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  1. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  3. Breast Cancer Risk Assessment SAS Macro (Gail Model)

    Cancer.gov

    A SAS macro (commonly referred to as the Gail Model) that projects absolute risk of invasive breast cancer according to NCI’s Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) algorithm for specified race/ethnic groups and age intervals.

  4. Mathematical models of breast and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-07-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review, we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, as answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:337-362. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1343 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27259061

  5. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. Breast cancer kills more women in the United States ... cancer. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are a number of risk ...

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Screening Symptoms ...

  7. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  8. Bioengineering Models for Breast Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Guiro, Khadidiatou; Arinzeh, Treena L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in early diagnosis, breast cancer (BC) still remains a clinical challenge. Most BC models use complex in vivo models and two-dimensional monolayer cultures that do not fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. The integration of cancer biology and engineering can lead to the development of novel in vitro approaches to study BC behavior and quantitatively assess different features of the tumor microenvironment that may influence cell behavior. In this review, we present tissue engineering approaches to model BC in vitro. Recent advances in the use of three-dimensional cell culture models to study various aspects of BC disease in vitro are described. The emerging area of studying BC dormancy using these models is also reviewed. PMID:26792996

  9. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of targeted therapy. It blocks certain hormones that fuel cancer growth. Cancer treatment can be local or ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  10. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  11. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer risk prediction models are used to plan clinical trials and counsel women; however, relationships of predicted risks of breast cancer incidence and prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis are unknown. Methods Using largely pre-diagnostic information from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) for 37,939 invasive breast cancers (1996–2007), we estimated 5-year breast cancer risk (<1%; 1–1.66%; ≥1.67%) with three models: BCSC 1-year risk model (BCSC-1; adapted to 5-year predictions); Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT); and BCSC 5-year risk model (BCSC-5). Breast cancer-specific mortality post-diagnosis (range: 1–13 years; median: 5.4–5.6 years) was related to predicted risk of developing breast cancer using unadjusted Cox proportional hazards models, and in age-stratified (35–44; 45–54; 55–69; 70–89 years) models adjusted for continuous age, BCSC registry, calendar period, income, mode of presentation, stage and treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Results Of 6,021 deaths, 2,993 (49.7%) were ascribed to breast cancer. In unadjusted case-only analyses, predicted breast cancer risk ≥1.67% versus <1.0% was associated with lower risk of breast cancer death; BCSC-1: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.75–0.90); BCRAT: HR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.65–0.81) and BCSC-5: HR = 0.84 (95% CI = 0.75–0.94). Age-stratified, adjusted models showed similar, although mostly non-significant HRs. Among women ages 55–69 years, HRs approximated 1.0. Generally, higher predicted risk was inversely related to percentages of cancers with unfavorable prognostic characteristics, especially among women 35–44 years. Conclusions Among cases assessed with three models, higher predicted risk of developing breast cancer was not associated with greater risk of breast cancer death; thus, these models would have limited utility in planning studies to evaluate breast cancer mortality reduction strategies. Further, when offering

  12. A microengineered pathophysiological model of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonseok; Hyun, Eunjeh; Seo, Jeongyun; Blundell, Cassidy; Kim, Hee Chan; Lee, Eunhee; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Aree; Moon, Woo Kyung; Huh, Dongeun

    2015-08-21

    A mounting body of evidence in cancer research suggests that the local microenvironment of tumor cells has a profound influence on cancer progression and metastasis. In vitro studies on the tumor microenvironment and its pharmacological modulation, however, are often hampered by the technical challenges associated with creating physiological cell culture environments that integrate cancer cells with the key components of their native niche such as neighboring cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) to mimic complex microarchitecture of cancerous tissue. Using early-stage breast cancer as a model disease, here we describe a biomimetic microengineering strategy to reconstitute three-dimensional (3D) structural organization and microenvironment of breast tumors in human cell-based in vitro models. Specifically, we developed a microsystem that enabled co-culture of breast tumor spheroids with human mammary ductal epithelial cells and mammary fibroblasts in a compartmentalized 3D microfluidic device to replicate microarchitecture of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We also explored the potential of this breast cancer-on-a-chip system as a drug screening platform by evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of an anticancer drug (paclitaxel). Our microengineered disease model represents the first critical step towards recapitulating pathophysiological complexity of breast cancer, and may serve as an enabling tool to systematically examine the contribution of the breast cancer microenvironment to the progression of DCIS to an invasive form of the disease. PMID:26158500

  13. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  14. An Orthotopic Mouse Model of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality of breast cancer patients. The mechanism underlying cancer cell metastasis, including breast cancer metastasis, is largely unknown and is a focus in cancer research. Various breast cancer spontaneous metastasis mouse models have been established. Here, we report a simplified procedure to establish orthotopic transplanted breast cancer primary tumor and resultant spontaneous metastasis that mimic human breast cancer metastasis. Combined with the bioluminescence live tumor imaging, this mouse model allows tumor growth and progression kinetics to be monitored and quantified. In this model, a low dose (1 x 10(4) cells) of 4T1-Luc breast cancer cells was injected into BALB/c mouse mammary fat pad using a tuberculin syringe. Mice were injected with luciferin and imaged at various time points using a bioluminescent imaging system. When the primary tumors grew to the size limit as in the IACUC-approved protocol (approximately 30 days), mice were anesthetized under constant flow of 2% isoflurane and oxygen. The tumor area was sterilized with 70% ethanol. The mouse skin around the tumor was excised to expose the tumor which was removed with a pair of sterile scissors. Removal of the primary tumor extends the survival of the 4T-1 tumor-bearing mice for one month. The mice were then repeatedly imaged for metastatic tumor spreading to distant organs. Therapeutic agents can be administered to suppress tumor metastasis at this point. This model is simple and yet sensitive in quantifying breast cancer cell growth in the primary site and progression kinetics to distant organs, and thus is an excellent model for studying breast cancer growth and progression, and for testing anti-metastasis therapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents in vivo. PMID:27584043

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  16. Modeling precision treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background First-generation molecular profiles for human breast cancers have enabled the identification of features that can predict therapeutic response; however, little is known about how the various data types can best be combined to yield optimal predictors. Collections of breast cancer cell lines mirror many aspects of breast cancer molecular pathobiology, and measurements of their omic and biological therapeutic responses are well-suited for development of strategies to identify the most predictive molecular feature sets. Results We used least squares-support vector machines and random forest algorithms to identify molecular features associated with responses of a collection of 70 breast cancer cell lines to 90 experimental or approved therapeutic agents. The datasets analyzed included measurements of copy number aberrations, mutations, gene and isoform expression, promoter methylation and protein expression. Transcriptional subtype contributed strongly to response predictors for 25% of compounds, and adding other molecular data types improved prediction for 65%. No single molecular dataset consistently out-performed the others, suggesting that therapeutic response is mediated at multiple levels in the genome. Response predictors were developed and applied to TCGA data, and were found to be present in subsets of those patient samples. Conclusions These results suggest that matching patients to treatments based on transcriptional subtype will improve response rates, and inclusion of additional features from other profiling data types may provide additional benefit. Further, we suggest a systems biology strategy for guiding clinical trials so that patient cohorts most likely to respond to new therapies may be more efficiently identified. PMID:24176112

  17. Network modeling links breast cancer susceptibility and centrosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pujana, Miguel Angel; Han, Jing-Dong J; Starita, Lea M; Stevens, Kristen N; Tewari, Muneesh; Ahn, Jin Sook; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Víctor; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gold, Bert; Assmann, Volker; Elshamy, Wael M; Rual, Jean-François; Levine, Douglas; Rozek, Laura S; Gelman, Rebecca S; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Greenberg, Roger A; Sobhian, Bijan; Bertin, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Solé, Xavier; Hernández, Pilar; Lázaro, Conxi; Nathanson, Katherine L; Weber, Barbara L; Cusick, Michael E; Hill, David E; Offit, Kenneth; Livingston, David M; Gruber, Stephen B; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Vidal, Marc

    2007-11-01

    Many cancer-associated genes remain to be identified to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of cancer susceptibility and progression. Better understanding is also required of how mutations in cancer genes affect their products in the context of complex cellular networks. Here we have used a network modeling strategy to identify genes potentially associated with higher risk of breast cancer. Starting with four known genes encoding tumor suppressors of breast cancer, we combined gene expression profiling with functional genomic and proteomic (or 'omic') data from various species to generate a network containing 118 genes linked by 866 potential functional associations. This network shows higher connectivity than expected by chance, suggesting that its components function in biologically related pathways. One of the components of the network is HMMR, encoding a centrosome subunit, for which we demonstrate previously unknown functional associations with the breast cancer-associated gene BRCA1. Two case-control studies of incident breast cancer indicate that the HMMR locus is associated with higher risk of breast cancer in humans. Our network modeling strategy should be useful for the discovery of additional cancer-associated genes. PMID:17922014

  18. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  19. Mouse Models of Breast Cancer: Platforms for Discovering Precision Imaging Diagnostics and Future Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Manning, H Charles; Buck, Jason R; Cook, Rebecca S

    2016-02-01

    Representing an enormous health care and socioeconomic challenge, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Although many of the challenges associated with preventing, treating, and ultimately curing breast cancer are addressable in the laboratory, successful translation of groundbreaking research to clinical populations remains an important barrier. Particularly when compared with research on other types of solid tumors, breast cancer research is hampered by a lack of tractable in vivo model systems that accurately recapitulate the relevant clinical features of the disease. A primary objective of this article was to provide a generalizable overview of the types of in vivo model systems, with an emphasis primarily on murine models, that are widely deployed in preclinical breast cancer research. Major opportunities to advance precision cancer medicine facilitated by molecular imaging of preclinical breast cancer models are discussed. PMID:26834104

  20. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  1. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it. PMID:27533387

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Develop Tumor Tropism but Do Not Accelerate Breast Cancer Tumorigenesis in a Somatic Mouse Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Lydia; Rao, Geetha; Christopherson II, Kent; Xu, Xiulong

    2013-01-01

    The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on breast cancer progression, growth and tumorigenesis remains controversial or unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of MSCs on breast tumor induction and growth in a clinically relevant somatic breast cancer model. We first conducted in vitro studies and found that conditioned media (CM) of RCAS-Neu and RCAS-PyMT breast cancer cell lines and tumor cells themselves dramatically increased the proliferation and motility of MSCs and induced morphological changes of MSCs and differentiation into fibroblast-like cells. In contrast, the CM of MSCs inhibited the proliferation of two breast cancer cell lines by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. In vivo studies revealed that fluorescence dye-labeled MSCs migrated into tumor tissues. Unexpectedly, single or multiple intravenous injections of MSCs did not affect the latency of breast cancer in TVA- transgenic mice induced by intraductal injection of the RCAS vector encoding polyoma middle-T antigen (PyMT) or Neu oncogenes. Moreover, MSCs had no effect on RCAS-Neu tumor growth in a syngeneic ectopic breast cancer model. While our studies consistently demonstrated the ability of breast cancer cells to profoundly induce MSCs migration, differentiation, and proliferation, the anti-proliferative effect of MSCs on breast tumor cells observed in vitro could not be translated into an antitumor activity in vivo, probably reflecting the antagonizing or complex effects of MSCs on tumor environment and tumor cells themselves. PMID:24069135

  3. [Discussion of breast cancer screening model in China].

    PubMed

    Li, W Q; Li, R; Liu, P F; Huang, Y B

    2016-07-01

    Cancer screening has been considered as double-edged sword with both advantages and disadvantages. For decades, there have been strong interests in screening strategies for the early detection of cancers to reduce the mortality, especially breast X-ray(mammography)screening. However, several evidences also suggested that the benefit of reduction of breast-cancer mortality with mammography might become a problem due to the repeat mammography, subsequent biopsies, and overdiagnosis. And different screening strategies with different models, different intervals, and different target populations also incurred debates. After systematical analysis and discussion, we suggested to focus on high-risk population, improve the accuracy of screening technique, conduct the informed consent of participants, and explore individual screening mode in the screening of breast cancer. PMID:27453120

  4. Using Clinical Factors and Mammographic Breast Density to Estimate Breast Cancer Risk: Development and Validation of a New Predictive Model

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Jeffrey A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Ichikawa, Laura; Barlow, William E.; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Background Current models for assessing breast cancer risk are complex and do not include breast density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer that is routinely reported with mammography. Objective To develop and validate an easy-to-use breast cancer risk prediction model that includes breast density. Design Empirical model based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results incidence, and relative hazards from a prospective cohort. Setting Screening mammography sites participating in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. Patients 1 095 484 women undergoing mammography who had no previous diagnosis of breast cancer. Measurements Self-reported age, race or ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, and history of breast biopsy. Community radiologists rated breast density by using 4 Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. Results During 5.3 years of follow-up, invasive breast cancer was diagnosed in 14 766 women. The breast density model was well calibrated overall (expected–observed ratio, 1.03 [95% CI, 0.99 to 1.06]) and in racial and ethnic subgroups. It had modest discriminatory accuracy (concordance index, 0.66 [CI, 0.65 to 0.67]). Women with low-density mammograms had 5-year risks less than 1.67% unless they had a family history of breast cancer and were older than age 65 years. Limitation The model has only modest ability to discriminate between women who will develop breast cancer and those who will not. Conclusion A breast cancer prediction model that incorporates routinely reported measures of breast density can estimate 5-year risk for invasive breast cancer. Its accuracy needs to be further evaluated in independent populations before it can be recommended for clinical use. PMID:18316752

  5. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  6. Korean Risk Assessment Model for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Ma, Seung Hyun; Shin, Aesun; Chang, Myung-Chul; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kim, Sungwan; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the performance of the Gail model for a Korean population and developed a Korean breast cancer risk assessment tool (KoBCRAT) based upon equations developed for the Gail model for predicting breast cancer risk. Methods Using 3,789 sets of cases and controls, risk factors for breast cancer among Koreans were identified. Individual probabilities were projected using Gail's equations and Korean hazard data. We compared the 5-year and lifetime risk produced using the modified Gail model which applied Korean incidence and mortality data and the parameter estimators from the original Gail model with those produced using the KoBCRAT. We validated the KoBCRAT based on the expected/observed breast cancer incidence and area under the curve (AUC) using two Korean cohorts: the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort (KMCC) and National Cancer Center (NCC) cohort. Results The major risk factors under the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, menopausal status, breastfeeding duration, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise, while those at and over the age of 50 were family history, age at menarche, age at menopause, pregnancy experience, body mass index, oral contraceptive usage, and exercise. The modified Gail model produced lower 5-year risk for the cases than for the controls (p = 0.017), while the KoBCRAT produced higher 5-year and lifetime risk for the cases than for the controls (p<0.001 and <0.001, respectively). The observed incidence of breast cancer in the two cohorts was similar to the expected incidence from the KoBCRAT (KMCC, p = 0.880; NCC, p = 0.878). The AUC using the KoBCRAT was 0.61 for the KMCC and 0.89 for the NCC cohort. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the KoBCRAT is a better tool for predicting the risk of breast cancer in Korean women, especially urban women. PMID:24204664

  7. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance that you could develop breast cancer: Some risk factors you can control, such as drinking alcohol. Others, such as family history, you cannot control. The more risk factors you have, the more your risk increases. ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth ...

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  12. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  13. SEARCHBreast Workshop Proceedings: 3D Modelling of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Bethny; Blyth, Karen; Carter, Phil; Chelala, Claude; Holen, Ingunn; Jones, Louise; Speirs, Valerie

    2015-12-01

    SEARCHBreast, a UK initiative supported by the NC3Rs, organised a workshop entitled 3D Modelling of Breast Cancer. The workshop focused on providing researchers with solutions to overcome some of the perceived barriers to working with human-derived tumour cells, cell lines and tissues, namely: a) the limited access to human-derived material; and b) the difficulty in working with these samples. The workshop presentations provided constructive advice and information on how to best prepare human cells or tissues for further downstream applications. Techniques in developing primary cultures from patient samples, and considerations when preserving tissue slices, were discussed. A common theme throughout the workshop was the importance of ensuring that the cells are grown in conditions as similar to the in vivo microenvironment as possible. Comparisons of the advantages of several in vitro options, such as primary cell cultures, cell line cultures, explants or tissue slices, suggest that all offer great potential applications for breast cancer research, and highlight that it need not be a case of choosing one over the other. The workshop also offered cutting-edge examples of on-chip technologies and 3-D tumour modelling by using virtual pathology, which can contribute to clinically relevant studies and provide insights into breast cancer metastatic mechanisms. PMID:26753939

  14. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  15. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Boughorbel, Sabri; Al-Ali, Rashid; Elkum, Naser

    2016-01-01

    We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC) for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM), GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Random Forests (RF), Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN) and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis. PMID:26771838

  16. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000837.htm Breast cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Breast cancer screenings can help find breast cancer early, before ...

  17. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  18. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  20. Innovative biomagnetic imaging sensors for breast cancer: A model-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Golkowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Breast cancer is a serious potential health problem for all women and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The current screening procedures and imaging techniques, including x-ray mammography, clinical biopsy, ultrasound imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging, provide only 73% accuracy in detecting breast cancer. This gives the impetus to explore alternate techniques for imaging the breast and detecting early stage tumors. Among the complementary methods, the noninvasive biomagnetic breast imaging is attractive and promising, because both ionizing radiation and breast compressions that the prevalent x-ray mammography suffers from are avoided. It furthermore offers very high contrast because of the significant electromagnetic properties' differences between the cancerous, benign, and normal breast tissues. In this paper, a hybrid and accurate modeling tool for biomagnetic breast imaging is developed, which couples the electromagnetic and ultrasonic energies, and initial validations between the model predication and experimental findings are conducted.

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells in an in vivo model of spontaneous metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Lagioia, Michelle; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2004-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are rapidly emerging as a new generation of therapeutic drug in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms underlying its antitumor effects are not fully understood and more thorough preclinical trials are needed to determine if COX-2 inhibition represents a useful approach for prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the growth inhibitory mechanism of a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, in an in vivo oncogenic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer that resembles human disease. The oncogenic mice carry the polyoma middle T antigen driven by the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and develop primary adenocarcinomas of the breast. Results show that oral administration of celecoxib caused significant reduction in mammary tumor burden associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis and decreased proliferation in vivo. In vivo apoptosis correlated with significant decrease in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, a cell survival signaling kinase, with increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, celecoxib treatment reduced levels of proangiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), suggesting a role of celecoxib in suppression of angiogenesis in this model. Results from these preclinical studies will form the basis for assessing the feasibility of celecoxib therapy alone or in combination with conventional therapies for treatment and/or prevention of breast cancer. PMID:15561779

  2. Swiss bare mice: a suitable model for transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic studies of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, T; Kumar, Piyush; Maru, G; Ingle, A; Krishna, C Murali

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting females worldwide. As early detection results in better prognosis, screening tools for breast cancer are being explored. Raman spectroscopy, a rapid, objective, and noninvasive tool, has shown promising results in the diagnosis of several cancers including breast cancer. For development as a screening tool, a study of spectral signatures associated with breast cancer progression is imperative. However, such studies are not possible in human subjects. Hence, there is a need for a suitable animal model, which is conducive to transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic measurements of breast with minimal interference from skin and hair and has contribution from functional mammary epithelium of breast. In this study, rodent models like C57, Swiss albino, Swiss bare, agouti mice, and Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. Among these models, transcutaneous breast spectra of hairless Swiss bare mice have the best signal-to-noise ratio and were closest to reported ex vivo as well as intraoperative in vivo human breast spectra. Principal component-linear discriminant analysis of several anatomical sites confirms minimal skin interference and suggests contribution from functional mammary epithelium of breast. Moreover, transcutaneous spectra from normal breast and breast tumors of Swiss bare mice could be classified with 99% efficiency, which is better than the previous reports. Thus, Swiss bare mice model may be better suited for transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic studies of breast physiology and pathology, especially breast cancer. Prospectively, in addition to cancer progression, breast-to-bone metastasis can also be studied, since these anatomical sites can be uniquely classified. PMID:23708992

  3. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  4. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  5. Plasma proteome profiling of a mouse model of breast cancer identifies a set of up-regulated proteins in common with human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Faca, Vitor M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Kasarda, A Erik; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Newcomb, Lisa; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Gina; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; McIntosh, Martin W; Kemp, Christopher J; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-04-01

    We have applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach, combining isotopic labeling extensive intact protein separation and mass spectrometry, for high confidence identification of protein changes in plasmas from a mouse model of breast cancer. We hypothesized that a wide spectrum of proteins may be up-regulated in plasma with tumor development and that comparisons with proteins expressed in human breast cancer cell lines may identify a subset of up-regulated proteins in common with proteins expressed in breast cancer cell lines that may represent candidate biomarkers for breast cancer. Plasma from PyMT transgenic tumor-bearing mice and matched controls were obtained at two time points during tumor growth. A total of 133 proteins were found to be increased by 1.5-fold or greater at one or both time points. A comparison of this set of proteins with published findings from proteomic analysis of human breast cancer cell lines yielded 49 proteins with increased levels in mouse plasma that were identified in breast cancer cell lines. Pathway analysis comparing the subset of up-regulated proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer cell lines with other up-regulated proteins indicated a cancer related function for the former and a host-response function for the latter. We conclude that integration of proteomic findings from mouse models of breast cancer and from human breast cancer cell lines may help identify a subset of proteins released by breast cancer cells into the circulation and that occur at increased levels in breast cancer. PMID:18311905

  6. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  7. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  8. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality from Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Lee, Christoph I.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J.; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimates of radiation-induced breast cancer risk from mammography screening have not previously considered dose exposure variation or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening. Objective To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening, considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation across women. Design Two simulation-modeling approaches using common data on screening mammography from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and radiation dose from mammography from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women aged 40–74 years. Interventions Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 until 74. Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality per 100,000 women screened (harms). Results On average, annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]=88–178) leading to 16 deaths (95% CI=11–23) relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 radiation-induced breast cancers leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete breast examination (8% of population) were projected to have higher radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (266 cancers, 35 deaths per 100,000 women), compared to women with small or average breasts (113 cancers, 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 reduced risk of radiation-induced cancers 5-fold. Limitations We were unable to estimate years of life lost from radiation-induced breast cancer. Conclusions Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are impacted by dose

  9. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  10. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  11. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  12. Putative cancer-initiating stem cells in cell culture models for molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    TELANG, NITIN

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating stem cells (CISC) represent a minor subpopulation of heterogeneous breast cancer. CISC are responsible for the acquired resistance to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and eventual relapse observed in patients with breast cancer. Certain molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer that exhibit differential expression of genes coding for hormone and growth factor receptors differ in their response to conventional chemoendocrine therapy and targeted therapeutic inhibitors. Thus, the development of reliable cell culture models for CISC may provide a valuable experimental approach for the study of stem cell-targeted therapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The present study utilized optimized cell culture systems as experimental models for different molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer, including luminal A, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer. Biomarker end points, including control of homeostatic growth, cancer risk and drug resistance, were quantitatively analyzed in the selected models. The results of the analyses indicated that, compared with the non-tumorigenic controls, the cell models representing the aforementioned molecular subtypes of clinical breast cancer exhibited aberrant cell cycle progression, downregulated cellular apoptosis and loss of control of homeostatic growth, as evidenced by hyperproliferation. Additionally, these models displayed persistent cancer risk, as indicated by their high incidence and frequency of anchorage-independent (AI) colony formation in vitro and their tumor development capacity in vivo. Furthermore, in the presence of maximum cytostatic drug concentrations, the drug-resistant phenotypes isolated from the parental drug-sensitive cell lines representing luminal A, HER-2-enriched and triple negative breast cancer exhibited an 11.5, 5.0 and 6.2 fold increase in cell growth, and a 5.6, 5.4 and 4.4 fold increase in the number of AI colonies

  13. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  14. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  15. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research. PMID:12631387

  16. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  17. Frailty Models for Familial Risk with Application to Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gorfine, Malka; Hsu, Li; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    In evaluating familial risk for disease we have two main statistical tasks: assessing the probability of carrying an inherited genetic mutation conferring higher risk; and predicting the absolute risk of developing diseases over time, for those individuals whose mutation status is known. Despite substantial progress, much remains unknown about the role of genetic and environmental risk factors, about the sources of variation in risk among families that carry high-risk mutations, and about the sources of familial aggregation beyond major Mendelian effects. These sources of heterogeneity contribute substantial variation in risk across families. In this paper we present simple and efficient methods for accounting for this variation in familial risk assessment. Our methods are based on frailty models. We implemented them in the context of generalizing Mendelian models of cancer risk, and compared our approaches to others that do not consider heterogeneity across families. Our extensive simulation study demonstrates that when predicting the risk of developing a disease over time conditional on carrier status, accounting for heterogeneity results in a substantial improvement in the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic. On the other hand, the improvement for carriership probability estimation is more limited. We illustrate the utility of the proposed approach through the analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers in the Washington Ashkenazi Kin-Cohort Study of Breast Cancer. PMID:24678132

  18. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  19. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites. PMID:23118918

  1. The Walker 256 Breast Cancer Cell- Induced Bone Pain Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Priyank A.; Kuo, Andy; Vetter, Irina; Smith, Maree T.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with terminal breast cancer show signs of bone metastasis, the most common cause of pain in cancer. Clinically available drug treatment options for the relief of cancer-associated bone pain are limited due to either inadequate pain relief and/or dose-limiting side-effects. One of the major hurdles in understanding the mechanism by which breast cancer causes pain after metastasis to the bones is the lack of suitable preclinical models. Until the late twentieth century, all animal models of cancer induced bone pain involved systemic injection of cancer cells into animals, which caused severe deterioration of animal health due to widespread metastasis. In this mini-review we have discussed details of a recently developed and highly efficient preclinical model of breast cancer induced bone pain: Walker 256 cancer cell- induced bone pain in rats. The model involves direct localized injection of cancer cells into a single tibia in rats, which avoids widespread metastasis of cancer cells and hence animals maintain good health throughout the experimental period. This model closely mimics the human pathophysiology of breast cancer induced bone pain and has great potential to aid in the process of drug discovery for treating this intractable pain condition.

  2. KOHBRA BRCA risk calculator (KOHCal): a model for predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Korean breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sue K; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Zisun; Noh, Woo-Chul; Jung, Yongsik; Yang, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-05-01

    The widely used Western BRCA mutation prediction models underestimated the risk of having a BRCA mutation in Korean breast cancer patients. This study aimed to identify predictive factors for BRCA1/2 mutations and to develop a Korean BRCA risk calculator. The model was constructed by logistic regression model, and it was based on the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer study, in which 1669 female patients were enrolled between May 2007 and December 2010. A separate data set of 402 patients, who were enrolled from Jan 2011 to August 2012, was used to test the performance of our model. In total, 264 (15.8%) and 67 (16.7%) BRCA mutation carriers were identified in the model and validation set, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that age at breast cancer diagnosis, bilateral breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and the number of relatives with breast or ovarian cancer within third-degree relatives were independent predictors of the BRCA mutation among familial breast cancer patients. An age <35 years at diagnosis, bilateral breast cancer, both breast and ovarian cancer and TNBC remained significant predictors in non-familial breast cancer cases. Our model was developed based on logistic regression models. The validation results showed no differences between the observed and expected carrier probabilities. This model will be a useful tool for providing genetic risk assessments in Korean populations. PMID:26763880

  3. MMTV mouse models and the diagnostic values of MMTV-like sequences in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Pankaj; Frazier, Donna P; Kendig, Robert D; Maglic, Dejan; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kai, Fumitake; Taneja, Neetu K; Inoue, Kazushi

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transgenic mice are excellent models for breast cancer as they allow for the targeted expression of various oncogenes and growth factors in neoplastic transformation of mammary glands. Numerous MMTV-LTR-driven transgenic mouse models of breast cancer have been created in the past three decades, including MMTV-neu/ErbB2, cyclin D1, cyclin E, Ras, Myc, int-1 and c-rel. These transgenic mice develop mammary tumors with different latency, histology and invasiveness, reflecting the oncogenic pathways activated by the transgene. Recently, homologous sequences of the env gene of MMTV have been identified in approximately 40% of human breast cancers, but not in normal breast or other types of cancers, suggesting possible involvement of mammary tumor virus in human breast carcinogenesis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the association of MMTV provirus with progesterone receptor, p53 mutations and advanced-stage breast cancer. Thus, the detection of MMTV-like sequences may have diagnostic value to predict the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:19580428

  4. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  5. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  6. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  7. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Johnson KC, Olsson H, Casagrande JT, et al. Anthropometric and hormonal risk factors for male breast cancer: ... D, Ferlay J, Brinton LA, Cook MB. An international comparison of male and female breast cancer incidence ...

  8. Computer Modeling for Microwave Ablation in Breast Cancer Using a Coaxial Slot Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda Rubio, Mario Francisco Jesus; Guerrero López, Geshel David; Valdés Perezgasga, Francisco; Flores García, Francisco; Vera Hernández, Arturo; Leija Salas, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The use of breast cancer mammography screening has allowed detection of a greater number of small carcinomas, and this has facilitated treatment by minimally invasive techniques. Microwave energy is a promising alternative treatment because it can preferentially heat and damage high-water-content breast carcinomas. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using this technique to treat breast cancer, a coaxial slot antenna computer simulation based on an axisymmetric finite element method (FEM) model was used to compare heating differences between cancer and normal breast tissue. Three FEM computer models were developed: in one of them, the coaxial slot antenna was immersed only in homogeneous breast tissue; for the second one, the antenna was immersed only in cancer tissue; for the third one, the antenna was inserted into malignant tissue surrounded by breast tissue. According to the results, the computer modeling demonstrated that the difference in dielectric properties and thermal parameters between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissue was able to cause preferential heating of tumors during microwave ablation. Furthermore, the ablation zone radius was 42 % larger in the tumor than in low-water-content adipose tissue. Even though this technique requires further research, it is a promising minimally invasive modality for the local treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Targeting Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, contain populations of cells that display stem-cell properties. These breast cancer stem cells, by virtue of their relative resistance to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy, may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The elucidation of pathways that regulate these cells has led to the identification of potential therapeutic targets. A number of agents capable of targeting breast cancer stem cells in preclinical models are currently entering clinical trials. Assessment of the efficacy of the agents will require development of innovative clinical trial designs with appropriate biologic and clinical end points. The effective targeting of breast cancer stem cells has the potential to significantly improve outcome for women with both early-stage and advanced breast cancer. PMID:20498387

  10. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  11. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  12. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  13. An improved syngeneic orthotopic murine model of human breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Omar M; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous (OP) injection in the area of the nipple, or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. ODV produced less variable-sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development . PMID:25200444

  14. Nomogram of Naive Bayesian Model for Recurrence Prediction of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojae; Kim, Ku Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Breast cancer has a high rate of recurrence, resulting in the need for aggressive treatment and close follow-up. However, previously established classification guidelines, based on expert panels or regression models, are controversial. Prediction models based on machine learning show excellent performance, but they are not widely used because they cannot explain their decisions and cannot be presented on paper in the way that knowledge is customarily represented in the clinical world. The principal objective of this study was to develop a nomogram based on a naïve Bayesian model for the prediction of breast cancer recurrence within 5 years after breast cancer surgery. Methods The nomogram can provide a visual explanation of the predicted probabilities on a sheet of paper. We used a data set from a Korean tertiary teaching hospital of 679 patients who had undergone breast cancer surgery between 1994 and 2002. Seven prognostic factors were selected as independent variables for the model. Results The accuracy was 80%, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of the model was 0.81. Conclusions The nomogram can be easily used in daily practice to aid physicians and patients in making appropriate treatment decisions after breast cancer surgery. PMID:27200218

  15. Breast cancer screening behaviors among Korean American immigrant women: findings from the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Stange, Mia Ju; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the utilization of clinical breast examinations (CBEs) and mammograms among Korean American immigrant women and investigated how the six constructs of Health Belief Model (HBM) are associated with the receipt of breast cancer screening. Using a quota sampling strategy, 202 Korean American immigrant women were recruited in metropolitan areas in the northeastern United States. Approximately 64% of the participants reported having had at least one CBE in their lifetime, and about 81% of the sample had undergone at least one mammogram in their lifetime. Women who perceived themselves to be susceptible to breast cancer were more likely to have undergone a CBE, and women who had lower barriers to screening or demonstrated a higher level of confidence were more likely than their counterparts to undergo a mammogram. Findings suggest that HBM constructs such as susceptibility, barriers, and confidence should be considered when designing interventions aimed at promoting breast cancer screening. PMID:24848345

  16. Global Nutrition Research: Nutrition and Breast Cancer Prevention as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Lelièvre, Sophie A.; Weaver, Connie M.

    2013-01-01

    The gene-environment interaction is paramount in light of the worldwide rise of incidence of chronic diseases, with cancers in the pole position. Diet is an environmental factor with potential to influence cancer onset by shaping the epigenome (i.e., the genome organization that controls the differential expression of genes). Yet, there is no consensus regarding how diet might help prevent breast cancer, the second most frequent malignancy globally. We propose that the complexity of breast cancers requires working on a global and multidisciplinary scale to further understand the relationship between breast cancer type, diet and the epigenome. This approach is the basis for the International Breast Cancer & Nutrition (IBCN) initiative and related symposia that gather scientists and clinicians from different backgrounds and world regions. A global endeavor will not only bring the diversity necessary to pinpoint important diet-gene relationships, it will also provide momentum to develop the models, detection and assessment tools, and funding and public policy framework necessary to advance primary prevention research for the benefit of all populations affected by breast cancer. This paradigm can be adapted to understanding diet-gene relationships for other chronic diseases. PMID:24447199

  17. A Comprehensive Multistate Model Analyzing Associations of Various Risk Factors With the Course of Breast Cancer in a Population-Based Cohort of Breast Cancer Cases.

    PubMed

    Eulenburg, Christine; Schroeder, Jennifer; Obi, Nadia; Heinz, Judith; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter

    2016-02-15

    We employed a semi-Markov multistate model for the simultaneous analysis of various endpoints describing the course of breast cancer. Results were compared with those from standard analyses using a Cox proportional hazards model. We included 3,012 patients with invasive breast cancer newly diagnosed between 2001 and 2005 who were recruited in Germany for a population-based study, the Mamma Carcinoma Risk Factor Investigation (MARIE Study), and prospectively followed up until the end of 2009. Locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis were included as intermediate states, and deaths from breast cancer, secondary cancer, and other causes were included as competing absorbing states. Tumor characteristics were significantly associated with all breast cancer-related endpoints. Nodal involvement was significantly related to local recurrence but more strongly related to distant metastases. Smoking was significantly associated with mortality from second cancers and other causes, whereas menopausal hormone use was significantly associated with reduced distant metastasis and death from causes other than cancer. The presence of cardiovascular disease at diagnosis was solely associated with mortality from other causes. Compared with separate Cox models, multistate models allow for dissection of prognostic factors and intermediate events in the analysis of cause-specific mortality and can yield new insights into disease progression and associated pathways. PMID:26823437

  18. Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the chance of dying from breast cancer. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in women with a high risk of breast ... the body. This procedure is also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI). MRI does not use any x-rays. ...

  19. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  20. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  1. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  3. Imaging the urokinase plasminongen activator receptor in preclinical breast cancer models of acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Craik, Charles S; Murphy, Laura L; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and (111)In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the (111)In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  4. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice. PMID:23181529

  5. A risk management model for familial breast cancer: A new application using Fuzzy Cognitive Map method.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Elpiniki I; Jayashree Subramanian; Karmegam, Akila; Papandrianos, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most deadly disease affecting women and thus it is natural for women aged 40-49 years (who have a family history of breast cancer or other related cancers) to assess their personal risk for developing familial breast cancer (FBC). Besides, as each individual woman possesses different levels of risk of developing breast cancer depending on their family history, genetic predispositions and personal medical history, individualized care setting mechanism needs to be identified so that appropriate risk assessment, counseling, screening, and prevention options can be determined by the health care professionals. The presented work aims at developing a soft computing based medical decision support system using Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM) that assists health care professionals in deciding the individualized care setting mechanisms based on the FBC risk level of the given women. The FCM based FBC risk management system uses NHL to learn causal weights from 40 patient records and achieves a 95% diagnostic accuracy. The results obtained from the proposed model are in concurrence with the comprehensive risk evaluation tool based on Tyrer-Cuzick model for 38/40 patient cases (95%). Besides, the proposed model identifies high risk women by calculating higher accuracy of prediction than the standard Gail and NSAPB models. The testing accuracy of the proposed model using 10-fold cross validation technique outperforms other standard machine learning based inference engines as well as previous FCM-based risk prediction methods for BC. PMID:26220142

  6. Modeling and Controlling Chaos in Breast Cancer: Toward Finding a Practical Cure—A first step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh, Somayeh; Sanayei, Ali

    2010-09-01

    The main aim of this work is finding a practical method which is based on a mathematical model to cure the breast cancer. This model with certain values of parameters could exhibit a chaotic behavior. Consequently, we achieve this goal by controlling chaos and find the best adjustable control parameter in order to control the malignancy.

  7. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging model for potential breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell; Xin, Hao

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we develop a complete microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) model for potential breast cancer imaging application. Acoustic pressures generated by different breast tissue targets are investigated by finite-difference time-domain simulations of the entire TAI process including the feeding antenna, matching mechanism, fluidic environment, 3-D breast model, and acoustic transducer. Simulation results achieve quantitative relationships between the input microwave peak power and the resulting specific absorption rate as well as the output acoustic pressure. Microwave frequency dependence of the acoustic signals due to different breast tissues is established across a broadband frequency range (2.3-12 GHz), suggesting key advantages of spectroscopic TAI compare to TAI at a single frequency. Reconstructed thermoacoustic images are consistent with the modeling results. This model will contribute to design, optimization, and safety evaluation of microwave-induced TAI and spectroscopy. PMID:22851231

  8. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  9. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  10. Three-Dimensional Breast Cancer Models Mimic Hallmarks of Size-Induced Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjulata; Mukundan, Shilpaa; Jaramillo, Maria; Oesterreich, Steffi; Sant, Shilpa

    2016-07-01

    Tumor size is strongly correlated with breast cancer metastasis and patient survival. Increased tumor size contributes to hypoxic and metabolic gradients in the solid tumor and to an aggressive tumor phenotype. Thus, it is important to develop three-dimensional (3D) breast tumor models that recapitulate size-induced microenvironmental changes and, consequently, natural tumor progression in real time without the use of artificial culture conditions or gene manipulations. Here, we developed size-controlled multicellular aggregates ("microtumors") of subtype-specific breast cancer cells by using non-adhesive polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwells of defined sizes (150-600 μm). These 3D microtumor models faithfully represent size-induced microenvironmental changes, such as hypoxic gradients, cellular heterogeneity, and spatial distribution of necrotic/proliferating cells. These microtumors acquire hallmarks of tumor progression in the same cell lines within 6 days. Of note, large microtumors of hormone receptor-positive cells exhibited an aggressive phenotype characterized by collective cell migration and upregulation of mesenchymal markers at mRNA and protein level, which was not observed in small microtumors. Interestingly, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines did not show size-dependent upregulation of mesenchymal markers. In conclusion, size-controlled microtumor models successfully recapitulated clinically observed positive association between tumor size and aggressive phenotype in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer while maintaining clinically proven poor correlation of tumor size with aggressive phenotype in TNBC. Such clinically relevant 3D models generated under controlled experimental conditions can serve as precise preclinical models to study mechanisms involved in breast tumor progression as well as antitumor drug effects as a function of tumor progression. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3732-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216179

  11. Estrogen Metabolism and Exposure in a Genotypic-Phenotypic Model for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, Philip S.; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Dawling, Sheila; Roodi, Nady; Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Plummer, W. Dale; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Dupont, William D.; Parl, Fritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current models of breast cancer risk prediction do not directly reflect mammary estrogen metabolism or genetic variability in exposure to carcinogenic estrogen metabolites. Methods We developed a model that simulates the kinetic effect of genetic variants of the enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and COMT on the production of the main carcinogenic estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), expressed as area under the curve metric (4-OHE2-AUC). The model also incorporates phenotypic factors (age, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives, family history), which plausibly influence estrogen metabolism and the production of 4-OHE2. We applied the model to two independent, population-based breast cancer case-control groups, the German GENICA study (967 cases, 971 controls) and the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 465 cases, 885 controls). Results In the GENICA study, premenopausal women at the 90th percentile of 4-OHE2-AUC among control subjects had a risk of breast cancer that was 2.30 times that of women at the 10th control 4-OHE2-AUC percentile (95% CI 1.7 – 3.2, P = 2.9 × 10−7). This relative risk was 1.89 (95% CI 1.5 – 2.4, P = 2.2 × 10−8) in postmenopausal women. In the NBC, this relative risk in postmenopausal women was 1.81 (95% CI 1.3 – 2.6, P = 7.6 × 10−4), which increased to 1.83 (95% CI 1.4 – 2.3, P = 9.5 × 10−7) when a history of proliferative breast disease was included in the model. Conclusions The model combines genotypic and phenotypic factors involved in carcinogenic estrogen metabolite production and cumulative estrogen exposure to predict breast cancer risk. Impact The estrogen carcinogenesis-based model has the potential to provide personalized risk estimates. PMID:21610218

  12. An Integrated Model of the Transcriptome of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Necela, Brian M.; Tang, Xiaojia; Thompson, Kevin J.; Lau, Melissa; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Anderson, S. Keith; Sun, Zhifu; Baheti, Saurabh; Carr, Jennifer M.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Barman, Poulami; Radisky, Derek C.; Joseph, Richard W.; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; Chai, High-seng; Camille, Stephan; Rossell, David; Asmann, Yan W.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Perez, Edith A.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal in these analyses was to use genomic features from a test set of primary breast tumors to build an integrated transcriptome landscape model that makes relevant hypothetical predictions about the biological and/or clinical behavior of HER2-positive breast cancer. We interrogated RNA-Seq data from benign breast lesions, ER+, triple negative, and HER2-positive tumors to identify 685 differentially expressed genes, 102 alternatively spliced genes, and 303 genes that expressed single nucleotide sequence variants (eSNVs) that were associated with the HER2-positive tumors in our survey panel. These features were integrated into a transcriptome landscape model that identified 12 highly interconnected genomic modules, each of which represents a cellular processes pathway that appears to define the genomic architecture of the HER2-positive tumors in our test set. The generality of the model was confirmed by the observation that several key pathways were enriched in HER2-positive TCGA breast tumors. The ability of this model to make relevant predictions about the biology of breast cancer cells was established by the observation that integrin signaling was linked to lapatinib sensitivity in vitro and strongly associated with risk of relapse in the NCCTG N9831 adjuvant trastuzumab clinical trial dataset. Additional modules from the HER2 transcriptome model, including ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, TGF-beta signaling, RHO-family GTPase signaling, and M-phase progression, were linked to response to lapatinib and paclitaxel in vitro and/or risk of relapse in the N9831 dataset. These data indicate that an integrated transcriptome landscape model derived from a test set of HER2-positive breast tumors has potential for predicting outcome and for identifying novel potential therapeutic strategies for this breast cancer subtype. PMID:24223926

  13. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  14. Determining the main risk factors and high-risk groups of breast cancer using a predictive model for breast cancer risk assessment in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; You, Chunghee; Lee, Dong-Suk; Han, Wonshik; Choe, Kuk-Jin; Noh, Dong-Young

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing a predictive model for assessing the breast cancer risk of Korean women under the assumption of differences in the risk factors between Westerners and Koreans. The cohort comprised 384 breast cancer patients and 2 control groups: one comprising 166 hospitalized patients and the other comprising 104 nurses and teachers. Two initial models were produced by comparing cases and the 2 control groups, and the final equations were established by selecting highly significant variables of the initial models to test the accuracy of the models in terms of disease probability and predictability. Both the initial models and the final disease-probability models were confirmed to exhibit high degrees of accuracy and predictability. Major risk factors determined by comparing the patients with hospitalized controls were a family history, menstrual regularity, total menstrual duration, age at first full-term pregnancy, and duration of breastfeeding. Major risk factors determined by comparing patients with nurse/teacher controls were age, education level, menstrual regularity, drinking status, and smoking status. The predictive model developed here shows that risk factors for breast cancer differ between Korean and Western subjects in the aspect of breastfeeding behavior. However, identifying the relationship between genetic susceptibility and breast cancer will require further studies with larger samples. In a model with nurse/teacher controls, drinking and higher education were found to be protective variables, whereas smoking was a risk factor. Hence the predictive model in this group could not be generalized to the Korean population; instead, breast cancer incidence needs to be compared among nurses and teachers in a nurse-and-teacher cohort. PMID:15525868

  15. Interdependence in Women with Breast Cancer and Their Partners: An Interindividual Model of Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorros, Sam M.; Card, Noel A.; Segrin, Chris; Badger, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to test whether interdependence in dyads living with breast cancer could account for person-partner crossover effects in distress outcomes. Method: The sample consisted of 95 dyads with early-stage breast cancer. By using reciprocal dyadic data from women with breast cancer and their partners, we fit a…

  16. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may result in a delay in diagnosis. Survival is highest when breast cancer is found early. If you notice any of ... chest or nipple, see a doctor right away. Survival rates are similar for men and women when breast cancer is found at the same stage. A man’s ...

  17. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  18. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-04-21

    When trying to explore the biology and etiology of human cancers, clinically relevant human culture models are essential. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. Here, we suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accurate interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context.

  19. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically relevant human culture models are essential for developing effective therapies and exploring the biology and etiology of human cancers. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. We suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accurate interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context. PMID:25896888

  20. A Threshold Model of Social Support, Adjustment, and Distress after Breast Cancer Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Armer, Jane M.; Heppner, P. Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a threshold model that proposes that social support exhibits a curvilinear association with adjustment and distress, such that support in excess of a critical threshold level has decreasing incremental benefits. Women diagnosed with a first occurrence of breast cancer (N = 154) completed survey measures of perceived support…

  1. Models of Understanding: Historical Constructions of Breast Cancer in Medicine and Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The era of technical and scientific progress ushered in with the twentieth century brought new medical knowledge such as the Halstead 'radical' mastectomy, which promised a cure for breast cancer. These advances in medical knowledge were premised on an epidemiological model of disease, which shaped the treatment and public understanding of breast…

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  3. MYC and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Yinghua; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2010-01-01

    MYC is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. MYC deregulation contributes to breast cancer development and progression and is associated with poor outcomes. Multiple mechanisms are involved in MYC deregulation in breast cancer, including gene amplification, transcriptional regulation, and mRNA and protein stabilization, which correlate with loss of tumor suppressors and activation of oncogenic pathways. The heterogeneity in breast cancer is increasingly recognized. Breast cancer has been classified into 5 or more subtypes based on gene expression profiles, and each subtype has distinct biological features and clinical outcomes. Among these subtypes, basal-like tumor is associated with a poor prognosis and has a lack of therapeutic targets. MYC is overexpressed in the basal-like subtype and may serve as a target for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Tumor suppressor BRCA1 inhibits MYC’s transcriptional and transforming activity. Loss of BRCA1 with MYC overexpression leads to the development of breast cancer—especially, basal-like breast cancer. As a downstream effector of estrogen receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor family pathways, MYC may contribute to resistance to adjuvant therapy. Targeting MYC-regulated pathways in combination with inhibitors of other oncogenic pathways may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for breast cancer, the basal-like subtype in particular. PMID:21779462

  4. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  5. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-03-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis.

  6. Inorganic Nanovehicle Targets Tumor in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:24651154

  7. Inorganic nanovehicle targets tumor in an orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Goeun; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Oh, Yeonji; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agent, methotrexate (MTX), can be limited by its very short plasma half-life, the drug resistance, and the high dosage required for cancer cell suppression. In this study, a new drug delivery system is proposed to overcome such limitations. To realize such a system, MTX was intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), inorganic drug delivery vehicle, through a co-precipitation route to produce a MTX-LDH nanohybrid with an average particle size of approximately 130 nm. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing orthotopic human breast tumors revealed that the tumor-to-liver ratio of MTX in the MTX-LDH-treated-group was 6-fold higher than that of MTX-treated-one after drug treatment for 2 hr. Moreover, MTX-LDH exhibited superior targeting effect resulting in high antitumor efficacy inducing a 74.3% reduction in tumor volume compared to MTX alone, and as a consequence, significant survival benefits. Annexin-V and propidium iodine dual staining and TUNEL analysis showed that MTX-LDH induced a greater degree of apoptosis than free MTX. Taken together, our data demonstrate that a new MTX-LDH nanohybrid exhibits a superior efficacy profile and improved distribution compared to MTX alone and has the potential to enhance therapeutic efficacy via inhibition of tumor proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:24651154

  8. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  9. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  10. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  11. Semiparametric model for semi-competing risks data with application to breast cancer study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renke; Zhu, Hong; Bondy, Melissa; Ning, Jing

    2016-07-01

    For many forms of cancer, patients will receive the initial regimen of treatments, then experience cancer progression and eventually die of the disease. Understanding the disease process in patients with cancer is essential in clinical, epidemiological and translational research. One challenge in analyzing such data is that death dependently censors cancer progression (e.g., recurrence), whereas progression does not censor death. We deal with the informative censoring by first selecting a suitable copula model through an exploratory diagnostic approach and then developing an inference procedure to simultaneously estimate the marginal survival function of cancer relapse and an association parameter in the copula model. We show that the proposed estimators possess consistency and weak convergence. We use simulation studies to evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed method, and illustrate it through an application to data from a study of early stage breast cancer. PMID:26340889

  12. Minimal elastographic modeling of breast cancer for model based tumor detection in a digital image elasto tomography (DIET) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Thomas F.; Muller, Natalie; Hann, Christopher E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Digital Image Elasto Tomography (DIET) is a non-invasive breast cancer screening technology that images the surface motion of a breast under harmonic mechanical actuation. A new approach capturing the dynamics and characteristics of tumor behavior is presented. A simple mechanical model of the breast is used to identify a transfer function relating the input harmonic actuation to the output surface displacements using imaging data of a silicone phantom. Areas of higher stiffness cause significant changes of damping and resonant frequencies as seen in the resulting Bode plots. A case study on a healthy and tumor silicone breast phantom shows the potential for this model-based method to clearly distinguish cancerous and healthy tissue as well as correctly predicting the tumor position.

  13. Pregnancy After Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gemignani; Petrek

    1999-05-01

    BACKGROUND: The issue of pregnancy following the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer is important because the incidence of breast cancer is increasing in women of childbearing age. The fact that many women are delaying childbearing, whether for educational, professional, or personal reasons, increases the number of women who will undergo breast cancer treatment before completing childbearing. METHODS: Data on pregnancy in breast cancer survivors are limited and consist only of retrospective data. This paper reviews the published literature on the influence of subsequent pregnancy on breast cancer, including three recent large-scale population-based studies. RESULTS: The survival of women with breast carcinoma who subsequently become pregnant is not reported to be decreased in any of the published series. However, several biases may be present that justify the concern regarding the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Further research on the safety of subsequent pregnancy after breast carcinoma treatment is needed. To address these issues, patients are currently being accrued for a large, prospective, multicenter study of young breast carcinoma patients. PMID:10758557

  14. PREDICT Plus: development and validation of a prognostic model for early breast cancer that includes HER2

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, G C; Bajdik, C D; Dicks, E; Provenzano, E; Schmidt, M K; Sherman, M; Greenberg, D C; Green, A R; Gelmon, K A; Kosma, V-M; Olson, J E; Beckmann, M W; Winqvist, R; Cross, S S; Severi, G; Huntsman, D; Pylkäs, K; Ellis, I; Nielsen, T O; Giles, G; Blomqvist, C; Fasching, P A; Couch, F J; Rakha, E; Foulkes, W D; Blows, F M; Bégin, L R; van't Veer, L J; Southey, M; Nevanlinna, H; Mannermaa, A; Cox, A; Cheang, M; Baglietto, L; Caldas, C; Garcia-Closas, M; Pharoah, P D P

    2012-01-01

    Background: Predict (www.predict.nhs.uk) is an online, breast cancer prognostication and treatment benefit tool. The aim of this study was to incorporate the prognostic effect of HER2 status in a new version (Predict+), and to compare its performance with the original Predict and Adjuvant!. Methods: The prognostic effect of HER2 status was based on an analysis of data from 10 179 breast cancer patients from 14 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The hazard ratio estimates were incorporated into Predict. The validation study was based on 1653 patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer identified from the British Columbia Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit. Predicted overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) for Predict+, Predict and Adjuvant! were compared with observed outcomes. Results: All three models performed well for both OS and BCSS. Both Predict models provided better BCSS estimates than Adjuvant!. In the subset of patients with HER2-positive tumours, Predict+ performed substantially better than the other two models for both OS and BCSS. Conclusion: Predict+ is the first clinical breast cancer prognostication tool that includes tumour HER2 status. Use of the model might lead to more accurate absolute treatment benefit predictions for individual patients. PMID:22850554

  15. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  16. Methylxanthines and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schairer, C; Brinton, L A; Hoover, R N

    1987-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between methylxanthine consumption and breast cancer using data from a case-control study which included 1,510 cases and 1,882 controls identified through a nation-wide breast cancer screening program. There was no evidence of a positive association between methylxanthine consumption and risk of breast cancer. In fact, there was some suggestion of a negative association, particularly in women diagnosed after age 50. In addition, there was no evidence of increased risk with past or recent methylxanthine consumption, or with the consumption of caffeine or specific beverages, most notably brewed or instant caffeinated coffee and tea. PMID:3117709

  17. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  18. Using Residential History and Groundwater Modeling to Examine Drinking Water Exposure and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Lisa G.; Webster, Thomas F.; Aschengrau, Ann; Vieira, Verónica M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spatial analyses of case–control data have suggested a possible link between breast cancer and groundwater plumes in upper Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Objective We integrated residential histories, public water distribution systems, and groundwater modeling within geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the association between exposure to drinking water that has been contaminated by wastewater effluent and breast cancer. Methods Exposure was assessed from 1947 to 1993 for 638 breast cancer cases who were diagnosed from 1983 to 1993 and 842 controls; we took into account residential mobility and drinking water source. To estimate the historical impact of effluent on drinking water wells, we modified a modular three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater model (MODFLOW) from the U.S. Geological Survey. The analyses included latency and exposure duration. Results Wastewater effluent impacted the drinking water wells of study participants as early as 1966. For > 0–5 years of exposure (versus no exposure), associations were generally null. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for > 10 years of exposure were slightly increased, assuming latency periods of 0 or 10 years [AOR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9–1.9 and AOR = 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.2, respectively]. Statistically significant associations were estimated for ever-exposed versus never-exposed women when a 20-year latency period was assumed (AOR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0–3.4). A sensitivity analysis that classified exposures assuming lower well-pumping rates showed similar results. Conclusion We investigated the hypothesis generated by earlier spatial analyses that exposure to drinking water contaminated by wastewater effluent may be associated with breast cancer. Using a detailed exposure assessment, we found an association with breast cancer that increased with longer latency and greater exposure duration. PMID:20164002

  19. S6K1 promotes invasiveness of breast cancer cells in a model of metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Goverdhan, Aarthi; Shen, Jia; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wei, Yongkun; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of oncology-related death in US women. Of all invasive breast cancers, patients with tumors lacking expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have the poorest clinical prognosis. These referred to as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represent an aggressive form of disease that is marked by early-onset metastasis, high tumor recurrence rate, and low overall survival during the first three years post-diagnosis. In this report, we discuss a novel model of early-onset TNBC metastasis to bone and lungs, derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast cancer cells injected intravenously produced rapid, osteolytic metastases in long bones and spines of athymic nude mice, with concurrent metastasis to lungs, liver, and soft tissues. From the bone metastases, we developed a highly metastatic luciferase-tagged cell line variant named MDA-231-LUC Met. In this report, we demonstrate that the Akt/mTOR/S6K1 axis is hyperactivated in these cells, leading to a dramatic increase in phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein at Ser235/236. Lastly, we provide evidence that inhibition of the furthest downstream kinase in the mTOR pathway, S6K1, with a highly specific inhibitor PF-4708671 inhibits cell migration, and thus may provide a potent anti-metastatic adjuvant therapy approach. PMID:25075253

  20. S6K1 promotes invasiveness of breast cancer cells in a model of metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Goverdhan, Aarthi; Shen, Jia; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Chang, Shih-Shin; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wei, Yongkun; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of oncology-related death in US women. Of all invasive breast cancers, patients with tumors lacking expression of the estrogen and progesterone hormone receptors and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have the poorest clinical prognosis. These referred to as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represent an aggressive form of disease that is marked by early-onset metastasis, high tumor recurrence rate, and low overall survival during the first three years post-diagnosis. In this report, we discuss a novel model of early-onset TNBC metastasis to bone and lungs, derived from MDA-MB-231 cells. Breast cancer cells injected intravenously produced rapid, osteolytic metastases in long bones and spines of athymic nude mice, with concurrent metastasis to lungs, liver, and soft tissues. From the bone metastases, we developed a highly metastatic luciferase-tagged cell line variant named MDA-231-LUC Met. In this report, we demonstrate that the Akt/mTOR/S6K1 axis is hyperactivated in these cells, leading to a dramatic increase in phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein at Ser235/236. Lastly, we provide evidence that inhibition of the furthest downstream kinase in the mTOR pathway, S6K1, with a highly specific inhibitor PF-4708671 inhibits cell migration, and thus may provide a potent anti-metastatic adjuvant therapy approach. PMID:25075253

  1. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  2. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  3. Pregnancy and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, R; Harvey, V

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) presents a challenging clinical situation. This article reviews the current evidence around the management of PABC and the safety of pregnancy after breast cancer. The trend towards later age at first childbirth has resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer cases coexistent with pregnancy. The management of breast cancer during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Breast surgery can be safely performed during any trimester of pregnancy. Radiation therapy, if required, must be delayed until after delivery. The majority of patients with PABC require chemotherapy. The timing of delivery in relation to chemotherapy administration should be carefully considered. There is no evidence to date that pregnancy termination influences overall survival for the mother. To date, there is no clear evidence that subsequent pregnancy after breast cancer is associated with worse maternal survival. There is a suggestion that subsequent pregnancy may in fact be associated with an improved survival. However, the available studies are limited by potential biases.

  4. Second Cancer Incidence Risk Estimates using BEIR VII Models for Standard and Complex External Beam Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, E M; James, H; Bonora, M; Yarnold, JR; Evans, PM

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy including cone beam CT verification following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Method Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated : (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) non-coplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low local cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contra-lateral breast, left and right lung, oesophagus, stomach, liver, colon and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 years according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver and bladder (< 0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB

  5. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  7. Breast cancer and protein biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Gam, Lay-Harn

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a healthcare concern of women worldwide. Despite procedures being available for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, researchers are working intensively on the disease in order to improve the life quality of breast cancer patients. At present, there is no single treatment known to bring a definite cure for breast cancer. One of the possible solutions for combating breast cancer is through identification of reliable protein biomarkers that can be effectively used for early detection, prognosis and treatments of the cancer. Therefore, the task of identification of biomarkers for breast cancer has become the focus of many researchers worldwide. PMID:24520539

  8. A Model for Diagnosing Breast Cancerous Tissue from Thermal Images Using Active Contour and Lyapunov Exponent

    PubMed Central

    GHAYOUMI ZADEH, Hossein; HADDADNIA, Javad; MONTAZERI, Alimohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The segmentation of cancerous areas in breast images is important for the early detection of disease. Thermal imaging has advantages, such as being non-invasive, non-radiation, passive, quick, painless, inexpensive, and non-contact. Imaging technique is the focus of this research. Methods: The proposed model in this paper is a combination of surf and corners that are very resistant. Obtained features are resistant to changes in rotation and revolution then with the help of active contours, this feature has been used for segmenting cancerous areas. Results: Comparing the obtained results from the proposed method and mammogram show that proposed method is Accurate and appropriate. Benign and malignance of segmented areas are detected by Lyapunov exponent. Values obtained include TP=91.31%, FN=8.69%, FP=7.26%. Conclusion: The proposed method can classify those abnormally segmented areas of the breast, to the Benign and malignant cancer. PMID:27398339

  9. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy and targeted therapy. This helps to increase survival. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two main types of breast ... shown lumpectomy plus radiation offers the same overall survival benefit as mastectomy for early ... (almost always followed by radiation): The surgeon ...

  10. Lipid biology of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Jan; Sevinsky, Christopher; Conklin, Douglas S.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been reported in many types of cancer. Lipids have been implicated in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, autophagy, motility and membrane homeostasis. It is required that their biosynthesis is tightly regulated to ensure homeostasis and to prevent unnecessary energy expenditure. This review focuses on the emerging understanding of the role of lipids and lipogenic pathway regulation in breast cancer, including parallels drawn from the study of metabolic disease models, and suggestions on how these findings can potentially be exploited to promote gains in HER2/neu-positive breast cancer research. PMID:23562840

  11. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Smeets, Evelien E J W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Nijmeijer, Sandra M; van den Berg, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. PMID:23541764

  12. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  13. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  14. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  16. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  17. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  18. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  19. PET/CT in Evaluating Response to Chemotherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. SIX1 induces lymphangiogenesis and metastasis via upregulation of VEGF-C in mouse models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu-An; Jedlicka, Paul; Patrick, Aaron N.; Micalizzi, Douglas S.; Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Deitsch, Erin; Casás-Selves, Matias; Harrell, J. Chuck; Ford, Heide L.

    2012-01-01

    An association between lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer was observed decades ago. However, the mechanisms by which tumor cells infiltrate the lymphatic system are not completely understood. Recently, it has been proposed that the lymphatic system has an active role in metastatic dissemination and that tumor-secreted growth factors stimulate lymphangiogenesis. We therefore investigated whether SIX1, a homeodomain-containing transcription factor previously associated in breast cancer with lymph node positivity, was involved in lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. In a model in which human breast cancer cells were injected into immune-compromised mice, we found that SIX1 expression promoted peritumoral and intratumoral lymphangiogenesis, lymphatic invasion, and distant metastasis of breast cancer cells. SIX1 induced transcription of the prolymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C, and this was required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. Using a mouse mammary carcinoma model, we found that VEGF-C was not sufficient to mediate all the metastatic effects of SIX1, indicating that SIX1 acts through additional, VEGF-C–independent pathways. Finally, we verified the clinical significance of this prometastatic SIX1/VEGF-C axis by demonstrating coexpression of SIX1 and VEGF-C in human breast cancer. These data define a critical role for SIX1 in lymphatic dissemination of breast cancer cells, providing a direct mechanistic explanation for how VEGF-C expression is upregulated in breast cancer, resulting in lymphangiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:22466647

  1. Tibolone and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erel, C Tamer; Senturk, Levent M; Kaleli, Semih

    2006-01-01

    Tibolone is a relatively new drug for postmenopausal women, which is structurally related to 19‐nortestosterone derivatives and exhibits weak oestrogenic, progestogenic and androgenic activities. The effect of tibolone on breast tissue is still obscure. In vitro studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effects of tibolone on breast cells. On the other hand, although epidemiological studies show an increase in the risk of breast cancer among women treated with tibolone, accumulation of data obtained from radiological studies presents promising results. However, the safety of tibolone with regard to breast tissue needs to be investigated further, especially through well‐designed, large‐scale, randomised‐controlled trials. PMID:17068276

  2. Antitumour activity of the novel flavonoid Oncamex in preclinical breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Carlos; Ward, Carol; Turnbull, Arran K; Mullen, Peter; Cook, Graeme; Meehan, James; Jarman, Edward J; Thomson, Patrick IT; Campbell, Colin J; McPhail, Donald; Harrison, David J; Langdon, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Background: The natural polyphenol myricetin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in preclinical cancer models. We hypothesised that myricetin-derived flavonoids with enhanced redox properties, improved cell uptake and mitochondrial targeting might have increased potential as antitumour agents. Methods: We studied the effect of a second-generation flavonoid analogue Oncamex in a panel of seven breast cancer cell lines, applying western blotting, gene expression analysis, fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of xenograft tissue to investigate its mechanism of action. Results: Proliferation assays showed that Oncamex treatment for 8 h reduced cell viability and induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, concomitant with increased caspase activation. Microarray analysis showed that Oncamex was associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling cell cycle and apoptosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed the compound's mitochondrial targeting and reactive oxygen species-modulating properties, inducing superoxide production at concentrations associated with antiproliferative effects. A preliminary in vivo study in mice implanted with the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft showed that Oncamex inhibited tumour growth, reducing tissue viability and Ki-67 proliferation, with no signs of untoward effects on the animals. Conclusions: Oncamex is a novel flavonoid capable of specific mitochondrial delivery and redox modulation. It has shown antitumour activity in preclinical models of breast cancer, supporting the potential of this prototypic candidate for its continued development as an anticancer agent. PMID:27031849

  3. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index

  4. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  5. Effect of Curcumin on Pro-angiogenic Factors in the Xenograft Model of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Livia Carvalho; Arbab, Ali S; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a new blood vessel is stimulated by angiogenic factors. Curcumin, which is the active ingredient of the spice plant Curcuma longa L and is used as food and traditional medicine, has shown anticancer effects against different types of cancers. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on angiogenesis/pro-angiogenic factors in a mouse model of human breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay after curcumin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). For the in vivo study, human breast cancer was induced in athymic mice and treated with 300 mg/kg/day of curcumin administered intraperitoneally. Tumor size was measured weekly, and the animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning with Tc-99m tagged VEGF-c to detect the in vivo expression of VEGFR2/3. In addition, the expression of proangiogenic/ growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by a membrane antibody array. Histological analysis was performed to confirm the effect of curcumin on neovascularization. The MTT assay showed that curcumin significantly reduced the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells. In breast cancer xenografts, curcumin treatment led to a decrease in tumor volume and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared with the vehicle treated group. Tc-99m-HYNIC-VEGF-c-SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake to the tumor, which may indicate a lower expression of VEGFR2/3 in curcumin treated tumors; however, a statistically significant difference was not achieved (p>0.05). Additionally, curcumin treatment showed a significantly low level of expression of pro-angiogenic factors (p<0.05) and a decrease in micro-vessel density (vWF) in animals compared with that of vehicle treated tumors. In conclusion, curcumin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:25991545

  6. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  7. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Polygenic model of DNA repair genetic polymorphisms in human breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha R; Levine, Edward A; Freimanis, Rita I; Akman, Steven A; Allen, Glenn O; Hoang, Kimberly N; Liu-Mares, Wen; Hu, Jennifer J

    2008-11-01

    Genetic variations in DNA repair may impact repair functions, DNA damage and breast cancer risk. Using data/samples collected from the first 752 Caucasians and 141 African-Americans in an ongoing case-control study, we examined the association between breast cancer risk and 18 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in four DNA repair pathways-(i) base excision repair: ADPRT V762A, APE1 D148E, XRCC1 R194W/R280H/R399Q and POLD1 R119H; (ii) nucleotide excision repair: ERCC2 D312N/K751Q, ERCC4 R415Q, ERCC5 D1104H and XPC A499V/K939Q; (iii) mismatch repair: MLH1 I219V, MSH3 R940Q/T1036A and MSH6 G39E and (iv) double-strand break repair: NBS1 E185Q and XRCC3 T241M. In Caucasians, breast cancer risk was significantly associated with ADPRT 762VV [odds ratio (OR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03, 2.03], APE1 148DD (OR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.03, 2.00), MLH1 219II/IV (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.11, 3.16) and ERCC4 415QQ (OR = 8.64; 95% CI = 1.04, 72.02) genotypes. With a limited sample size, we did not observe any significant association in African-Americans. However, there were significant trends in breast cancer risk with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for ADPRT 762VV, APE1 148DD, ERCC4 415RQ/QQ and MLH1 219II/IV (P(trend) < 0.001) in Caucasians and ADPRT 762VA, ERCC2 751KQ/QQ and NBS1 185EQ/QQ in African-Americans (P(trend) = 0.006), respectively. Our results suggest that combined nsSNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to breast cancer risk and larger studies are warranted to further evaluate polygenic models of DNA repair in breast cancer risk. PMID:18701435

  9. Breast Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Euhus, David; Di Carlo, Philip A; Khouri, Nagi F

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer screening has become a controversial topic. Understanding the points of contention requires an appreciation of the conceptual framework underpinning cancer screening in general, knowledge of the strengths and limitations of available screening modalities, and familiarity with published clinical trial data. This review is data intense with the intention of presenting enough information to permit the reader to enter into the discussion with an ample knowledge base. The focus throughout is striking a balance between the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. PMID:26315519

  10. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high rate of breast cancer (142.7 per 100,000 in Suffolk County) and in a representative sample of US women (NHANES 1999-2008, 92 with breast cancer and 2,884 without). In a multivariable logistic model, both samples showed a significant trend for increased odds of breast cancer across increasing UCd quartiles (NHANES, p=0.039 and LI, p=0.023). Compared to those in the lowest quartile, LI women in the highest quartile had increased risk for breast cancer (OR=2.69; 95% CI=1.07, 6.78) and US women in the two highest quartiles had increased risk (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.11, 5.63 and OR=2.22; 95% CI=.89, 5.52, respectively). Further research is warranted on the impact of environmental cadmium on breast cancer risk in specific populations and on identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21071816

  11. Cdk4 and Nek2 Signal Binucleation and Centrosome Amplification in a Her2+ Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Harrison Pitner, Mary Kathryn; Saavedra, Harold I.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA) is a contributor to carcinogenesis, generating aneuploidy, and chromosome instability. Previous work shows that breast adenocarcinomas have a higher frequency of centrosome defects compared to normal breast tissues. Abnormal centrosome phenotypes are found in pre-malignant lesions, suggesting an early role in breast carcinogenesis. However, the role of CA in breast cancers remains elusive. Identification of pathways and regulatory molecules involved in the generation of CA is essential to understanding its role in breast tumorigenesis. We established a breast cancer model of CA using Her2-positive cells. Our goal was to identify centrosome cycle molecules that are deregulated by aberrant Her2 signaling and the mechanisms driving CA. Our results show some Her2+ breast cancer cell lines harbor both CA and binucleation. Abolishing the expression of Cdk4 abrogated both CA and binucleation in these cells. We also found the source of binucleation in these cells to be defective cytokinesis that is normalized by downregulation of Cdk4. Protein levels of Nek2 diminish upon Cdk4 knockdown and vice versa, suggesting a molecular connection between Cdk4 and Nek2. Knockdown of Nek2 reduces CA and binucleation in this model while its overexpression further enhances centrosome amplification. We conclude that CA is modulated through Cdk4 and Nek2 signaling and that binucleation is a likely source of CA in Her2+ breast cancer cells. PMID:23776583

  12. Paternal overweight is associated with increased breast cancer risk in daughters in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Fontelles, Camile Castilho; Carney, Elissa; Clarke, Johan; Nguyen, Nguyen M.; Yin, Chao; Jin, Lu; Cruz, M. Idalia; Ong, Thomas Prates; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; de Assis, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have shown that maternal weight and nutrition in pregnancy affects offspring’s breast cancer risk, no studies have investigated the impact of paternal body weight on daughters’ risk of this disease. Here, we show that diet-induced paternal overweight around the time of conception can epigenetically reprogram father’s germ-line and modulate their daughters’ birth weight and likelihood of developing breast cancer, using a mouse model. Increased body weight was associated with changes in the miRNA expression profile in paternal sperm. Daughters of overweight fathers had higher rates of carcinogen-induced mammary tumors which were associated with delayed mammary gland development and alterations in mammary miRNA expression. The hypoxia signaling pathway, targeted by miRNAs down-regulated in daughters of overweight fathers, was activated in their mammary tissues and tumors. This study provides evidence that paternal peri-conceptional body weight may affect daughters’ mammary development and breast cancer risk and warrants further studies in other animal models and humans. PMID:27339599

  13. Morphine does not facilitate breast cancer progression in two preclinical mouse models for human invasive lobular and HER2⁺ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Doornebal, Chris W; Vrijland, Kim; Hau, Cheei-Sing; Coffelt, Seth B; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Jonkers, Jos; de Visser, Karin E; Hollmann, Markus W

    2015-08-01

    Morphine and other opioid analgesics are potent pain-relieving agents routinely used for pain management in patients with cancer. However, these drugs have recently been associated with a worse relapse-free survival in patients with surgical cancer, thus suggesting that morphine adversely affects cancer progression and relapse. In this study, we evaluated the impact of morphine on breast cancer progression, metastatic dissemination, and outgrowth of minimal residual disease. Using preclinical mouse models for metastatic invasive lobular and HER2 breast cancer, we show that analgesic doses of morphine do not affect mammary tumor growth, angiogenesis, and the composition of tumor-infiltrating immune cells. Our studies further demonstrate that morphine, administered in the presence or absence of surgery-induced tissue damage, neither facilitates de novo metastatic dissemination nor promotes outgrowth of minimal residual disease after surgery. Together, these findings indicate that opioid analgesics can be used safely for perioperative pain management in patients with cancer and emphasize that current standards of "good clinical practice" should be maintained. PMID:25734987

  14. 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160134.html 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer' Many women found online support after their diagnosis, ... Women who communicated via social media after a breast cancer diagnosis and received information and/or support about ...

  15. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  16. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... inhibitor, can do an even better job of preventing breast cancer than the SERMs. Aromatase inhibitors stop an enzyme ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  18. Stimulation of natural killer cells with a CD137-specific antibody enhances trastuzumab efficacy in xenotransplant models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Holbrook E; Houot, Roch; Weiskopf, Kipp; Goldstein, Matthew J; Scheeren, Ferenc; Czerwinski, Debra; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Weng, Wen-Kai; Clarke, Michael F; Carlson, Robert W; Stockdale, Frank E; Mollick, Joseph A; Chen, Lieping; Levy, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as HER-2/neu), is indicated for the treatment of women with either early stage or metastatic HER2(+) breast cancer. It kills tumor cells by several mechanisms, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Strategies that enhance the activity of ADCC effectors, including NK cells, may improve the efficacy of trastuzumab. Here, we have shown that upon encountering trastuzumab-coated, HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, human NK cells become activated and express the costimulatory receptor CD137. CD137 activation, which was dependent on NK cell expression of the FcγRIII receptor, occurred both in vitro and in the peripheral blood of women with HER2-expressing breast cancer after trastuzumab treatment. Stimulation of trastuzumab-activated human NK cells with an agonistic mAb specific for CD137 killed breast cancer cells (including an intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant cell line) more efficiently both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplant models of human breast cancer, including one using a human primary breast tumor. The enhanced cytotoxicity was restricted to antibody-coated tumor cells. This sequential antibody strategy, combining a tumor-targeting antibody with a second antibody that activates the host innate immune system, may improve the therapeutic effects of antibodies against breast cancer and other HER2-expressing tumors. PMID:22326955

  19. Building risk-on-a-chip models to improve breast cancer risk assessment and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Leary, James; Lelièvre, Sophie A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preventive actions for chronic diseases hold the promise of improving lives and reducing healthcare costs. For several diseases, including breast cancer, multiple risk and protective factors have been identified by epidemiologists. The impact of most of these factors has yet to be fully understood at the organism, tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Importantly, combinations of external and internal risk and protective factors involve cooperativity thus, synergizing or antagonizing disease onset. Models are needed to mechanistically decipher cancer risks under defined cellular and microenvironmental conditions. Here, we briefly review breast cancer risk models based on 3D cell culture and propose to improve risk modeling with lab-on-a-chip approaches. We suggest epithelial tissue polarity, DNA repair and epigenetic profiles as endpoints in risk assessment models and discuss the development of ‘risks-on-chips’ integrating biosensors of these endpoints and of general tissue homeostasis. Risks-on-chips will help identify biomarkers of risk, serve as screening platforms for cancer preventive agents, and provide a better understanding of risk mechanisms, hence resulting in novel developments in disease prevention. PMID:23681255

  20. Combination of drug-conjugated SWCNT nanocarriers for efficient therapy of cancer stem cells in a breast cancer animal model.

    PubMed

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Shaik, Asma Sultana; Ratemi, Elaref; Halwani, Rabih

    2016-03-10

    Targeting breast cancer and more specifically cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation, responsible for tumor growth, resistance and self-renewal, using combination of therapeutic drugs selectively delivered via biocompatible nanocarriers, provides a novel approach for effective therapy. Here, we propose to evaluate the potential therapeutic efficacy of combining Paclitaxel and Salinomycin drugs actively targeted to both breast cancer and CSCs in xenograft murine model after conjugation with biocompatible CD44 antibody conjugated SWCNTs via hydrazone linker allowing pH-responsive release mechanism near the acidic tumor microenvironment. Both in vitro investigations on MDA-MB-231, sorted CSC negative or CSC positive fractions and in vivo evaluations on tumor-bearing mice using noninvasive bioluminescence and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the enhanced therapeutic effect of the combined therapy compared to treatment with individual drug-conjugated nanocarriers or free drug suspensions. Thus, confirmed the great promise of the developed SWCNTs drug delivery system for effective breast cancer treatment by targeting and eradicating both whole tumor cells and CSCs populations. PMID:26827662

  1. Immunotherapy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmé, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment including immune cell infiltrates in breast cancer has long been recognized. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are prognostic and predictive; however, their prevalence as well as their prognostic and predictive power are subtype-dependent and appear most prominent in aggressive subtypes like triple-negative and HER2-positive disease. The immune responses observed in many cancers are attracted by tumor-associated antigens and, as suggested by recent research, by neoantigens - immunogenic antigens encoded for by non-synonymous mutations. The appealing promise of cancer vaccines has been pursued in breast cancer for over 2 decades; however, despite much effort having been put into vaccine trials, their clinical benefit, with the exception of some encouraging preliminary results, remains disappointing. The main hurdles compromising the efficacy of these vaccination strategies are the difficulties to generate broad and robust immune responses as well as to overcome immune escape mechanisms. The remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma and lung cancer has set the ground for a race in the clinical development of numerous agents targeting these immune escape mechanisms in many tumor entities. Early clinical data in metastatic breast cancer suggests at least some clinical activity. This review discusses the current status and future perspectives of immunotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27260697

  2. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  3. A decision-analytic model for early stage breast cancer: lumpectomy vs mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Büyükdamgaci-Alogan, G; Elele, T; Hayran, M; Erman, M; Kiliçkap, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to construct a decision model that incorporated patient preferences over differing health state prospects and to analyze the decision context of early stage breast cancer patients in relation to two main surgical treatment options. A Markov chain was constructed to project the clinical history of breast carcinoma following surgery. A Multi Attribute Utility Model was developed for outcome evaluation. Transition probabilities were obtained by using subjective probability assessment. This study was performed on the sample population of female university students and utilities were elicited from these healthy volunteers. The results were validated by using Standard Gamble technique. Finally, Monte Carlo Simulation was utilized in Treeage-Pro 2006-Suit software program in order to calculate expected utility generated by each treatment option. The results showed that, if the subject had mastectomy, mean value for the quality adjusted life years gained was 6.42; on the other hand, if the preference was lumpectomy, it was 7.00 out of a possible 10 years. Sensitivity analysis on transition probabilities to local recurrence and salvaged states was performed and two threshold values were observed. Additionally, sensitivity analysis on utilities showed that the model was more sensitive to no evidence of disease state; however, was not sensitive to utilities of local recurrence and salvaged states. The decision model was developed with reasonable success for early stage breast cancer patients, and tested by using general public data. The results obtained from these data showed that lumpectomy was more favourable for these participants. PMID:18348655

  4. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  5. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Newly Constructed Network Models of Different WNT Signaling Cascades Applied to Breast Cancer Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Frank; Pukrop, Tobias; Beißbarth, Tim; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction WNT signaling is a complex process comprising multiple pathways: the canonical β-catenin-dependent pathway and several alternative non-canonical pathways that act in a β-catenin-independent manner. Representing these intricate signaling mechanisms through bioinformatic approaches is challenging. Nevertheless, a simplified but reliable bioinformatic WNT pathway model is needed, which can be further utilized to decipher specific WNT activation states within e.g. high-throughput data. Results In order to build such a model, we collected, parsed, and curated available WNT signaling knowledge from different pathway databases. The data were assembled to construct computationally suitable models of different WNT signaling cascades in the form of directed signaling graphs. This resulted in four networks representing canonical WNT signaling, non-canonical WNT signaling, the inhibition of canonical WNT signaling and the regulation of WNT signaling pathways, respectively. Furthermore, these networks were integrated with microarray and RNA sequencing data to gain deeper insight into the underlying biology of gene expression differences between MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, representing weakly and highly invasive breast carcinomas, respectively. Differential genes up-regulated in the MDA-MB-231 compared to the MCF-7 cell line were found to display enrichment in the gene set originating from the non-canonical network. Moreover, we identified and validated differentially regulated modules representing canonical and non-canonical WNT pathway components specific for the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrated that these newly constructed WNT networks reliably reflect distinct WNT signaling processes. Using transcriptomic data, we shaped these networks into comprehensive modules of the genes implicated in the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype and demonstrated that non-canonical WNT signaling is

  7. Mucin 1-specific immunotherapy in a mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Madsen, Cathy S; Ginardi, Amelia R; Tinder, Teresa L; Jacobs, Fred; Parker, Joanne; Agrawal, Babita; Longenecker, B Michael; Gendler, Sandra J

    2003-01-01

    Human mucin 1 (MUC1) is an epithelial mucin glycoprotein that is overexpressed in 90% of all adenocarcinomas including breast, lung, pancreas, prostate, stomach, colon, and ovary. MUC1 is a target for immune intervention, because, in patients with solid adenocarcinomas, low-level cellular and humoral immune responses to MUC1 have been observed, which are not sufficiently strong to eradicate the growing tumor. The hypothesis for this study is that enhancing MUC1-specific immunity will result in antitumor immunity. To test this, the authors have developed a clinically relevant breast cancer model that demonstrates peripheral and central tolerance to MUC1 and develops spontaneous tumors of the mammary gland. In these mice, the authors tested a vaccine formulation comprised of liposomal-MUC1 lipopeptide and human recombinant interleukin-2. Results indicate that when compared with untreated mice, immunized mice develop T cells that express intracellular IFN-gamma, are reactive with MHC class I H-2Db/MUC1 tetramer, and are cytotoxic against MUC1-expressing tumor cells in vitro. The presence of MUC1-specific CTL did not translate into a clinical response as measured by time of tumor onset, tumor burden, and survival. The authors demonstrate that some of the immune-evasion mechanisms used by the tumor cells include downregulation of MHC-class I molecule, expression of TGF-beta2, and decrease in IFN-gamma -expressing effector T cells as tumors progress. Finally, utilizing an injectable breast cancer model, the authors show that targeting a single tumor antigen may not be an effective antitumor treatment, but that immunization with dendritic cells fed with whole tumor lysate is effective in breaking tolerance and protecting mice from subsequent tumor challenge. A physiologically relevant spontaneous breast cancer model has been developed to test improved immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:12514429

  8. Longitudinal in vivo transcutaneous observation of Raman signals from breast cancer during chemotherapy in small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Myoung, NoSoung; Yim, Sang-Youp; Kim, Jae G.

    2015-02-01

    Because mammography, the gold standard of breast cancer screening and monitoring treatment efficacy, has limitations, there is a necessity to have a new method for breast cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy is considered as one of the best alternative approaches due to its ability of visualizing (bio)chemical information of a matter. In this study, we hypothesized that the change of biochemical composition occurs earlier than morphological change in breast cancer during chemotherapy, and attempted to prove it by employing fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for longitudinal Raman measurement in small animal breast cancer model. To confirm the hypothesis, we measured Raman spectra of a tumor breast and the contralateral breast during chemotherapy for 4 fisher 344 female rats longitudinally. Principal component analysis and Raman spectral differences between breast tumor and contralateral normal breast did not show a clear difference between them which may have been caused by interference from skin. Thus, spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy will be employed in order to acquire the Raman signal directly from tumor while suppressing Raman signal from skin for the future study.

  9. The Neoadjuvant Model Is Still the Future for Drug Development in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    DeMichele, Angela; Yee, Douglas; Berry, Donald A; Albain, Kathy S; Benz, Christopher C; Boughey, Judy; Buxton, Meredith; Chia, Stephen K; Chien, Amy J; Chui, Stephen Y; Clark, Amy; Edmiston, Kirsten; Elias, Anthony D; Forero-Torres, Andres; Haddad, Tufia C; Haley, Barbara; Haluska, Paul; Hylton, Nola M; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaplan, Henry; Korde, Larissa; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Liu, Minetta C; Melisko, Michelle; Minton, Susan E; Moulder, Stacy L; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Paoloni, Melissa; Park, John W; Parker, Barbara A; Perlmutter, Jane; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Rugo, Hope; Symmans, Fraser; Tripathy, Debasish; van't Veer, Laura J; Viscusi, Rebecca K; Wallace, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Yau, Christina; Esserman, Laura J

    2015-07-01

    The many improvements in breast cancer therapy in recent years have so lowered rates of recurrence that it is now difficult or impossible to conduct adequately powered adjuvant clinical trials. Given the many new drugs and potential synergistic combinations, the neoadjuvant approach has been used to test benefit of drug combinations in clinical trials of primary breast cancer. A recent FDA-led meta-analysis showed that pathologic complete response (pCR) predicts disease-free survival (DFS) within patients who have specific breast cancer subtypes. This meta-analysis motivated the FDA's draft guidance for using pCR as a surrogate endpoint in accelerated drug approval. Using pCR as a registration endpoint was challenged at ASCO 2014 Annual Meeting with the presentation of ALTTO, an adjuvant trial in HER2-positive breast cancer that showed a nonsignificant reduction in DFS hazard rate for adding lapatinib, a HER-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, to trastuzumab and chemotherapy. This conclusion seemed to be inconsistent with the results of NeoALTTO, a neoadjuvant trial that found a statistical improvement in pCR rate for the identical lapatinib-containing regimen. We address differences in the two trials that may account for discordant conclusions. However, we use the FDA meta-analysis to show that there is no discordance at all between the observed pCR difference in NeoALTTO and the observed HR in ALTTO. This underscores the importance of appropriately modeling the two endpoints when designing clinical trials. The I-SPY 2/3 neoadjuvant trials exemplify this approach. PMID:25712686

  10. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity. PMID:27068794

  11. Bioorthogonal two-component drug delivery in HER2(+) breast cancer mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    The HER2 receptor is overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is associated with tumorigenesis, metastasis, and a poor prognosis. Trastuzumab is a first-line targeted drug used against HER2(+) breast cancers; however, at least 50% of HER2(+) tumors develop resistance to trastuzumab. To treat these patients, trastuzumab-based antibody-drug conjugates (ACDs) have been developed and are currently used in the clinic. Despite their high efficacy, the long circulation half-life and non-specific binding of cytotoxic ADCs can result in systemic toxicity. In addition, standard ADCs do not provide an image-guided mode of administration. Here, we have developed a two-component, two-step, pre-targeting drug delivery system integrated with image guidance to circumvent these issues. In this strategy, HER2 receptors are pre-labeled with a functionalized trastuzumab antibody followed by the delivery of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Both components are cross-linked by multiple bioorthogonal click reactions in situ on the surface of the target cell and internalized as nanoclusters. We have explored the efficacy of this delivery strategy in HER2(+) human breast cancer models. Our therapeutic study confirms the high therapeutic efficacy of the new delivery system, with no significant toxicity.

  12. Premenopausal Obesity and Breast Cancer Growth Rates in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Shawna B.; McGinley, John N.; Neil, Elizabeth S.; Thompson, Henry J.

    2016-01-01

    Obese premenopausal women with breast cancer have poorer prognosis for long term survival, in part because their tumors are larger at the time of diagnosis than are found in normal weight women. Whether larger tumor mass is due to obesity-related barriers to detection or to effects on tumor biology is not known. This study used polygenic models for obesity and breast cancer to deconstruct this question with the objective of determining whether cell autonomous mechanisms contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer burden. Assessment of the growth rates of 259 chemically induced mammary carcinomas from rats sensitive to dietary induced obesity (DS) and of 143 carcinomas from rats resistant (DR) to dietary induced obesity revealed that tumors in DS rats grew 1.8 times faster than in DR rats. This difference may be attributed to alterations in cell cycle machinery that permit more rapid tumor cell accumulation. DS tumors displayed protein expression patterns consistent with reduced G1/S checkpoint inhibition and a higher threshold of factors required for execution of the apoptotic cell death pathway. These mechanistic insights identify regulatory targets for life style modifications or pharmacological interventions designed to disrupt the linkage between obesity and tumor burden. PMID:27077880

  13. The selective estrogen receptor downregulator GDC-0810 is efficacious in diverse models of ER+ breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, James D; Darimont, Beatrice; Zhou, Wei; Arrazate, Alfonso; Young, Amy; Ingalla, Ellen; Walter, Kimberly; Blake, Robert A; Nonomiya, Jim; Guan, Zhengyu; Kategaya, Lorna; Govek, Steven P; Lai, Andiliy G; Kahraman, Mehmet; Brigham, Dan; Sensintaffar, John; Lu, Nhin; Shao, Gang; Qian, Jing; Grillot, Kate; Moon, Michael; Prudente, Rene; Bischoff, Eric; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; Bonnefous, Celine; Douglas, Karensa L; Julien, Jackaline D; Nagasawa, Johnny Y; Aparicio, Anna; Kaufman, Josh; Haley, Benjamin; Giltnane, Jennifer M; Wertz, Ingrid E; Lackner, Mark R; Nannini, Michelle A; Sampath, Deepak; Schwarz, Luis; Manning, Henry Charles; Tantawy, Mohammed Noor; Arteaga, Carlos L; Heyman, Richard A; Rix, Peter J; Friedman, Lori; Smith, Nicholas D; Metcalfe, Ciara; Hager, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    ER-targeted therapeutics provide valuable treatment options for patients with ER+ breast cancer, however, current relapse and mortality rates emphasize the need for improved therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of prevalent ESR1 mutations in relapsed tumors underscores a sustained reliance of advanced tumors on ERα signaling, and provides a strong rationale for continued targeting of ERα. Here we describe GDC-0810, a novel, non-steroidal, orally bioavailable selective ER downregulator (SERD), which was identified by prospectively optimizing ERα degradation, antagonism and pharmacokinetic properties. GDC-0810 induces a distinct ERα conformation, relative to that induced by currently approved therapeutics, suggesting a unique mechanism of action. GDC-0810 has robust in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of human breast cancer cell lines and patient derived xenografts, including a tamoxifen-resistant model and those that harbor ERα mutations. GDC-0810 is currently being evaluated in Phase II clinical studies in women with ER+ breast cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15828.001 PMID:27410477

  14. Premenopausal Obesity and Breast Cancer Growth Rates in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Shawna B; McGinley, John N; Neil, Elizabeth S; Thompson, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    Obese premenopausal women with breast cancer have poorer prognosis for long term survival, in part because their tumors are larger at the time of diagnosis than are found in normal weight women. Whether larger tumor mass is due to obesity-related barriers to detection or to effects on tumor biology is not known. This study used polygenic models for obesity and breast cancer to deconstruct this question with the objective of determining whether cell autonomous mechanisms contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer burden. Assessment of the growth rates of 259 chemically induced mammary carcinomas from rats sensitive to dietary induced obesity (DS) and of 143 carcinomas from rats resistant (DR) to dietary induced obesity revealed that tumors in DS rats grew 1.8 times faster than in DR rats. This difference may be attributed to alterations in cell cycle machinery that permit more rapid tumor cell accumulation. DS tumors displayed protein expression patterns consistent with reduced G1/S checkpoint inhibition and a higher threshold of factors required for execution of the apoptotic cell death pathway. These mechanistic insights identify regulatory targets for life style modifications or pharmacological interventions designed to disrupt the linkage between obesity and tumor burden. PMID:27077880

  15. Prevention of Distant Lung Metastasis After Photodynamic Therapy Application in a Breast Cancer Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Portilho, Flávia Arruda; de Souza, Ludmilla Regina; Silva, Jaqueline Rodrigues; Lacava, Zulmira Guerrero Marques; Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the activity of photodynamic therapy mediated by aluminum-chlorophthalocyanine contained in a polymeric nanostructured carrier composed by methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride (PVM/MA) against local subcutaneous breast cancer tumors and its effects against distant metastasis in a mouse tumor model. In our results, we observed a decrease in breast cancer tumor growth, prevention of distant lung metastases, and a significant increased survival in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. In addition to these results, we observed that tumor-bearing mice without treatment developed a significant extension of liver hematopoiesis that was significantly reduced in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. We hypothesized and showed that this reduction in (1) metastasis and (2) liver hematopoiesis may be related to the systemic activity of immature hematopoietic cells, specifically the myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were suppressed in mice treated with photodynamic therapy. These cells produce a tolerogenic tumor environment that protects tumor tissues from immunological surveillance. Therefore, we suggest that photodynamic therapy could be employed in combination with other conventional therapies; such as surgery and radiotherapy, to improve the overall survival of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, as observed in our experimental resuIts. PMID:27301195

  16. Model selection for a medical diagnostic decision support system: a breast cancer detection case.

    PubMed

    West, D; West, V

    2000-11-01

    There are a number of different quantitative models that can be used in a medical diagnostic decision support system (MDSS) including parametric methods (linear discriminant analysis or logistic regression), non-parametric models (K nearest neighbor, or kernel density) and several neural network models. The complexity of the diagnostic task is thought to be one of the prime determinants of model selection. Unfortunately, there is no theory available to guide model selection. Practitioners are left to either choose a favorite model or to test a small subset using cross validation methods. This paper illustrates the use of a self-organizing map (SOM) to guide model selection for a breast cancer MDSS. The topological ordering properties of the SOM are used to define targets for an ideal accuracy level similar to a Bayes optimal level. These targets can then be used in model selection, variable reduction, parameter determination, and to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement system. These ideas are applied to a successful model selection for a real-world breast cancer database. Diagnostic accuracy results are reported for individual models, for ensembles of neural networks, and for stacked predictors. PMID:10998586

  17. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated. PMID:12095951

  18. The Efficacy of Trastuzumab in Animal Models of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Canhong; Guo, Bin; Sena, Emily S.; Macleod, Malcolm R.; Yuan, Yawei; Hirst, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most frequent cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. Trastuzumab is an effective treatment, the first monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). To inform the development of other effective treatments we report summary estimates of efficacy of trastuzumab on survival and tumour volume in animal models of breast cancer. Methods We searched PubMed and EMBASE systematically to identify publications testing trastuzumab in animal models of breast cancer. Data describing tumour volume, median survival and animal features were extracted and we assessed quality using a 12-item checklist. We analysed the impact of study design and quality and evidence for publication bias. Results We included data from 83 studies reporting 169 experiments using 2076 mice. Trastuzumab treatment caused a substantial reduction in tumour growth, with tumours in treated animals growing to 32.6% of the volume of tumours in control animals (95%CI 27.8%-38.2%). Median survival was prolonged by a factor of 1.45 (1.30–1.62). Many study design and quality features accounted for between-study heterogeneity and we found evidence suggesting publication bias. Conclusion We have found trastuzumab to be effective in animal breast cancer models across a range of experimental circumstances. However the presence of publication bias and a low prevalence of measures to reduce bias provide a focus for future improvements in preclinical breast cancer research. PMID:27463246

  19. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-04-15

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of total red meat in adolescence was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintiles, RR, 1.43; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend  = 0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent intake of poultry was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.60-0.97; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.85; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 23% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.77; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). In conclusion, higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  20. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  1. Surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dooley, W C

    1998-11-01

    Women with breast cancer today have many more therapeutic options available to them for their surgical therapy. Almost all patients with breast cancer have some options for breast conservation. Active patient involvement in analyzing and understanding the pros and cons of each of these options seems extremely important to the long-term emotional and psychological outcome of their breast cancer therapy. Several reports this year have reintroduced the issue of adequate local control. The common philosophy a decade ago was that because systematic therapy (adjuvant chemotherapy) was improving, local therapy would become of lesser importance. Several studies this year have indicated the extreme importance of local control in maximizing survival advantage because of the relationship of increasing local failure and deteriorating survival from systemic disease. Despite significant improvements in treatment, our screening and diagnostic approaches have still failed to identify the majority of lesions prior to the patient's own palpation of the tumor. Using new diagnostic modalities that do not involve surgery, the biopsy of lower probability lesions with great accuracy is expected to improve the efficacy of the current screening measures. Despite all the improvements, the most important therapeutic step in the management of breast cancer remains earlier diagnosis and earlier extirpation of the initial invasive focus of malignancy. PMID:9818228

  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Modeling of response to endocrine therapy in a panel of human luminal breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cottu, P; Marangoni, E; Assayag, F; de Cremoux, P; Vincent-Salomon, A; Guyader, Ch; de Plater, L; Elbaz, C; Karboul, N; Fontaine, J J; Chateau-Joubert, S; Boudou-Rouquette, P; Alran, S; Dangles-Marie, V; Gentien, D; Poupon, M-F; Decaudin, D

    2012-06-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is a major complication of luminal breast cancer and studies of the biological features of hormonal resistance are limited by the lack of adequate preclinical models. The aim of this study is to establish and characterize a panel of primary human luminal breast carcinoma xenografts, and to evaluate their response to endocrine therapies. Four hundred and twenty-three tumor fragments obtained directly from patients have been grafted in the interscapular fatpad of Swiss nude mice. After stable engraftment with estradiol supplementation, xenografted tumors have been validated by conventional pathology and immunohistochemistry examination, and additional molecular studies. In vivo tumor growth and response to different endocrine treatments were evaluated. We have engrafted 423 tumors including 314 ER+ tumors, and 8 new luminal breast cancer xenografts have been obtained (2.5%). Tumor take was much lower for luminal tumors than for non-luminal tumors (2.5 vs. 24.7%, P < 0.0001), and was associated with two independent criteria, i.e., ER status (P < 0.0001) and a high grade tumor (P = 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses performed on patient's tumors and xenografts showed striking similarities in the tumor morphology as well as in the expression level of ER, PR, and HER2. Response to hormone therapy, evaluated in 6 luminal models, showed different sensitivities, thus exhibiting heterogeneity similar to what is observed in the clinic. We have established a panel of primary human luminal breast cancer xenografts, recapitulating the biological and clinical behaviors of patient tumors, and therefore suitable for further preclinical experiments. PMID:22002565

  4. Modelling breast cancer requires identification and correction of a critical cell lineage-dependent transduction bias

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hines, William C.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-04-21

    When trying to explore the biology and etiology of human cancers, clinically relevant human culture models are essential. Current breast tumour models, such as those from oncogenically transformed primary breast cells, produce predominantly basal-like properties, whereas the more common phenotype expressed by the vast majority of breast tumours are luminal. Reasons for this puzzling, yet important phenomenon, are not understood. We show here that luminal epithelial cells are significantly more resistant to viral transduction than their myoepithelial counterparts. Here, we suggest that this is a significant barrier to generating luminal cell lines and experimental tumours in vivo and to accuratemore » interpretation of results. We show that the resistance is due to lower affinity of luminal cells for virus attachment, which can be overcome by pretreating cells—or virus—with neuraminidase. We present an analytical method for quantifying transductional differences between cell types and an optimized protocol for transducing unsorted primary human breast cells in context.« less

  5. Proteome and Transcriptome Profiles of a Her2/Neu-driven Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenherr, Regine M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Lin, Chen Wei; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Tao; Holzman, Ted; Coleman, Ilsa; Feng, Li-Chia; Lorentzen, Travis D.; Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Wang, Pei; Liu, Yan; Gurley, Kay E.; Amon, Lynn M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Peter S.; McIntosh, Martin; Kemp, Christopher; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, mouse models have proven to be invaluable in expanding our understanding of cancer biology. We have amassed a tremendous amount of proteomics and transcriptomics data profiling blood and tissues from a Her2-driven mouse model of breast cancer that closely recapitulates the pathology and natural history of human breast cancer. The purpose of this report is to make all of these data publicly available in raw and processed forms, as a resource to the community. Importantly, high quality biospecimens from this same mouse model are freely available through a sample repository that we established, so researchers can readily obtain samples to test biological hypotheses without the need of breeding animals and collecting biospecimens. Specifically, six proteomics and six transcriptomics datasets are available, with the former encompassing 841 liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments of both plasma and tissue samples, and the latter including 255 individual microarray analyses of five different tissue types (thymus, spleen, liver, blood cells, and breast ± laser capture microdissection). A total of 18,880 unique peptides were identified with a PeptideProphet error rate ≤1%, with 3884 non-redundant protein groups identified in five plasma datasets, and 1659 non-redundant protein groups in a tissue dataset (4977 non-redundant protein groups in total). We anticipate that these data will be of use to the community for software tool development, investigations of analytical variation in MS/MS data, development of quality control tools (multiple technical replicates are provided for a subset of the data), empirical selection of proteotypic peptides for multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, and for advancing our understanding of cancer biology.

  6. [Development of three-dimensional breast cancer cell culture drug resistance model].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Hou, Liang; Lu, Ying-Jin; Chen, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Can; Feng, Di; Kong, Li; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2016-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to develop three-dimensional (3D) culture model, a more pathologically relevant model, of human breast cancer for drug resistance study. MCF-7 cells were embedded within collagen gel to establish 3D culture model. Cellular morphology was observed using Carmine and HE staining. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay, and cell activity was detected by Live/Dead staining kit. Drug sensitivities of the 3D culture to doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were assayed and compared with those of monolayer (2D) culture. In addition, the levels of drug resistance-related genes P-glycoprotein (P-gp), mrp2 mRNA expressions were detected by real time RT-PCR. Expression level of P-gp protein was detected by Western blot. The results showed that MCF-7 cells in 3D culture formed a number of cell aggregates, and most of them displayed good cell viability. The IC50 values of doxorubicin, carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil were all increased significantly in 3D culture compared with those in 2D culture. Moreover, compared with MCF-7 cells in 2D culture, the cells in 3D culture showed increased mRNA levels of P-gp and mrp2, as well as up-regulated protein expression of P-gp. These results suggest that in vitro collagen-embedded culture system of human breast cancer cells represents an improved pathologically relevant 3D microenvironment for breast cancer cells, providing a robust tool to explore the mechanism of drug resistance of cancer cells. PMID:27108905

  7. The development of a functionally relevant cell culture model of progressive human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Weaver, V M; Howlett, A R; Langton-Webster, B; Petersen, O W; Bissell, M J

    1995-06-01

    Normal mammary homeostasis, and by implication tumorigenesis, are dependent upon the dynamic interplay between epithelial cells, stromal components and the extracellular matrix. To study the evolution of human breast cancer, a functionally relevant cell culture model is required which recognizes the complexity of the mammary gland's microenvironment. The development of an appropriate breast epithelial cancer cell model will be dependent on the ability to recreate the 'normal' and 'neoplastic' tissue microenvironment in culture. Towards this goal, a 3-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) assay, employing a reconstituted basement membrane, has been developed which allows for the rapid and accurate discrimination of normal and neoplastic cells when cultured. To investigate stromal/epithelial cell interactions, we have developed a tumor environment assay which essentially mirrors the tumor microenvironment histologically. The use of a novel, near diploid, human breast epithelial cell line, HMT-3522, which has transformed spontaneously with passage in culture, together with these 3-dimensional culture assays is expected to provide meaningful markers of initiation and progression. PMID:7495986

  8. Dissecting the Role of Curcumin in Tumour Growth and Angiogenesis in Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Luciano, Antonio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Arra, Claudio; Izzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is considered the most common cancer for women worldwide and it is now the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females in the world. Since breast cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy, alternative anticancer strategies have been developed. In particular, many studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a derivative of turmeric, can be used as natural agent in treatment of some types of cancer by playing antiproliferative and antioxidant effects. In our study, we assessed the antitumor activities of curcumin in ER-negative human breast cancer cell line resistant to chemotherapy, MDA.MB231 by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro data allowed us to demonstrate that curcumin played a role in regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo, by generation of mouse model of breast cancer, we showed that treatment of curcumin inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis. Specifically, we showed that curcumin is able to deregulate the expression of cyclin D1, PECAM-1, and p65, which are regulated by NF-κB. Our data demonstrated that curcumin could be used as an adjuvant agent to chemotherapy in treatment of triple negative breast cancer. PMID:25879038

  9. Overcoming radiation resistance in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A; Debeb, Bisrat G; Xu, Wei; Buchholz, Thomas A

    2010-06-01

    The clinical-pathological features of inflammatory breast cancer include enrichment of factors that have been previously associated with radioresistant disease, including negative hormone receptor status and a phenotype enriched for relatively radioresistant breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The risks and benefits of accelerated postmastectomy radiation treatment regimens in the multimodality management of inflammatory breast cancer were reviewed at the first International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The biological basis for radiation resistance and strategies to radiosensitize these tumors were also presented. The prevalent basal phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer makes it an ideal clinical model to examine stem cell hypotheses, which the authors believe can help guide future trials to continue making incremental progress against this aggressive disease. PMID:20503417

  10. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to gain new insights into cancer biology, prevention, diagnostics, and treatments. Multiple centers are developing breast cancer computational models. NCI and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer ...

  11. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  12. A three dimensional micropatterned tumor model for breast cancer cell migration studies.

    PubMed

    Peela, Nitish; Sam, Feba S; Christenson, Wayne; Truong, Danh; Watson, Adam W; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Ros, Robert; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer cell invasion is a highly orchestrated process driven by a myriad of complex microenvironmental stimuli, making it difficult to isolate and assess the effects of biochemical or biophysical cues (i.e. tumor architecture, matrix stiffness) on disease progression. In this regard, physiologically relevant tumor models are becoming instrumental to perform studies of cancer cell invasion within well-controlled conditions. Herein, we explored the use of photocrosslinkable hydrogels and a novel, two-step photolithography technique to microengineer a 3D breast tumor model. The microfabrication process enabled precise localization of cell-encapsulated circular constructs adjacent to a low stiffness matrix. To validate the model, breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF7) and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) were embedded separately within the tumor model, all of which maintained high viability throughout the experiments. MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited extensive migratory behavior and invaded the surrounding matrix, whereas MCF7 or MCF10A cells formed clusters that stayed confined within the circular tumor regions. Additionally, real-time cell tracking indicated that the speed and persistence of MDA-MB-231 cells were substantially higher within the surrounding matrix compared to the circular constructs. Z-stack imaging of F-actin/α-tubulin cytoskeletal organization revealed unique 3D protrusions in MDA-MB-231 cells and an abundance of 3D clusters formed by MCF7 and MCF10A cells. Our results indicate that gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel, integrated with the two-step photolithography technique, has great promise in the development of 3D tumor models with well-defined architecture and tunable stiffness. PMID:26724455

  13. Two Models of Caregiver Strain and Bereavement Adjustment: A Comparison of Husband and Daughter Caregivers of Breast Cancer Hospice Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Lori L.; Guarnaccia, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Caregiver bereavement adjustment literature suggests opposite models of impact of role strain on bereavement adjustment after care-recipient death--a Complicated Grief Model and a Relief Model. This study tests these competing models for husband and adult-daughter caregivers of breast cancer hospice patients. Design and Methods: This…

  14. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  15. Structured additive regression modeling of age of menarche and menopause in a breast cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Elisa; de Sousa, Bruno; Cadarso-Suarez, Carmen; Rodrigues, Vitor; Kneib, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer risk is believed to be associated with several reproductive factors, such as early menarche and late menopause. This study is based on the registries of the first time a woman enters the screening program, and presents a spatio-temporal analysis of the variables age of menarche and age of menopause along with other reproductive and socioeconomic factors. The database was provided by the Portuguese Cancer League (LPCC), a private nonprofit organization dealing with multiple issues related to oncology of which the Breast Cancer Screening Program is one of its main activities. The registry consists of 259,652 records of women who entered the screening program for the first time between 1990 and 2007 (45-69-year age group). Structured Additive Regression (STAR) models were used to explore spatial and temporal correlations with a wide range of covariates. These models are flexible enough to deal with a variety of complex datasets, allowing us to reveal possible relationships among the variables considered in this study. The analysis shows that early menarche occurs in younger women and in municipalities located in the interior of central Portugal. Women living in inland municipalities register later ages for menopause, and those born in central Portugal after 1933 show a decreasing trend in the age of menopause. Younger ages of menarche and late menopause are observed in municipalities with a higher purchasing power index. The analysis performed in this study portrays the time evolution of the age of menarche and age of menopause and their spatial characterization, adding to the identification of factors that could be of the utmost importance in future breast cancer incidence research. PMID:24615881

  16. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. [Breast cancer imaging].

    PubMed

    Canale, Sandra; Balleyguier, Corinne; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of breast cancer is multimodal. Mammography uses X-rays, the development of digital mammography has improved its quality and enabled implementations of new technologies such astomosynthesis (3D mammography) or contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Ultrasound is added to mammography when there is need to improve detection in high-density breast, to characterize an image, or guide apuncture or biopsy. Breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality. It detects a possible tumor angiogenesis by highlighting an early and intense contrast uptake. This method has an excellent negative predictive value, but its lack of specificity (false positives) can be problematic, thus it has to be prescribed according to published standards. An imaging breast screening report must be concluded by the BI-RADS lexicon classification of the ACR and recommendations about monitoring or histological verification. PMID:24579332

  18. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  19. PDK1 promotes tumor growth and metastasis in a spontaneous breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Yang, M; Chen, S; Li, D; Chang, Z; Dong, Z

    2016-06-23

    Because malignant cells have altered, usually accelerated, energy consumption, targeting metabolic signaling represents a prevailing strategy for tumor therapy. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a proximal signaling molecule of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, which is required for metabolic activation. It is still lacking definitive evidence whether inactivation of PDK1 can overwhelm tumorigenesis in vivo. Herein we revealed that mammary-specific ablation of PDK1 could delay tumor initiation, progression and metastasis in a spontaneous mouse tumor model. We also demonstrated that inducible deletion of PDK1 could noticeably shrink the growing breast tumors. However, a small portion of PDK1-deficient tumorigenic cells eventually established tumor lesions, albeit at a relatively later phase, most likely owing to compensatory upregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation. Consequently, simultaneous inhibition of PDK1 and Erk1/2 impeded the survival of breast cancer cells. Thus we identify PDK1 as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer, particularly in combination with an Erk1/2 inhibitor. PMID:26455327

  20. Differentiation of cancer cells in two-dimensional and three-dimensional breast cancer models by Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Damayanti, Nur P.; Fang, Yi; Parikh, Mukti R.; Craig, Ana Paula; Kirshner, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We demonstrate the first application of Raman spectroscopy in diagnosing nonmalignant, premalignant, malignant, and metastatic stages of breast cancer in a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture model that closely mimics an in vivo environment. Comprehensive study comparing classification in two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D cell models was performed using statistical methods composed of principal component analysis for exploratory analysis and outlier removal, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and elastic net regularized regression for classification. Our results show that Raman spectroscopy with an appropriate classification tool has excellent resolution to discriminate the four stages of breast cancer progression, with a near 100% accuracy for both 2-D and 3-D cell models. The diversity in chemical groups related to nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids, among other chemicals, were identified by appropriate peaks in the Raman spectra that correspond to the correct classification of the different stages of tumorigenesis model comprising of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT, MCF10CA1h, and MCF10CA1a cell lines. An explicit relationship between wavenumber and the stages of cancer progression was identified by the elastic net variable selection. PMID:24247810

  1. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  2. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  3. ERRgamma mediates tamoxifen resistance in novel models of invasive lobular breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Riggins, Rebecca B; Lan, Jennifer P-J; Zhu, Yuelin; Klimach, Uwe; Zwart, Alan; Cavalli, Luciane R; Haddad, Bassem R; Chen, Li; Gong, Ting; Xuan, Jianhua; Ethier, Stephen P; Clarke, Robert

    2008-11-01

    One-third of all estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumors treated with endocrine therapy fail to respond, and the remainder is likely to relapse in the future. Almost all data on endocrine resistance has been obtained in models of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). However, invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC) comprise up to 15% of newly diagnosed invasive breast cancers each year and, whereas the incidence of IDC has remained relatively constant during the last 20 years, the prevalence of ILC continues to increase among postmenopausal women. We report a new model of Tamoxifen (TAM)-resistant invasive lobular breast carcinoma cells that provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of endocrine resistance. SUM44 cells express ER and are sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of antiestrogens. Selection for resistance to 4-hydroxytamoxifen led to the development of the SUM44/LCCTam cell line, which exhibits decreased expression of ERalpha and increased expression of the estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma). Knockdown of ERRgamma in SUM44/LCCTam cells by siRNA restores TAM sensitivity, and overexpression of ERRgamma blocks the growth-inhibitory effects of TAM in SUM44 and MDA-MB-134 VI lobular breast cancer cells. ERRgamma-driven transcription is also increased in SUM44/LCCTam, and inhibition of activator protein 1 (AP1) can restore or enhance TAM sensitivity. These data support a role for ERRgamma/AP1 signaling in the development of TAM resistance and suggest that expression of ERRgamma may be a marker of poor TAM response. PMID:18974135

  4. Progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R

    2007-10-01

    Progestins exert their progestational activity by binding to the progesterone receptor (form A, the most active and form B, the less active) and may also interact with other steroid receptors (androgen, glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, estrogen). They can have important effects in other tissues besides the endometrium, including the breast, liver, bone and brain. The biological responses of progestins cover a very large domain: lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, water and electrolyte regulation, hemostasis, fibrinolysis, and cardiovascular and immunological systems. At present, more than 200 progestin compounds have been synthesized, but the biological response could be different from one to another depending on their structure, metabolism, receptor affinity, experimental conditions, target tissue or cell line, as well as the biological response considered. There is substantial evidence that mammary cancer tissue contains all the enzymes responsible for the local biosynthesis of estradiol (E(2)) from circulating precursors. Two principal pathways are implicated in the final steps of E(2) formation in breast cancer tissue: the 'aromatase pathway', which transforms androgens into estrogens, and the 'sulfatase pathway', which converts estrone sulfate (E(1)S) into estrone (E(1)) via estrone sulfatase. The final step is the conversion of weak E(1) to the potent biologically active E(2) via reductive 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity. It is also well established that steroid sulfotransferases, which convert estrogens into their sulfates, are present in breast cancer tissues. It has been demonstrated that various progestins (e.g. nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone, promegestone) as well as tibolone and their metabolites can block the enzymes involved in E(2) bioformation (sulfatase, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in breast cancer cells. These substances can also stimulate the sulfotransferase activity which converts estrogens into the biologically

  5. The Effect of Stress Management Model in Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Women

    PubMed Central

    Khodabakhshi Koolaee, Anahita; Falsafinejad, Mohammad Reza; Akbari, Mohammd Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer associates with severs severe distress and stress. Since Because of that, the stress management program can train necessary skills to cope with stress; therefore, the current study investigates the effectiveness of stress management on enhancement of quality of life. Objectives: The aim of the current study is to examine the effectiveness of stress management model in quality of life for breast cancer patients. Patients and Methods: This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre and post-tests. The 21 subjects were selected from cancer institute of Imam Khomeini in Tehran in 2014. The participants were allocated to two matched groups based on their pre-test scores. They were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Stress management was conducted with the experimental group during 10 sessions. Then the questionnaire was administered at post-test. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the independent t-test and analysis of variance. The research instrument was the core quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30. Results: The results of the independent t-test showed that there is a significant difference between the pretest and post-test scores in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Also, there is no significant difference between means of quality of life subscales and socio demographic of the patients such as; age, education and disease stage (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate that stress management can change the irrational and distortion thoughts. So, it enhances the quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26478793

  6. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease. PMID:27225883

  7. In vivo Raman spectroscopy for breast cancer: diagnosis in animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, R.; Martins, M. A.; Ribeiro, D.; Carvalho, C.; Santos, E. A. P.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.; Ramalho, F.; Martinho, H.; Martin, A. A.

    2008-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been well established as a powerful method for studying biological tissues and diagnosing diseases. In this study we have developed a breast cancer animal model and collected in vivo Raman spectra of mammary glands of 27 Sprague-Dawley female rats treated with DMBA and 5 non-treated used as control group. A dispersive Raman spectrometer with a @785 nm laser excitation coupled a fiber optic probe and a CCD detector was used to obtain the spectra. The obtained in vivo transcutaneous Raman spectra have shown important differences between normal and abnormal tissues when acquired from one side to the other side of the lesion.

  8. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  9. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  10. Construction the model on the breast cancer survival analysis use support vector machine, logistic regression and decision tree.

    PubMed

    Chao, Cheng-Min; Yu, Ya-Wen; Cheng, Bor-Wen; Kuo, Yao-Lung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the paper is to use data mining technology to establish a classification of breast cancer survival patterns, and offers a treatment decision-making reference for the survival ability of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Taiwan. We studied patients with breast cancer in a specific hospital in Central Taiwan to obtain 1,340 data sets. We employed a support vector machine, logistic regression, and a C5.0 decision tree to construct a classification model of breast cancer patients' survival rates, and used a 10-fold cross-validation approach to identify the model. The results show that the establishment of classification tools for the classification of the models yielded an average accuracy rate of more than 90% for both; the SVM provided the best method for constructing the three categories of the classification system for the survival mode. The results of the experiment show that the three methods used to create the classification system, established a high accuracy rate, predicted a more accurate survival ability of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and could be used as a reference when creating a medical decision-making frame. PMID:25119239

  11. Breast cancer surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rachetta, Eleonora; Osano, Silvia; Astegiano, Francesco; Martincich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Since several studies have demonstrated the inadequate diagnostic performance of mammography in high risk women, over the past two decades, different breast imaging tests have been evaluated as additional diagnostic methods to mammography, and the most relevant ones are the techniques that do not imply the use of X-rays, considering the young age of these patients and the higher radio-sensitivity. Breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has risen growing interest not only because of the absence of use of X-rays, but also because it provides morpho-functional features, which may depict biological characteristics of breast tissues, including invasive and in situ cancers. Different multicenter non-randomized prospective studies aimed to evaluate breast DCE-MRI as an integral part of surveillance programs, agreed about the evidence that in high risk women screening with DCE-MRI is more effective than either mammography and/or ultrasound. Moreover, this modality leads to the identifications of cancers at a more favorable stage, allowing a real advantage in terms of tumor size and nodal involvement. The medical community is evaluating to suggest DCE-MRI alone as screening modality in high-risk women, as it was reported that in these cases the sensitivity of MRI plus conventional imaging was not significantly higher than that of MRI alone. Breast MRI is now recommended as part of screening program for high risk women by both European and American guidelines. PMID:26924173

  12. Your Body After Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from a trained breast cancer survivor. Cancer Survivors Network : An online community of people with cancer and their loved ones that provides peer support through discussion boards, chat rooms and other ...

  13. A three-dimensional in vitro model of breast cancer: Toward replacing the need for animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Deborah L

    2010-12-01

    While the events leading to breast cancer development are not fully understood, a pre-invasive lesion, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), is recognised as the main precursor of invasive disease. Understanding how pre-invasive lesions develop into invasive breast cancer is critical, since currently there is no way of predicting which tumours are likely to progress, leading to unnecessary surgical intervention or chemotherapy. With a lack of good animal models able to mimic DCIS progression in a laboratory setting, there has been a shift toward developing in vitro human models which more accurately represent human disease. By manipulating individual cell populations in these models, we can recapitulate the complex cellular interactions involved in disease progression, an essential step in understanding breast cancer behaviour. PMID:21275482

  14. Reproduction after breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, Stefanos; Iatrakis, George; Navrozoglou, Iordanis

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women of developed countries, and as a result of new developments in breast cancer treatment, more women are cured after being diagnosed with this disease. It is important that fertility preservation strategies are addressed before chemotherapy, because chemotherapy may induce premature ovarian failure (depending on the woman's age, the drugs used, the dosage and duration of treatment). Among possible solutions are embryos or oocytes cryopreservation, ovarian tissue cryopreservation-freezing with a subsequent orthotopic and heterotopic autotransplantation, whole ovary cryopreservation, ovarian suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, which inhibit ovarian follicular depletion induced by chemotherapeutic agents and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) after ovulation induction with aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen. PMID:20170848

  15. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  16. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. PMID:24891218

  17. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  18. Imagable 4T1 model for the study of late stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Kai; Fang, Min; Alroy, Joseph; Sahagian, G Gary

    2008-01-01

    Background The 4T1 mouse mammary tumor cell line is one of only a few breast cancer models with the capacity to metastasize efficiently to sites affected in human breast cancer. Here we describe two 4T1 cell lines modified to facilitate analysis of tumor growth and metastasis and evaluation of gene function in vivo. New information regarding the involvement of innate and acquired immunity in metastasis and other characteristics of the model relevant to its use in the study of late stage breast cancer are reported. Methods The lines were engineered for stable expression of firefly luciferase to allow tracking and quantitation of the cells in vivo. Biophotonic imaging was used to characterize growth and metastasis of the lines in vivo and an improved gene expression approach was used to characterize the basis for the metastatic phenotype that was observed. Results Growth of cells at the primary site was biphasic with metastasis detected during the second growth phase 5–6 weeks after introduction of the cells. Regression of growth, which occurred in weeks 3–4, was associated with extensive necrosis and infiltration of leukocytes. Biphasic tumor growth did not occur in BALB/c SCID mice indicating involvement of an acquired immune response in the effect. Hematopoiesis in spleen and liver and elevated levels of circulating leukocytes were observed at week 2 and increased progressively until death at week 6–8. Gene expression analysis revealed an association of several secreted factors including colony stimulatory factors, cytokines and chemokines, acute phase proteins, angiogenesis factors and ECM modifying proteins with the 4T1 metastatic phenotype. Signaling pathways likely to be responsible for production of these factors were also identified. Conclusion The production of factors that stimulate angiogenesis and ECM modification and induce hematopoiesis, recruitment and activation of leukocytes suggest that 4T1 tumor cells play a more direct role than previously

  19. Development and characterization of a preclinical model of breast cancer lung micrometastatic to macrometastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Downs, Lora C; Thorpe, Jessica E; Disch, Bryan C; Bastian, Anja; Hauser, Paul J; Farasyn, Taleah; Berry, William L; Hurst, Robert E; Ihnat, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer patients die with metastatic disease, thus, good models that recapitulate the natural process of metastasis including a dormancy period with micrometastatic cells would be beneficial in developing treatment strategies. Herein we report a model of natural metastasis that balances time to complete experiments with a reasonable dormancy period, which can be used to better study metastatic progression. The basis for the model is a 4T1 triple negative syngeneic breast cancer model without resection of the primary tumor. A cell titration from 500 to 15,000 GFP tagged 4T1 cells implanted into fat pad number four of immune proficient eight week female BALB/cJ mice optimized speed of the model while possessing metastatic processes including dormancy and beginning of reactivation. The frequency of primary tumors was less than 50% in animals implanted with 500-1500 cells. Although implantation with over 10,000 cells resulted in 100% primary tumor development, the tumors and macrometastases formed were highly aggressive, lacked dormancy, and offered no opportunity for treatment. Implantation of 7,500 cells resulted in >90% tumor take by 10 days; in 30-60 micrometastases in the lung (with many animals also having 2-30 brain micrometastases) two weeks post-implantation, with the first small macrometastases present at five weeks; many animals displaying macrometastases at five weeks and animals becoming moribund by six weeks post-implantation. Using the optimum of 7,500 cells the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer, doxorubicin, given at its maximal tolerated dose (MTD; 1 mg/kg weekly) was tested for an effect on metastasis. Doxorubicin treatment significantly reduced primary tumor growth and lung micrometastases but the number of macrometastases at experiment end was not significantly affected. This model should prove useful for development of drugs to target metastasis and to study the biology of metastasis. PMID:24878664

  20. Therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom-loaded silica nanoparticles in the treatment of breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of drug-resistant cancer is a clinical challenge, and thus screening for novel anticancer drugs is critically important. We recently demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom (WEV) in vitro in breast carcinoma, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cell lines but not in normal cells when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in breast cancer- and prostate cancer-bearing experimental mouse models. Xenograft breast and prostate tumor mice models were randomized into 4 groups for each cancer model (10 mice per group) and were treated with vehicle (control), NP, WEV, or WEV+NP daily for 28 days post tumor inoculation. The tumor volumes were monitored throughout the experiment. On Day 28 post tumor inoculation, breast and prostate tumor cells were collected and either directly cultured for flow cytometry analysis or lysed for Western blot and ELISA analysis. Treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly reduced both breast and prostate tumor volumes compared to treatment with NP or vehicle alone. Compared to treatment with WEV alone, treatment of breast and prostate cancer cells with WEV+NP induced marked elevations in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroperoxides, and nitric oxide; robust reductions in the levels of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CXCL16 and decreased surface expression of their cognate chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4, CXCR5, and CXCR6; and subsequent reductions in the chemokine-dependent migration of both breast and prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively, and enhanced the induction of apoptosis by increasing the activity of caspase-3,-8, and -9 in both breast and

  1. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  2. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings. PMID:26095429

  3. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3(Tyr705), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  4. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3Tyr705, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  5. The Anthelmintic Drug Niclosamide Induces Apoptosis, Impairs Metastasis and Reduces Immunosuppressive Cells in Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yupeng; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Li, Deliang; Wang, Ningyu; Zhang, Lidan; Zhu, Yongxia; Zeng, Jun; Wei, Yuquan; Yu, Luoting

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Discovery of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of metastatic breast cancer is still needed. Here, we reported our finding with niclosamide, an FDA approved anthelmintic drug. The potency of niclosamide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that niclosamide showed a dramatic growth inhibition against breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of 4T1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Western blot analysis demonstrated the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of Cleaved caspases-3, down-regulation of Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Survivin. Moreover, niclosamide blocked breast cancer cells migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated STAT3Tyr705, phosphorylated FAKTyr925 and phosphorylated SrcTyr416 were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg/d niclosamide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth without detectable toxicity. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki67-positive cells, VEGF-positive cells and microvessel density (MVD) and an increase in Cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon niclosamide. Notably, niclosamide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in tumor tissues and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases. Taken together, these results demonstrated that niclosamide may be a promising candidate for breast cancer. PMID:24416452

  6. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  7. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  8. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  9. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  10. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  11. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  12. Live Imaging of Drug Responses in the Tumor Microenvironment in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakasone, Elizabeth S.; Askautrud, Hanne A.; Egeblad, Mikala

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and the response to anti-cancer therapies. Three-dimensional co-culture systems are frequently used to explicate tumor-stroma interactions, including their role in drug responses. However, many of the interactions that occur in vivo in the intact microenvironment cannot be completely replicated in these in vitro settings. Thus, direct visualization of these processes in real-time has become an important tool in understanding tumor responses to therapies and identifying the interactions between cancer cells and the stroma that can influence these responses. Here we provide a method for using spinning disk confocal microscopy of live, anesthetized mice to directly observe drug distribution, cancer cell responses and changes in tumor-stroma interactions following administration of systemic therapy in breast cancer models. We describe procedures for labeling different tumor components, treatment of animals for observing therapeutic responses, and the surgical procedure for exposing tumor tissues for imaging up to 40 hours. The results obtained from this protocol are time-lapse movies, in which such processes as drug infiltration, cancer cell death and stromal cell migration can be evaluated using image analysis software. PMID:23542634

  13. Mutation Screening of 1,237 Cancer Genes across Six Model Cell Lines of Basal-Like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Törngren, Therese; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K.; Saal, Lao H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937) and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing of 1,237 cancer-associated genes, including all exons, UTRs and upstream flanking regions. In total, 658 somatic variants were identified, of which 378 were non-silent (average 63 per cell line, range 37–146) and 315 were novel (not present in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database; COSMIC). 125 novel mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing (59 exonic, 48 3’UTR and 10 5’UTR, 1 splicing), with a validation rate of 94% of high confidence variants. Of 36 mutations previously reported for these cell lines but not detected in our exome data, 36% could not be detected by Sanger sequencing. The base replacements C/G>A/T, C/G>G/C, C/G>T/A and A/T>G/C were significantly more frequent in the coding regions compared to the non-coding regions (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.0–5.3, P<0.0001; OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9–6.6, P<0.0001; OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8–3.1, P<0.0001; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7, P = 0.024, respectively). The single nucleotide variants within the context of T[C]T/A[G]A and T[C]A/T[G]A were more frequent in the coding than in the non-coding regions (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.2–6.1, P<0.0001; OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0–7.2, P = 0.001, respectively). Copy number estimations were derived from the targeted regions and correlated well to Affymetrix SNP array copy number data (Pearson correlation 0.82 to 0.96 for all compared cell lines; P<0.0001). These mutation calls across 1,237 cancer-associated genes and identification of novel variants will aid

  14. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  17. Risk assessment model for invasive breast cancer in Hong Kong women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Dai, Juncheng; Li, Mengjie; Chan, Wing-cheong; Kwok, Carol Chi-hei; Leung, Siu-lan; Wu, Cherry; Li, Wentao; Yu, Wai-cho; Tsang, Koon-ho; Law, Sze-hong; Lee, Priscilla Ming-yi; Wong, Carmen Ka-man; Shen, Hongbing; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Tse, Lap Ah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract No risk assessment tool is available for identifying high risk population of breast cancer (BCa) in Hong Kong. A case–control study including 918 BCa cases and 923 controls was used to develop the risk assessment model among Hong Kong Chinese women. Each participant received an in-depth interview to obtain their lifestyle and environmental risk factors. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) selection model was used to select the optimal risk factors (LASSO-model). A risk score system was constructed to evaluate the cumulative effects of selected factors. Bootstrap simulation was used to test the internal validation of the model. Model performance was evaluated by receiver-operator characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC). Age, number of parity, number of BCa cases in 1st-degree relatives, exposure to light at night, and sleep quality were the common risk factors for all women. Alcohol drinking was included for premenopausal women; body mass index, age at menarche, age at 1st give birth, breast feeding, using of oral contraceptive, hormone replacement treatment, and history of benign breast diseases were included for postmenopausal women. The AUCs were 0.640 (95% CI, 0.598–0.681) and 0.655 (95% CI, 0.621–0.653) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. Further subgroup evaluation revealed that the model performance was better for women aged 50 to 70 years or ER-positive. This BCa risk assessment tool in Hong Kong Chinese women based on LASSO selection is promising, which shows a slightly higher discriminative accuracy than those developed in other populations. PMID:27512870

  18. Risk assessment model for invasive breast cancer in Hong Kong women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Dai, Juncheng; Li, Mengjie; Chan, Wing-Cheong; Kwok, Carol Chi-Hei; Leung, Siu-Lan; Wu, Cherry; Li, Wentao; Yu, Wai-Cho; Tsang, Koon-Ho; Law, Sze-Hong; Lee, Priscilla Ming-Yi; Wong, Carmen Ka-Man; Shen, Hongbing; Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Yang, Xiaohong R; Tse, Lap Ah

    2016-08-01

    No risk assessment tool is available for identifying high risk population of breast cancer (BCa) in Hong Kong. A case-control study including 918 BCa cases and 923 controls was used to develop the risk assessment model among Hong Kong Chinese women.Each participant received an in-depth interview to obtain their lifestyle and environmental risk factors. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) selection model was used to select the optimal risk factors (LASSO-model). A risk score system was constructed to evaluate the cumulative effects of selected factors. Bootstrap simulation was used to test the internal validation of the model. Model performance was evaluated by receiver-operator characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC).Age, number of parity, number of BCa cases in 1st-degree relatives, exposure to light at night, and sleep quality were the common risk factors for all women. Alcohol drinking was included for premenopausal women; body mass index, age at menarche, age at 1st give birth, breast feeding, using of oral contraceptive, hormone replacement treatment, and history of benign breast diseases were included for postmenopausal women. The AUCs were 0.640 (95% CI, 0.598-0.681) and 0.655 (95% CI, 0.621-0.653) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. Further subgroup evaluation revealed that the model performance was better for women aged 50 to 70 years or ER-positive.This BCa risk assessment tool in Hong Kong Chinese women based on LASSO selection is promising, which shows a slightly higher discriminative accuracy than those developed in other populations. PMID:27512870

  19. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jepson, A S; Fentiman, I S

    1998-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, often with a late presentation and poor prognosis. The mainstay of treatment is modified radical mastectomy, with axillary node dissection to assess stage, prognosis and the need for adjuvant treatment. When matched for age, tumour size, grade and axillary nodal status, the prognosis is similar for males and females. Concerted efforts must be made to educate both the public and health professionals, in order to make earlier diagnoses and thereby improve prognosis. PMID:10622057

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. Assessment of Breast Cancer Risk and Belief in Breast Cancer Screening Among the Primary Healthcare Nurses.

    PubMed

    İz, Fatma Başalan; Tümer, Adile

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Early detection of breast cancer is known to increase survival rates significantly after diagnosis. This research was carried out to determine the level of breast cancer risk among primary healthcare nurses and their belief in breast cancer screening. In this descriptive research, the data were collected in face-to-face interviews with the participants. The researchers contacted all primary healthcare nurses currently working in the province. The data collection tools included a questionnaire form on sociodemographic characteristics, breast cancer risk assessment form, and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS) for breast cancer screening. In data analysis, descriptive statistics, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. The mean age of nurses was 35 ± 3.6. The mean score for the breast cancer risk assessment form was calculated as 82.9 ± 18.7. The subscale scores for the CHBMS for breast cancer screening were as follows: susceptibility 7.3 ± 1.8, seriousness 19.5 ± 4.1, benefits of breast self-exam 15.5 ± 2.6, barriers to breast self-exam 15.1 ± 2.8, self-efficacy 40.3 ± 7.0, and motivation 19.5 ± 4.1. The risk of breast cancer was found to be low in the study group. The analysis of the subscale scores for the CHBMS for breast cancer screening revealed that nurses had a below-average susceptibility perception, a somewhat lower perception of seriousness, an above-average mean score for perceived benefits, a moderate barrier perception, a relatively high perceived self-efficacy, and motivation above average. PMID:26758047

  3. Modeling Malignant Breast Cancer Occurrence and Survival in Black and White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC), the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States, is a heterogeneous disease in which age-specific incidence rates (ASIRs) differ by race and mortality rates are higher in blacks than whites. Goals: (i) understand the reasons for the black-to-white ethnic crossover in the ASIRs; (ii) formulate a…

  4. Model development of laser fiber optic endoablative treatment for primary breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David S.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Denham, David B.; Manns, Fabrice; Gonzalez, Xochitl; Schachner, Robert D.; Herron, Alan J.; Burdette, Everette C.

    1996-05-01

    A mammographic stereotactic core biopsy instrument can be adapted for laser hyperthermic ablation of breast cancer. The object of this study is to characterize laser endohyperthermia ex-vivo and in-vivo to develop a reliable approach leading to human trials. Light of a Nd:YAG laser passed through a fiberoptic cable to a diffusing quartz tip upon entering surrounding tissues can bring about very high temperatures. This approach concentrating on the heat distribution to fat and fibrofatty tissue, first analyzed a physical model into which both the quartz tip and thermocouple needles were placed. Temperature recordings in volume through a time course demonstrated a progressive thermal increase around the tip. Additional light distribution studies in several media demonstrated the tip's output. The technique transferred to ex-vivo human breast and porcine fibrofatty tissue showed similar findings leading to an in-vivo analysis of subcutaneous porcine fibrofatty tissue. A step-down energy program beginning at 20 watts and decreasing to 15 watts, 10 watts, and to 7 watts, at 30 second intervals was held at the latter power for the remainder of 6 minutes. Three such cycles appear to be the optimal treatment program to develop temperatures between 60 degrees Celsius and 80 degrees Celsius (approximately equals 9700 joules). In-vivo experiments conducted on 5 occasions revealed no skin change. At necropsy the treated tissues demonstrated a circular sharply defined 3 cm volume of necrosis with no change in adjacent tissue. Time-temperature correlations between ex-vivo and in-vivo tissues showed great similarity. Nd:YAG laser energy distributed to a quartz tip through a fiberoptic cable is capable of uniform, complete tissue destruction to a 1 1/2 cm radius with no change beyond that field. This technique with further refinement will be appropriate to the treatment of small breast cancers that have been stereotactically biopsied.

  5. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  6. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  7. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  8. Tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elodia B; Pisano, Etta D

    2016-01-01

    Breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional x-ray based breast imaging technology, has been available for clinical use in the United States since 2011. In this paper we review the literature on breast cancer screening with this new technology including where gaps in knowledge remain. PMID:26472036

  9. Evidence That Breast Tissue Stiffness Is Associated with Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Norman F.; Li, Qing; Melnichouk, Olga; Huszti, Ella; Martin, Lisa J.; Gunasekara, Anoma; Mawdsley, Gord; Yaffe, Martin J.; Minkin, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from animal models shows that tissue stiffness increases the invasion and progression of cancers, including mammary cancer. We here use measurements of the volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography to derive estimates of breast tissue stiffness and examine the relationship of stiffness to risk of breast cancer. Methods Mammograms were used to measure the volume and projected areas of total and radiologically dense breast tissue in the unaffected breasts of 362 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer (cases) and 656 women of the same age who did not have breast cancer (controls). Measures of breast tissue volume and the projected area of the compressed breast during mammography were used to calculate the deformation of the breast during compression and, with the recorded compression force, to estimate the stiffness of breast tissue. Stiffness was compared in cases and controls, and associations with breast cancer risk examined after adjustment for other risk factors. Results After adjustment for percent mammographic density by area measurements, and other risk factors, our estimate of breast tissue stiffness was significantly associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.03, 1.43, p = 0.02) and improved breast cancer risk prediction in models with percent mammographic density, by both area and volume measurements. Conclusion An estimate of breast tissue stiffness was associated with breast cancer risk and improved risk prediction based on mammographic measures and other risk factors. Stiffness may provide an additional mechanism by which breast tissue composition is associated with risk of breast cancer and merits examination using more direct methods of measurement. PMID:25010427

  10. Conserved E2F mediated metastasis in mouse models of breast cancer and HER2 positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Rennhack, Jonathan; Andrechek, Eran

    2015-01-01

    To improve breast cancer patient outcome work must be done to understand and block tumor metastasis. This study leverages bioinformatics techniques and traditional genetic screens to create a novel method of discovering potential contributors of tumor progression with a focus on tumor metastasis. A database of 1172 of expression data from a variety of mouse models of breast cancer was assembled and queried using previously defined oncogenic activity signatures. This analysis revealed high activity of the E2F family of transcription factors in the MMTV-Neu mouse model. A genetic cross of MMTV-Neu mice into an E2F1 null, E2F2 null, or E2F3 heterozygous background revealed significant changes in tumor progression specifically reductions in tumor latency and metastasis with E2F1 or E2F2 loss. These findings were found to be conserved in human HER2 positive patients. Patients with high E2F1 activity were shown to have worse outcomes such as relapse free survival and distant metastasis free survival. This study shows conserved mechanisms of tumor progression in human breast cancer subtypes and analogous mouse models and underlies the importance of increased research into the characterization of and comparisons between mouse and human tumors to identify which mouse models resemble each subtype of human breast cancer. PMID:26682278