancer early detection ...

  20. Metals and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D; Storchan, Geoffrey B; Parodi, Daniela A; Martin, Mary Beth

    2013-03-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-?. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  1. Breast cancer screening: its impact on clinical medicine.

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, H. J.; van Oortmarssen, G. J.; van Ineveld, B. M.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Breast cancer screening is generally accepted as an effective means of reducing breast cancer mortality in post-menopausal women. In this analysis the impact of nationwide screening on clinical medicine and the effects for the women involved are quantified. Effect estimates are based on results from screening trials in Utrecht (DOM-project) and Nijmegen, and on bi-annual screening of women aged 50-70. The consequences for health care are based on generally accepted assessment and treatment policies. The number of assessment procedures for non-palpable lesions will increase by 12% per year in the build-up period, and will remain slightly higher. The total number of biopsies in a real population is expected to decrease. Screening will lead to a shift in primary treatment modalities, as 15% of mastectomies will be replaced by breast conserving therapy. The temporary increase in the demand for primary treatment in the first years will be followed by a decrease in the demand for treating women with advanced disease. Favourable effects outweigh the inevitable unfavourable effects, with high quality screening and an appropriate invitation system. Breast cancer screening can also be recommended after considering other consequences than mortality reduction. PMID:2310681

  2. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-20

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  3. Breast Cancer prediction based on Backpropagation Algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Bin Mohd Azmi; Z. C. Cob

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide and occurs in nearly one out of eight women. Currently there are three techniques to diagnose breast cancer: mammography, FNA (Fine Needle Aspirate) and surgical biopsy. In this paper, we develop a system that can classify “Breast Cancer Disease” tumor using neural network with Feed-forward Backpropagation Algorithm

  4. Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming

    E-print Network

    Ludwig, Simone

    Prognosis of Breast Cancer using Genetic Programming Simone A. Ludwig and Stefanie Roos Department of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Canada ludwig@cs.usask.ca Abstract. Worldwide, breast cancer. In 2004, breast cancer caused 519,000 deaths worldwide. In order to reduce the cancer deaths and thereby

  5. [Mammary implants and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Meunier, A; Tristant, H; Sinna, R; Delay, E

    2005-10-01

    Many publications deal with the impact of cosmetic breast implants to increase the breast cancer occurence or to delay its diagnosis. We first try to express the clinical and radiological differences in the implanted breast. The diagnostical and therapeutical difficulties were developped to the different technics of imagery, biopsy and specific management of the treatment. On one hand, the litterature revue does not show any significant difference in tumoral stage and nodal status between augmented and nonaugmented women eventhough the mammography sensibility is not as optimal. On the other hand, the global mortality of the augmented population is higher but it appears that this phenomenon could be link to their way of life and is totally independant of breast cancer. Finally, if the diagnosis and the treatment are more complex, the women survival is not altered by breast augmented surgery. PMID:16169139

  6. Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Krontiras, Helen; Pisu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Racial disparities in breast cancer treatment among Medicare beneficiaries have been documented. This study aimed to determine whether racial disparities exist among white and black female Medicare beneficiaries in Alabama, an economically disadvantaged U.S. state. Methods: From a linked dataset of breast cancer cases from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry and fee-for-service claims from Medicare, we identified 2,097 white and black females, aged 66 years and older, who were diagnosed with stages 1–3 breast cancer from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2002. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used to determine whether there were racial differences in initiating and completing National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice guideline-specific treatment. Results: Sixty-two percent of whites and 64.7% of blacks had mastectomy (p=0.27); 34.6% of whites and 30.2% of blacks had breast conserving surgery (BCS) (p=0.12). Among those who had BCS, 76.8% of whites and 83.3% of blacks started adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.33) and they equally completed adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.29). For women with tumors over 1 centimeter, whites and blacks were equally likely to start (16.1% of whites and 18.3% of black; p=0.34) and complete (50.6% of whites and 46.3% of black; p=0.87) adjuvant chemotherapy. There were still no differences after adjusting for confounders using GEE. However, differences were observed by area-level socioeconomic status (SES), with lower SES residents more likely to receive a mastectomy (odds ratio [OR]=1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.57) and initiate radiation after BCS (OR=2.24; 95% CI: 1.28–3.93). Conclusions: No racial differences were found in guideline-specific breast cancer treatment or treatment completion, but there were differences by SES. Future studies should explore reasons for SES differences and whether similar results hold in other economically disadvantaged U.S. states. PMID:24350590

  7. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  8. Environmental exposures, breast development and cancer risk: Through the looking glass of breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Forman, Michele R; Winn, Deborah M; Collman, Gwen W; Rizzo, Jeanne; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2015-07-01

    This review summarizes the report entitled: Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention, highlights research gaps and the importance of focusing on early life exposures for breast development and breast cancer risk. PMID:25499721

  9. Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    Top 5 cancers ALL CANCERS Prostate Breast Brain Melanoma ­ Skin Lung and Bronchus 6,234 832 575 405Sources: UCSF, Zero Breast Cancer, California Department of Public Health, American Association for Cancer Research, SEER Facts on Breast Cancer · UCSF's second highest ethnic group of breast cancer

  10. Does multicentric\\/multifocal breast cancer differ from unifocal breast cancer? An analysis of survival and contralateral breast cancer incidence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rinat Yerushalmi; Hagen Kennecke; Ryan Woods; Ivo A. Olivotto; Caroline Speers; Karen A. Gelmon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose we evaluated whether patients with multifocal\\/multicentric (M\\/M) breast cancer have different outcomes compared to unifocal\\u000a (U) disease in terms of survival and the development of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) disease. Methods women diagnosed with stage I–III breast cancer were classified as having U or M\\/M disease. Prognostic factors were prospectively\\u000a collected and obtained from the breast cancer outcome unit

  11. The ‘other half’ of breast cancer: A review of male breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcus W. L. Ying; Amit Agrawal; Kwok-Leung Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Male breast cancer has always been shadowed by the attention received by its other half of the coin; female breast cancer. It is widely known to be 1% of all breast cancer, constituting also about 1% of all breast cancer literature. As a rare disease, it is fortunate that its female counterpart has provided it with the wealth of knowledge

  12. What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Breast Cancer Survivors Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Breast Cancer (NIH Senior Health) Breast Cancer FAQs (OWH) Cancer ...

  13. The impact of breast cancer screening on breast cancer registrations in New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Richardson; Brian Cox; Thelma Brown; Paul Smale

    Aims To investigate the impact of the national breast cancer screening programme, BreastScreen Aotearoa, on breast cancer registrations in New Zealand. Methods Age-specific breast cancer incidence rates for women aged 50-64 years were compared before and after the establishment of BreastScreen Aotearoa. The degree of spread of breast cancers diagnosed at screening was compared with the degree of spread of

  14. Impact of Age, Obesity and Smoking on Patient Satisfaction with Breast Implant Surgery – A Unicentric Analysis of 318 Implant Reconstructions after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kern, P.; Zarth, F.; Kimmig, R.; Rezai, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Breast reconstruction has become increasingly important for the body image of women with breast cancer. We conducted a study to investigate how patient characteristics correlate with surgical outcome after breast reconstruction with implant after mastectomy and to identify risk factors which could facilitate patient selection for reconstruction. Patients and Methods: For this case cohort analysis (n?=?257 patients with 318 heterologous reconstructions), we analyzed BMI, smoking, pre-existing disease, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one-stage/two-stage reconstruction, immediate/delayed reconstruction, antibiotic therapy and complications, partner interaction and adherence to the decision for reconstruction using a customized questionnaire. Results: 257 patients with 318 implant reconstructions (196 unilateral, 61 bilateral) were eligible for inclusion in the study. Median follow-up time was 3.1 years (range: 1 month to 10 years). Response rate to the questionnaire was 71.8?%. Median age was 49 years (range 24–79 years), median BMI was 22.44 (range 16.33–40.09). A BMI >?30 was inversely correlated with positive self-image (p?=?0.004), and implant loss/rotation was more frequent in this group (p??10 cigarettes/day had a negative impact on surgical outcome. A positive self-image had a positive impact on partner interaction (p??10 cigarettes/day are unfavorable preconditions for implant reconstruction. The use of prophylactic antibiotics was confirmed as beneficial for surgical outcome. A positive self-image after reconstruction strongly influences partner interaction.

  15. Organochlorine Compounds and Risk of Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Tongzhang Zheng, of Yale University, New Haven, CT, and colleagues conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Connecticut to investigate risk for breast cancer associated with exposure to organochlorine compounds. Levels of organochlorine compounds are being measured in breast adipose (fatty) tissue and blood serum obtained from women who had surgery or biopsies for breast cancer or benign breast disease.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  19. FastStats: Mammography/Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ordered or provided: 3.0 million Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2011 Outpatient Department Summary Tables, table 15 [PDF - 330 KB] Breast cancer mortality Number of breast cancer deaths for females: 40, ...

  20. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Breast Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New ...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility Suzanne. E. Fenton US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  2. Treatment and prognosis for retrograde cervical lymph node metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Rong; Zhang, Qiaoyu; Weng, Jianfeng; Liu, Weiping; Zhang, Bo; Lv, Gang; Wang, Yi; Wu, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis in axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes has been frequently observed in patients with breast cancer. The clinical staging and therapeutic principle determined according to the situation of lymph node metastasis are clear. One patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the left breast was reported to undergo modified radical mastectomy. One and a half years later, lymphadenectasis was observed in area II, III, IV, V and VI of the left neck; therefore, cervical lymphadenectomy was performed under cervical plexus anesthesia, indicating lymph node metastatic adenocarcinoma (21/26). The patient took 10 mg tamoxifen twice per day for five years after lymphadenectomy and the review showed negative results in liver, lungs, mediastinum, neck and contralateral breast. This suggested that although breast cancer complicated with retrograde cervical lymph node metastases is rare, timely surgery is required even if the patient is in a good general condition, to avoid „delayed therapy” due to misjudgment of illness simply according to disease staging. PMID:26034395

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Breast

    PubMed Central

    Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Monville, Florence; Ginestier, Christophe; Dontu, Gabriela; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wicha, Max S.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis, which holds that cancers are driven by a cellular subcomponent that has stem cell properties, that is, self-renewal, tumorigenicity and multilineage differentiation capacity. The cancer stem cell hypothesis modifies our conceptual approach of oncogenesis and shall have implications in breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment, especially in metastatic breast cancer for which no curative treatment exists. Given the specific stem cell features, novel therapeutic pathways can be targeted. Following this approach, new molecules are currently in development. Focusing on the cross-talk between stem cells and their microenvironment is also a promising way to explore how to better target cancer stem cells and be curative. PMID:18544962

  4. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-24

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuxin Li; Powel H. Brown

    The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk\\u000a of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent\\u000a results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast\\u000a cancer than are SERMs. However, while

  6. Epicutaneous breast forms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karsten Münstedt; Brigitte Schüttler; Wolfgang Milch; Stefan Sachsse; Marek Zygmunt; Uwe Kullmer; Helmut Vahrson

    1998-01-01

    Mastectomies will remain a treatment alternative for breast cancer in spite of efforts to perform more breast-conserving\\u000a treatment. Restoration of body symmetry may then be an important issue, which can be achieved by surgical breast reconstruction\\u000a or with an epicutaneous breast prosthesis. A new improved system has recently been developed, which is self-adhesive to the\\u000a thorax wall. In this study

  7. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  8. HLA-G polymorphism and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rolfsen, G B; Castelli, E C; Donadi, E A; Duarte, R A; Soares, C P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore a possible influence of the HLA-G coding polymorphisms on the susceptibility to breast cancer development in Brazilian subjects; however, none of the HLA-G variation sites evaluated was influencing breast cancer susceptibility indicating that the variation in the HLA-G coding region is not a risk factor for breast cancer. PMID:24164707

  9. The Basic Pathology of Human Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth Mallon; Pinchas Osin; Nasar Nasiri; Iain Blain; Beatrice Howard; Barry Gusterson

    2000-01-01

    This article illustrates the most common benign and malignant lesions in the breast, and is intended for the biologist working in the area of breast cancer and breast biology, not for the practicing pathologist. The atlas covers benign proliferative lesions, atypical lesions, variants of in situ cancer, the main types of invasive cancers, spindle cell lesions, and examples of vascular

  10. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-12

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  11. Current attitudes to breast reconstruction surgery for women at risk of post-mastectomy radiotherapy: A survey of UK breast surgeons.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Paula J; Gandhi, Ashu; Kirwan, Cliona C; Jain, Yogesh; Harvey, James R

    2015-08-01

    Decision-making for women requiring reconstruction and post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) includes oncological safety, cosmesis, patient choice, potential delay/interference with adjuvant treatment and surgeon/oncologist preference. This study aimed to quantitatively assess surgeons' attitudes and perceptions about reconstructive options in this setting, and to ascertain if surgical volume influenced advice given. A questionnaire was sent to surgical members of the UK Association of Breast Surgery (ABS) in March-June 2014. The questionnaire elicited information on surgeon volume, reconstructive practice and drivers influencing decision-making. Response rate was 42% (148/355), representing 71% of UK breast units. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) was offered more commonly than immediate implant, delayed-immediate or immediate autologous reconstruction (p < 0.05). Cosmesis was thought to be equivalent between IBR and DBR by 15% of surgeons, and 26% believe IBR and DBR offer similar Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Surgeon volume had no effect on reconstruction choice. Common decision-making drivers included negative effects of radiotherapy upon reconstructive and cosmetic outcome. The majority of surgeons (77%) believe the current evidence base is insufficient to guide decision-making. Despite surgeons believing that cosmesis and quality of life are not equivalent between IBR and DBR, DBR remains the commonest approach to this difficult clinical scenario. Surgeons perceive they are using a variety of newer techniques such as Delayed-Immediate Reconstruction and Acellular Dermal Matrices to try to ameliorate the effects of PMRT. This survey demonstrates that there is wide variation in reported surgical practice in this difficult setting. There is widespread acknowledgement of the lack of evidence to guide decision-making. PMID:26021276

  12. Basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland detected in a patient with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozgun, Alpaslan; Tuncel, Tolga; Emirzeoglu, Levent; Haholu, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell adenocarcinoma (BCAC) is a rare tumour of the salivary glands and often associated with a good prognosis. The present case had BCAC of the parotid gland as the second primary tumour in addition to breast cancer. The patient was a 66-year-old woman who underwent mastectomy due to breast cancer. She then underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant hormone therapy. After 4 years of disease-free follow-up, the patient presented with a swelling on the left cheek. The examination of the biopsy specimen revealed BCAC of the parotid gland. The patient then underwent left parathyroidectomy plus left neck dissection. Adjuvant radiotherapy was performed. Despite the therapy, the patient developed four local recurrences within 1 year, and then developed metastasis to the pleura. A swelling in the parotid gland in a patient with breast cancer should be carefully screened for the presence of a second primary tumour. PMID:24925533

  13. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tatl?, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Ba?sorgun, Cumhur ?brahim; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

  14. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  15. The boomerang incision for periareolar breast malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mona P

    2007-11-01

    Breast-conservation surgery has been shown to be equivalent to mastectomy in terms of long-term survival for the treatment of breast cancer. Various techniques have been described on how to achieve clear margins and good cosmetic outcomes and therefore expand the indications for breast conservation. A novel incision is detailed to augment the options already available. PMID:17936437

  16. Clinical and morphological results after breast augmentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Anastasiadis; M. v. Lüdinghausen; H. Finkbeiner; F. Rühl

    1980-01-01

    In 85 patients, breast augmentation mammaplasty (often bilateral) was performed in the course of 5 1\\/2 years when the breast was too small or after subcutaneous mastectomy. In two women, a very painful deformation and pronounced hardening of the breast clinically simulating cancer and a foreign body reaction of irregular density appeared histologically in association with severe capsular fibrosis. In

  17. Clinical Proteomics of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bask?n, Y.; Yi?itba??, T.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the lifetimes that increased in breast cancers due to the the early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, many cases still are being lost due to the metastatic relapses. For this reason, new approaches such as the proteomic techniques have currently become the prime objectives of breast cancer researches. Various omic-based techniques have been applied with increasing success to the molecular characterisation of breast tumours, which have resulted in a more detailed classification scheme and have produced clinical diagnostic tests that have been applied to both the prognosis and the prediction of outcome to the treatment. Implementation of the proteomics-based techniques is also seen as crucial if we are to develop a systems biology approach in the discovery of biomarkers of the early diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of the outcome of the breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discuss the studies that have been conducted thus far, for the discovery of diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers, and evaluate the potential of the discriminating proteins identified in this research for clinical use as breast cancer biomarkers. PMID:21532837

  18. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy of breast cancer: which patients would benefit and what are the advantages?

    PubMed

    Takei, Hiroyuki; Kurosumi, Masafumi; Yoshida, Takashi; Hayashi, Yuji; Higuchi, Toru; Uchida, Sayaka; Ninomiya, Jun; Oba, Hanako; Inoue, Kenichi; Nagai, Shigenori; Tabei, Toshio

    2011-04-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) were more effective than tamoxifen as a neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NAE) for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Neoadjuvant AIs were shown to reduce tumor volume and to allow the performance of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in cases that would normally require mastectomy. Predictive markers of neoadjuvant AIs may be ER-rich, progesterone receptor (PgR)-rich and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors. However, the ability of HER2 expression to predict a response to neoadjuvant AIs is controversial. Pathological tumor size, nodal status, Ki67 level, and ER score are predictive for the survival of postmenopausal women with breast cancer who have been treated with NAE. These factors could be useful in order to select patients who do not require chemotherapy. Indeed, neoadjuvant AIs are a potential treatment option for postmenopausal women with ER-rich breast cancer who prefer BCS despite having large tumors suitable for mastectomy. PMID:21104350

  19. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Hopital d'Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, Paris (France); Castadot, Pierre [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); MacDermed, Dhara [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vandekerkhove, Christophe [Department of Medical Physics, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul [Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Magne, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.magne@igr.f [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Department of Radio-Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  20. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. [Department of Radiotherapy, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)], E-mail: drbudhi@gmail.com; Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder [Department of Radiotherapy, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  1. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  2. Breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, B E; Sox, H C

    1999-10-01

    Randomized controlled trials involving nearly 500,000 women on two continents have confirmed the early promise that screening mammography can reduce breast cancer mortality. The observed benefits of mammographic screening, however, are not the same in all women. The mortality reduction in women over age 70 is unknown, and women aged 40 to 49 do not appear to benefit from mammographic screening to the same extent as those over age 50. The reasons for this disparity are incompletely understood, but it depends in part upon differing tumor biology and mammographic test characteristics in younger women. Even if relative survival benefits were equal for women under and over age 50, absolute reduction in risk would remain considerably lower for younger women, a disparity that would not be corrected by improved screening technology or adjustment of interscreening intervals. The authors' review of the evidence leads them to strongly support mammographic screening of women aged 50 to 69 at an interval not longer than 2 years. The authors also feel it is reasonable to screen women over age 70 who have a favorable life expectancy. They conclude, however, that the evidence does not support a blanket recommendation in favor of screening women aged 40 to 49. Instead, they advocate a well-informed conversation between physician and patient regarding the present knowledge and the risks and benefits of screening for each individual woman. Definitive answers await the results of ongoing RCTs designed to study the survival benefit conferred by screening women aged 40 to 49. Disagreement will undoubtedly persist regarding which recommendations should determine private practice and public policy. PMID:10572546

  3. Study Comparing Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel With Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-10

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. Common breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Vachon, Celine M.; Lee, Adam M.; Slager, Susan; Lesnick, Timothy; Olswold, Curtis; Fasching, Peter A.; Miron, Penelope; Eccles, Diana; Carpenter, Jane E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Ambrosone, Christine; Winqvist, Robert; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Sawyer, Elinor; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Ekici, Arif B.; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Graham, Nikki; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stephan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M.; Fountzilas, George; Clarke, Christine L.; Balleine, Rosemary; Olson, Janet E.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Diasio, Robert B.; Pathak, Harsh; Ross, Eric; Weaver, JoEllen; Rüdiger, Thomas; Försti, Asta; Dünnebier, Thomas; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Kulkarni, Swati; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Limbergen, Erik; Janssen, Hilde; Peto, Julian; Fletcher, Olivia; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Verhoef, Senno; Tomlinson, Ian; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Beesley, Jonathan; Greco, Dario; Blomqvist, Carl; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Blows, Fiona M.; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W; Lambrechts, Diether; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Hamann, Ute; Pharoah, Paul; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Nevanlinna, Heli; Wang, Xianshu; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers are an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with poor survival, but there remains little known about the etiological factors which promote its initiation and development. Commonly inherited breast cancer risk factors identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) display heterogeneity of effect among breast cancer subtypes as defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. In the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC), 22 common breast cancer susceptibility variants were investigated in 2,980 Caucasian women with triple negative breast cancer and 4,978 healthy controls. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with risk of triple negative breast cancer, including rs2046210 (ESR1), rs12662670 (ESR1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs999737 (RAD51L1), rs8170 (19p13.11) and rs8100241 (19p13.11). Together, our results provide convincing evidence of genetic susceptibility for triple negative breast cancer. PMID:21844186

  5. Future prospects for reconstructive surgery in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gabka, C J; Bohmert, H

    1996-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery has become an integral part of primary breast cancer therapy in patients requiring total mastectomy. State-of-the-art reconstructions with autogenous tissue are transverse rectus abdominis (TRAM) flap procedures. Superior aesthetic results in terms of both appearance and consistency, seem to outweigh the disadvantages of impaired abdominal wall competence and donor site scars. The "free," microvascular TRAM flap may be the way to minimize abdominal wall weakness, since only a little portion of the rectus abdominis muscle must be sacrificed. Despite all discussions, breast reconstruction using silicone (gel) implants is a safe and reliable method and will be in the future. However, not every patient may be the right candidate for silicone reconstruction. Advantages of using silicone implants include (relatively) simple technique, short operation time, and no donor site morbidity. In patients suffering from breast-conserving therapy failures, plastic surgery has to address skin and parenchymal loss in an irradiated environment. Oncoplastic surgery, such as volume shrinking or volume replacement techniques, are useful for immediate reconstruction in breast-conserving therapy. PMID:8821412

  6. Prevention of ER-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    The successful demonstration that the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene reduce the risk of breast cancer has stimulated great interest in using drugs to prevent breast cancer in high-risk women. In addition, recent results from breast cancer treatment trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be even more effective at preventing breast cancer than are SERMs. However, while SERMs and aromatase inhibitors do prevent the development of many estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers, these drugs do not prevent the development of ER-negative breast cancer. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify agents that can prevent ER-negative breast cancer. We have studied the cancer preventative activity of several classes of drugs for their ability to prevent ER-negative breast cancer in preclinical models. Results from these studies demonstrate that rexinoids (analogs of retinoids that bind and activate RXR receptors), tyrosine kinase inhibitors (such as EGFR inhibitors and dual kinase inhibitors that block EGFR and HER2/neu signaling), and cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors all prevent ER-negative breast cancer in transgenic mice that develop ER-negative breast cancer. Other promising agents now under investigation include vitamin D and vitamin D analogs, drugs that activate PPAR-gamma nuclear receptors, and statins. Many of these agents are now being tested in early phase cancer prevention clinical trials to determine whether they will show activity in breast tissue and whether they are safe for use in high-risk women without breast cancer. The current status of these studies will be reviewed. It is anticipated that in the future, drugs that effectively prevent ER-negative breast cancer will be used in combination with hormonal agents such SERMs or aromatase inhibitors to prevent all forms of breast cancer. PMID:19213564

  7. The role of chemoendocrine agents in postoperative adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: Meta-analysis of the first collaborative studies of postoperative adjuvant chemoendocrine therapy for breast cancer (ACETBC)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osahiko Abe

    1994-01-01

    The first collaborative studies of postoperative adjuvant chemoendocrine therapy for breast cancer (ACETBC) were carried out\\u000a in 6 regions of Japan from 1982 to 1985, and the results were subjected to meta-analysis.\\u000a \\u000a Subjects consisted of Stage II and IIIa cases who underwent radical mastectomy with Brt + Ax or more extensive resection for\\u000a primary breast cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Regimen A consisted of

  8. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Psychological morbidity associated with local recurrence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P L; May, V E; Hughes, L E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-two individuals who had suffered from local recurrence of breast cancer were interviewed to determine psychosocial morbidity. Psychometric assessment using the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale was conducted prior to clinical evaluation including a structured interview, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Lifetime and current psychiatric diagnoses were established. Ten (45%) of the recurrence group had current psychiatric illness (anxiety and depression) at the time of local recurrence, a similar prevalence to that described by others at mastectomy. Previous psychiatric illness and trait neuroticism are predictive of vulnerability to psychiatric morbidity at local recurrence. These results suggest that a significant proportion of patients with local recurrence suffer from major depressive illness. PMID:1894454

  10. Thin slice three dimentional (3D) reconstruction versus CT 3D reconstruction of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Xinhua; Tang, Peng; Qiu, Quanguang; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: With improvement in the early diagnosis of breast cancer, breast conserving therapy (BCT) is being increasingly used. Precise preoperative evaluation of the incision margin is, therefore, very important. Utilizing three dimentional (3D) images in a preoperative evaluation for breast conserving surgery has considerable significance, but the currently 3D CT scan reconstruction commonly used has problems in accurately displaying breast cancer. Thin slice 3D reconstruction is also widely used now to delineate organs and tissues of breast cancers. This study was aimed to compare 3D CT with thin slice 3D reconstruction in breast cancer patients to find a better technique for accurate evaluation of breast cancer. Methods: A total of 16-slice spiral CT scans and 3D reconstructions were performed on 15 breast cancer patients. All patients had been treated with modified radical mastectomy; 2D and 3D images of breast and tumours were obtained. The specimens were fixed and sliced at 2 mm thickness to obtain serial thin slice images, and reconstructed using 3D DOCTOR software to gain 3D images. Results: Compared with 2D CT images, thin slice images showed more clearly the morphological characteristics of tumour, breast tissues and the margins of different tissues in each slice. After 3D reconstruction, the tumour shapes obtained by the two reconstruction methods were basically the same, but the thin slice 3D reconstruction showed the tumour margins more clearly. Interpretation & conclusions: Compared with 3D CT reconstruction, thin slice 3D reconstruction of breast tumour gave clearer images, which could provide guidance for the observation and application of CT 3D reconstructed images and contribute to the accurate evaluation of tumours using CT imaging technology. PMID:23481052

  11. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Mohr, Sharif Burgette

    2012-01-01

    breast cancer with consideration of the methodological issues. Cancer causes &breast cancer incidence rates: a census- based methodology (United States). Cancer Causesbreast cancer risk in postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Cancer Causes

  12. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breast cancer in men? What are the key statistics about breast cancer in men? The American Cancer ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  13. Role of "Reach to Recovery" in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Willits, M J

    1994-10-01

    Medical personnel should be aware that the Reach to Recovery program has gone from one visit to a radical mastectomy surgery patient to a multifaceted program. Reach to Recovery volunteers have been trained to make lumpectomy, mastectomy, reconstruction, and recurrence visits. They make visits not only in the hospital but at alternative locations (home, physician's office, library, coffee shop). Older women have the same needs as all women--getting back to normal, feeling good about themselves, and their sexuality. Older woman should not be ignored because of their age. Volunteers who visit patients are matched to a patient according to the type of surgery performed and the patient's age; older volunteers visit older patients. Programs continue to evolve as health care changes, with more lumpectomies, more reconstruction, etc. A 2-year evaluation just has been completed, and all the data are in the process of being updated. Medical personnel give medical advice. They offer support and the opportunity to talk to someone who has been there and who understands the concern of the patient with breast cancer. PMID:8087785

  14. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  15. The short-term effects of low-level laser therapy in the management of breast-cancer-related lymphedema

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abuzer Dirican; Oya Andacoglu; Ronald Johnson; Kandace McGuire; Lisa Mager; Atilla Soran

    2011-01-01

    Background  Breast-cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a chronic disease, and currently there is no definitive treatment for it. There\\u000a are some therapeutic interventions targeted to decrease the limb swelling and the associated problems. Low-level laser therapy\\u000a (LLLT) has been used in the treatment of post-mastectomy lymphedema since 2007 in the US. The aim of this study is to review\\u000a our short-term experience

  16. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)

    Cancer.gov

    Established in 1994 in response to the 1992 Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) develops and conducts collaborative research projects that use common data elements contributed by its network of seven mammography registries across the United States.

  17. Pictures of Breast Cancer Diagnoses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This webpage by breastcancer.org, provides a number of diagrams relative to various methods of breast cancer diagnosis. The site also shows PET scan, mammogram, ultrasound, and MRI images from different perspectives; illustrations of abnormal lymph nodes are also shown. Lastly, webpage contains a link to additional information about screening and testing options.

  18. CISNET: Breast Cancer Model Profiles

    Cancer.gov

    Model profiles are standardized documents that facilitate the comparison of models and their results. The Joint Profile provided includes profiles for all breast cancer models. Individual profiles for each model are also provided and may be more current than the joint profile document.

  19. Progestin therapy for breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William L McGuire; Franco Cavalli; Philip Bonomi; J Alexieva-Figusch

    1985-01-01

    The use of pharmacologic doses of steroid hormones to treat patients with advanced breast cancer has been standard for many years. Recently there has been increased interest in the investigation of progestational agents, largely as a result of their excellent response rate in selected patients and their minimal side effects. In this panel discussion the participants discuss the use of

  20. Pain control in breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William L. McGuire; Kathleen M. Foley; Michael H. Levy; C. Kent Osborne

    1989-01-01

    Pain can be a prominent finding in breast cancer patients. It may occur in the setting of the postmastectomy period, related to the disruption of normal neural pathways or the development of lymphedema. In advanced disease, the management of pain from nerve compression or bone metastases requires special approaches. In this panel discussion, the participating physicians will discuss these topics

  1. The ALTTO Breast Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Adjuvant Lapatinib And/Or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimisation, or ALTTO, study that will compare the targeted agents lapatinib and trastuzumab alone, in sequence, or in combination as adjuvant therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer.

  2. Breast cancer: Relationship between acculturation and barriers to breast cancer screening in Southwest Florida Latinas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Patino

    2006-01-01

    Despite multiple campaigns by the American Cancer Society, reports indicate that Latinas living in the United States who contract breast cancer are more likely than Anglos to die. These findings correlate with low participation in breast cancer screenings among Latinas. The objective of this study was to identify key obstacles that influence Latinas' low participation in breast cancer screenings, based

  3. Lymphangiosarcoma of the arm presenting with lymphedema in a woman 16 years after mastectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sepah, Yasir J; Umer, Masood; Qureshi, Asim; Khan, Shaista

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangiosarcoma following breast cancer is a relatively rare entity, with around 300 cases so far reported worldwide. Affecting the long term survivors of breast cancer, lymphangiosarcoma (Stewart-Traves Syndrome) has a high mortality rate. Since lympedema following radical mastectomy or axillary clearance and radiotherapy seems to be the main predisposing factor, further research regarding modifications in the surgical technique of axillary nodes dissection as well as the development of new chemotherapeutic agents effective in lymphangiosarcoma are required. PMID:19918554

  4. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:25489714

  5. Breast Cancer May Originate In Utero: The Importance of the Intrauterine Environment for Breast Cancer Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fei Xue; Karin B. Michels

    \\u000a Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer death (after lung cancer)\\u000a (American Cancer Society 2009). The incidence of breast cancer varies four- to fivefold across countries, is the highest in\\u000a Europe and North America, and the lowest in Asia (Ferlay et al. 2001). Breast cancer incidence has been on the rise

  6. Intelligent Decision Support System for Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Janghel; Anupam Shukla; Ritu Tiwari; Rahul Kala

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide and occurs in nearly one out of eight women.\\u000a Currently there are three techniques to diagnose breast cancer: mammography, FNA (Fine Needle Aspirate) and surgical biopsy.\\u000a In this paper we develop an integrated expert system for diagnosis, prognosis and prediction for breast cancer using soft\\u000a computing techniques.

  7. HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  8. Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Petra; Savage, Michelle I.; Brown, Powel H.

    2013-01-01

    With a better understanding of the etiology of breast cancer, molecularly targeted drugs have been developed and are being testing for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Targeted drugs that inhibit the estrogen receptor (ER) or estrogen-activated pathways include the selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and lasofoxifene) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer and promising results of AIs in breast cancer trials, suggest that AIs might be even more effective in the prevention of ER-positive breast cancer. However, these agents only prevent ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, current research is focused on identifying preventive therapies for other forms of breast cancer such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, breast cancer that does express ER, progesterone receptor, or HER2). HER2-positive breast cancers are currently treated with anti-HER2 therapies including trastuzumab and lapatinib, and preclinical and clinical studies are now being conducted to test these drugs for the prevention of HER2-positive breast cancers. Several promising agents currently being tested in cancer prevention trials for the prevention of TNBC include poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, vitamin D, and rexinoids, both of which activate nuclear hormone receptors (the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors). This review discusses currently used breast cancer preventive drugs, and describes the progress of research striving to identify and develop more effective preventive agents for all forms of breast cancer. PMID:24069582

  9. Benefits, risks, and safety of external beam radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay C; Mutter, Robert W; Halyard, Michele Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common and complex disease often necessitating multimodality care. Breast cancer may be treated with surgical resection, radiotherapy (RT), and systemic therapy, including chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and targeted therapies, or a combination thereof. In the past 50 years, RT has played an increasingly significant role in the treatment of breast cancer, resulting in improvements in locoregional control and survival for women undergoing mastectomy who are at high risk of recurrence, and allowing for breast conservation in certain settings. Although radiation provides significant benefit to many women with breast cancer, it is also associated with risks of toxicity, including cardiac and pulmonary toxicity, lymphedema, and secondary malignancy. RT techniques have advanced and continue to evolve dramatically, offering increased precision and reproducibility of treatment delivery and flexibility of treatment schedule. This increased sophistication of RT offers promise of improved outcomes by maintaining or improving efficacy, reducing toxicity, and increasing patient access and convenience. A review of the role of radiation therapy in breast cancer, its associated toxicities and efforts in toxicity reduction is presented. PMID:25977608

  10. Hereditary female cancers: Breast, ovarian, and endometrial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Morgan Tucker; Botros Rizk

    Hereditary cancers breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers comprise a significant portion of cancers affecting women. This paper strives to review the genetics and current screening, prophylaxis, and treatment of these malignancies.

  11. Bilateral breast cancer following augmentation mammaplasty with polyacrylamide hydrogel injection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YANING; YUAN, NA; LI, KUANZHI; GENG, YI; ZHOU, HAIPING; WANG, HUA; HOU, JIE; ZHANG, BIN; CAI, YUAN; ZHAO, XINHAN

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer occurring following injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAMG) for augmentation mammaplasty is rare. The present study reports the case of a 43-year-old female presenting with bilateral breast cancer 10 years after augmentation mammaplasty with PAMG injection and no family history of breast cancer. A 5.5×6.0-cm mass in the right breast with multiple intumescent axillary lymph nodes was revealed and a palpable mass of ~1.0 cm was identified in the outer upper quadrant of the left breast. Multiple smaller nodules were observed in the pulmonary field. Pathological examination revealed invasive lobular grade II carcinoma in both breasts with ER(+++), PR(+++), C-erbB2(?), Top-2(+), in the right breast and ER(++), PR(++), c-erb-B2(?), Top-2(+) in the left. Preoperative chemotherapy, modified radical bilateral mastectomy with axillary clearance, postoperative chemotherapy, and an oophorectomy were conducted, followed by treatment with Arimedex® until the present date A number of valuable insights can be garnered from this case. First, close follow-up is required for female patients who receive an injection of PAMG for augmentation mammaplasty in order to achieve an early diagnosis and to intervene in any incidences of breast cancer. Second, the differential diagnosis of dual primary carcinoma versus metastatic breast cancer is important and may be aided by the use of molecular technology. Third, it remains difficult to determine gene expression values for the prediction of chemotherapy sensitivity. Thus, discrimination between primary and secondary carcinomas is the principle barrier for identifying an appropriate treatment strategy when a patient is diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer.

  12. Are males with early breast cancer treated differently from females with early breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim Wang; James Kollias; Claire Marsh; Guy Maddern

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer in males is much rare than in females so in practice, male breast cancer treatment is likely to follow the guidelines developed for female breast cancer patients. The objective of this study is to compare the characteristics and treatment pattern of male breast cancer patients with comparable subgroups of female breast cancer patients using data submitted to the

  13. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Chest wall resection in the treatment of local recurrence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zoetmulder, F A; van Dongen, J A

    1988-04-01

    Chest wall resection has been carried out in 30 patients with chest wall recurrences of breast cancer after previous mastectomy and irradiation. Patients were carefully selected. Twenty-eight patients were treated with curative intent, two patients underwent palliative resections for extremely painful ulcerating recurrences. The operation consists of a full thickness chest wall resection and immediate reconstruction. A variety of reconstructive techniques have been used. Based on this experience we prefer reconstruction of rigidity by means of a vicryl mesh and of soft tissue coverage by omentum transposition and split skin grafting. Using this technique post operative complications have been acceptable. Long term results have been encouraging with 50% disease free survival at 5 years. A disease free interval after mastectomy longer than 5 years correlates with a long disease free survival after chest wall resection. Chest wall resection is very effective in the palliation of pain caused by ulcerating chest wall recurrence. PMID:2452100

  15. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... biopsy procedures themselves. Radiation therapy : Women who had radiation therapy to the chest (including the breasts) before age 30 have an increased risk of developing breast cancer throughout their lives. This includes women treated for ...

  16. The non-breast-cancer death rate among breast cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Devon Bush; Barbara Smith; Jerry Younger; James S. Michaelson

    2011-01-01

    Non-breast-cancer deaths currently account for almost half of deaths among breast carcinoma patients in the 15 years following\\u000a diagnosis. Understanding the trends of non-breast-cancer death is vital for calibrating treatment and survival expectations,\\u000a and for understanding the consequences of potentially toxic therapies. To observe trends over time in non-breast-cancer relative\\u000a survival—the non-breast-cancer survival rates of breast cancer patients relative to the

  17. Breast cancer local recurrence under the form of inflammatory carcinoma, treated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, a case report

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Isabel; Pereira, Helena; Azevedo, Isabel; Conde, João; Bravo, Isabel; Craveiro, Rogéria; Pereira, Deolinda

    2013-01-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with breast cancer diagnosed in 2005, treated with conservative surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, followed by hormonal therapy until 2010, who relapsed under the form of inflammatory breast cancer in 2011. After tumor progression detected during primary systemic therapy, a concurrent radiation and radiosensitizing chemotherapy were proposed. There was a significant clinical response to this treatment, enabling curative chance with total mastectomy. The histological examination of the breast and regional lymph nodes revealed a complete response, since there was no evidence of residual tumor. There are few reports concerning concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer, but it could be a suitable “loco regional rescue therapy” to further reduce tumor progression and allow curative surgery. Study of this treatment strategy in randomized clinical trials is warranted. PMID:24936322

  18. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-07

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  19. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-25

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. 76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the...commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously...early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this year,...

  1. 75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ...8572 of October 1, 2010 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the...been made in the fight against breast cancer, it remains the most frequently...will be claimed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we...

  2. 77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the...States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans...000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and tens of...

  3. Guide to Understanding Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Owens, MSN, RN, FNP , Kathryn J. Ruddy, MD, MPH & Elizabeth Woolfe, MPH Our Guide to Understanding Triple-Negative Breast Cancer , ... Triple-Negative Breast Cancer . Living Beyond Breast Cancer 40 Monument Road, Suite 104 Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 ...

  4. Coding Instructions for Breast Cancer Chart Audit (DETECT)

    Cancer.gov

    CODING INSTRUCTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER CHART AUDIT ? DETECT ? I. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS About this study: Study period. Chart audits will be conducted among women diagnosed with breast cancer. The Breast Cancer Audit will capture the clinical experience

  5. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01

    lymph node dissection for patients with breast carcinoma. Cancer,cancers based on tumor size and spread to neighboring tissue (T), lymph nodelymph nodes, and the pectoralis major and minor muscles behind the breast) was routine treatment for breast cancer.

  6. Mastectomy - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lymph nodes of the armpit (axilla). When a breast lump is found to contain cancer, and if the ... addition to surgery. In certain cases of malignant lumps, ... lumpectomy does not require a breast replacement (prosthesis).

  7. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Beketi?-Oreškovi?, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Oreškovi?, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established fertility preservation strategy, providing a 25-35% chance of pregnancy. In addition, oocyte freezing can be considered as an alternative in patients who are single and in those who do not wish a sperm donor. Although ovarian tissue harvesting appears to be safe, experience regarding ovarian transplantation is still limited due to low utilization, so the true value of this procedure remains to be determined. Nevertheless, in clinical situations in which chemotherapy needs to be started in young patients facing premature ovarian failure, ovarian tissue preservation seems to be a promising option for restoring fertility, especially in conjunction with other options like immature oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation of oocytes, oocyte vitrification, or embryo cryopreservation. It seems that in vitro maturation is a useful strategy because it improves oocyte or cryopreservation outcome in breast cancer patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for fertility preservation. PMID:24315568

  8. Breast cancer in Singapore: some perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Thilagaratnam, Shyamala; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy among Singapore women, accounting for 29.7% of all female cancers, with an age-standardized rate of 54.9 per 100,000 per year. It has been the most frequent cancer in Singapore women for the last 30 years, with the highest rates previously reported in those aged between 45 and 49 years, but with a more recent observation of a change in peak age group to women in their late 50s. About 1,100 new cases are diagnosed annually and approximately 270 women die in Singapore each year from breast cancer. In the multiethnic population of Singapore, it has been noted that rising breast cancer incidence is consistent across all three ethnic groups (Chinese, Malays, and Indians). Singapore has among the highest breast cancer incidence in Asia. Possible explanations include rapid urbanization, improvement in socio-economic status, and adoption of a western lifestyle. Our experience with the Singapore breast screening pilot project (1994-1997) and the national breast-screening program (BreastScreen Singapore) has led to increased understanding of this disease in the country. Data from the pilot project showed that breast screening is just as effective in a predominantly Asian population as in the west. Early breast cancer accounted for most breast cancers detected, with pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) comprising 26% of all screen-detected cancers in the pilot study. In the currently on-going BreastScreen Singapore, DCIS forms >30% of all breast cancers among pre-menopausal women, a relatively high proportion probably accounted for partially by the greater participation of women aged between 40 and 49 years. Despite the ready availability of subsidized mammographic screening, there are still women in Singapore who present with locally advanced breast cancer. Clinical management of an increasing number of women with breast cancer embraces a multidisciplinary team-based approach, with regular discussions of therapeutic strategies at tumor boards. In order to improve breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutics in our country, it is important that there are continual breast cancer and breast disease-related educational activities for medical professionals engaged in diagnosing and managing breast cancer. The role of public education in raising awareness is also essential. PMID:19701678

  9. Diabetes and breast cancer : the women's healthy eating & living study

    E-print Network

    Erickson, Kirsten Diann

    2011-01-01

    with early stage breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control 19:Shanghai breast cancer survival study. Cancer Causes Controlbreast cancer survival is reduced in women with diabetes due to diabetes-related causes

  10. Triple-negative breast cancer: clinicopathological characteristics and relationship with basal-like breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aye Aye Thike; Poh Yian Cheok; Ana Richelia Jara-Lazaro; Benita Tan; Patrick Tan; Puay Hoon Tan

    2010-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer, defined as that with negative expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors and cerbB2, accounted for 11% of invasive breast cancers in our study, drawn from an original cohort of 7048 women diagnosed with breast cancer from the files of the Department of Pathology, Singapore General Hospital, over 14 years. Women with triple-negative breast cancer were generally postmenopausal,

  11. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony B Miller; Peter Gøtzsche

    2001-01-01

    The HIP trial was done in an era when the size of breast cancers was much larger than became usual in the subsequent two decades in North America. I recall no instance in which the masking of the allocation was compromised. The major difficulty for the reviewers was not whether the patient died of cancer, nor whether breast cancer had

  12. BREAST CANCER GROUP WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    BREAST CANCER GROUP May 2009 WOMEN'S HEALTH INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTER [WHIRC] #12;2 Table of Contents Page Introduction to the Women's Health Interdisciplinary Research Center (WHIRC) 3 Overview Cancer Prevention 27 Aging and Breast Cancer 30 Slone Epidemiology Center Black Women's Health Study

  13. Unique Presentations of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Ayub, Samia; Mohindra, Ramesh; Ayub, Zunaira; Ahad, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Breast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women. Unlike IDC, which typically metastasizes to the lung, liver or bone, ILC has been found to metastasize to GI tract, peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Nonspecific symptomology may be considered secondary to other diseases and this can delay the definite diagnosis and treatment of metastatic disease. Knowledge of the pattern of disease spread is essential for accurate diagnosis and early initiation of systemic treatment, thus avoiding unnecessary interventions. We are reporting three unique cases of metastatic ILC presenting with wide range of symptoms. Case Presentations: Case A: 69-year-old female presented with recurrent jaundice. Case B: 77-year-old female with the past medical history of right breast ILC seven years ago status post right radical mastectomy with chemotherapy, presented with anemia. Case C: 56-year-old female presented with bright red blood per rectum. Conclusion: A high level of suspicion is needed for metastatic breast cancer in patients with history of ILC, regardless of disease free interval. Since it frequently metastasizes to unusual sites and presents with a wide spectrum of symptoms. PMID:25598762

  14. [Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer: implications for the pathologist].

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Sophie; Perallon, Romain; Alunni, Jean-Philippe; Charitansky, Hélène; Leaha, Christina; Gonzalez, Aurélie Maran; Chateau, Marie-Christine; Simony-Lafontaine, Joelle; Jacot, William; Gutowski, Marian; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali

    2011-12-01

    These past few years, neoadjuvant strategy has taken an increasing place in the management of breast cancer patients. This strategy is mainly indicated to obtain a tumour bulk regression allowing a breast conserving surgery in patients that otherwise would have undergone mastectomy. Of note, development of new chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies has critically helped in the progress of neoadjuvant strategy as it is currently associated with better pathological response rates. In this context, the pathologist is at the crossroad of this multidisciplinary process. First, he provides on the initial core needle biopsy the tumour pathological characteristics that are critical for the choice of treatment strategy, i.e. histological type, histological grade, proliferative activity (mitotic count and Ki67/MIB1 index labeling), hormone receptor status (oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and HER2 status. Secondly, the pathologist evaluates the pathological response and the status of surgical margins with regards to the residual tumour on the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant treatment. These parameters are important for the management of the patient, since it has been shown that complete pathological response is associated with improved disease free survival. Several grading systems are used to assess the pathological response in breast and axillary lymph nodes. The most frequently used in France are currently the systems described by Sataloff et al. and Chevallier et al. In this review, we detail the different steps involving the pathologist in neoadjuvant setting, with special regards to the quality process and future perspectives such as emerging predictive biomarkers. PMID:22172117

  15. Evolution of breast cancer screening in countries with intermediate and increasing incidence of breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grace Hui-Min Wu; Li-Sheng Chen; King-Jen Chang; Ming-Feng Hou; Shin-Chen Chen; Tse-Jia Liu; Chiun-Sheng Huang; Giu-Cheng Hsu; Chih-Cheng Yu; Li-Li Jeng; Shou-Tung Chen

    2006-01-01

    Background Few studies have been published regarding the practice of breast cancer screening in Asian countries. Aims The present study illustrates how the health policy for breast cancer screening has evolved in Taiwan from selective mammographic screening within a high-risk group, firstly to a programme of physical examination by public health nurses, and finally to a two-stage breast cancer screening

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Male Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophocles Lanitis; Alexandra J. Rice; Alexander Vaughan; Paul Cathcart; George Filippakis; Ragheed Al Mufti; Dimitri J. Hadjiminas

    2008-01-01

    Background  Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare with an incidence of 1% of all breast cancers. The evidence about the treatment is derived\\u000a from the data on the management of the female breast cancer because conduction of randomized, controlled trials is impossible\\u000a due to the rarity of the disease. In this study, we review the special features, overall management, diagnosis, and

  17. Multidisciplinary care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulvat, Melissa C; Hansen, Nora M; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients with breast cancer has become increasingly complex with advancements in diagnostic modalities, surgical approaches, and adjuvant treatments. A multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care is essential to the successful integration of available therapies. This article addresses the key components of multidisciplinary breast cancer care, with a special emphasis on new and emerging approaches over the past 10 years in the fields of diagnostics, surgery, radiation, medical oncology, and plastic surgery. PMID:19186235

  18. Clinical proteomics in breast cancer: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Christine W. Gast; Jan H. M. Schellens; Jos H. Beijnen

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer imposes a significant healthcare burden on women worldwide. Early detection is of paramount importance in reducing\\u000a mortality, yet the diagnosis of breast cancer is hampered by the lack of an adequate detection method. In addition, better\\u000a breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients eligible for adjuvant therapy. Hence, new markers for early\\u000a diagnosis, accurate prognosis and prediction

  19. Unique features of breast cancer in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Skye Hongiun Cheng; Mei-Hua Tsou; Mei-Ching Liu; James J. Jian; Jason Chia-Hsein Cheng; Szu-Yun Leu; Cheng-Yee Hsieh; Andrew T. Huang

    2000-01-01

    Between April 1990 and December 1997, 811 consecutive patients with 830 newly diagnosed breast cancers having their primary treatments in our institution were included in this study. Sixty three percent of breast cancer patients were premenopausal. The early-onset breast cancer (age =?40) composed 29.3% of all patients. The five-year survival rate of all patients was 80.4% (95% confidence interval [CI],

  20. CISNET: Simulating Breast Cancer in Wisconsin

    Cancer.gov

    This project will update and extend a previously developed model simulating breast cancer age- and stage-specific incidence and age-specific mortality in Wisconsin. The model was developed and validated in 1992-93 and was used to explain breast cancer trends in Wisconsin from 1982-1992. We will reprogram the macrosimulation model as a discrete event microsimulation, updating inputs to account for demographic, and breast cancer detection and treatment changes since 1992.

  1. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  2. Effective methods for disclosing breast cancer diagnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle C. Azu; Stephanie Jean; Jean-Marie Piotrowski; Brian O’Hea

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundThe current study sought to determine effective methods for disclosing breast cancer diagnosis and to identify epidemiologic patterns in patient preference for method of information disclosure.

  3. Breast cancer circulating tumor cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria João Carvalho; Mafalda Laranjo; Margarida Abrantes; António S. Cabrita; Filomena Botelho; Carlos F. de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Metastasization of breast cancer involves various mechanisms responsible for progression from invasive lesion to dissemination\\u000a in distant organs. Regional lymph node metastasization was considered an initial step in this process, but it is now recognized\\u000a that hematogenous dissemination is a deviation from lymphatic circulation. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC)\\u000a is an aim in several oncology areas. For this

  4. Presenting Painless Breast Cancer Detection!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    This lesson culminates the unit with the Go Public phase of the legacy cycle. In the associated activity, students depict a tumor amidst healthy body tissue using a Microsoft Excel® graph. In addition, students design a brochure for both patients and doctors advertising a new form of painless yet reliable breast cancer detection. Together, the in-class activity and the take-home assignment function as an assessment of what students have learned throughout the unit.

  5. CISNET: Breast Cancer Landmark Study

    Cancer.gov

    After remaining relatively constant for many years, breast cancer mortality in the United States decreased by a dramatic 24% from 1989 to 2000. CISNET investigators initiated a joint comparative modeling effort among seven groups to determine the contributions of mammography and adjuvant therapy to this decline. While the benefits of adjuvant therapy were more settled, controversy regarding the benefits of mammography screening persisted due to uneven results and continuing criticism of the controlled trials on which the mortality benefits had been based.

  6. Trends in Post-mastectomy Reconstruction: A SEER Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Julie E.; Summers, Danielle E.; Cui, Haiyan; Carey, Joseph N.; Viscusi, Rebecca K.; Hurst, Craig A.; Waer, Amy L.; Ley, Michele L B.; Sener, Stephen F.; Vijayasekaran, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study was performed to investigate recent trends and factors associated with immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) using a large population-based registry. We hypothesized that rates of IBR have increased since passage of the Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998. Methods The SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database was used to evaluate Stage I–III breast cancer (BC) patients who underwent total mastectomy from 1998–2008. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to study predictors of IBR. Results Of 112,348 patients with BC treated by mastectomy, 18,001 (16%) had IBR. Rates of IBR increased significantly from 1998–2008 (p<0.0001). Use of IBR significantly decreased as patient age increased (p<0.0001), as stage increased (p<0.0001), and as the number of positive lymph nodes increased (p<0.0001). Estrogen receptor +/progesterone receptor + (ER+/PR+) patients had significantly higher IBR rates than ER?/PR? patients (p<0.0001). IBR was used in 3615 of 25,823 (14.0%) of patients having post-mastectomy radiation (XRT) and in 14,188 of 86,513 (16.4%) of those not having XRT (p<0.0001). Conclusions The utilization of IBR has increased significantly over the last decade. IBR was found to be significantly associated with age, race, geographical region, stage, ER, grade, LN status, and XRT (p<0.0001). PMID:23861196

  7. Iron homeostasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marques, Oriana; da Silva, Berta Martins; Porto, Graça; Lopes, Carlos

    2014-05-28

    Iron is an essential element and a critical component of molecules involved in energy production, cell cycle and intermediate metabolism. However, the same characteristic chemistry that makes it so biologically versatile may lead to iron-associated toxicity as a consequence of increased oxidative stress. The fact that free iron accumulates with age and generates ROS led to the hypothesis that it could be involved in the etiogenesis of several chronic diseases. Iron has been consistently linked to carcinogenesis, either through persistent failure in the redox balance or due to its critical role in cellular proliferation. Several reports have given evidence that alterations in the import, export and storage of cellular iron may contribute to breast cancer development, behavior and recurrence. In this review, we summarize the basic mechanisms of systemic and cellular iron regulation and highlight the findings that link their deregulation with breast cancer. To conclude, progresses in iron chelation therapy in breast cancer, as a tool to fight chemotherapy resistance, are also reviewed. PMID:24486738

  8. Breast reconstruction: current and future options

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Henry; Prendergast, Tahira I; Nicholson, Bryson; White, Shenita; Frederick, Wayne AI

    2011-01-01

    When initiated by the devastating diagnosis of cancer, post ablative breast restoration has at its core the goal of restoring anatomic normalcy. The concepts of body image, wholeness, and overall well-being have been introduced to explain the paramount psychological influence the breast has on both individuals and society as a whole. Hence, a growing subspecialty has been established to recreate or simulate the lost breast. At least one third of breast cancer victims consider breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction post mastectomy may be offered at the time of mastectomy or delayed post mastectomy after adjuvant therapy. This may be utilizing autologous tissues or implants and each has risks and benefits, especially when considering adjuvant therapy. In addition, there has been a move away from a traditional mastectomy to less invasive, but still curative procedures, such as skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy. These procedures provide the breast envelope to facilitate reconstruction. This paper reviews the primary issues in breast reconstruction, as well as their psychologic, oncologic, and social impact. PMID:24367179

  9. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships. PMID:21545207

  10. Deciphering Medspeak: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information on symptoms and diagnosis, news and research, library of terms, interactive discussion lists, treatment options and ... Web sites and a list of patient cancer libraries in the United States and Canada. http://www. ...

  11. Detecting Breast Cancer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students are introduced to the unit challenge: To develop a painless means of identifying cancerous tumors. Solving the challenge depends on an understanding of the properties of stress and strain. After learning the challenge question, students generate ideas and consider the knowledge required to solve the challenge. Then they read an expert's opinion on ultrasound imaging and the potentials for detecting cancerous tumors. This interview helps to direct student research and learning towards finding a solution.

  12. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-24

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  13. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-08

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  14. Breast Cancer Decision Support System for Rural People

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thoranin Intarajak; Seung Hwan Kang

    In Thailand, breast cancer is one of the top five cancers and the percentage of breast cancer patients is surprisingly increasing. Siriraj Hospital has collected data of breast cancer patients for more than ten years. Unfortunately, those data were not arranged in a useable form. Therefore, a system to record breast cancer information and treatment methods has been created. It

  15. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  16. Cathepsin D in breast secretions from women with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, L. M.; Ferrando, A. A.; Diez-Itza, I.; Vizoso, F.; Ruibal, A.; López-Otin, C.

    1993-01-01

    A proteinase accumulated in breast secretions from women with breast cancer has been characterised. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of breast secretions by pepstatin A showed that the main enzyme involved was an aspartyl proteinase. Determination of its cleavage specificity by SDS-PAGE and amino acid sequence analysis revealed that it was identical to that of cathepsin D, an aspartyl proteinase suggested to be involved in breast cancer development. The identity between both proteins was further confirmed by immunological analysis with monoclonal antibodies against cathepsin D. Quantification of cathepsin D in nipple fluids from 41 women with benign or malignant breast diseases and from 19 control women without breast pathology revealed the presence of variable amounts of this proteinase. The average concentration of cathepsin D in breast secretions from cancer-bearing breasts was 7.2 +/- 2.2 fmol micrograms of protein, which was significantly higher than those of nipple fluids from control women (2.9 +/- 0.6 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.04) or from patients with benign breast diseases (2.1 +/- 0.3 fmol micrograms-1) (P = 0.004). Though the number of cancer patients studied was small (n = 21), no correlations were found with cytosolic concentrations of cathepsin D or oestrogen receptors, neither with other parameters such as tumour size, histological grade, axillary node involvement or menopausal status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8494701

  17. “Would a man smell a rose then throw it away?” Jordanian men’s perspectives on women's breast cancer and breast health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting women, and the most common cancer overall in Jordan. A woman’s decision to go for screening is influenced by her social support network. This study aims to explore Jordanian men’s individual and contextual perspectives on women’s breast cancer and their own role in the breast health of the females within their families. Methods An explorative qualitative design was used to purposively recruit 24 married men aged 27 to 65 years (median 43 years) from four governorates in Jordan. Data in the form of interviews transcriptions was subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes were identified: a) Supporting one’s wife; b) Marital needs and obligations; c) Constrained by a culture of destiny and shame. The first theme was built on men’s feelings of responsibility for the family’s health and well-being, their experiences of encouraging their wives to seek health care and their providing counselling and instrumental support. The second theme emerged from men’s views about other men’s rejection of a wife inflicted by breast cancer, their own perceptions of diminished femininity due to mastectomy and their own concerns about protecting the family from the hereditary risk of breast cancer. The third theme was seen in men’s perception of breast cancer as an inevitable act of God that is far away from one’s own family, in associating breast cancer with improper behaviour and in their readiness to face the culture of Eib (shame). Conclusions Jordanian men perceive themselves as having a vital role in supporting, guiding and encouraging their wives to follow breast cancer early detection recommendations. Breast health awareness campaigns could involve husbands to capitalize on family support. PMID:24160268

  18. The intracrinology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Keely May; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    The importance of intracrinology, or in situ production of steroids from circulating precursors, in breast cancer has been firmly established in estrogen actions on postmenopausal patients. Expression levels of various steroid synthesizing and/or metabolizing enzymes have been examined in human breast cancer tissues by a number of groups. The enzymes examined include those capable of converting circulating DHEA-S to sex steroids (STS and 3?HSD?4-5 isomerase), the group of enzymes that modulate the strength of both androgens and estrogens (17?HSD family) as well as the androgenic 5?R enzymes and the estrogenic aromatase enzyme. In addition to these DHEA-related metabolism pathways, other intracrine pathways involving progesterone and cholesterol have also been examined. Some risk factors of breast cancer development, including obesity, have also been postulated to interact with steroid metabolising pathways. In this review, we aimed to summarise the current state of knowledge regarding intracrine metabolism including expression levels of various enzymes and receptors, focusing particularly upon the importance of the production of biologically potent steroids from circulating sulfated precursors such as DHEA-S. In addition, we attempted to summarise the factors, both steroidal and non-steroidal, involved in the regulation of these enzymes and propose future directions for research in this particular field. The concept of intracrinology was first proposed over 20 years ago but there still remain many unanswered questions which could open new horizons for the understanding of intracrine metabolism in the breast. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'. PMID:24751707

  19. New approaches in the management of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Patten, Darren K; Sharifi, Laurence K; Fazel, Maisam

    2013-10-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare condition that accounts for 0.1% of all male cancers. Our current evidence base for treatment is derived from female breast cancer (FBC) patients. Risk factors for MBC include age, genetic predisposition, race, sex hormone exposure, and environmental factors. Most patients present later and with more advanced disease than comparable FBC patients. Tumors are likely to be estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor positive, with the most common histologic type being invasive ductal carcinoma. Triple assessment remains the criterion standard for diagnosis. Primary MBC is mostly managed initially by simple mastectomy, with the option of breast conserving surgery, which carries an increased risk of recurrence. Sentinel node biopsy is recommended as the initial procedure for staging the axilla. Reconstructive surgery focuses on achieving primary skin closure, and radiotherapy largely follows treatment protocols validated in FBC. We recommend chemotherapy for men with more advanced disease, in particular, those with estrogen receptor negative histology. MBC responds well to endocrine therapy, although it is associated with significant adverse effects. Third-generation aromatase inhibitors are promising but raise concerns due to their failure to prevent estrogen synthesis in the testes. Fulvestrant remains unproven as a therapy, and data on trastuzumab is equivocal with HER2 receptor expression and functionality unclear in MBC. In metastatic disease, drug-based hormonal manipulation remains a first-line therapy, followed by systemic chemotherapy for hormone-refractory disease. Prognosis for MBC has improved over the past 30 years, with survival affected by disease staging, histologic classification, and comorbidity. PMID:23845572

  20. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  1. Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Biomechanical breast modeling to improve patient positioning during breast cancer radiotherapy S irradiation for cases of early stage breast cancer. Delivering higher doses to more localized volumes demands, France Keywords: Finite Element model; breast soft tissues; partial breast irradiation; breast phantom. 1

  2. Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy vs mastectomy for ductal carcinoma in situ: French Survey experience

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, B; Lemanski, C; Fourquet, A; de Lafontan, B; Giard, S; Meunier, A; Pioud-Martigny, R; Campana, F; Marsiglia, H; Lancrenon, S; Mery, E; Penault-Llorca, F; Fondrinier, E; Tunon de Lara, C

    2009-01-01

    From March 2003 to April 2004, 77 physicians throughout France prospectively recruited 1289 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) patients and collected data on diagnosis, patient and tumour characteristics, and treatments. Median age was 56 years (range, 30–84). Ductal carcinoma in situ was diagnosed by mammography in 87.6% of patients. Mastectomy, conservative surgery alone (CS) and CS with radiotherapy (CS+RT) were performed in 30.5, 7.8 and 61.7% of patients, respectively. Thus, 89% of patients treated by CS received adjuvant RT. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and axillary dissection (AD) were performed in 21.3 and 10.4% of patients, respectively. Hormone therapy was administered to 13.4% of the patients (80% tamoxifen). Median tumour size was 14.5?mm (6, 11 and 35?mm for CS, CS+RT and mastectomy, respectively, P<0.0001). Nuclear grade was high in 21% of patients, intermediate in 38.5% and low in 40.5%. Excision was considered complete in 92% (CS) and 88.3% (CS+RT) of patients. Oestrogen receptors were positive in 69.8% of assessed cases (31%). Treatment modalities varied widely according to region: mastectomy rate, 20–37%; adjuvant RT, 84–96%; hormone treatment, 6–34%. Our survey on current DCIS management in France has highlighted correlations between pathological features (tumour size, margin and grade) and treatment options, with several similar variations to those observed in recent UK and US studies. PMID:19277037

  3. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique. PMID:24598575

  4. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56?year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4?months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders. PMID:22873795

  5. Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

    2013-09-01

    Background. Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, ?-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer. Results. Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (P < .05) and decreased HER2 expression (P < .05) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 index; NS) among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients when compared with placebo. Uncontrolled and biomarker studies suggest beneficial effects on hot flashes, cell proliferation, atypical cytomorphology, and mammographic density, as well as possible anti-angiogenic activity at doses of 25 g ground flax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients. Conclusions. Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast cancer. PMID:24013641

  6. The Genomic Signature of Breast Cancer Prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose Russo; Gabriela Balogh; Daniel Mailo; Patricia A. Russo; Rebecca Heulings; Irma H. Russo

    Early pregnancy imprints in the breast permanent genomic changes or a signature that reduces the susceptibility of this organ to cancer. The breast attains its maximum development during pregnancy and\\u000a lactation. After menopause, the breast regresses in both nulliparous and parous women containing lobular structures designated\\u000a Lob.1. The Lob 1 found in the breast of nulliparous women and of parous

  7. Breast Cancer Diagnosis Systems: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esugasini Subramaniam; Tan Kuan Liung

    Studies on breast cancer have been approached for many years from different angles of importance; be it the cause of the disease, the detection of the disease, the diagnosis systems, method of treatments before and after surgery. These studies have been divided into two paradigms, one which defines breast cancer disease as a local and regional disease; and another as

  8. Multidrug Resistance in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Can Atalay; Ismet Deliloglu Gurhan; Cigdem Irkkan; Ufuk Gunduz

    2006-01-01

    Background: Advanced breast cancer cases can still be encountered resulting in poor prognosis. The primary treatment for these patients is chemotherapy, and multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle in the treatment. Detecting drug resistance before first-line chemotherapy may increase the patient’s survival. In this study, the role of MDR is evaluated in locally advanced breast cancer patients. Methods: Reverse

  9. Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhaskarapillai Binukumar; Aleyamma Mathew

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and

  10. Prognostic factors in primary breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary M. Clark; William L. McGuire

    1983-01-01

    Summary Estrogen receptor (ER) has been well documented as an important predictor of long disease-free intervals and survival for patients with primary breast cancer (1). In advanced breast cancer it has been hypothesized that the presence of progesterone receptor (PR) might be a more sensitive marker for predicting response to endocrine therapy (2,3). We have recently found that PR was

  11. Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) Cohort is an international resource of multi-generational families, data, and biospecimens established in 1995 for interdisciplinary collaborative research on the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer. Questionnaire data, clinical data and (when available) biospecimens have been collected for over 30,000 women and men from nearly 12,000 families.

  12. Quality of life and related factors among the women undergoing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Musarezaie, Amir; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and 81% of therapeutic surgery performed for breast cancer in Iran is mastectomy. Following mastectomy, the patients suffer from many problems which lead to several disorders and decrease in their quality of life (QOL). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 105 breast cancer patients who underwent mastectomy, selected with a convenient sampling method. A questionnaire containing three parts was used to collect data. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 14 using descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: Spearman test showed that there was a statistically significant relationship between QOL and education level and also fatigue. Moreover, Spearman test indicated a statistically significant correlation between age and the mental dimension of QOL. There was no significant relationship between QOL with marital and employment status. Conclusions: Based on the findings, we can suggest that nurses should be educated about the factors affecting QOL. They can receive the necessary knowledge in various areas such as meeting the patients, optimum management of patients’ problems, improvement of their health, and finally help to increase the cancer patients’ QOL. PMID:25878710

  13. Skin-sparing mastectomy: a survey based approach to defining standard of care.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jeannie; Ellenhorn, Joshua; Qian, Dajun; Kulber, David; Aronowitz, Joel

    2008-10-01

    Skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) followed by immediate reconstruction has been advocated as an effective treatment option for patients with early-stage breast carcinoma. It markedly improves the quality of breast reconstruction through preservation of the natural skin envelope and a smaller incision. The purpose of this study was to investigate general surgeons' attitudes towards SSM. A postal questionnaire survey of California general surgeons was conducted regarding SSM. Of 370 respondents who stated they performed breast cancer surgery, 331 perform mastectomy for cancer with planned immediate reconstruction. Ninety per cent of respondents did not feel that SSM resulted in higher rates of local recurrence. In addition, 70 per cent felt that the cosmetic results of immediate breast reconstruction after SSM were better than those after a standard mastectomy. Despite this, only 61 per cent perform SSM in most cases when immediate breast reconstruction is planned. The majority of general surgeons perform SSM and therefore it should be considered standard of care. Despite a growing body of literature demonstrating high rates of patient satisfaction and long-term oncologic safety with SSM, there remains significant variation in practice patterns among general surgeons. Additional effort in general surgery education regarding the feasibility and safety of SSM is needed. PMID:18942610

  14. Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective association?

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    2002-01-01

    Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 192­196 Mastalgia and breast cancer: a protective to breast cancer risk. We have examined the association between mastalgia and breast cancer in the patient breast cancer risk factor information, 1532 (28%) reported breast pain as an incidental complaint

  15. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-15

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  17. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-28

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  18. Ospemifene, vulvovaginal atrophy, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wurz, Gregory T; Soe, Lin H; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2013-03-01

    The incidence and severity of vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients has a significant impact on quality of life. While the etiology of VVA is primarily related to low estrogen levels seen in menopause, women with breast cancer have an added risk of VVA induced by a combination of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and menopause. Ospemifene is a new, non-hormonal selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) triphenylethylene derivative that is effective in treating VVA in postmenopausal women. Although other SERMs have antagonistic effects on the vagina, ospemifene exerts an estrogen-like effect on the vaginal epithelium. This review will focus on data demonstrating the antiestrogenic activity of ospemifene in several unique breast cancer animal models, and the implications for utilizing ospemifene in patients with breast cancer suffering from VVA. Additional research addressing the expanded use of ospemifene in breast cancer patients is also warranted. PMID:23332519

  19. Diet and breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mourouti, Niki; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Papavagelis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer occurs as a result between genes-diet interactions. Concerning diet, only alcohol is widely recognized for being most consistently associated with breast cancer risk. The purpose of this review is to report through a systematic way the current scientific evidence relating breast cancer and diet, through original-research studies published in English language during the last decade, assessing the consumption of specific foodstuffs/food-nutrients in relation to the disease. The available literature suggests that soy food intake seems to be inversely associated with the disease, while no association seems to be reported for dietary carbohydrates and dietary fiber intake. The consumption of dietary fat, is probably suggestive of an increase in breast cancer risk, while studies evaluating the role of fruit/vegetable, meat as well as dietary patterns and breast cancer risk, provide inconsistent results. Diet seems to be modestly associated with the disease, highlighting the need for more studies to be conducted. PMID:25198160

  20. Mammography screening in the Netherlands: delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer after breast cancer screening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L E M Duijm; J H Groenewoud; F H Jansen; J Fracheboud; M van Beek; H J de Koning; LEM Duijm

    2004-01-01

    In a prospective study we determined the frequency and causes of delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer after suspicious screening mammography. We included all women aged 50–75 years who underwent biennial screening mammography in the southern breast cancer screening region of the Netherlands between 1 January 1996 and 1 January 2002. Clinical data, breast imaging reports, biopsy results and

  1. A case of neurofibromatosis and breast cancer: loss of heterozygosity of NF1 in breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?ef?k Güran; Mükerrem Safali

    2005-01-01

    Only a few cases with breast cancer and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have been reported in the literature. Here, we present a family with a history of neurofibromatosis and breast cancer. No hereditary NF1 mutation was observed in this case. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analyses of the breast tumor revealed LOH in the NF1 region. In this family, the proband

  2. Breast cancer with cartilaginous and/or osseous metaplasia diagnosed by lymph nodal metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsukuda, Kazunori; Tsuji, Hisashi; Kunitomo, Tadayoshi; Aokage, Keiju; Miyake, Takayoshi; Nakahara, Saki; Masuda, Hiroko

    2009-12-01

    Breast cancer with cartilaginous and/or osseous metaplasia is a type of metaplastic carcinomas and is a rare disease. We report the case of a 49 year-old female who underwent right mastectomy for a large breast tumor. Histological examinations revealed a mixed tumor with both stromal and epithelial elements;the stroma showed poor differentiated spindle-shape and multiform cells with a massive osseous matrix, and atypical epithelial cells, which mainly existed on the surface of the cysts, showed nucleic atypia. The tumor was diagnosed as a malignant phyllodes tumor with osteosarcomatous differentiation;it was not identified as a metaplastic carcinoma because of the lack of proof of a cancerous component. Two years after a mastectomy, swelling of the axillary lymph nodes was found and a biopsy was performed. Histological findings for the lymph node indicated a metastasis of the invasive ductal carcinoma. The primary tumor was re-examined and was considered to be the origin of the lymph nodal metastasis. Lymph nodal metastasis of cancer proved that the primary tumor had cancerous potential, and the pathological diagnosis was altered to a breast cancer with cartilaginous and/or osseous metaplasia. PMID:20035293

  3. Breast cancer detection using time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Hossein

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer among women. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have certain limitations in detecting breast cancer, especially during its early stage of development. A number of studies have shown that microwave breast cancer detection has potential to become a successful clinical complement to the conventional X-ray mammography. Microwave breast imaging is performed by illuminating the breast tissues with an electromagnetic waveform and recording its reflections (backscatters) emanating from variations in the normal breast tissues and tumour cells, if present, using an antenna array. These backscatters, referred to as the overall (tumour and clutter) response, are processed to estimate the tumour response, which is applied as input to array imaging algorithms used to estimate the location of the tumour. Due to changes in the breast profile over time, the commonly utilized background subtraction procedures used to estimate the target (tumour) response in array processing are impractical for breast cancer detection. The thesis proposes a new tumour estimation algorithm based on a combination of the data adaptive filter with the envelope detection filter (DAF/EDF), which collectively do not require a training step. After establishing the superiority of the DAF/EDF based approach, the thesis shows that the time reversal (TR) array imaging algorithms outperform their conventional conterparts in detecting and localizing tumour cells in breast tissues at SNRs ranging from 15 to 30dB.

  4. Epidemiology and clinicopathology of breast cancer in metro Manila and Rizal Province, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Laudico, Adriano; Redaniel, Maria Theresa M; Mirasol-Lumague, Maria Rica; Mapua, Cynthia A; Uy, Gemma B; Pukkala, Eero; Pisani, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The breast cancer incidence in the Philippines is among the highest in Asia. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) in Metro Manila and Rizal Province derived from the Philippine Cancer Society-Manila Cancer Registry and the Department of Health-Rizal Cancer Registry showed increase from 1980 to 2002, and were significantly higher in 7 cities in Metro Manila and significantly lower in 14 cities/municipalities mostly in Rizal Province. The AJCC Clinical Stage did not change from 1993 to 2002 among incident cases, the average distribution being: I= 5%, IIA= 20%, IIB= 18%, IIIA= 9%, IIIB= 10%, IV= 11%, Unknown= 28%. The International Agency for Research on Cancer attempted to run a randomized screening trial in 1995-1997 in the Philippines based on clinical breast examination by trained nurses and midwives. Unfortunately, even after home visits by a team equipped to perform needle biopsy, only 35% of screen-positive cases eventually had a diagnostic test. The estimated prevalence of BRCA mutations among unselected patients in the Philippine General Hospital (PGH) in 1998 was 5.1%, with a prevalence of 4.1% for BRCA2 mutations alone. There is a continuing effort at improving IHC hormone receptor testing at PGH, particularly on early fixation in buffered formalin. It was observed that hormone receptor-positive proportions tended to be higher in core needle biopsy specimens (72%) compared to mastectomy specimens (65%). During the years 1991, 1994 and 1997, 97% of incident cases of early breast cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, 18% had postoperative radiotherapy, 51% had adjuvant hormone treatment and 47% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Survival of incident cases in 1993 to 2002 was compared to that of Filipino-Americans and Caucasians in the SEER 13 database. The age-adjusted 5-year relative survival, using period analysis, of Metro Manila residents, Filipino-Americans and Caucasians were 58.6%, 89.6% and 88.3% respectively. PMID:19469648

  5. Current and future role of neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Untch, M; Konecny, GE; Paepke, S; von Minckwitz, G; von Minckwitz, G

    2014-01-01

    radiotherapy after primary systemic therapy be administered with the same recommendations made for operable breast cancerBreast Radiotherapy (START) trials of radiotherapy hypofractionation for treatment of early breast cancer:

  6. Obese Postmenopausal Women May Face Higher Risk for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Obese Postmenopausal Women May Face Higher Risk for Breast Cancer Researchers report the increased risk was as high ... and postmenopausal may face significantly higher odds for breast cancer compared with slimmer women. The risk for breast ...

  7. Diabetes and breast cancer : the women's healthy eating & living study

    E-print Network

    Erickson, Kirsten Diann

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome as a prognostic factor for breast cancermetabolic syndrome, 29 also found associations with a worse prognosis after breast cancer.metabolic disorders can be controlled and may present an opportunity for improving prognosis in early stage breast cancer

  8. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Breast Cancer In Men? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer In Men After Treatment What`s New in Breast ...

  9. Long-term risk of sarcoma following radiation treatment for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taghian, A.; de Vathaire, F.; Terrier, P.; Le, M.; Auquier, A.; Mouriesse, H.; Grimaud, E.; Sarrazin, D.; Tubiana, M. (Inst. Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France))

    1991-07-01

    Between 1954 and 1983, 7620 patients were treated for breast carcinoma at Institut Gustave Roussy (France). Of these patients, 6919 were followed for at least 1 year. Out of these, 11 presented with sarcomas thought to be induced by irradiation, 2 of which were Steward-Treves Syndrome, and 9 of which were sarcomas within the irradiated fields. All histological slides were reviewed and a comparison with those of breast cancer was done. The sites of these sarcomas were: parietal wall, 1 case; second costal cartilage, 1 case; infraclavicular region, 1 case; supraclavicular region, 2 cases; internal third of the clavicle, 2 cases; axillary region 2 cases; and the internal side of the upper arm (Stewart-Treves syndrome), 2 cases. The median age of these 11 patients at the diagnosis of sarcomas was 65.8 (49-83). The mean latent period was 9.5 years (4-24). Three patients underwent radical mastectomy and nine modified radical mastectomy. Only one patient received chemotherapy. The radiation doses received at the site of the sarcoma were 45 Gy/18 fr. for 10 cases and 90-100 Gy for 1 case (due to overlapping between two fields). The histology was as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 5 cases; fibrosarcoma, 3 cases; lymphangiosarcoma, 2 cases; and osteochondrosarcoma, 1 case. The median survival following diagnosis of sarcoma was 2.4 years (4 months-9 years). Two patients are still alive: one with recurrence of her breast cancer, the other in complete remission, with 7 and 3 years follow-up, respectively. All other patients died from their sarcomas. The cumulative incidence of sarcoma following irradiation of breast cancer was 0.2% (0.09-0.47) at 10 years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of sarcoma (observed n{number sign} of cases (Obs)/expected n{number sign} of cases (Exp) computed from the Danish Cancer Registry for the same period) was 1.81 (CI 0.91-3.23).

  10. AN AWARENESS SURVEY OF SURGEONS INVOLVED IN BREAST CANCER TREATMENT REGARDING THEIR PATIENTS RETURNING TO WORK

    PubMed Central

    AKAHANE, KAZUHISA; TSUNODA, NOBUYUKI; MURATA, TORU; FUJII, MASAHIRO; FUWA, YOSHITAKA; WADA, KOJI; ODA, KOJI; NAGINO, MASATO

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Surgeons focus on the period of absence from work during the initial treatment of breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine surgeons’ perceptions and awareness regarding the necessary period of absence from work during breast cancer treatment. We created a questionnaire for all surgeons involved in breast cancer treatment who are affiliated with the Department of Surgery at the Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine and its associated facilities. The necessary leave of absence period for each treatment was considered, and the decision regarding whether patients should return to work was examined. The surgeons were instructed to assume that a ‘heavy load worker’ was a nurse or caregiver and that a ‘light load worker’ was a medical office worker. This study included 184 surgeons (response rate: 96.8%). More than half of the surgeons considered that light load workers could return to work within 2 weeks; 89.8% after conservative resection, 71.6% after total mastectomy, 50.3% after axillary dissection. In contrast, more than half of the surgeons considered that heavy load worker should wait returning to work more than 3 weeks; 49.4% after conservative resection, 73.3% after total mastectomy, 85.7% after axillary dissection. For patients treated with chemotherapy, three-quarters of the surgeons indicated that it would be difficult to work while receiving anthracycline regimens. The results suggest that surgeons can predict the approximate period of absence from work for patients who receive an initial treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25741040

  11. Breast-feeding after breast cancer: if you wish, madam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hatem A. Azim Jr; Giulia Bellettini; Shari Gelber; Fedro A. Peccatori

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor-affecting women during the child bearing period. With the rising trend in\\u000a delaying pregnancy later in life, the issue of subsequent pregnancy and lactation following breast cancer diagnosis has been\\u000a more frequently encountered. In this context, data is scarce particularly those addressing the issue of lactation. In this\\u000a review, we discussed different endocrinal,

  12. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-17

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  13. DNA methylation epigenotypes in breast cancer molecular subtypes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naiara G Bediaga; Amelia Acha-Sagredo; Isabel Guerra; Amparo Viguri; Carmen Albaina; Irune Ruiz Diaz; Ricardo Rezola; María Jesus Alberdi; Joaquín Dopazo; David Montaner; Mertxe de Renobales; Agustín F Fernández; John K Field; Mario F Fraga; Triantafillos Liloglou; Marian M de Pancorbo

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Identification of gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes is considered a critical means of prognostication. Genetic mutations along with epigenetic alterations contribute to gene-expression changes occurring in breast cancer. So far, these epigenetic contributions to sporadic breast cancer subtypes have not been well characterized, and only a limited understanding exists of the epigenetic mechanisms affected in those particular breast cancer

  14. Competing risks to breast cancer mortality in Catalonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ester Vilaprinyo; Rosa Gispert; Montserrat Martínez-Alonso; Misericòrdia Carles; Roger Pla; Josep-Alfons Espinàs; Montserrat Rué

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer mortality has experienced important changes over the last century. Breast cancer occurs in the presence of other competing risks which can influence breast cancer incidence and mortality trends. The aim of the present work is: 1) to assess the impact of breast cancer deaths among mortality from all causes in Catalonia (Spain), by age and birth cohort

  15. The efficacy of surgical treatment of breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the analysis was to resolve the two opposing claims regarding the efficacy of surgical treatment of breast cancer, namely the course of the disease is not affected by surgery because breast cancer is an incurable systemic disease, as shown by a previous analysis, results of randomized breast cancer treatment trials and long-term follow-up of breast cancer patients;

  16. Coincidence of nonpuerperal mastitis and noninflammatory breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Friedolf Peters; Anja Kießlich; Volker Pahnke

    2002-01-01

    Background: Nonpuerperal mastitis may mimic breast cancer but the incidence of noninflammatory cancer among such patients is unknown. Aim: To estimate the risk of breast cancer in patients with nonpuerperal mastitis within 12 months of treatment. Study design: Two hundred seventy-seven patients with nonpuerperal breast inflammation were prospectively screened for breast cancer within 1 year after mastitis was diagnosed. The

  17. Breast cancer subtyping from plasma proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early detection of breast cancer in blood is both appealing clinically and challenging technically due to the disease's illusive nature and heterogeneity. Today, even though major breast cancer subtypes have been characterized, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+, and basal-like, little is known about the heterogeneity of breast cancer in blood, which could help to discover minimally invasive protein biomarkers with which clinical researchers can detect, classify, and monitor different breast cancer subtypes. Results In this study, we performed an integrative pathway-assisted clustering analysis of breast cancer subtypes from plasma proteome samples collected from 80 patients diagnosed with breast cancer and 80 healthy women. First, four breast cancer subtypes and additionally unknown subtype (according to existing annotation) were determined based on pathology lab test results in primary tumors of enrolled patients. Next, we developed and applied four distance metrics, i.e., Protein Intensity, Q-Value, Pathway Profile, and Distance Score Function, to measure and characterize these cancer subtypes. Then, we developed a permutation test to evaluate the significant protein level changes in each biological pathway for each breast cancer subtype, using q-value. Lastly, we developed a pathway-protein matrix for each of the four distance methods to estimate the distance between breast cancer subtypes, for which further Pathway Association Network analysis were performed. Conclusions We found that 1) the luminal group (luminal A and luminal B) are clustered together, as well as the basal group (basal-like and HER2+) and 2) luminal A and luminal B are more close to each other than basal-like and HER2+ to each other. Our results were consistent with a recent independent breast cancer research from the Cancer Genome Atlas Network using genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our results showed that changes of different breast cancer subtypes at the pathway level are more profound and less variable than those at the molecular level. Similar subtypes share distinct yet similar pathway activation networks, while dissimilar subtypes are different also at the level of pathway activation networks. The results also showed that distance or similarity of cancer subtypes based on pathway analysis might be able to provide further insight into the intrinsic relationship of breast cancer subtypes. We believe integrative pathway-assisted proteomics analysis described here can become a model for reliable clustering or classification of other cancer subtypes. PMID:23369492

  18. [Breast cancer classification is evolving].

    PubMed

    Penault-Llorca, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic strategy of breast cancer has changed enormously during the last thirty years. To classical obligatory morphological data on the macroscopical and microscopical levels are now added imunocytochemistry, which is capable of detecting therapeutic targets such hormonal receptors and HER2 (Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor2), and molecular biology, which yields the molecular profile of tumors and their multigenic properties. By leaning on up-to-date classifications (TNM system and UICC grades), the pathologist is able to evaluate not only diagnostic but also pronostic criteria, leading to personalized and predictive treatments. PMID:25840451

  19. Esophageal cancer as second primary tumor after breast cancer radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beatrix Scholl; Ernane D Reis; Abderrahim Zouhair; Igor Chereshnev; Jean-Claude Givel; Michel Gillet

    2001-01-01

    Background: An increased risk of esophageal cancer has been reported in survivors of breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. This study further characterizes this association.Methods: Through hospital databases, 118 patients (109 men, 9 women) treated for esophageal cancer between 1985 and 1993 were identified, of whom 37 had 60 synchronous or metachronous cancers. 5 women had primary esophageal cancer after having

  20. Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsner, Robert James

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous tissue, a portable, inexpensive device was developed as a tool to help physicians visualize expression of surface markers. The system visualizes absorbance from nanoshell aggregates and fluorescence in the visible and near-infrared light spectrum. This study represents the first step in the development of an intraoperative optical imaging device to enhance the visualization of molecular markers overexpressed in cancerous cells.

  1. Analysis of gene expression of secreted factors associated with breast cancer metastases in breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Elana J; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, having multiple subtypes with different malignant phenotypes. The triple-negative breast cancer, or basal breast cancer, is highly aggressive, metastatic, and difficult to treat. Previously, we identified that key molecules (IL6, CSF2, CCL5, VEGFA, and VEGFC) secreted by tumor cells and stromal cells in basal breast cancer can promote metastasis. It remains to assess whether these molecules function similarly in other subtypes of breast cancer. Here, we characterize the relative gene expression of the five secreted molecules and their associated receptors (GP130, GMRA, GMRB, CCR5, VEGFR2, NRP1, VEGFR3, NRP2) in the basal, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) positive, luminal A, and luminal B subtypes using high throughput data from tumor samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC). IL6 and CCL5 gene expression are basal breast cancer specific, whereas high gene expression of GP130 was observed in luminal A/B. VEGFA/C and CSF2?mRNA are overexpressed in HER2 positive breast cancer, with VEGFA and CSF2 also overexpressed in basal breast cancer. Further study of the specific protein function of these factors within their associated cancer subtypes may yield personalized biomarkers and treatment modalities. PMID:26173622

  2. Using social marketing to increase breast cancer screening among African American women: perspectives from African American breast cancer survivors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Yvonne Talbert

    2008-01-01

    ? Despite progressive preventative techniques, intervention programs, and guidelines to help reduce breast cancer mortality, African American women (AAW) remain affected by breast cancer in greater numbers compared to Caucasians. As rates of breast cancer mortality continue to increase among AAW, a greater need for change emerges, which should include crafting culturally specific social marketing programs that promote breast cancer

  3. CISNET: Mechanistic Modeling of Breast Cancer Surveillance

    Cancer.gov

    The model will be validated with data on breast cancer from the Utah Population Data Base and the Utah Cancer registry. Using these resources we will obtain initial parameter values for a pertinent estimation algorithm designed for grouped data on breast cancer mortality provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. This two-step estimation procedure will be tested by computer simulations and analyses of epidemiological data.

  4. Breast cancer screening in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Panieri, Eugenio

    2012-04-01

    Diagnosing breast cancer early and efficiently is a critical component of any strategy aimed at decreasing breast cancer mortality in developing countries. In this chapter, I evaluate the evidence behind screening strategies and its controversies. The effect of breast-cancer screening has never been formally evaluated in developing countries, and data from the major screening trials need to be viewed in this context. Screening asymptomatic women by means of breast self-examination, clinical examination or mammography can play a significant role in decreasing breast-cancer mortality in developing countries. Major programmes should not be implemented, however, until adequate diagnostic and therapeutic facilities are in place. The most fundamental interventions in early detection, diagnosis, surgery, radiation therapy, and drug therapy must be integrated, organised and resourced appropriately within existing healthcare structures. PMID:22222136

  5. Video Q&A: Molecular profiling of breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Caldas, Carlos

    2013-06-21

    % of all breast cancer), and the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab for HER2 positive breast cancer (up to 15% of all breast cancer). 2. What are the problems with current treatments for breast cancer? The problems are that any systemic treatment, whether... risk. In the case of hormone therapy and trastuzumab, we have very good predictive tests that can help to assess benefit. For example, we know that women with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer do not benefit from hormone therapy, and those...

  6. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Factors influencing time between surgery and radiotherapy: A population based study of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Katik, S; Gort, M; Jobsen, J J; Maduro, J H; Struikmans, H; Siesling, S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes variation in the time interval between surgery and radiotherapy in breast cancer (BC) patients and assesses factors at patient, hospital and radiotherapy centre (RTC) level influencing this variation. To do so, the factors were investigated in BC patients using multilevel logistic regression. The study sample consisted of 15,961 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Registry at 79 hospitals and 19 (RTCs) with breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy directly followed by radiotherapy. The percentage of patients starting radiotherapy ?42 days varied from 14% to 94%. Early year of incidence, higher age, higher stage, mastectomy, higher ASA category and no availability of radiotherapy facilities were significantly associated with a longer time interval between radiotherapy and surgery. More patients received radiotherapy ?42 days in hospitals with on-site radiotherapy facilities (OR 1.36, p = 0.024). Among the remainder, significant variation was found at the RTC level (11.1%, ?(2) = 0.254, SE 0.054), and at the hospital level (6.4% ?2 = 0.443, SE 0.163) (ICC 0.064). The significant delay and unexplained variance remaining at the RCT and hospital level suggests delays caused by the patient referral pathway from hospital to RCT, and indicates potential for improvement at both levels. PMID:25933729

  8. Saddle pulmonary embolus and bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia develop simultaneously after first cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5FU chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-06-01

    A 62-year-old woman underwent a right mastectomy with axillary node dissection for a poorly differentiated ductal carcinoma. One month later, she underwent a left nephrectomy for a renal cell carcinoma. Two weeks after, she received her first cycle of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5FU (CMF) as a part of her breast cancer treatment. We describe an unusual case of non-occlusive saddle pulmonary embolus with extensive bilateral deep vein thrombosis and severe bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia developing simultaneously after the first CMF chemotherapy for breast cancer. PMID:25987120

  9. Saddle pulmonary embolus and bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia develop simultaneously after first cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5FU chemotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hameed, Fahad M.

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman underwent a right mastectomy with axillary node dissection for a poorly differentiated ductal carcinoma. One month later, she underwent a left nephrectomy for a renal cell carcinoma. Two weeks after, she received her first cycle of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5FU (CMF) as a part of her breast cancer treatment. We describe an unusual case of non-occlusive saddle pulmonary embolus with extensive bilateral deep vein thrombosis and severe bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia developing simultaneously after the first CMF chemotherapy for breast cancer. PMID:25987120

  10. A case of long term survival with skeletal only metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuechle, Joseph B.; McGrath, Brian E.; Khoury, Thaer; Mindell, Eugene R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer is very poor. Because of this, treatment of skeletal metastasis is often palliative with limited goals rather than cure. However, there are those patients, such as presented here, who survive for an extended time. Presentation of case This thirty-six year old female presented with lytic lesions to one ulna and rib five years after mastectomy for breast cancer. Despite radiation and chemotherapy, the ulnar lesion expanded and resulted in an elbow dislocation. The rib lesion was resected and the arm amputated above the elbow. She developed local recurrence in both her above elbow amputation stump and chest wall and a more proximal below shoulder amputation was performed with resection of chest wall lesion. Even though she had locally aggressive disease, she has survived for 31 years after diagnosis without any evidence of disease. Discussion Reports of metastatic breast cancer survival indicate the five year survival to be 15%. There have been few reports indicating that those patients with skeletal only or oligometastatic disease have improved prognosis. It is not clear what biological properties of these tumors results in the improved survival. Conclusion This case highlights the challenges of giving patients the optimal treatment in the light of limited ability to predict prognosis. It also highlights the need to further investigate the phenotypes of breast cancer that can, despite metastatic disease and with modern treatment go on to long survival. In addition this case demonstrates the importance of long term followup. PMID:25556998

  11. GLUT 5 Is Not Over-Expressed in Breast Cancer Cells and Patient Breast Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Zitzmann-Kolbe, Sabine; Junutula, Anitha; Reeves, Robert; Levi, Jelena; Srinivasan, Ananth; Bruus-Jensen, Kjerstin; Cyr, John; Dinkelborg, Ludger; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    F18 2-Fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) has been the gold standard in positron emission tomography (PET) oncologic imaging since its introduction into the clinics several years ago. Seeking to complement FDG in the diagnosis of breast cancer using radio labeled fructose based analogs, we investigated the expression of the chief fructose transporter-GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells and human tissues. Our results indicate that GLUT 5 is not over-expressed in breast cancer tissues as assessed by an extensive immunohistochemistry study. RT-PCR studies showed that the GLUT 5 mRNA was present at minimal amounts in breast cancer cell lines. Further knocking down the expression of GLUT 5 in breast cancer cells using RNA interference did not affect the fructose uptake in these cell lines. Taken together these results are consistent with GLUT 5 not being essential for fructose uptake in breast cancer cells and tissues. PMID:22073218

  12. Vitamin supplement use and risk for breast cancer: the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsogzolmaa Dorjgochoo; Martha J. Shrubsole; Xiao Ou Shu; Wei Lu; Zhixian Ruan; Ying Zheng; Hui Cai; Qi Dai; Kai Gu; Yu-Tang Gao; Wei Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective The influence of vitamin supplements on breast cancer risk is unclear and the interactive effects of dietary and supplemental\\u000a sources are unknown. This study investigated (1) the association between self-reported vitamin supplement use (multivitamin,\\u000a A, B, C, and E) and breast cancer and (2) the combined effect of vitamin supplements in relation to dietary vitamin intakes\\u000a on breast cancer

  13. Circulating transforming growth factor-?-1 and breast cancer prognosis: results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana M. Grau; Wanqing Wen; Denise S. Ramroopsingh; Yu-Tang Gao; Jinghuan Zi; Qiuyin Cai; Xiao-Ou Shu; Wei Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Studies investigating the prognostic effect of circulating TGF-?-1 in breast cancer have given inconsistent findings. The\\u000a purpose of this study is to evaluate whether circulating transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?-1) is associated with overall\\u000a and disease-free survival in a cohort of recently diagnosed breast cancer patients. Methods We measured TGF-?-1 levels in plasma samples of breast cancer patients

  14. Can differences in breast cancer utilities explain disparities in breast cancer care?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D. Schleinitz; Dina DePalo; Jeffrey Blume; Michael Stein

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black, older, and less affluent women are less likely to receive adjuvant breast cancer therapy than their counterparts.\\u000a Whereas preference contributes to disparities in other healt care scenarios, it is unclear if preference explains differential\\u000a rates of breast cancer care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE: To ascertain utilities from women of diverse backgrounds for the different stages of, and treatments for, breast cancer

  15. Management of fertility preservation in young breast cancer patients in a large breast cancer centre

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Lawrenz; E. Neunhoeffer; M. Henes; S. Lessmann-Bechle; B. Krämer; Tanja Fehm

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  The increase of breast cancer in young women under 40 years and the increasing age of women at the time of the birth of their\\u000a first child underlines the importance to implement counselling for fertility-preserving strategies in the management of breast\\u000a cancer care. We present the fertility-preserving procedures performed after routine counselling for primary breast cancer\\u000a patients in a large certified

  16. BCSC Grants: Commonly Used Medications and Breast Cancer Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and it is the second most common cause of cancer mortality. Breast cancer incidence rates have continued to rise since 1980, while mortality rates have declined. As a result, more women are at risk for breast cancer recurrences. Recurrences have important negative consequences requiring a variety of palliative treatments and often lead to death.

  17. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martineau; Rebecca M

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, one in eight women will be affected by breast cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed - as well as the second most fatal - cancer in American women. It is estimated that there will be nearly 200,000 diagnoses of breast cancer this year; more than 40,000 of these

  18. Breast cancer incidence and prevalence estimated from survival and mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riccardo Capocaccia; Arduino Verdecchia; Andrea Micheli; Milena Sant; Gemma Gatta; Franco Berrino

    1990-01-01

    Survival probability for female breast cancer patients was used to estimate incidence rates from breast cancer mortality data in Italy. The female breast cancer survival curve from the Lombardy Cancer Registry (LCR) was used to test the method on data from four local cancer registries, covering areas in different regions of Italy. In spite of the well known geographic variability

  19. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Millikan; Beth Newman; Chiu-Kit Tse; Patricia G. Moorman; Kathleen Conway; Lisa V. Smith; Miriam H. Labbok; Joseph Geradts; Jeannette T. Bensen; Susan Jackson; Sarah Nyante; Chad Livasy; Lisa Carey; H. Shelton Earp; Charles M. Perou

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified “intrinsic” breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal\\u000a growth factor receptor 2-positive\\/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based,\\u000a case–control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive\\u000a and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared

  20. Mechanisms of psychological resiliency in women after mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    S?k, Helena; Ziarko, Micha?; Marzec, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study To investigate into the mechanisms of resiliency in women after mastectomy. We hypothesized that the mechanism of resiliency in women with breast cancer would involve facilitation of adaptive coping strategies and inhibition of maladaptive strategies. We tested a mediational model in which resiliency was related to satisfaction with life through coping strategies. Material and methods Thirty women after mastectomy aged 28–69 years (M = 53.23, SD = 9.00) completed the Ego Resiliency Scale, Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Results The bootstrapping technique revealed that there were significant indirect effects for positive reframing (95% CI: 0.01–0.36), hopelessness/helplessness (95% CI: 0.18–0.83) and anxious preoccupation (95% CI: 0.001–0.55) but not for fighting spirit. The models explained up to 33% of the variance in satisfaction with life. Conclusions Coping strategies fully explain the effect of resiliency on satisfaction with life in women after mastectomy. This finding provides additional evidence of the fundamental role of coping strategies in the mechanisms of resiliency. We obtained similar results in patients with type II diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. The lack of significant associations of fighting spirit with resiliency suggests that this coping strategy may be beneficial for somatic health but its contribution to the mechanisms of psychological resiliency is complex. PMID:23788906

  1. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic (Infographic)

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  2. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dictionary of Genetics Terms Blogs and Newsletters Health Communications Publications What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take an ...

  3. Carbohydrate Intake and Outcomes among Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors /

    E-print Network

    Emond, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    intake would reduce the risk of a breast cancer recurrencereduce the risk of recurrence among postmenopausal breast cancerbreast cancer survivors soon after completing treatment for their primary cancer. Dietary targets should reduce

  4. Identification of genes involved in breast cancer and breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolou, Panagiotis; Toloudi, Maria; Papasotiriou, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in women. Great progress has been made in its treatment but relapse is common. One hypothesis to account for the high recurrence rates is the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple malignant cell types. This study aimed to determine genes that are expressed in breast cancer and breast CSCs and to investigate their correlation with stemness. RNA was extracted from established breast cancer cell lines and from CSCs derived from five different breast cancer patients. DNA microarray analysis was performed and any upregulated genes were also studied in other cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer. For genes that were expressed only in breast cancer, knockdown-based experiments were performed. Finally, the gene expression levels of stemness transcription factors were measured. The outcome of the analysis indicated a group of genes that were aberrantly expressed mainly in breast cancer cells with stemness properties. Knockdown experiments confirmed the impact of several of these on NANOG, OCT3/4, and SOX2 transcription factors. It seems that several genes that are not directly related with hormone metabolism and basic signal transduction pathways might have an important role in relapse and disease progression and, thus, can be targeted for new treatment approaches for breast cancer.

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well docosahexaenoic acid works in preventing recurrence in breast cancer survivors. Docosahexaenoic acid supplement may prevent recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

  6. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study.

  7. Factors influencing the surgery intentions and choices of women with early breast cancer: the predictive utility of an extended theory of planned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women diagnosed with early breast cancer (stage I or II) can be offered the choice between mastectomy or breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy due to equivalence in survival rates. A wide variation in the surgical management of breast cancer and a lack of theoretically guided research on this issue highlight the need for further research into the factors influencing women’s choices. An extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) could provide a basis to understand and predict women’s surgery choices. The aims of this study were to understand and predict the surgery intentions and choices of women newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, examining the predictive utility of an extended TPB. Methods Sixty-two women recruited from three UK breast clinics participated in the study; 48 women, newly diagnosed with early breast cancer, completed online questionnaires both before their surgery and after accessing an online decision support intervention (BresDex). Questionnaires assessed views about breast cancer and the available treatment options using items designed to measure constructs of an extended TPB (i.e., attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and anticipated regret), and women’s intentions to choose mastectomy or BCS. Objective data were collected on women’s choice of surgery via the clinical breast teams. Multiple and logistic regression analyses examined predictors of surgery intentions and subsequent choice of surgery. Results The extended TPB accounted for 69.9% of the variance in intentions (p <.001); attitudes and subjective norms were significant predictors. Including additional variables revealed anticipated regret to be a more important predictor than subjective norms. Surgery intentions significantly predicted surgery choices (p <.01). Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of an extended TPB in predicting and understanding women’s surgery intentions and choices for early breast cancer. Understanding these factors should help to identify key components of interventions to support women while considering their surgery options. PMID:23962230

  8. A prophylactic vaccine for breast cancer?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine J Watson; Barry A Gusterson

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Cancer vaccines are the Holy Grail for patients and clinicians alike. The possibility that we can be vaccinated against common cancers is very appealing and the socioeconomic consequences are significant. A recent paper published in the journal Nature Medicine suggests a new approach for the development of a prophylactic vaccine for breast cancer. Their strategy was to induce mammary

  9. Local linear wavelet neural network for breast cancer recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Senapati; A. K. Mohanty; S. Dash; P. K. Dash

    Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer deaths in women today and it is the most common type of cancer in women. Many sophisticated\\u000a algorithm have been proposed for classifying breast cancer data. This paper presents some experiments for classifying breast\\u000a cancer tumor and proposes the use local linear wavelet neural network for breast cancer recognition by training its

  10. Breast Cancer Risk Reduction, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Therese B; Ward, John H; Arun, Banu K; Colditz, Graham A; Cowan, Kenneth H; Daly, Mary B; Garber, Judy E; Gemignani, Mary L; Gradishar, William J; Jordan, Judith A; Korde, Larissa A; Kounalakis, Nicole; Krontiras, Helen; Kumar, Shicha; Kurian, Allison; Laronga, Christine; Layman, Rachel M; Loftus, Loretta S; Mahoney, Martin C; Merajver, Sofia D; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Mortimer, Joanne; Newman, Lisa; Pritchard, Elizabeth; Pruthi, Sandhya; Seewaldt, Victoria; Specht, Michelle C; Visvanathan, Kala; Wallace, Anne; Bergman, Mary Ann; Kumar, Rashmi

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. To assist women who are at increased risk of developing breast cancer and their physicians in the application of individualized strategies to reduce breast cancer risk, NCCN has developed these guidelines for breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:26150582

  11. GPER Function in Breast Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lappano, Rosamaria; Pisano, Assunta; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER, formerly known as GPR30) has attracted increasing interest, considering its ability to mediate estrogenic signaling in different cell types, including the hormone-sensitive tumors like breast cancer. As observed for other GPCR-mediated responses, the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor is a fundamental integration point in the biological action triggered by GPER. A wide number of natural and synthetic compounds, including estrogens and anti-estrogens, elicit stimulatory effects in breast cancer through GPER up-regulation and activation, suggesting that GPER function is associated with breast tumor progression and tamoxifen resistance. GPER has also been proposed as a candidate biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer, opening a novel scenario for a more comprehensive assessment of breast tumor patients. PMID:24834064

  12. Perceived Versus Objective Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Risk in Diverse Women

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Julia; Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Karliner, Leah; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Jessica; Ozanne, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Prior research suggests that women do not accurately estimate their risk for breast cancer. Estimating and informing women of their risk is essential for tailoring appropriate screening and risk reduction strategies. Methods: Data were collected for BreastCARE, a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a PC-tablet based intervention providing multiethnic women and their primary care physicians with tailored information about breast cancer risk. We included women ages 40–74 visiting general internal medicine primary care clinics at one academic practice and one safety net practice who spoke English, Spanish, or Cantonese, and had no personal history of breast cancer. We collected baseline information regarding risk perception and concern. Women were categorized as high risk (vs. average risk) if their family history met criteria for referral to genetic counseling or if they were in the top 5% of risk for their age based on the Gail or Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium Model (BCSC) breast cancer risk model. Results: Of 1,261 participants, 25% (N=314) were classified as high risk. More average risk than high risk women had correct risk perception (72% vs. 18%); 25% of both average and high risk women reported being very concerned about breast cancer. Average risk women with correct risk perception were less likely to be concerned about breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.2–0.4) while high risk women with correct risk perception were more likely to be concerned about breast cancer (OR=5.1; 95%CI=2.7–9.6). Conclusions: Many women did not accurately perceive their risk for breast cancer. Women with accurate risk perception had an appropriate level of concern about breast cancer. Improved methods of assessing and informing women of their breast cancer risk could motivate high risk women to apply appropriate prevention strategies and allay unnecessary concern among average risk women. PMID:24372085

  13. The Effect of Environment on Breast Cancer Risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YvonneMarie Coyle

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors are believed to explain a large proportion of breast cancer incidence. Known risk factors for breast cancer, which are related to the reproductive life of women, and other factors, such as inheritance and socioeconomic status, explain only about half of the breast cancer cases in the US. Ionizing radiation is a well established environmental risk factor for breast

  14. Ultra-Wideband Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection

    E-print Network

    Genov, Roman

    Ultra-Wideband Imaging Systems for Breast Cancer Detection Hossein Kassiri Bidhendi, Hamed Mazhab system design and its advantages for breast cancer detection after reading this chapter. Keywords Breast cancer detection · Breast imaging · Ultra-wideband imaging · UWB transceiver · UWB pulses · UWB

  15. CRN - Cancer Screening Research: PROTECTS Study

    Cancer.gov

    The PROTECTS Project is comprised of two sub-studies. One of these sub-studies, described below, addresses whether breast cancer screening before the age of 50 is efficacious, and examines the efficacy stratified by average or increased breast cancer risk. The other sub-study examines the use of prophylactic mastectomy in a defined population.

  16. Cryotherapy in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy and Nail Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Who Are Receiving Paclitaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-06

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Pain; Peripheral Neuropathy; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  17. Breast cancer associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolaos S. Salemis; Georgios Nakos; Dimitrios Sambaziotis; Stavros Gourgiotis

    2010-01-01

    The association between breast cancer and type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) is a rare clinical entity. We herein present the\\u000a case of a 59-year-old woman, with typical clinical manifestations of NF1, who presented with a painless lump in her right\\u000a breast, which she had first noticed 8 months earlier. Clinical examination and diagnostic workup were suggestive of a breast\\u000a carcinoma, and

  18. A population-based study of contralateral breast cancer following a first primary breast cancer (Washington, United States)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda S. Cook; Emily White; Stephen M. Schwartz; Barbara McKnight; Janet R. Daling; Noel S. Weiss

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate predictors of contralateral breast cancer risk, we examined data from a nested case-control study of second primary cancers among a cohort of women in western Washington (United States) diagnosed with breast cancer during 1978 through 1990 and identified through a population-based cancer registry. Cases included all women in the cohort who subsequently developed contralateral breast cancer at least

  19. MRI Evaluation of the Contralateral Breast in Women with Recently Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Constance D. Lehman; Constantine Gatsonis; Christiane K. Kuhl; R. Edward Hendrick; Etta D. Pisano; Lucy Hanna; Sue Peacock; Stanley F. Smazal; Daniel D. Maki; Thomas B. Julian; Elizabeth R. DePeri; David A. Bluemke; Mitchell D. Schnall

    2007-01-01

    Even after careful clinical and mammographic evaluation, cancer is found in the contralateral breast in up to 10% of women who have received treatment for unilat- eral breast cancer. We conducted a study to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve on clinical breast examination and mammography in detecting contralateral breast cancer soon after the initial diagnosis of unilateral

  20. Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Ying; Cai, Hui; Gu, Kai; Chen, Zhi; Zheng, Wei; Lu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Context Soy foods are rich in isoflavones, a major group of phytoestrogens that have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, the estrogen-like effect of isoflavones and the potential interaction between isoflavones and tamoxifen have led to concern about soy food consumption among breast cancer patients. Objective To evaluate the association of soy food intake after diagnosis of breast cancer with total mortality and cancer recurrence. Design, Setting, and Participants The Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a large, population-based cohort study of 5,042 female breast cancer survivors. Study participants were recruited between March 2002 and April 2006 and followed through June 2009. Information on cancer diagnosis and treatment, lifestyle exposures after cancer diagnosis, and disease progression was collected at approximately 6 months after cancer diagnosis and was reassessed at three follow-up interviews conducted at 18, 36, and 60 months after diagnosis. Annual record linkage with the Shanghai Vital Statistics Registry database was carried out to obtain survival information for participants who were lost to follow-up. Medical charts were reviewed to verify disease and treatment information. Main Outcome Measures Any death and recurrence or breast cancer-related death. Cox regression analysis was carried out with adjustment for known clinical predictors and other lifestyle factors. Soy food intake was treated as a time-dependent variable. Results During the median follow-up of 3.9 years (range: 0.5-6.2), 444 deaths and 534 recurrences or breast cancer-related deaths were documented in 5,033 surgically-treated breast cancer patients. Soy food intake, as measured either by soy protein or soy isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with mortality and recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR) associated with highest quartile of soy protein intake was 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.51-0.88) for total mortality and 0.66 (95%CI=0.52-0.84) for recurrence compared with the lowest quartile of intake. The multivariate adjusted 5-year mortality rates were 13.1% and 9.2% and 5-year recurrence rates were 13.0% and 8.9%, respectively, for women in the lowest and highest quartiles of soy protein intake. The inverse association was evident among women with either ER?positive or ER-negative breast cancer and was present in both users and non-users of tamoxifen. Conclusion Among women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and recurrence. PMID:19996398

  1. Optoacoustic tomography of breast cancer with arc-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeri G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Solomatin, Sergey V.; Savateeva, Elena V.; Aleinikov, Vadim; Zhulina, Yulia V.; Fleming, R. Declan; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2000-05-01

    The second generation of the laser optoacoustic imaging system for breast cancer detection, localization and characterization using a 32-element arc-shaped transducer array was developed and tested. Each acoustic transducer was made of 110-micrometers thick SOLEF PVDF film with dimensions of 1mm X 12.5mm. The frequency band of transducer array provided 0.4-mm axial in-depth resolution. Cylindrical shape of this 10-cm long transducer array provided an improved lateral resolution of 1.0 mm. Original and compact design of low noise preamplifiers and wide band amplifiers was employed. The system sensitivity was optimized by choosing limited bandwidth of ultrasonic detection 20-kHz to 2-MHz. Signal processing was significantly improved and optimized resulting in reduced data collection time of 13 sec. The computer code for digital signal processing employed auto- gain control, high-pass filtering and denoising. An automatic recognition of the opto-acoustic signal detected from the irradiated surface was implemented in order to visualize the breast surface and improve the accuracy of tumor locations. Radial back-projection algorithm was used for image reconstruction. Optimal filtering of image was employed to reduce low and high frequency noise. The advantages and limitations of various contrast-enhancing filters applied to the entire image matrix were studied and discussed. Time necessary for image reconstruction was reduced to 32 sec. The system performance was evaluated initially via acquisition of 2D opto-acoustic images of small absorbing spheres in breast-tissue-like phantoms. Clinical ex-vivo studies of mastectomy specimen were also performed and compared with x-ray radiography and ultrasound.

  2. Impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on locoregional surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2015-05-01

    Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (NC) has become the standard of care for patients with locally advanced breast cancer and is being increasingly used in those with large operable disease. Its main clinical advantages from a surgical therapy standpoint include the potential for conversion of patients requiring mastectomy to breast-conservation candidates, the potential for improving the cosmetic outcome following lumpectomy by decreasing the size of the primary breast tumor even if the patient is a lumpectomy candidate at presentation, and the potential for converting patients who present with positive axillary nodes and who would initially require axillary lymph node dissection to candidates for sentinel lymph node biopsy alone. Important steps are required from the time of diagnosis until the time of surgical resection to ensure successful locoregional therapy outcomes in patients treated with NC. They include accurate assessment of the location and extent of the primary breast tumor and determination of axillary nodal status before and after NC. This information is critical for successful execution of the surgical plan and to optimize the use of adjuvant radiotherapy following NC. In the future, development of more active neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens and novel molecular and imaging techniques will undoubtedly lead to further individualization of breast cancer surgical management following NC, including the possibility of avoiding surgical resection in cases with a high likelihood of achieving a pathological complete response. PMID:25727558

  3. Inequalities in breast cancer care and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M.; Sainsbury, R.; Kerr, D.

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons across Europe suggest that survival from breast cancer is less good in the United Kingdom than in many countries. The care given in some UK breast cancer units is exemplary. However, it is difficult to escape the conclusion that a substantial number of women who present with breast cancer receive suboptimal care. Cancer registry-based studies have clearly demonstrated variations between surgeons and between hospitals in the management of early breast cancer. Although variations in surgical practice per se may have little impact on survival, there is evidence that differences in the use of systemic adjuvant therapy influence outcome. Five-year survival seems to be greater in women treated by surgeons seeing more than 30-50 new cases of breast cancer each year. This may be because such patients are more likely to be treated by a multidisciplinary team and to receive adjuvant therapy. Proposals that would increase the overall quality of breast cancer care and remove current inequalities must be carefully considered and should then be implemented. PMID:9303363

  4. [Partial reconstruction after conservative treatment for breast cancer: classification of sequelae and treatment options].

    PubMed

    Clough, K B; Nos, C; Fitoussi, A; Couturaud, B; Inguenault, C; Sarfati, I

    2008-04-01

    Most patients presenting with breast cancer are treated by breast conserving treatment (BCT). Some of these patients present with poor cosmetic results and ask for partial breast reconstruction. These reconstructions following BCT are presenting more frequently to plastic surgeons as a difficult management problem. We have defined and published a classification of the different cosmetic sequelae (CS) after BCT into three types. This classification helps to analyse these complex deformities aggravated by radiotherapy. Furthermore, our classification helps to choose between the different surgical techniques and propose the optimal option for their surgical correction. Our initial publications reported 35 and 85 patients: we have currently operated more than 150 cases of CS after BCT. Type-1 CS are defined by an asymmetry between the two breasts, with no distortion or deformity of the radiated breast. Type-2 CS are those with an obvious breast deformity, that can be corrected with a partial reconstruction of the breast. Type-3 CS are those with such a deformity that only a mastectomy with total reconstruction of the breast can be performed. Most of the patients present with type-2 CS, but are reluctant to undergo what they feel is a major reconstructive procedure: in a initial prospective series of 85 patients operated for CS after BCT, 48 (56.5%) had type-1 CS, 33 patients (38.8%) type-2 CS and four patients (4.7%) type-3 CS. Type-1 patients should be managed essentially by contralateral symmetrizing procedures. One should limit any surgery on the radiated breast, as a mammoplasty or an augmentation is at high risk of complications. Type-2 is the most difficult to manage and requires all the surgical armamentarium of breast reconstructive surgery. The insetting of a myocutaneous flap is often necessary and autologous fat grafting is a promising tool in selected cases. Type-3 CS requires mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with a myocutaneous flap. The major development though in the past 10 years has been the development of oncoplastic techniques at the time of the original tumour removal, in order to avoid most of type 2 and type 3 deformities. This paper reaffirms the validity of the Cosmetic Sequelae classification as a simple, practical guide for breast reconstructive surgeons. It discusses the various choices of reconstructive procedures available, the importance of "preventing" these CS and defining the role of the plastic surgeon in the management of these patients. PMID:18387726

  5. Nuclear imaging and early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita

    2014-01-01

    The present report discusses about the most important roles of nuclear medicine related to the early detection of breast cancer. We summarily describe the established and emerging diagnostic techniques, their indications and clinical impact for planar and tomographic breast scintigraphy, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and positron emission mammography (PEM). PMID:24836945

  6. Neoadjuvant Docetaxel in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew W. Hutcheon; Steven D. Heys; Tarun K. Sarkar

    2003-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy produces substantial increases in clinical response rates and rates of breast conserving therapy. Pathologic response rate, though generally low, is an important outcome as it is presumably associated with eradication of micrometastatic disease and may likely result in improved outcomes. Anthracyclines have long been considered the most efficacious chemotherapy agents for neoadjuvant therapy of early breast cancer. Unfortunately,

  7. Targeting SH2 domains in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morlacchi, Pietro; Robertson, Fredika M; Klostergaard, Jim; McMurray, John S

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is among the most commonly diagnosed cancer types in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer-related disease in the USA. SH2 domains recruit signaling proteins to phosphotyrosine residues on aberrantly activated growth factor and cytokine receptors and contribute to cancer cell cycling, metastasis, angiogenesis and so on. Herein we review phosphopeptide mimetic and small-molecule approaches targeting the SH2 domains of Grb2, Grb7 and STAT3 that inhibit their targets and reduce proliferation in in vitro breast cancer models. Only STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated in in vivo models and have led to tumor reduction. Taken together, these studies suggest that targeting SH2 domains is an important approach to the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25495984

  8. [Present status and tasks for genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery in patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Arai, Masami; Taki, Keiko; Iwase, Haruko; Takizawa, Ken; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-04-01

    In Japan, awareness of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has gradually increased among health care workers and the general population. We focus on two current topics: genetic testing and risk-reducing surgery for HBOC. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2, the genes responsible for HBOC, is performed to diagnose HBOC. PCR-direct sequencing is a standard method used for BRCA1/2 mutation analysis. Recently, genetic rearrangement of BRCA1 was reported in a Japanese patient with HBOC. Therefore, MLPA tests are also being included in routine genetic testing for the disease. The result of "uncertain significance, " which indicates unclear pathogenic significance, is obtained in about 3% of all patients who undergo BRCA1/2 genetic tests. Furthermore, novel candidate genes for HBOC, such as RAD51C, PALB2, and BRIP1, were recently identified. Prophylactic surgical intervention for HBOC includes procedures such as risk-reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and risk-reducing mastectomy(RRM). In Japan, RRSO is performed in very few patients at present. Increasing evidence from overseas indicates that RRSO contributes to a decreased incidence of ovarian/breast cancers and lowers overall mortality. Therefore, a system for performing RRSO was established in our institute. RRSO was approved to be performed as a clinical examination by our Institutional Review Board. The clinical significance of ipsilateral complete mastectomy and RRM remains unclear. Based on the NCCN guidelines, conservative mastectomy with radiation therapy is relatively contraindicated in patients with HBOC. However, several studies have reported that conservative mastectomy with radiation the rapydoes not increase the incidence of recurrent or metachronous breast cancers in the ipsilateral breast of mutation-positive patients when compared to mutation-negative or control patients. However, more aggressive malignancies seem to be included in the mutation-positive group(especially BRCA1 -mutation-positive cases). RRM clearly reduced the incidence of breast cancers. RRM may also be allowed as a treatment option for HBOC in Japan. PMID:22504676

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-05

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  10. Optical Microscope Software for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at NCI have developed computer software able to analyze optical microscopic images of human breast tissue sections for diagnosing cancer by using the differences in spatial positioning of certain genes.

  11. Asymptomatic Bladder Metastasis from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Fino, Giuseppe; Massenio, Paolo; Ruocco, Nicola; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected. PMID:24716084

  12. Asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cormio, Luigi; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Massenio, Paolo; Liuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruocco, Nicola; Bufo, Pantaleo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected. PMID:24716084

  13. Zoledronic Acid Improves Early Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    The addition of zoledronic acid (Zometa®) to adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer significantly improves clinical outcomes beyond those achieved with endocrine therapy alone, according to findings presented at the 2008 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  14. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , BS ; Kamaneh Montazeri , MD ; Sara Tolaney , ... in remission. Previous Section Next Section What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure or cardiomyopathy occurs when the ...

  15. Comparative proteome analysis of breast cancer and normal breast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuanming Luo; Jindan Zhang; Yanxin Liu; Allan Christian Shaw; Xiaorong Wang; Shuzhen Wu; Xuan Zeng; Jie Chen; Youhe Gao; Dexian Zheng

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women. The underlying molecular mechanism is still not well understood. In this\\u000a study, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to analyze changes in the proteome of\\u000a infiltrating ductal carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue. Ten sets of two-dimensional gels per experimental condition\\u000a were analyzed and more than 500

  16. Endocrine resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L H; Zhao, Y H; Feng, H L; Liu, Y J

    2014-10-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are synthetic molecules which bind to estrogen receptors (ER) and can modulate their transcriptional capabilities in different ways in diverse estrogen target tissues. Unfortunately, the use of resistant therapy is associated with acquired resistance. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to be responsible for endocrine resistance in breast cancer, including MIR-451, FGF and FGFR, ADAM12, fibronectin and other soluble stromal factors, PELP1-KDM1, HER2, NOTCH, ?EF1, mTOR, AKT/mTOR, Pi3K/AKT, Pi3K/AKT/mTOR, NF?B, LMTK3, IGF1R, cyclin E2, IRF1, Tab2, and SRC-1. Further research is needed to know more about endocrine resistance. PMID:24245601

  17. Angiogenesis in Breast Cancer and its Correlation with Estrogen, Progesterone Receptors and other Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Poonam; Kamal, Vinay; Agarwal, Prem Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of study is to evaluate angiogenesis using CD34, in estrogen, progesterone positive and negative breastcancer and to correlate the microvessel density with known histological prognostic factors, morphological type of breast carcinoma and lymph node metastasis. Materials and Methods: Twenty eight untreated cases of breast cancer were included in the study and paraffin embedded sections were obtained from representative mastectomy specimen of breast cancer patient. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and immunohistochemistry was performed using CD34, estrogen, progesterone, cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen antibody. Angiogenesis was analysed using CD 34 antibody. For statistical analysis, cases were grouped into estrogen, progesterone positive and negative receptors. Results: Mean microvessel density in ER-/PR-, ER-/ PR+, ER+/PR-, ER+/PR+ was 15.45, 14.83, 11, 10.89 respectively. A significant correlation was found between ER receptors and mean vascular density with p-value (< 0.05). A significant difference was observed in mean vascular density between the four groups comprising (p-value < 0.05). Infiltrating duct carcinoma (NOS) grade III has got the highest mean microvessel density (14.17) followed by grade II (12.93) and grade I (12.33). Conclusion: Information about prognostic factors in breast cancer patients may lead to better ways to identify those patients at high risk who might benefit from adjuvant therapies. PMID:25737993

  18. Estrogen-Related Receptors in Breast Cancer and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Aya; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-signaling pathways are implicated in the development of breast cancer and prostate cancer. Various studies have focused on additional signaling pathways, mediated by estrogen-related receptors (ERRs). ERRs are constitutively active receptors that share a high degree of homology with the classical estrogen receptors (ERs). However, they do not bind to estrogen, while ERs do. ERRs are involved in the development of alternative pathways that lead to the development of cancer and are regarded as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of breast cancer and prostate cancer that do not respond to conventional therapies. In this review, we first present general structural features of ERRs. Then, we focus on breast cancer and prostate cancer, which are primarily hormone-dependent cancers, and summarizes recent progress in elucidating the involvement of each ERR in these two types of malignancies. PMID:26074877

  19. Fetal Dose Evaluation During Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Antypas; Panagiotis Sandilos; John Kouvaris; Ersi Balafouta; Eleftheria Karinou; Nikos Kollaros; Lambros Vlahos

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the work was to estimate the radiation dose delivered to the fetus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast cancer.Methods and Materials: A 45-year woman was treated for left breast cancer using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposing tangential unwedged fields. Daily dose was 2.3 Gy at 95% isodose line given by two

  20. Breast Cancer Classification Applying Artificial Metaplasticity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexis Marcano-cedeño; Fulgencio S. Buendía-Buendía; Diego Andina

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we are apply Artificial Metaplasticity MLP (MMLPs) to Breast Cancer Classification. Artificial Metaplasticity\\u000a is a novel ANN training algorithm that gives more relevance to less frequent training patterns and subtract relevance to the\\u000a frequent ones during training phase, achieving a much more efficient training, while at least maintaining the Multilayer Perceptron\\u000a performance. Wisconsin Breast Cancer Database (WBCD)

  1. Dietary Carbohydrates, Fiber, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle D. Holmes; Simin Liu; Susan E. Hankinson; Graham A. Colditz; David J. Hunter; Walter C. Willett

    2004-01-01

    Dietary fiber, fiber fractions, carbohydrate, glycemic index, and glycemic load were prospectively assessed five times over 18 years with a validated food frequency questionnaire in relation to breast cancer risk among 88,678 women (aged 34-59 years at baseline) in the Nurses' Health Study. Incident breast cancer occurred in 4,092 of these women between 1980 and 1998. The authors observed no

  2. Adipocytokine resistin and breast cancer risk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chien-An Sun; Mei-Hsuan Wu; Chi-Hong Chu; Yu-Ching Chou; Giu-Cheng Hsu; Tsan Yang; Wan-Yun Chou; Cheng-Ping Yu; Jyh-Cherng Yu

    2010-01-01

    Adipocytokine resistin is a member of the newly discovered family of cysteine-rich protein. Recent data suggest that macrophages\\u000a are a major source of human resistin. Given the obesity-breast cancer link and convergence of adipocyte and macrophage function,\\u000a resistin may provide unique insight into links between obesity, inflammation, and breast cancer risk in humans. We conducted\\u000a a hospital-based case–control study to

  3. The emerging landscape of breast cancer susceptibility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R Stratton; Nazneen Rahman

    2007-01-01

    The genetic basis of inherited predisposition to breast cancer has been assiduously investigated for the past two decades and has been the subject of several recent discoveries. Three reasonably well-defined classes of breast cancer susceptibility alleles with different levels of risk and prevalence in the population have become apparent: rare high-penetrance alleles, rare moderate-penetrance alleles and common low-penetrance alleles. The

  4. Modern Breast Cancer Detection: A Technological Review

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Jagtap, Shami; Anjum, Waqas; Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Brooks, Ari D.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field. PMID:20069109

  5. Disparities across the breast cancer continuum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JudyAnn Bigby; Michelle D. Holmes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We performed a structured review of the literature to identify areas of greater and lesser knowledge of the nature of disparities across the breast cancer continuum from risk and prevention to treatment and mortality.Methods: We searched OvidMedline and PubMed to identify published studies from January 1990 to March 2004 that address disparities in breast cancer. We read the abstracts

  6. Leukemia risk following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Curtis; J. D. Jr. Boice; M. Stovall; J. T. Flannery; W. C. Moloney

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate further the relationship between high-dose radiotherapy and leukemia incidence, a nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 22,753 women who were 18-month survivors of invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 1935 to 1972. Women treated for breast cancer after 1973 were excluded to minimize the possible confounding influence of treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The cases had histologically

  7. TGFBR1 Signaling and Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lakisha Moore-Smith; Boris Pasche

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade mutations discovered in genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PTEN, have emerged as high-penetrance susceptibility genes and are clinically relevant for determination of breast cancer risk.\\u000a Genetic counseling and subsequent screening for mutations and gene rearrangement has improved patient outcome through early\\u000a detection and prophylactic interventions in patients with familial breast cancer syndromes. However, these

  8. Quantifying the natural history of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, K H X; Simonella, L; Wee, H L; Roellin, A; Lim, Y-W; Lim, W-Y; Chia, K S; Hartman, M; Cook, A R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Natural history models of breast cancer progression provide an opportunity to evaluate and identify optimal screening scenarios. This paper describes a detailed Markov model characterising breast cancer tumour progression. Methods: Breast cancer is modelled by a 13-state continuous-time Markov model. The model differentiates between indolent and aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ tumours, and aggressive tumours of different sizes. We compared such aggressive cancers, that is, which are non-indolent, to those which are non-growing and regressing. Model input parameters and structure were informed by the 1978–1984 Ostergotland county breast screening randomised controlled trial. Overlaid on the natural history model is the effect of screening on diagnosis. Parameters were estimated using Bayesian methods. Markov chain Monte Carlo integration was used to sample the resulting posterior distribution. Results: The breast cancer incidence rate in the Ostergotland population was 21 (95% CI: 17–25) per 10?000 woman-years. Accounting for length-biased sampling, an estimated 91% (95% CI: 85–97%) of breast cancers were aggressive. Larger tumours, 21–50?mm, had an average sojourn of 6 years (95% CI: 3–16 years), whereas aggressive ductal carcinomas in situ took around half a month (95% CI: 0–1 month) to progress to the invasive ?10?mm state. Conclusion: These tumour progression rate estimates may facilitate future work analysing cost-effectiveness and quality-adjusted life years for various screening strategies. PMID:24084766

  9. Preterm delivery and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melbye, M; Wohlfahrt, J; Andersen, A-M N; Westergaard, T; Andersen, P K

    1999-01-01

    To explore the risk of breast cancer in relation to the length of a pregnancy we tested whether a preterm delivery carries a higher risk of breast cancer than does a full-term delivery. Based on information from the Civil Registration System, and the National Birth Registry in Denmark, we established a population-based cohort of 474 156 women born since April 1935, with vital status and detailed parity information, including the gestational age of liveborn children and stillbirths. Information on spontaneous and induced abortions was obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Registry and the National Registry of Induced Abortions. Incident cases of breast cancer in the cohort (n = 1363) were identified through linkage with the Danish Cancer Registry. The period at risk started in 1978 and continued until a breast cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or 31 December, 1992, whichever occurred first. After adjusting for attained age, parity, age at first birth and calendar period, we observed the following relative risks of breast cancer for different lengths of the pregnancy: < 29 gestational weeks = 2.11 (95% confidence interval 1.00–4.45); 29–31 weeks = 2.08 (1.20–3.60); 32–33 weeks = 1.12 (0.62–2.04); 34–35 weeks = 1.08 (0.71–1.66); 36–37 weeks = 1.04 (0.83–1.32); 38–39 weeks = 1.02 (0.89–1.17); 40 weeks = 1 (reference). Parous women who had a preterm delivery below 32 weeks gestation had a 1.72-fold (1.14–2.59) increased risk of breast cancer compared with other parous women. In conclusion, a preterm delivery of 32+ weeks gestation did not significantly increase a woman's risk of contracting breast cancer. Only for the very small group of women with preterm deliveries of less than 32 weeks gestation did we observe an increased risk. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408874

  10. Breast Cancer: Modelling and Detection D.J. GAVAGHANa

    E-print Network

    Maini, Philip K.

    Breast Cancer: Modelling and Detection D.J. GAVAGHANa , J.M. BRADYb , C.P. BEHRENBRUCHb , R cancer, breast carcinoma, to illustrate how the modelling can be used in aiding detection. We to meet some of the major challenges in cancer detection. Keywords: Breast cancer; Tumour; Image

  11. Paget's disease of the male breast with underlying ductal carcinoma in situ ('DCIS').

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Bhuban; Bright-Thomas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer accounts for 1% of all breast malignancies and 0.1% of all male cancer death. Like Paget's disease, DCIS is a rare form of male breast malignancy. We report a 69-year-male presenting with 3 years history of subtle of nipple symptoms and normal breast imaging. Punch biopsy of nipple established the diagnosis of Paget's disease and subsequent histology of mastectomy specimen revealed underlying DCIS. PMID:25832464

  12. Hypofractionated Image Guided Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Central Nervous System Metastases; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma With Predominant in Situ Component; Liver Metastases; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lung Metastases; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  13. Locoregional treatment outcomes for breast cancer patients with ipsilateral supraclavicular metastases at diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Strom, Eric A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fornage, Bruno [Department of Diagnostic Imagining, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Perkins, George H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, T.-K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meric-Bernstam, Funda [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sahin, Aysegul A. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bedrosian, Isabelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hortobagyi, Gabriel N. [Dept. of Breast Medical Oncology, Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the locoregional efficacy of multimodality treatment for breast cancer patients who present with ipsilateral supraclavicular (SCV) disease without systemic metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 71 patients with ipsilateral SCV involvement at presentation. SCV involvement in 16 patients (23%) was diagnosed by ultrasound examination only, without palpable disease. All patients were treated with curative intent using neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCT), and radiotherapy. Results: The 5-year SCV control, locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 77%, 30%, and 47%, respectively. Patients with persistent SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by physical examination had a lower rate of LRC (64% vs. 86%, p = 0.026), as did those with persistent SCV disease by ultrasound examination (66% vs. 96%, p = 0.007). Of those with a complete response of SCV disease by physical examination after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, those with persistently abnormal ultrasound findings had significantly worse disease-free survival (0% vs. 55%, p = 0.03). BCT was not associated with lower rates of LRC (82% for BCT vs. 76% for mastectomy, p = 0.80). Conclusion: Radiotherapy achieved excellent LRC after surgery for patients with ipsilateral SCV metastases who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For patients who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease by physical examination, ultrasonography of the SCV fossa may help assess the risk of disease recurrence. SCV involvement should not be considered a contraindication for BCT.

  14. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20??M, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20??M reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, ?-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst ?-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  15. Proteomic studies in breast cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Bruce X.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of invasive cancer in females worldwide. Despite major advances in early cancer detection and emerging therapeutic strategies, further improvement has to be achieved for precise diagnosis to reduce the chance of metastasis and relapses. Recent proteomic technologies have offered a promising opportunity for the identification of new breast cancer biomarkers. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the derived surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) enable the development of high-throughput proteome analysis based on comprehensive reliable biomarkers. In this review, we examined proteomic technologies and their applications, and provided focus on the proteomics-based profiling analyses of tumor tissues/cells in order to identify and confirm novel biomarkers of breast cancer. PMID:22740985

  16. Risk Factors for Breast Cancer According to Family History of Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham A. Colditz; Bernard A. Rosner; Frank E. Speizer

    1996-01-01

    Background: Family history of breast cancer is an established risk factor for this disease and is used to identify women at higher risk, although the im- pact of risk factors for breast cancer among women with a family history is not well defined. Purpose: Using a modified extended log-incidence Pike model, we prospectively examined the impact of risk factors for

  17. The role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer: Direct effects of bisphosphonates on breast cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siddhika G Senaratne; Kay W Colston

    2002-01-01

    In addition to inhibiting bone resorption, bisphosphonates have also been shown to exhibit antitumour effects. In vitro, bisphosphonates inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. In addition, bisphosphonate treatment interferes with breast cancer cell adhesion to bone matrix, and inhibits cell migration and invasion. The combination of bisphosphonates with other anticancer drugs such as the taxoids

  18. Breast cancer risk during HRT: influence of estradiol metabolites on breast cancer and endothelial cell proliferation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Seeger; Fritz-Ulrich Deuringer; Diethelm Wallwiener; Alfred O. Mueck

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Long-term hormone replacement therapy is associated with an increased breast cancer risk. Evidence is accumu- lating that estradiol metabolites are involved in carcinogenesis. These metabolites may have proliferating and anti-proliferative properties. We have investigated the effect of 14 metabolites on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells and on the pro- liferation of human vascular endothelial cells. Methods: As

  19. The Auckland Breast Cancer Register: a special project of the Auckland Breast Cancer Study Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorraine Neave; Vernon Harvey; Chelleraj Benjamin; Paul Thompson; Ora Pellett; Jeremy Whitlock; Wayne Jones; Garth Poole

    Aims The Auckland Breast Cancer Register (ABCR) has been established in response to the need for a comprehensive database of breast cancer cases from the Auckland area. Methods The database records patient demographics, diagnosis, treatment options, prognosis and long-term outcome (annual follow up). Data from 1204 cases, recorded between June 2000 and June 2002 are reported. Results The major findings

  20. THE AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND BREAST CANCER TRIALS GROUP: SOME CONTRIBUTIONS TO BREAST CANCER TRIALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John F Forbes

    The Australian New Zealand Breast Cancer Trials Group was formed in 1978 after the first adjuvant therapy trials were published. This commenced a new era of clinical trials and the commencement of substantial global collaboration, particularly with the International Breast Cancer Study Group. The Australia New Zealand Group is currently conducting 46 trials encompassing prevention and early and advanced disease.