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Sample records for breast conservation treatment

  1. Breast conservation treatment with perioperative interstitial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Mansfield, C.M.; Jewell, W.R.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-10-01

    Limited resection of the breast combined with radiation has proved to be as effective as more radical surgery in treating early breast cancer. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, the radiotherapy consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to deliver an interstitial boost dose to the tumor bed with iridium-192 immediately following the surgical procedure. An axillary node dissection is also performed at the time of lumpectomy. A dose of 2000 cGy is delivered to the tumor bed between 40 and 60 h. Two to three weeks later, 4500-5000 cGy is delivered to the entire breast with external beam radiation over 5-5.5 weeks. One hundred breasts in 98 patients were so treated between June 1982 and February 1986, with 2 carcinomas in situ, 40 stage I, 51 stage II, and 7 stage III cancers, consisting of 2 TIS, 54 T1, 39 T2, and 5 T3 lesions. Locoregional control with a median follow-up of 31 months was 98%. One recurrence was in a different quadrant, and the other revealed predominantly the in situ component. Immediate implant did not compromise wound healing or cosmesis. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in 88% of the breasts. Our preliminary results appear to suggest a better local control with immediate interstitial irradiation.

  2. Time Course of Mild Arm Lymphedema After Breast Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita; Cheville, Andrea; Solin, Lawrence J.; Dutta, Pinaki; Both, Stefan; Harris, Eleanor

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Arm lymphedema is a potential consequence of the treatment for breast carcinoma. The objective of this retrospective study was to characterize the progression of mild arm lymphedema after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study cohort was drawn from 1,713 consecutive Stage I or II breast cancer patients who underwent breast conservation therapy, including axillary staging followed by radiation. Arm lymphedema was documented in 266 (16%) of 1,713 patients. One hundred nine patients, 6% of the overall group and 40% of the patients with arm lymphedema, presented with mild arm lymphedema, defined as a difference of 2 cm or less between the measured circumferences of the affected and unaffected arms. Results: Among the 109 patients with mild arm lymphedema at the time of arm lymphedema diagnosis, the rate of freedom from progression to more severe lymphedema was 79% at 1 year, 66% at 3 years, and 52% at 5 years. The patients who were morbidly obese, had positive axillary lymph nodes, or received supraclavicular irradiation at the time of breast cancer treatment were at higher risk of progression from mild arm lymphedema to more severe edema. Conclusions: Mild arm lymphedema, generally considered to be a minor complication after breast conservation treatment for breast cancer, was associated with a risk of progression to a more severe grade of arm lymphedema in a substantial fraction of patients.

  3. Is there an Ideal Breast Conservation Rate for the Treatment of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed

    Tan, M P

    2016-09-01

    Since the results of randomised controlled trials in the last quarter of the twentieth century were reported, it has been conventionally accepted that breast conservation treatment (BCT) provides equivalent survival to mastectomy for early breast cancer. As expected, there was an initial fall in the use of mastectomy. The first decade of the twenty-first century, however, witnessed a trend of increasing mastectomy rates in some regions. This perplexing circumstance served as an impetus for a relook at survival outcomes with each surgical modality. Recent studies have demonstrated higher survival rates and improved local control associated with BCT. Such findings warrant a re-evaluation of treatment strategies, beginning with whether there is an optimum BCT rate. PMID:27177489

  4. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  5. Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment With Radiation in Women With Prior Nonbreast Malignancy and Subsequent Invasive Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nemani, Deepika; Vapiwala, Neha Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Little information has been reported regarding outcomes after treatment for patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. This report analyzes the outcomes in patients with Stage I and II breast cancer after breast conservation treatment (BCT) with a prior nonbreast malignancy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 66 women with invasive breast cancer and a prior nonbreast malignancy. All patients were treated with breast conservation surgery followed by definitive breast irradiation between 1978 and 2003. Median ages at diagnosis of invasive breast cancer and prior malignancy were 57 and 50 years, respectively. The median interval between the prior malignancy and breast cancer was 7.0 years. Median and mean follow-up times after BCT were 5.3 and 7.0 years. Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82-98%) and 78% (95% CI, 59-89%), respectively. There were 4 patients (6%) with local failure and 10 patients (15%) with distant metastases. The 10-year rate of local failure rate was 5% (95% CI, 2-16%) and freedom from distant metastases was 78% (95% CI, 61-88%). No obvious differences in survival or local control were noted compared with the reported results in the literature for patients with invasive breast cancer alone. Conclusions: Both overall survival and local control at 5 and 10 years were comparable to rates observed in early-stage breast cancer patients without a prior malignancy. Prior nonbreast malignancy is not a contraindication to BCT, if the primary cancer is effectively controlled.

  6. [BCT, breast conserving treatment--cosmetism and radicality].

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Fujio

    2006-03-01

    In performing BCT with radicality and cosmetism, the attitudes of breast oncologists in Japan and western countries are different at present. In Japan, our problem is to get surgical margin negative almost sacrificing the cosmetism. On the contrary, in western countries, they evaluate RT irrespective of margin status. Contrary to our expectation, results are almost equal in the point of radicality and IBTR. If both results are almost the same, it would be better and reasonable for us to adopt the western convenience and rationalism, of cause continuing our earnest attitude utmost. PMID:16529043

  7. Cosmetic Outcomes and Complications Reported by Patients Having Undergone Breast-Conserving Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Metz, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years, much work in treatment of breast cancer has contributed to improvement of cosmetic and functional outcomes. The goal of breast-conservation treatment (BCT) is avoidance of mastectomy through use of lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation. Modern data demonstrate 'excellent' or 'good' cosmesis in >90% of patients treated with BCT. Methods and Materials: Patient-reported data were gathered via a convenience sample frame from breast cancer survivors using a publically available, free, Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. During use of the tool, breast cancer survivors are queried as to the cosmetic appearance of the treated breast, as well as perceived late effects. All data have been maintained anonymously with internal review board approval. Results: Three hundred fifty-four breast cancer survivors having undergone BCT and voluntarily using this tool were queried with regard to breast cosmesis and perceived late effects. Median diagnosis age was 48 years, and median current age 52 years. 'Excellent' cosmesis was reported by 27% (n = 88), 'Good' by 44% (n = 144), 'Fair' by 24% (n = 81), and 'Poor' by 5% (n = 18). Of the queries posted to survivors after BCT, late effects most commonly reported were cognitive changes (62%); sexual concerns (52%); changes in texture and color of irradiated skin (48%); chronic pain, numbness, or tingling (35%); and loss of flexibility in the irradiated area (30%). Survivors also described osteopenia/osteoporosis (35%), cardiopulmonary problems (12%), and lymphedema (19%). Conclusions: This anonymous tool uses a convenience sample frame to gather patient reported assessments of cosmesis and complications after breast cancer. Among the BCT population, cosmetic assessment by survivors appears less likely to be 'excellent' or 'good' than would be expected, with 30% of BCT survivors reporting 'fair' or 'poor' cosmesis. Patient reported incidence of chronic pain, as well as cognitive and

  8. Trends and Patterns of Breast Conservation Treatment in Hong Kong: 1994-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. Soong, Inda S.; Sze, Henry; Choi, C.-W.; Yeung, M.-W.; Ng, W.-T.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation treatment (BCT) was quite unpopular in Hong Kong until the early 1990s, but the trends and patterns of BCT use in the past 14 years have not been studied since. The purpose of this study was to identify the latest trends and patterns. Methods and Materials: All consecutive cases of female breast cancer referred to a community oncology center in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 2,375 women with T1-2 invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery, 1,137 (48%) had T1 ({<=}2 cm) disease and 1,238 (52%) had T2 (>2 cm-{<=}5 cm) disease. Median patient age was 51 years (range, 24-95 years); 65% patients had their surgery in public hospitals. Results: Of the total patient cohort, 2,153 (91%) patients presented with palpable breast masses and only 104 (4%) with mammographically detected cancers. Overall, 721 (30%) and 1,654 (70%) patients underwent BCT and mastectomy, respectively. There was no significant increase in the BCT rates (31%, SD 5%; p = 0.804) or mammographic detection rates (5%, SD 1%; p = 0.125) in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007. In multivariate analyses, age {<=}50 years (OR 2.479; p < 0.001), mammographically detected tumors (OR 1.868; p = 0.007), T1 tumors (OR 3.159; p < 0.001), surgeries in private hospitals (OR 1.288; p = 0.018), and negative nodal status (OR 1.886; p < 0.001) were independent factors predictive of a higher likelihood of a woman having BCT. Conclusions: Our results indicate a satisfactory acceptance of BCT by patients who are young and have small tumors, node-negative disease, or surgery in private hospitals. However, the continuing unpopularity of breast screening is likely a major factor limiting the broad use of BCT.

  9. Decision-Making in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer: Factors Influencing Women’s Choices for Mastectomy and Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellavance, Emily Catherine; Kesmodel, Susan Beth

    2016-01-01

    One of the most difficult decisions a woman can be faced with when choosing breast cancer treatment is whether or not to undergo breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. The factors that influence these treatment decisions are complex and involve issues regarding access to health care, concerns for cancer recurrence, and the impact of surgery on body image and sexuality. Understanding these factors will help practitioners to improve patient education and to better guide patients through this decision-making process. Although significant scientific and societal advances have been made in improving women’s choices for the breast cancer treatment, there are still deficits in the decision-making processes surrounding the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Further research is needed to define optimal patient education and shared decision-making practices in this area. PMID:27066455

  10. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco Sacco, Mariano; Loi, Gianfranco; Masini, Laura; Ferrante, Daniela; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Ronco, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Carriero, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

  11. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  12. Long-Term Clinical and Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation Treatment for Women With Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma According to the Type of Breast Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Chacko, David; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Vapiwala, Neha; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The present study was performed to compare outcomes after breast conservation treatment with iridium-192 implant boost vs. electron boost. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1983, 141 patients were treated with whole breast radiotherapy followed by iridium-192 boost after breast-conserving surgery. They were matched 1:1 to patients treated with electron boost. Outcome measures included survival, local recurrence, cosmesis, and complications. Results: Median follow-up was 16.7 and 12.6 years for the implant vs. electron groups (p < 0.001). Rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival at 10/20 years did not differ between the groups, nor did patterns of first failure. Patients in the electron group were more likely to have excellent/good cosmesis than those in the implant group 1 year after radiotherapy (p = 0.014); this trend continued through 10 years but did not reach statistical significance at years 5/10. Complication rates were similar, although patients receiving electron boost seemed less likely to develop breast fibrosis than did those receiving implant boost (23/141 vs. 58/141, respectively, incidence rate ratio 0.7, p = 0.17). Conclusions: Twenty-year data demonstrate no difference in rates of local recurrence, freedom from distant metastases, overall survival, or patterns of failure between groups treated with these two well-described radiotherapy boost techniques. Better cosmesis was observed in the electron group 1 year after radiotherapy, with a trend continuing for 10 years. The incidence of complications was similar between the groups, with a trend toward increased fibrosis in patients receiving implant boost.

  13. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Is Short-Interval Mammography Necessary After Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiation Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Hymas, Richard V.; Gaffney, David K.; Parkinson, Brett T.; Belnap, Thomas W.; Sause, William T.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The optimum timing and frequency of mammography in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) are controversial. The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends the first posttreatment mammogram 1 year after diagnosis but no earlier than 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends annual mammography. Intermountain Healthcare currently follows a more frequent mammography schedule during the first 2 years in BCT patients. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the cancer yield mammography during the first 2 years after BCT. Methods and Materials: 1,435 patients received BCT at Intermountain Healthcare between 2003 and 2007, inclusive. Twenty-three patients had bilateral breast cancer (1,458 total breasts). Patients were followed up for 24 months after diagnosis. The 1- and 2-year mammography yields were determined and compared with those of the general screening population. Results: 1,079 breasts had mammography at less than 1 year, and two ipsilateral recurrences (both noninvasive) were identified; 1,219 breasts had mammography during the second year, and nine recurrences (three invasive, six noninvasive) were identified. Of the 11 ipsilateral recurrences during the study, three presented with symptoms and eight were identified by mammography alone. The mammography yield was 1.9 cancers per 1,000 breasts the first year and 4.9 per 1,000 the second year. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the mammography yield during the first 2 years after BCT is not greater than that in the general population, and they support the policy for initiating followup mammography at 1 year after BCT.

  15. The Impact of Comorbidities on Outcomes for Elderly Women Treated With Breast-Conservation Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R. Hwang, W.-T.; Urtishak, Sandra L.; Plastaras, John; Kinosian, Bruce; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer incidence increases with age and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly women, but is not well studied in this population. Comorbidities often impact on the management of breast cancer in elderly women. Methods and Materials: From 1979 to 2002, a total of 238 women aged 70 years and older with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma of the breast underwent breast-conservation therapy. Outcomes were compared by age groups and comorbidities. Median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 70-89 years). Age distribution was 122 women (51%) aged 70-74 years, 71 women (30%) aged 75-79 years, and 45 women (19%) aged 80 years or older. Median follow-up was 6.2 years. Results: On outcomes analysis by age groups, 10-year cause-specific survival rates for women aged 70-74, 75-79, and 80 years or older were 74%, 81%, and 82%, respectively (p = 0.87). Intercurrent deaths at 10 years were significantly higher in older patients: 20% in those aged 70-74 years, 36% in those aged 75-79 years, and 53% in those 80 years and older (p = 0.0005). Comorbidities were not significantly more common in the older age groups and did not correlate with cause-specific survival adjusted for age. Higher comorbidity scores were associated with intercurrent death. Conclusions: Older age itself is not a contraindication to standard breast-conservation therapy, including irradiation. Women of any age with low to moderate comorbidity indices should be offered standard breast-conservation treatment if otherwise clinically eligible.

  16. Role of Oral Antibiotics in Treatment of Breastfeeding Women with Chronic Breast Pain Who Fail Conservative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Kelly; Hawn, Thomas R.; Zyzanski, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although breast pain remains a common cause of weaning, controversy exists regarding the etiology of chronic pain. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal treatment regimens. We evaluated patient history, exam, and bacterial cultures in breastfeeding women with chronic breast pain. We compared pain resolution and breastfeeding complications in patients responding to conservative therapy (CTX) (n=38) versus those in patients failing CTX and receiving oral antibiotic treatment (OTX) (n=48). Subjects and Methods: We prospectively enrolled 86 breastfeeding women with breast pain lasting greater than 1 week and followed up patients through 12 weeks. Results: Higher initial breast (p=0.012) and nipple pain severity (p=0.004), less response to latch correction (p=0.015) at baseline visit, and breastmilk Staphylococcus aureus growth (p=0.001) were associated with failing CTX. Pain type was not associated with failure of CTX. When culture results were available at 5 days, breast pain remained higher (p<0.001) in patients failing CTX and starting antibiotics. OTX patients then had more rapid breast pain reduction between 5 and 14 days (score of 3.1 vs. 1.3; p<0.001). By 4 weeks there was no difference (1.8/10 vs. 1.4/10; p=0.088) in breast pain level between groups. Median length of OTX was 14 days. At 12 weeks, weaning frequency (17% vs. 8%; p=0.331) was not statistically different. Conclusions: Initial pain severity and limited improvement to latch correction predicts failure of CTX. S. aureus growth is more common in women failing CTX. For those women not responding to CTX, OTX matched to breastmilk culture may significantly decrease their pain and is not associated with increased complications. PMID:24387034

  17. Treatment Techniques to Reduce Cardiac Irradiation for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Robert E.; Kim, Leonard; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer each year receive breast-conserving surgery followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. For women with left-sided breast cancer, there is risk of potential cardiotoxicity from the radiation therapy. As data have become available to quantify the risk of cardiotoxicity from radiation, strategies have also developed to reduce the dose of radiation to the heart without compromising radiation dose to the breast. Several broad categories of techniques to reduce cardiac radiation doses include breath hold techniques, prone positioning, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and accelerated partial breast irradiation, as well as many small techniques to improve traditional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. This review summarizes the published scientific literature on the various techniques to decrease cardiac irradiation in women treated to the left breast for breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25452938

  18. Radiobiological advantages of an immediate interstitial boost dose in conservative treatment of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, E.C.; Krishnan, L.; Cytaki, E.P.; Woolf, C.D.; Henry, M.M.; Lin, F.; Jewell, W.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Minimum surgery with irradiation is emerging as one of the main modalities of therapy for operable early breast cancer. Between June 1982 and June 1986, 110 breasts with Tis, T1 to T3 lesions have been treated at our institution with lumpectomy and interstitial irradiation to the tumor bed with Iridium-192 perioperatively followed by external beam irradiation. There have been two local recurrences at or near the vicinity of the primary, at a median follow-up of 60 months. To analyze the parameters that might have contributed to the local control, we have examined the treatment volumes, prescribed dose to the tumor bed, dose at the core of the tumor bed, and dose to the surrounding normal tissue. Immediate interstitial implant has the radiobiological advantage of delivering continuous low dose irradiation, immediately upon removal of gross tumor to residual foci. Implantation of the afterloading catheters intraoperatively facilitates accurate dose delivery and avoidance of geographical misses. By precise treatment of any residual foci, immediately upon removal of the gross mass, perioperative interstitial irradiation improves local control and by facilitating less radical surgical excision, leads to better cosmetic results.

  19. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT) Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II) for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Kei; Aoyama, Nobutaka; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Kariya, Shinji; Hamada, Norihiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Onogawa, Masahide; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT) using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand) has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48) were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter) of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane) prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non-surgical BCT can be

  20. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  1. Delayed breast cellulitis: An evolving complication of breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Newlin, Heather; Morris, Christopher G.; Haigh, Linda S.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price . E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Delayed breast cellulitis (DBC) is characterized by the late onset of breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth. This retrospective study analyzes the risk factors and clinical course of DBC. Methods and Materials: From 1985 through 2004, 580 sequential women with 601 stage T0-2N0-1 breast cancers underwent breast conserving therapy. Cases of DBC were identified according to accepted clinical criteria: diffuse breast erythema, edema, tenderness, and warmth occurring >3 months after definitive surgery and >3 weeks after radiotherapy. Potential risk factors analyzed included patient comorbidity, operative technique, acute complications, and details of adjunctive therapy. Response to treatment and long-term outcome were analyzed to characterize the natural course of this syndrome. Results: Of the 601 cases, 16%, 52%, and 32% were Stage 0, I, and II, respectively. The overall incidence of DBC was 8% (50/601). Obesity, ecchymoses, T stage, the presence and aspiration of a breast hematoma/seroma, removal of >5 axillary lymph nodes, and arm lymphedema were significantly associated with DBC. The median time to onset of DBC from the date of definitive surgery was 226 days. Ninety-two percent of DBC patients were empirically treated with antibiotics. Fourteen percent required more invasive intervention. Twenty-two percent had recurrent episodes of DBC. Ultimately, 2 patients (4%) underwent mastectomy for intractable breast pain related to DBC. Conclusion: Although multifactorial, we believe DBC is primarily related to a bacterial infection in the setting of impaired lymphatic drainage and may appear months after completion of radiotherapy. Invasive testing before a trial of antibiotics is generally not recommended.

  2. Periareolar Approach in Oncoplastic Breast Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Marco; Giannasi, Silvia; Klinger, Francesco; Caviggioli, Fabio; Bandi, Valeria; Banzatti, Barbara; Forcellini, Davide; Maione, Luca; Catania, Barbara; Vinci, Valeriano; Lisa, Andrea; Cornegliani, Guido; Siliprandi, Mattia; Tinterri, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer represents the most frequent cancer in female population. Nowadays breast conservative surgery (BCS) is an accepted option for breast malignancies, and its indications has been extended thanks to the advent of oncoplastic surgery, reducing both mastectomy and re-excision rate, avoiding at the same time breast deformities. From January 2008 to November 2011, 84 women underwent BCS with periareolar approach for oncoplastic volume replacement. We divided patients into four groups analyzing breast size and resection volume (Group 1: small-moderate sized breast with resection <20%; Group 2: small-moderate sized breast with resection >20%; Group 3: big sized breast with resection <20%; Group 4: big sized breast with resection >20%). We evaluated patients' satisfaction regarding final esthetic outcome using the specific module "Satisfaction with outcome" of the Breast-Q questionnaire 1 year after surgery. The mean age was 52.1 years, and the mean follow-up was 11.2 months. During the follow-up, 12 patients have been lost. We obtained high satisfaction mean value with Breast-Q questionnaire in each group: 75.8 in group 1, 63.4 in group 2, 81.1 in group 3, 69.7 in group 4. Periareolar approach as oncoplastic volume replacement technique is useful in correction of breast deformity after BCS: it is a versatile technique that can be easily adapted for any breast tumor location and for wide glandular resection. PMID:27088898

  3. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  4. Treating early-stage breast cancer: hospital characteristics associated with breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Johantgen, M E; Coffey, R M; Harris, D R; Levy, H; Clinton, J J

    1995-01-01

    Despite growing acceptance of the fact that women with early-stage breast cancer have similar outcomes with lumpectomy plus radiation as with mastectomy, many studies have revealed the uneven adoption of such breast-conserving surgery. Discharge data from the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project, representing multiple payers, locations, and hospital types, demonstrate increasing trends in breast-conserving surgery as a proportion of breast cancer surgeries from 1981 to 1987. Women with axillary node involvement were less likely to have a lumpectomy, even though consensus recommendations do not preclude this form of treatment when local metastases are present. Non-White race, urban hospital location, and hospital teaching were associated with an increased likelihood of having breast-conserving surgery. PMID:7573632

  5. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk to your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  6. Comparison of Treatment Outcome Between Breast-Conservation Surgery With Radiation and Total Mastectomy Without Radiation in Patients With One to Three Positive Axillary Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Il; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang Ok; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To test the difference in treatment outcome between breast-conservation surgery with radiation and total mastectomy without radiation, to evaluate the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Using the Severance Hospital Breast Cancer Registry, we divided the study population of T1, T2 and one to three axillary node-positive patients into two groups: breast-conservation surgery with radiation (BCS/RT) and total mastectomy without radiation (TM/no-RT). Data related to locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, and death were collected, and survival rates were calculated. Results: The study population consisted of 125 patients treated with BCS/RT and 365 patients treated with TM/no-RT. With a median follow-up of 68.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate with BCS/RT and TM/no-RT was 90.5% and 79.2%, respectively (p = 0.056). The 10-year distant recurrence-free survival rate was 78.8% for patients treated with BCS/RT vs. 68.0% for those treated with TM/no-RT (p = 0.012). The 10-years overall survival rate for patients treated with BCT/RT and TM/no-RT was 87.5% and 73.9%, respectively (p = 0.035). After multivariate analysis, patients treated with BCT/RT had better distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.527; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.297-0.934; p = 0.028), with improving locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.491; 95% CI, 0.231-1.041; p = 0.064) and overall survival trend (HR, 0.544; 95% CI, 0.277-1.067; p = 0.076). Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence that adjuvant radiation substantially reduces local recurrence, distant recurrence, and mortality for patients with one to three involved nodes.

  7. Small-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A new approach that is superior to fixed-field IMRT in optimizing dosimetric and treatment-relevant parameters for patients undergoing whole-breast irradiation following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Hu, Tao; Chen, Yeshan

    2016-08-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is considered to deliver a better dose distribution and to shorten treatment time. There is a lack of research regarding breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using VMAT with prone positioning. We developed a new small-arc VMAT methodology and compared it to conventional (fixed-field) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the dosimetric and treatment relevant parameters for breast cancer patients in the prone position.Ten early-stage breast cancer patients were included in this exploratory study. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation scan in the prone position and for each patient, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated using the Monaco planning system. Two symmetrical partial arcs were applied in the VMAT plans. The angle ranges of the 2 arcs were set to approximately 60° to 100° and 220° to 260°, with small adjustments to maximize target coverage, while minimizing lung and heart exposure. The IMRT plans used 4 fixed fields. Prescribed doses were 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The target coverage, homogeneity, conformity, dose to organs at risk (OAR), treatment time, and monitor units (MU) were evaluated.Higher median conformal index (CI) and lower homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV) were respectively observed in VMAT and plans group (CI, 95% vs 91%; HI, 0.09 vs 0.12; P < 0.001). The volumes of ipsilateral lung receiving 30, 20, 10, and 5 Gy were lower for VMAT (P < 0.01), being 10%, 14.9%, 25.9%, and 44.9%, respectively, compared to 11.79%, 17.32%, 30.27%, and 50.58% for the IMRT plans. The mean lung dose was also reduced from 10.6 ± 1.8 to 9.6 ± 1.4 Gy (P = 0.001). The volumes of the heart receiving 30 and 40 Gy were similar for the 2 methods. In addition, the median treatment time (161 vs 412 seconds; P < 0.001) and the mean MU (713 vs 878; P < 0.001) were lower for VMAT.Small-arc VMAT plan improved CI and HI for the

  8. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  9. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  11. Advances in the surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; He, Qiang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Guo-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has become the top malignant neoplasm in Chinese women with an increasing risk of morbidity and mortality. As a crucial part of comprehensive treatment of breast cancer, breast surgical technique is ceaselessly ameliorating and enriching its features. With the purpose of achieving minimal surgical intervention and satisfactory cosmetic results, the trend of mammary surgery is focusing on minimally invasive treatment and aesthetics in the 21st century. This article gives an overview of the most representative surgical procedures, such as breast conservative surgery, sentinel lymph node dissection, oncoplastic technique and breast reconstructive surgery. PMID:27265302

  12. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  13. Preoperative Localization and Surgical Margins in Conservative Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, F.; Sorrentino, L.; Bossi, D.; Sartani, A.; Foschi, D.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. The adequacy of surgical margins (SM) is a crucial issue for adjusting the volume of excision and for avoiding local recurrences, although the precise definition of an adequate margins width remains controversial. Moreover, other factors such as the biological behaviour of the tumor and subsequent proper systemic therapies may influence the local recurrence rate (LRR). However, a successful BCS requires preoperative localization techniques or margin assessment techniques. Carbon marking, wire-guided, biopsy clips, radio-guided, ultrasound-guided, frozen section analysis, imprint cytology, and cavity shave margins are commonly used, but from the literature review, no single technique proved to be better among the various ones. Thus, an association of two or more methods could result in a decrease in rates of involved margins. Each institute should adopt its most congenial techniques, based on the senologic equipe experience, skills, and technologies. PMID:23986868

  14. Surgical resection margins after breast-conserving surgery: Senonetwork recommendations.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Viviana; Taffurelli, Mario; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Aristei, Cynthia; Trentin, Chiara; Cassano, Enrico; Pietribiasi, Francesca; Corso, Giovanni; Munzone, Elisabetta; Tondini, Carlo; Frigerio, Alfonso; Cataliotti, Luigi; Santini, Donatella

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports findings of the "Focus on Controversial Areas" Working Party of the Italian Senonetwork, which was set up to improve the care of breast cancer patients. After reviewing articles in English on the MEDLINE system on breast conserving surgery for invasive carcinoma, the Working Party presents their recommendations for identifying risk factors for positive margins, suggests how to manage them so as to achieve the highest possible percentage of negative margins, and proposes standards for investigating resection margins and therapeutic approaches according to margin status. When margins are positive, approaches include re-excision, mastectomy, or, as second-line treatment, radiotherapy with a high boost dose. When margins are negative, boost administration and its dose depend on the risk of local recurrence, which is linked to biopathological tumor features and surgical margin width. Although margin status does not affect the choice of systemic therapy, it may delay the start of chemotherapy when further surgery is required. PMID:27103209

  15. Problems with the use of breast conservation therapy for breast cancer in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Danielle M; Khera, Samira Y; Meade, Tammi L; Dupont, Elisabeth L; Greenberg, Harvey M; Diaz, Nils M; Romilly, A Pat; Cox, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type I and breast cancer represent a subset of people who may be considered at high risk for secondary cancers after conventional whole breast radiation therapy and breast conservation surgery. A case of a 49-year-old woman with neurofibromatosis type I is presented. She was diagnosed with a 1.1-cm right breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Clinical, diagnostic imaging, and pathologic features are discussed. Her initial treatment plan of breast conserving therapy was thwarted when her sentinel node biopsy was positive for micrometastatic disease in 1/14 lymph nodes. She elected to have a bilateral simple mastectomy. This case addresses the rare dilemma of offering breast conservation therapy as a viable option for patients with neurofibromatosis type I. Current data on radiation-induced secondary cancers such as sarcoma after treatment for breast and other cancers are reviewed. PMID:18248558

  16. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  17. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  18. Biopsy Findings After Breast Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vapiwala, Neha Starzyk, Jill; Harris, Eleanor E.; Tchou, Julia C.; Boraas, Marcia C.; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Rosato, Ernest F.; Orel, Susan G.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns and factors predictive of positive ipsilateral breast biopsy after conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of Stage I-II breast cancer patients initially treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996, who later underwent post-treatment ipsilateral breast biopsies. Results: A total of 223 biopsies were performed in 193 treated breasts: 171 single and 22 multiple biopsies. Of the 223 biopsies, 56% were positive and 44% were negative for recurrence. The positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 59% for the first and 32% for subsequent biopsies. The median time to the first post-treatment biopsy was 49 months. Of the patients with negative initial biopsy findings, 11% later developed local recurrence. The PBR was 40% among patients with physical examination findings only, 65% with mammographic abnormalities only, and 79% with both findings (p = 0.001). Analysis of the procedure type revealed a PBR of 86% for core and 58% for excisional biopsies compared with 28% for aspiration cytology alone (p = 0.025). The PBR varied inversely with age at the original diagnosis: 49% if {>=}51 years, 57% if 36-50 years, and 83% if {<=}35 years (p = 0.05). The PBR correlated directly with the interval after radiotherapy: 49% if {<=}60 months, 59% if 60.1-120 months, 77% if 120.1-180 months, and 100% if >180 months after completing postlumpectomy radiotherapy (p = 0.01). The PBR was not linked with recurrence location, initial pathologic T or N stage, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or final pathologic margins (all p {>=} 0.15). Conclusion: After definitive radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, a greater PBR was associated with the presence of both mammographic and clinical abnormalities, excisional or core biopsies, younger age at the initial diagnosis, and longer intervals after radiotherapy completion.

  19. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  20. Systematic review: conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several conservative (i.e., nonpharmacologic, nonsurgical) treatments exist for secondary lymphedema. The optimal treatment is unknown. We examined the effectiveness of conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema, as well as harms related to these treatments. Methods We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials®, AMED, and CINAHL from 1990 to January 19, 2010. We obtained English- and non-English-language randomized controlled trials or observational studies (with comparison groups) that reported primary effectiveness data on conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema. For English-language studies, we extracted data in tabular form and summarized the tables descriptively. For non-English-language studies, we summarized the results descriptively and discussed similarities with the English-language studies. Results Thirty-six English-language and eight non-English-language studies were included in the review. Most of these studies involved upper-limb lymphedema secondary to breast cancer. Despite lymphedema's chronicity, lengths of follow-up in most studies were under 6 months. Many trial reports contained inadequate descriptions of randomization, blinding, and methods to assess harms. Most observational studies did not control for confounding. Many studies showed that active treatments reduced the size of lymphatic limbs, although extensive between-study heterogeneity in areas such as treatment comparisons and protocols, and outcome measures, prevented us from assessing whether any one treatment was superior. This heterogeneity also precluded us from statistically pooling results. Harms were rare (< 1% incidence) and mostly minor (e.g., headache, arm pain). Conclusions The literature contains no evidence to suggest the most effective treatment for secondary lymphedema. Harms are few and unlikely to cause major clinical problems. PMID:22216837

  1. [The treatment of nonpalpable breast lesions. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Latteri, M; Cipolla, C; Amato, C; Cassano, T; Salanitro, L; Graceffa, G; Di Lisi, G; Bottino, A; Grillo, A; Farro, G

    1991-04-01

    Thanks to the diffusion of the clinico-mammographic screening, in the last ten years a considerable increase of breast carcinomas diagnosed in a subclinical stage has been registered. The authors report the preliminary results of their experience in nonpalpable lesions of the breast and confirm the validity of conservative surgery for their treatment. Nonpalpable breast carcinomas must be considered as an early stage of palpable T1 tumors, for which validity of conservative surgery is largely demonstrated. Moreover, results are not compromised by possible multicentricity and/or positivity of axillary lymph nodes. PMID:1911072

  2. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  3. Conservative treatment modalities in retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Bhavna; Jain, Amit; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on various conservative treatment modalities available for the treatment of retinoblastoma and their effectiveness, when used alone or in combination. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched through 2012 for published peer reviewed data on conservative treatment modalities for retinoblastoma. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumors, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermotherapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results. It is important to recognize that today, several treatment options are available that can obviate the need for enucleation, and cure the cancer with preservation of functional vision. A thorough knowledge and understanding of these conservative treatment modalities is essential for appropriate management. PMID:24104705

  4. Breast conservative surgery: is it appropriate for locally advanced breast cancer following downstaging by neoadjuvant chemotherapy? A pathological assessment.

    PubMed

    Moneer, M; El-Didi, M; Khaled, H

    1999-12-01

    The application of breast conserving surgery to down-staged cases with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is still a controversial issue with a variable incidence of locoregional failures. In this study, the response of LABC to NACT was assessed pathologically and the eligible candidates for breast conserving surgery were identified retrospectively. The efficacy of preoperative clinical examination and mammography in detecting these pathological changes were also evaluated. The study included 41 LABC cases. They received NACT (FAC) and were then subjected to a mastectomy. The cases were examined clinically and by mammography before starting treatment and immediately before surgery. Residual tumours in the mastectomy specimens were correlated with the pretreatment and preoperative clinical and mammographic findings in order to assess the efficacy of these tools for detection of NACT-induced changes. After 3 cycles of NACT, 78% of women showed an objective response. However, only 25% of them would have been eligible for breast conserving surgery. The remaining responders had an increased incidence of either multifocality and or peritumoural in situ carcinoma. Both clinical examination and mammography were inadequate for detection of these chemotherapy-induced changes and hence for selecting suitable candidates for breast conservation. This study has shown that tumour regression by NACT is probably induced by a process of tumour segmentation and is associated with an increased incidence of ductal in situ lesions in the original tumour bearing area. PMID:14731459

  5. Margins in breast conserving surgery: A practice-changing process.

    PubMed

    Rubio, I T; Ahmed, M; Kovacs, T; Marco, V

    2016-05-01

    Margins in breast conserving surgery (BCS) have been a long standing subject debate. This largely arises from the absence of a consensus on what constitutes an adequate margin width, resulting in re-excision rates of 25-40% for close or positive margins and its consequent impact upon cosmesis, economic costs, patient dissatisfaction and lack of bearing on survival. Accepting that the increased risk of local recurrences (LR) has its influence on survival, the decrease in LR in BCS in the last decade have been motivated by better surgical techniques for assessing negative margins, use of targeted therapies and in general with the multimodal treatment in the management of breast cancer patients. Since the publication of the consensus guidelines on margins there has evolved a trend of changing attitudes towards re-excision. Surgeons are considering margins in the context of all factors including not only patient and tumor characteristics but also the regional and systemic treatment the patient is receiving. PMID:26880017

  6. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  7. Breast Conservation Therapy: The Influence of Molecular Subtype and Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci, Senem; Broadwater, Gloria; Marks, Lawrence B.; Clough, Robert; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results and prognostic factors, especially margin status and molecular subtype, in early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,058 Stage I or II breast cancer patients treated with BCT (surgical excision plus radiotherapy) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, from 1985-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional receptor analyses were used as surrogate markers for molecular subtype classification (luminal A, luminal B, Her2 positive, and basal like). Actuarial estimates of overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), failure-free survival, and locoregional control (LRC) were computed by use of Kaplan-Meier plots. We analyzed prognostic variables for significance using Cox proportional hazards univariate and multivariate analysis. The study was approved by the Duke University Medical Center Institutional Review Board. Results: The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 18-89 years). Of the patients, 80% had T1 disease and 66% N0 disease pathologically. With a median follow-up of 9.8 years, an in-breast recurrence developed in 53 patients and 10 patients had nodal failure. For all patients, the 10-year CSS rate was 94%; LRC rate, 94%; and failure-free survival rate, 88%. Luminal A patients had a CSS rate of 95% and LRC rate of 99%. Basal-type patients appeared to do worse, with regard to both CSS rate (74%) and LRC rate (76%), but the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. LRC rates of patients with negative margins (widely negative, close, and extent of margin not known) were virtually identical (93%, 96%, and 94%, respectively). Those with positive margins appeared to fare slightly worse based on LRC rate (88%), but again, the numbers were small and the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: BCT remains the treatment of choice for early-stage breast cancer

  8. Conservation therapy for breast cancers other than infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, J M; Jacquemier, J; Torhorst, J; Spitalier, J M; Amalric, R; Hünig, R; Walther, E; Harder, F; Almendral, A; Brandone, H

    1989-04-15

    Pathologic review of 861 Stage I and II breast cancers yielded 152 patients (18%) with histologic types other than invasive ductal carcinoma. All patients had been treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy, including supplemental radiation to the tumor bed. For 67 patients with predominantly lobular carcinomas, the actuarial overall 5-year survival was 100% and 77% for node-negative and node-positive patients, respectively. The actuarial probability of recurrence in the treated breast (13.5% at 5 years) appeared to be somewhat greater than that observed after treatment of invasive ductal cancers (8.8% at 5 years, P = 0.11). Of 12 mammary recurrences in patients with lobular carcinoma, four occurred at a considerable distance from the original primary and seven were multifocal, involving more than one quadrant in five patients. Of 47 patients with strictly in situ carcinomas, one patient whose axillary nodal status had not been determined subsequently developed distant metastases. Three additional patients developed mammary recurrence, two at the primary tumor site and one in another quadrant. The actuarial 5-year mammary recurrence and overall survival rates were 4% and 98%, respectively. For 27 patients with true medullary cancers, overall survival at 5 years was 90%. One localized mammary recurrence was observed at the site of the original primary. Actuarial mammary recurrence rate was 4% at 5 years. No relapse was observed in ten patients with colloid and one patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma. The authors conclude that, in addition to its well-established efficacy in the treatment of infiltrating ductal carcinomas, the combination of tumor excision and radiotherapy appears to provide adequate local control for other histologic types as well. However, patients with lobular cancer appear to be at somewhat greater risk of mammary failure, and recurrences in such patients tend to be multifocal and multicentric. PMID:2538219

  9. Acquired Lymphangiectasia of the Breast After Breast Conserving Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Murat Özgür; Dener, Cenap

    2015-12-01

    Lymphangiectasia is characterized by vesicular dilation of lymphatic vessels and is generally a complication of radiotherapy or surgery of various malignant tumors such as breast and cervical cancers. Although it is not a precancerous disease, correct diagnosis is important to rule out Stewart-Treves syndrome which is defined as lymphangiosarcoma that develops in long-standing chronic postmastectomy lymphedema. Observation alone or many therapeutic options including cryosurgery, electrocauterization, sclerotherapy, and excision have been widely used in the management. Herein, a case of breast lymphangiectasia was presented as a late and rare complication of breast cancer-related therapies. PMID:27011587

  10. Interrogating a Multifactorial Model of Breast Conserving Therapy with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Remi; Garbey, Marc; Moore, Linda W.; Bass, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Most women with early stage breast cancer do not require removal of the entire breast to treat their cancer; instead, up to 70% of women can be effectively and safely treated by breast conserving therapy (BCT) with surgical removal of the tumor only (lumpectomy) followed by radiation treatment of the remaining breast tissue. Unfortunately, the final contour and cosmesis of the treated breast is suboptimal in approximately 30% of patients. The ability to accurately predict breast contour after BCT for breast cancer could significantly improve patient decision-making regarding the choice of surgery for breast cancer. Our overall hypothesis is that the complex interplay among mechanical forces due to gravity, breast tissue constitutive law distribution, inflammation induced by radiotherapy and internal stress generated by the healing process play a dominant role in determining the success or failure of lumpectomy in preserving the breast contour and cosmesis. We have shown here from a first patient study that even in the idealistic situation of excellent cosmetic outcome this problem requires multiscale modeling. We propose a method to decide which component of the model works best for each phase of healing and what parameters should be considered dominant and patient specific. This patient study is part of a clinical trial registered on ClinicalTrial.gov, identifier NCT02310711. PMID:25906048

  11. Hypofractionation with no boost after breast conservation in early-stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arcadipane, Francesca; Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Colle, Chiara; Rondi, Nadia; Di Muzio, Jacopo; Pelle, Emanuela; Martini, Stefania; Ala, Ada; Airoldi, Mario; Donadio, Michela; De Sanctis, Corrado; Castellano, Isabella; Ragona, Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate local control, survival and toxicity profile of a consecutive cohort of early-stage breast cancer (EBC) patients treated with adjuvant hypofractionated radiotherapy (HF) with no boost delivered to the lumpectomy cavity, after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Between 2005 and 2015, a total of 493 women affected with EBC were treated with HF (46 Gy/20 fractions or 40.05 Gy/15 fractions) to the whole breast without boost to tumor bed, because of age and/or favorable tumor characteristics. The primary endpoint was 5-year actuarial local control (LC); secondary endpoints included survival, toxicity profile and cosmesis. Median follow-up was 57 months (range 6-124). Actuarial 5-year overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and LC were 96.3, 98.9, 97.8 and 98.6 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, tumor stage (T1 vs. T2) and hormonal status (positive vs. negative estrogen receptors) were significantly correlated with LC. Only 2 % of patients experienced ≥G3 acute skin toxicity. Late toxicity was mild with only 1 case of G3 fibrosis. Most of the patients (95 %) had good-excellent cosmetic results. HF to the whole breast with no boost delivered to the tumor bed is a safe and effective option for a population of low-risk breast cancer patients after BCS, with excellent 5-year LC, mild toxicity profile and promising cosmetic outcome. A subgroup of patients with larger tumors and/or with no estrogen receptor expression may potentially benefit from treatment intensification with a boost dose to the lumpectomy cavity. PMID:27573380

  12. Breast cancer: Actual methods of treatment and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Murawa, Paweł; Murawa, Dawid; Adamczyk, Beata; Połom, Karol

    2014-01-01

    The recent ten to twenty years have seen a substantial progress in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A rapid development of various curative options has led to the improvement of treatment outcomes, while paying more and more attention to the aspects of quality of life and cosmetic effect. In our publication, we wish to outline certain trends in the development of modern treatment of breast cancer. Among topics discussed are new forms of molecular diagnostics, new approach to the idea of sentinel node biopsy, as well as new techniques for delivery of medical procedures, the increasing use of nomograms, progress in the techniques of breast conservative treatment, modern approach to occult breast lesions, the increasing use of neoadjuvant treatment and intraoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24936340

  13. Denosumab in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan C; van der Padt, Annemieke; Sleijfer, Stefan; Jager, Agnes

    2013-10-01

    The bone is the most common site to which breast cancer metastasises. Recently, denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) has been developed as a new targeted bone therapy. In a large randomized phase III study with a head-to-head comparison of denosumab to zoledronic acid in patients with bone metastases of breast cancer, denosumab significantly delayed the time to first skeletal related event. In the adjuvant setting denosumab significantly increased bone mineral density compared to placebo in a phase III study in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors. Preclinical data suggest an effect of denosumab on tumour growth and even on carcinogenesis. This review describes the current indications for denosumab in the various settings of breast cancer treatment, with special attention for efficacy, short and long term toxicity and other relevant issues for clinical practice. Furthermore possible and necessary future research questions are proposed. PMID:23545361

  14. Management of the regional lymph nodes following breast-conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer: an evolving paradigm.

    PubMed

    Warren, Laura E G; Punglia, Rinaa S; Wong, Julia S; Bellon, Jennifer R

    2014-11-15

    Radiation therapy to the breast following breast conservation surgery has been the standard of care since randomized trials demonstrated equivalent survival compared to mastectomy and improved local control and survival compared to breast conservation surgery alone. Recent controversies regarding adjuvant radiation therapy have included the potential role of additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. This review summarizes the evolution of regional nodal management focusing on 2 topics: first, the changing paradigm with regard to surgical evaluation of the axilla; second, the role for regional lymph node irradiation and optimal design of treatment fields. Contemporary data reaffirm prior studies showing that complete axillary dissection may not provide additional benefit relative to sentinel lymph node biopsy in select patient populations. Preliminary data also suggest that directed nodal radiation therapy to the supraclavicular and internal mammary lymph nodes may prove beneficial; publication of several studies are awaited to confirm these results and to help define subgroups with the greatest likelihood of benefit. PMID:25585780

  15. Management of the Regional Lymph Nodes Following Breast-Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: An Evolving Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Laura E.G.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Bellon, Jennifer R.

    2014-11-15

    Radiation therapy to the breast following breast conservation surgery has been the standard of care since randomized trials demonstrated equivalent survival compared to mastectomy and improved local control and survival compared to breast conservation surgery alone. Recent controversies regarding adjuvant radiation therapy have included the potential role of additional radiation to the regional lymph nodes. This review summarizes the evolution of regional nodal management focusing on 2 topics: first, the changing paradigm with regard to surgical evaluation of the axilla; second, the role for regional lymph node irradiation and optimal design of treatment fields. Contemporary data reaffirm prior studies showing that complete axillary dissection may not provide additional benefit relative to sentinel lymph node biopsy in select patient populations. Preliminary data also suggest that directed nodal radiation therapy to the supraclavicular and internal mammary lymph nodes may prove beneficial; publication of several studies are awaited to confirm these results and to help define subgroups with the greatest likelihood of benefit.

  16. [Extensive conservative treatment of obesity].

    PubMed

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of obesity is complex due to the multifactorial etiology. A modern therapy concept must therefore be tailored to the individual needs and problems and depends on various factors such as degree of obesity, the presence of physical complications, psychological co-morbidities, any treatment measures the patient underwent up to now as well as on motivational factors. Before deciding on a therapeutic measure a structured multidisciplinary cooperation is essential including psychosomatic medicine/psychiatry/psychotherapy, endocrinology, sports medicine, nutritional medicine and surgery as well. The treatment must be carried out in a multidisciplinary team and includes an adequate therapy of comorbidities and sometimes a psychopharmacological support. The success of a conservative treatment of obesity is remarkable and long-lasting and can be straightforwardly compared to bariatric surgery in financial as well as ethical terms, although for patients and their physicians the latter often carries the allure of quick success. PMID:23385187

  17. Breast Augmentation after Conservation Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, James; Hsieh, Frank; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data regarding outcomes for patients undergoing breast augmentation with implants after breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy. This retrospective study examined outcomes for patients with breast implant-only augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. Methods: Between June 1998 and December 2010, 671 women underwent prosthetic breast reconstruction. Nineteen patients (2.8%) underwent an augmentation after BCS and radiotherapy. The mean age was 55.8 years (range, 40–69 years). Sixteen of these patients underwent one-stage implant-only breast augmentation, whereas 3 patients underwent two-stage expander and then implant augmentation. Results: All surgeries were successful. The average size of breast implant used was 258.7 g. Seven patients also received contralateral augmentation with an average implant size of 232.2 g. One patient received oral antibiotics for minor wound infection. Patients were judged to have an excellent (14/19; 73.7%), good (3/19; 15.8%), or fair (2/19; 10.5%) cosmetic result. Conclusion: The breasts of selected patients with breast cancer after BCS and radiotherapy. with asymmetry can be adequately augmented with breast implants alone. PMID:27536475

  18. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  19. Conservative treatment of liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Andersson, R; Bengmark, S

    1990-01-01

    A marked change toward a more conservative approach in the treatment of abdominal trauma has been noted, especially during the last decade. This change in regimen was first seen in the handling of splenic trauma, initiated by pediatric surgeons. Later, the concept of conservative management was also introduced among adults and it is now widely accepted. Here, an almost mandatory splenectomy has been replaced by attempts at various forms of splenic salvage. The development followed an initial report by King and Shumacker in 1952 on an increased susceptibility to overwhelming sepsis in splenectomized children, findings which later also were demonstrated among adults. It has also been shown that the bleeding from intraparenchymal lesions with an intact splenic capsule or minor capsular tears frequently ceases spontaneously, hereby making nonoperative management possible in selective cases. PMID:2200210

  20. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  1. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  2. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Breast Cancer? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Breast Cancer Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New ...

  3. Radiation recall dermatitis occurring 6 years and 4 months after breast-conserving surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UBUKATA, MAMIKO; KAMIO, TAKAKO; OHCHI, TETSUYA; NOGUCHI, EIICHIRO; TSUKADA, HIROKO; KAMEOKA, SHINGO

    2016-01-01

    Currently in Japan, breast-conserving therapy, consisting of breast-conserving surgery and post-operative radiation therapy, is performed frequently for the treatment of invasive breast cancer. It has been demonstrated that radiation therapy not only prevents recurrence in the preserved breast, but that it also contributes to improved patient survival. The present study describes the case of a 37-year-old woman with radiation recall dermatitis that occurred 6 years and 4 months after breast-conserving surgery. Erythema with a relatively distinct border was observed at the irradiated site on the left breast; eczema was diagnosed by a dermatologist. Inflammatory breast cancer was ruled out, since chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound and bone scintigraphy were negative. Following ~1 month of topical corticosteroid application and oral second generation antihistamine treatment, the erythema was alleviated and the subjective symptoms also disappeared. Only a few cases of radiation recall dermatitis have been described in the fields of radiology and dermatology, but not yet in the surgical field. In the future, the incidence of radiation recall dermatitis is predicted to increase due to the increasing number of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy. Whether in the surgical, radiological or dermatological field, if erythema is detected at the irradiated site during post-operative follow-up, routine care should be provided, keeping in mind the possibility of radiation recall dermatitis and inflammatory breast cancer. PMID:27123065

  4. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  5. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) combined with postoperative radiotherapy is a standard therapy for early-stage breast cancer patients. In addition, recent developments in oncoplastic surgery have improved cosmetic outcomes and patient satisfaction. Therefore, a breast surgeon’s current role in BCS is not only to perform a curative resection of cancerous lesions with adequate surgical margins, but also to preserve the shape and appearance of the treated breast. Endoscopy-assisted breast-conserving surgery (EBCS), which has the advantage of a less noticeable scar, was developed more than ten years ago. Recently, some clinical studies have reported the feasibility, oncological outcomes, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction of EBCS. Herein, we will review the EBCS clinical studies that have been conducted so far and discuss current issues regarding this operative method. PMID:25083503

  6. True Local Recurrences after Breast Conserving Surgery have Poor Prognosis in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Serkan; Ordu, Cetin; Alco, Gul; Bozdogan, Atilla; Elbuken, Filiz; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Agacayak, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Eralp, Yesim; Dincer, Maktav

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed at investigating clinical and histopathologic features of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and their effects on survival after breast conservation therapy. Methods: 1,400 patients who were treated between 1998 and 2007 and had breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for early breast cancer (cT1-2/N0-1/M0) were evaluated. Demographic and pathologic parameters, radiologic data, treatment, and follow-up related features of the patients were recorded. Results: 53 patients (3.8%) had IBTR after BCS within a median follow-up of 70 months. The mean age was 45.7 years (range, 27-87 years), and 22 patients (41.5%) were younger than 40 years. 33 patients (62.3%) had true recurrence (TR) and 20 were classified as new primary (NP). The median time to recurrence was shorter in TR group than in NP group (37.0 (6-216) and 47.5 (11-192) months respectively; p = 0.338). Progesterone receptor positivity was significantly higher in the NP group (p = 0.005). The overall 5-year survival rate in the NP group (95.0%) was significantly higher than that of the TR group (74.7%, p < 0.033). Multivariate analysis showed that younger age (<40 years), large tumor size (>20 mm), high grade tumor and triple-negative molecular phenotype along with developing TR negatively affected overall survival (hazard ratios were 4.2 (CI 0.98-22.76), 4.6 (CI 1.07-13.03), 4.0 (CI 0.68-46.10), 6.5 (CI 0.03-0.68), and 6.5 (CI 0.02- 0.80) respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the local recurrences after BCS in our study were true recurrences, which resulted in a poorer outcome as compared to new primary tumors. Moreover, younger age (<40), large tumor size (>2 cm), high grade, triple negative phenotype, and having true recurrence were identified as independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on overall survival in this dataset of patients with recurrent breast cancer. In conjunction with a more intensive follow-up program, the role of adjuvant therapy

  7. Skeletal Manifestations of Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M.; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  8. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Sophocles H.; Frank, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  9. Breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomies: predictors of complications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Voineskos, Sophocles H; Frank, Simon G; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed using a variety of techniques, most commonly categorized into an alloplastic approach or an autologous tissue method. Both strategies have certain risk factors that influence reconstructive outcomes and complication rates. In alloplastic breast reconstruction, surgical outcomes and complication rates are negatively impacted by radiation, smoking, increased body mass index (BMI), hypertension, and prior breast conserving therapy. Surgical factors such as the type of implant material, undergoing immediate breast reconstruction, and the use of fat grafting can improve patient satisfaction and aesthetic outcomes. In autologous breast reconstruction, radiation, increased BMI, certain previous abdominal surgery, smoking, and delayed reconstruction are associated with higher complication rates. Though a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common type of flap used for autologous breast reconstruction, pedicled TRAMs are more likely to be associated with fat necrosis than a free TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap. Fat grafting can also be used to improve aesthetic outcomes in autologous reconstruction. This article focuses on factors, both patient and surgical, that are predictors of complications and outcomes in breast reconstruction. PMID:26645003

  10. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tadashi; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Matsu, Akira; Masamura, Shigeru; Kitajima, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has become popular, especially for patients with advanced breast cancer. The pros and cons of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for treating breast cancer patients are reviewed. The advantages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are 1) overall survival and recurrence-free survival rate are the same as post-operative chemotherapy, 2) serves as an in vivo sensitivity test, 3) increases the rate of breast conserving therapy, 4) facilitates the study of cancer biology. On the other hand, the disadvantages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are 1) it modifies the stage, 2) treatment delay of PD cases, 3) residual intraductal component may be left behind after breast conserving surgery, 4) there are some cases of over-treatment. Combination chemotherapy is one possible way to increase the pathological CR rate, although the optimal order and cycles have not been determined. To avoid residual cancer cells after breast conserving surgery, the shrinkage pattern should be evaluated by MRI. Core needle biopsy should be performed before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to avoid over-treatment. It is essential to develop more effective regimens and stratify patients based on predictive factors. PMID:12196715

  11. Mammographic compression after breast conserving therapy: Controlling pressure instead of force

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, J. E. de Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Heeten, G. J. den

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: X-ray mammography is the primary tool for early detection of breast cancer and for follow-up after breast conserving therapy (BCT). BCT-treated breasts are smaller, less elastic, and more sensitive to pain. Instead of the current force-controlled approach of applying the same force to each breast, pressure-controlled protocols aim to improve standardization in terms of physiology by taking breast contact area and inelasticity into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential for pressure protocols to reduce discomfort and pain, particularly the number of severe pain complaints for BCT-treated breasts. Methods: A prospective observational study including 58 women having one BCT-treated breast and one untreated nonsymptomatic breast, following our hospital's 18 decanewton (daN) compression protocol was performed. Breast thickness, applied force, contact area, mean pressure, breast volume, and inelasticity (mean E-modulus) were statistically compared between the within-women breast pairs, and data were used as predictors for severe pain, i.e., scores 7 and higher on an 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Curve-fitting models were used to estimate how pressure-controlled protocols affect breast thickness, compression force, and pain experience. Results: BCT-treated breasts had on average 27% smaller contact areas, 30% lower elasticity, and 30% higher pain scores than untreated breasts (allp < 0.001). Contact area was the strongest predictor for severe pain (p < 0.01). Since BCT-treatment is associated with an average 0.36 dm{sup 2} decrease in contact area, as well as increased pain sensitivity, BCT-breasts had on average 5.3 times higher odds for severe pain than untreated breasts. Model estimations for a pressure-controlled protocol with a 10 kPa target pressure, which is below normal arterial pressure, suggest an average 26% (range 10%–36%) reduction in pain score, and an average 77% (range 46%–95%) reduction of the odds for severe pain

  12. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28%) presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy could bring clear advantages

  13. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery: Volume replacement vs. volume displacement.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, M; Yokoi-Noguchi, M; Ohno, Y; Morioka, E; Nakano, Y; Kosaka, T; Kurita, T

    2016-07-01

    Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery (BCS) has emerged as a third option between conventional BCS and mastectomy. Oncoplastic BCS includes two fundamentally different approaches: volume replacement and volume displacement. The former involves partial mastectomy and immediate reconstruction of the breast with the transposition of autologous tissue from elsewhere, while the latter involves partial mastectomy and using the remaining breast tissue to fill the defect resulting from extirpation of the tumor. There are several benefits associated with oncoplastic BCS. First, it allows partial mastectomy without cosmetic penalties, and can achieve better cosmetic outcomes than total mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction. Second, it avoids the need for total mastectomy in an increasing number of patients without compromising local control. Third, partial breast reconstruction is less extensive and has fewer complications than conventional procedures. Partial mastectomy and partial breast reconstruction can be carried out either simultaneously as a one-stage procedure, or using a two-stage approach. Although patients prefer a one-stage procedure, it requires intraoperative confirmation of complete tumor excision using frozen-section analysis. Moreover, oncoplastic BCS requires combined skills, knowledge, and understanding of both oncological and plastic surgeries, which may be optimally achieved by an oncoplastic surgeon. PMID:26988623

  14. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treatment Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast cancer treatment fact sheet ePublications Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet Print this fact sheet Early-stage breast cancer treatment fact sheet (PDF, 943 KB) Related information ...

  15. [Significance of conservative treatment for faecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schwandner, O

    2012-08-01

    Based on a variety of aetiological factors and combined disorders in faecal incontinence, a conservative treatment option as the primary treatment can be recommended. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy influencing stool consistency and stool passage, pelvic floor exercises and biofeedback as well as local treatment options. However, defining the role of conservative treatment concepts related to success or failure remains a challenging task. The lack of evidence derived from studies is related to a variety of reasons including inclusion criteria, patient selection, treatment standardisation, and the principal difficulty to objectively define functional success. PMID:22933004

  16. [Special considerations in breast cancer treatment of an augmented breast].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Kunos, Csaba; Pesthy, Pál; Bartal, Alexandra; Szabó, Eva; Kásler, Miklós

    2011-10-16

    Breast augmentation surgery involving the use of implants has been one of the most popular plastic surgical procedures for decades. As the multi-million female population who received breast implants ages, the risk of cancer is increasing rapidly, therefore the incidence of malignant disease in association with breast implants will increase as well. Although there is no relationship between tumor development and implants, these cases require special considerations in diagnostics, therapy and follow-up methods. Appropriate multidisciplinary treatment of tumors in augmented breasts corresponding with modern oncoplastic principles can only be accomplished based on adequate oncological, breast and plastic surgical knowledge. Supposing a possible increase of this condition in Hungary, too, authors provide a wide review of the literature on the special oncological and esthetic considerations, for the first time in Hungarian language. PMID:21979221

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  18. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  19. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  20. Mammotome-assisted endoscopic breast-conserving surgery: a novel technique for early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of its minimally invasive and highly accurate nature, the use of Mammotome, a vacuum-assisted breast biopsy device has proven beneficial to the treatment of benign breast lesions. Taking advantage of endoscopic and Mammotome techniques together, we utilized the Mammotome device for therapeutic excision of malignant lesions in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods Between December 2009 and January 2010, two patients with early breast cancer received Mammotome-assisted endoscopic BCSs. Under ultrasound monitoring, the Mammotome system dissected the surrounding tissue and freed the tumor en bloc leaving negative margins; endoscopic axillary lymph node dissection then followed. Results The operation time was less than 180 minutes and the mean blood loss was 60 ml. The post-operative pathology report confirmed two patients to have invasive ductal carcinoma, one without axillary lymph nodes metastasis (0/11) and the other with one lymph node metastasis (1/21). No adverse events were noted. During a mean follow-up of 26.5 months, no evidence of recurrence or metastasis was found. The patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Conclusions Mammotome-assisted endoscopic surgery appears to be a valuable option for early breast cancer. The long-term therapeutic effect remains to be confirmed. PMID:24742110

  1. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.; University of Melbourne, Melbourne

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  2. Neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Naoto T; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the advantage of converting unresectable breast tumors to resectable tumors and allowing more conservative surgery in some mastectomy candidates. Chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, which are recommended in the adjuvant setting, are also considered in the neoadjuvant setting. Here, we review studies of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with breast cancer. PubMed and conference or congress proceedings were searched for clinical studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials of nab-paclitaxel as a neoadjuvant agent in breast cancer. Twenty studies of nab-paclitaxel in the neoadjuvant setting were identified. In addition to reviewing key efficacy and safety data, we discuss how each trial assessed response, focusing on pathologic complete response and residual cancer burden scoring. Safety profiles are also reviewed. nab-Paclitaxel demonstrated antitumor activity and an acceptable safety profile in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Ongoing and future trials will further evaluate preoperative nab-paclitaxel in breast cancer, including in combination with many novel immunological targeted therapies. PMID:27072366

  3. Breast conserving surgery with preservation of the nipple-areola complex as a feasible and safe approach in male breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lanitis, Sophocles; Filippakis, George; Al Mufti, Ragheed; Hadjiminas, Dimitri J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer in men is rare. The evidence about treatment has been derived from data on the management of the disease in women. The usual treatment is for male patients to undergo modified radical mastectomy. There is insufficient experience of breast conserving surgery with preservation of the nipple. The management of patients who demand such an approach for personal reasons remains a challenge for both the surgeon and oncologist. Case presentation A 50-year-old man with a breast cancer was successfully managed with breast conserving surgery with nipple preservation combined with axillary clearance and postoperative radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone treatment. Since there are no similar cases in the literature, we discuss the feasibility, safety and possible indications of such an approach. Conclusion Despite the limited indications and evidence about the safety and efficacy of breast conserving surgery with nipple preservation in men with breast cancer, it is a feasible approach if other options are declined by the patient. More studies are necessary to reach firm conclusions about the safety of such an approach. PMID:18442386

  4. Breast cancer treatment in mutation carriers: surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Biglia, Nicoletta; D'Alonzo, Marta; Sgro, Luca G; Tomasi Cont, Nicoletta; Bounous, Valentina; Robba, Elisabetta

    2016-10-01

    The surgical option which should be reserved for patients with BRCA1/2 mutation and breast cancer diagnosis is still debated. Several aspects should be considered before the surgical decision-making: the risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), the potential survival benefit of prophylactic mastectomy, and the possible risk factors that could either increase or decrease the risk for IBR or CBC. Breast conservative treatment (BCT) does not increase the risk for IBR in BRCA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers in short term follow-up; however, an increased risk for IBR in carriers was observed in studies with long follow-up. In spite of the increased risk for IBR in patients who underwent BCT than patients with mastectomy, no significant difference in breast-cancer specific or overall survival was observed by local treatment type at 15 years. Patients with BRCA mutation had a higher risk for CBC compared with non-carriers and BRCA1-mutation carriers had an increased risk for CBC compared to BRCA2-mutation carriers. Bilateral mastectomy is intended to prevent CBC in BRCA mutation carriers, however, no difference in survival was found if a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was performed or not. For higher-risk groups of BRCA mutated patients, a more-aggressive surgical approach may be preferable, but there are some aspects that should be considered in the surgical decision-making process. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy and performing oophorectomy are associated with a decreased risk for IBR. When considering the risk for CBC, three risk factors were associated with significantly decreased risk: the use of adjuvant tamoxifen, performing oophorectomy and older age at first breast cancer diagnosis. As a result, we could identify a group of patients that might benefit from a more aggressive surgical approach (unilateral mastectomy or unilateral therapeutic mastectomy with concomitant contralateral prophylactic

  5. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk. PMID:24450034

  6. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  7. Three-Dimensional Conformal Simultaneously Integrated Boost Technique for Breast-Conserving Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, Hans Paul van der

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the target coverage and normal tissue dose with the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and the sequential boost technique in breast cancer, and to evaluate the incidence of acute skin toxicity in patients treated with the SIB technique. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early-stage left-sided breast cancer underwent breast-conserving radiotherapy using the SIB technique. The breast and boost planning target volumes (PTVs) were treated simultaneously (i.e., for each fraction, the breast and boost PTVs received 1.81 Gy and 2.3 Gy, respectively). Three-dimensional conformal beams with wedges were shaped and weighted using forward planning. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk with the SIB technique, 28 x (1.81 + 0.49 Gy), were compared with those for the sequential boost technique, 25 x 2 Gy + 8 x 2 Gy. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated for 90 patients treated with the SIB technique according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: PTV coverage was adequate with both techniques. With SIB, more efficiently shaped boost beams resulted in smaller irradiated volumes. The mean volume receiving {>=}107% of the breast dose was reduced by 20%, the mean volume outside the boost PTV receiving {>=}95% of the boost dose was reduced by 54%, and the mean heart and lung dose were reduced by 10%. Of the evaluated patients, 32.2% had Grade 2 or worse toxicity. Conclusion: The SIB technique is proposed for standard use in breast-conserving radiotherapy because of its dose-limiting capabilities, easy implementation, reduced number of treatment fractions, and relatively low incidence of acute skin toxicity.

  8. A Case of Secondary Angiosarcoma of the Breast after Breast-conserving Surgery and Radiation: Review of Radiologic and Pathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Eppelheimer, Christine N; Marti, Jennifer L; Eisenberg, Amanda; Gan, Qiong; Shabalova, Rena; Cohen, Jean-Marc; Fulop, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of the breast is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It can present as a palpable mass or subtle erythematous lesion, depending on the predisposing clinical factors. Erythematous skin lesions may be confused for a benign process, which may lead to a delay in diagnosis. We present a case of an 80-year-old woman who developed secondary angiosarcoma after undergoing breast-conserving therapy for Stage IA breast cancer. In this article, we review our experience with a case of secondary angiosarcoma of the breast and discuss the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of this disease. This case demonstrates the importance of vigilance regarding erythematous or papular breast lesions in the setting of prior local radiation. PMID:26430538

  9. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  10. Time Interval From Breast-Conserving Surgery to Breast Irradiation in Early Stage Node-Negative Breast Cancer: 17-Year Follow-Up Results and Patterns of Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Perera, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: A retrospectivechart review was conducted to determine whether the time interval from breast-conserving surgery to breast irradiation (surgery-radiation therapy interval) in early stage node-negative breast cancer had any detrimental effects on recurrence rates. Methods and Materials: There were 566 patients with T1 to T3, N0 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and breast irradiation and without adjuvant systemic treatment between 1985 and 1992. The surgery-to-radiation therapy intervals used for analysis were 0 to 8 weeks (201 patients), >8 to 12 weeks (233 patients), >12 to 16 weeks (91 patients), and >16 weeks (41 patients). Kaplan-Meier estimates of time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, distant disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Median follow-up was 17.4 years. Patients in all 4 time intervals were similar in terms of characteristics and pathologic features. There were no statistically significant differences among the 4 time groups in local recurrence (P=.67) or disease-free survival (P=.82). The local recurrence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.9%, 11.5%, and 15.0%, respectively. The distant disease relapse rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 10.6%, 15.4%, and 18.5%, respectively. The disease-free failure rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 20%, 32.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. Cause-specific survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 92%, 84.6%, and 79.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 89.3%, 79.2%, and 66.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Surgery-radiation therapy intervals up to 16 weeks from breast-conserving surgery are not associated with any increased risk of recurrence in early stage node-negative breast cancer. There is a steady local recurrence rate of 1% per year with adjuvant radiation alone.

  11. Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I. J.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

  12. Disparities in Breast Cancer Treatment and Survival for Women with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ellen P.; Ngo, Long H.; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Chirikos, Thomas N.; Li, Donglin; Drews, Reed E.; Iezzoni, Lisa I.

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery combined with axillary lymph node dissection and radiotherapy or mastectomy are definitive treatments for women with early-stage breast cancer. Little is known about breast cancer treatment for women with disabilities. Objective To compare initial treatment for early-stage breast cancer between women with and without disabilities and to examine the association of treatment differences and survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 11 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program tumor registries. Participants 100 311 women who received a diagnosis of stage I to IIIA breast cancer at 21 to 64 years of age from 1988 to 1999. Women who qualified for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare at breast cancer diagnosis were considered disabled. Measurements Receipt of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy. For women who had breast-conserving surgery (n = 49 166), the authors examined receipt of radiotherapy and axillary lymph node dissection. Survival was measured from diagnosis until death or until 31 December 2001. Results Women with SSDI and Medicare coverage had lower rates of breast-conserving surgery than other women (43.2% vs. 49.2%; adjusted relative risk, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.76 to 0.84]). Among women who had breast-conserving surgery, women with SSDI and Medicare coverage were less likely than other women to receive radiotherapy (adjusted relative risk, 0.83 [CI, 0.77 to 0.90]) and axillary lymph node dissection (adjusted relative risk, 0.81 [CI, 0.74 to 0.90]). Women with SSDI and Medicare coverage had lower survival rates than those of other women in all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.02 [CI, 1.88 to 2.16]) and breast cancer–specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.31 [CI, 1.18 to 1.45]). Results were similar after adjustment for treatment differences. Limitations Findings are limited to women who qualified for SSDI and Medicare. No data on adjuvant chemotherapy and

  13. Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Edward

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast cancer, shorter radiation schedules are as efficacious for local control and short-term cosmetic results as traditional fractionation regimens. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is done in specialized cancer centres; regional radiation is recommended for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes. Postmastectomy radiation has been shown to have survival benefits for high-risk premenopausal patients. Systemic metastases from breast cancer usually respond satisfactorily to radiation. CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy continues to have an important role in treatment of breast cancer. There have been great advances in radiation therapy in the last decade, but they have raised controversy. Further studies are needed to address the controversies. PMID:12113193

  14. [Conservative treatment of dry eye].

    PubMed

    Hefner, J; Reinshagen, H

    2014-11-01

    The use of topic anti-inflammatory drugs has become very important in the treatment of dry eye disease. Besides the basic therapy including tear replacement, use of serum eye drops and mucolytic eye drops, the topical application of corticosteroids and cyclosporin A is more commonly used in moderate to severe forms of dry eye disease. The consistent treatment of Meibomian gland dysfunction as a frequent reason for evaporative dry eye is also of particular importance. Understanding the chronicity of the disease and long-term compliance are the essential for successful therapy of this widespread disease. PMID:25275793

  15. Vaginal Health During Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy J; Bober, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    There are increasing numbers of breast cancer survivors. Chemotherapy or endocrine therapy result in effects on vaginal health that may affect quality of life. These effects may impact sexual function, daily comfort, or the ability to perform a pelvic examination. Vulvovaginal atrophy, or genitourinary syndrome of menopause, may be treated with nonhormonal or hormonal measures. Breast cancer survivors who are menopausal and/or on endocrine therapy should be screened for issues with vaginal health and counseled about treatment options. PMID:27074843

  16. [Progress in breast cancer treatment over a quarter of a century].

    PubMed

    Tominaga, T

    1999-06-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has changed greatly over the last 25 years in Japan. The use of Halsted's surgical procedure has been reduced in breast conserving treatment, and even the ommision of axillary dissection has been argued recently. On the other hand, endocrine therapy has progressed remarkably with acceptance of tamoxifen in the clinic. Approval of LH-RH analogs and aromatase inhibitors has brought a new era in breast cancer treatment. The introduction of adriamycin, a powerful anticancer drug brought about a rapid increase in response rate and the development of oral type 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derivatives made new treatments possible. S-1 and capecitabine, newly licensed 5-FU derivatives developed in Japan, have attracted notice worldwide. In 1992 the Japan Breast Cancer Society was founded and the level of breast cancer research in Japan has improved remarkably. Treatment results are now camparable to those of western countries. PMID:10410664

  17. True Recurrence Versus New Primary: An Analysis of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrences After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Truong, Pauline T.; McDonald, Rachel E.; Alexander, Cheryl; Ross, Louetta; Ryhorchuk, Aleata; Watson, Peter H.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) can occur in 5-20% of women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Two entities of IBTR have been described: true recurrence (TR), suggested to be regrowth of disease at the tumor bed, and new primary (NP), distinct from the index lesion in histology and location. This study compared survival outcomes between two patient cohorts classified clinically as having either TR or NP. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 1999, 6,020 women were referred to the BC Cancer Agency with newly diagnosed pT1-2, N0-1, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery. Of these, 289 patients had pathologically confirmed IBTR. Retrospective analysis was performed, and a set of decision rules was applied to classify cases as TR or NP based on change in histology, grade, hormone receptor status, and tumor location. Of 289 patients, 129 (45%) were classified as having TR and 139 (48%) as having NP; 21 (7%) were unclassified. Results: The distributions of age at diagnosis, age at recurrence, and histopathologic factors were similar in the TR and NP cohorts (all p > 0.05). The mean time to recurrence was shorter in TR patients than in NP patients (4.8 years vs. 6.3 years, p = 0.001). Treatment of the IBTR did not differ between the two groups. In the TR and NP cohorts, breast cancer-specific survival was 55.7% vs. 61.3% (p = 0.93), and overall survival was 43.7% vs. 54.8% (p = 0.53). Conclusions: Time to recurrence is significantly shorter in patients with IBTR classified as true recurrence compared to new primary. Non-statistically significant trends for less favorable survival were observed for patients with TR. Further investigation of the hypothesis that TR and NP tumors are distinct entities with different survival prognoses will require standardized pathology review and molecular analyses.

  18. In Search of a Gold Standard Scoring System for the Subjective Evaluation of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Breast-Conserving Therapy.

    PubMed

    Racz, Jennifer M; Hong, Nicole Look; Latosinsky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The absence of a widely accepted method for aesthetic evaluation following breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer limits the ability to evaluate cosmetic outcomes. In this study, two different panel scoring approaches were compared in an attempt to identify a gold standard scoring system for subjectively assessing cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy. Standardized photographs of each participant were evaluated independently by twelve health care professionals involved in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment using the Danoff four-point scale. Individual Danoff scores were combined using two methods, a random sample "three-panel" score and an iterative "Delphi-panel" score, in order to create a final cosmetic score for each patient. Agreement between these two aggregative approaches was assessed with a weighted kappa (wk) statistic. Patient and professional recruitment occurred at two separate tertiary care multi-disciplinary breast health centers. Women with unilateral breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving therapy (segmental mastectomy or lumpectomy and radiotherapy) and were at least 2 years after radiotherapy were asked to participate. Ninety-seven women were evaluated. The Delphi approach required three rounds of evaluation to obtain greater than 50% agreement in all photographs. The wk statistic between scores generated from the "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" approaches was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.71-0.89), thus demonstrating substantial agreement. Evaluation of cosmetic outcomes following breast-conserving therapy using a "three-panel" and "Delphi-panel" score provide similar results, confirming the reliability of either approach for subjective evaluation. Simplicity of use and interpretation favors the "three-panel" score. Future work should concentrate on the integration of the three-panel score with objective and patient-reported scales to generate a comprehensive cosmetic evaluation platform. PMID:25940058

  19. Neoadjuvant endocrine treatment in early breast cancer: An overlooked alternative?

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; van Dam, V C N; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Rolfo, C; Trinh, X B

    2016-03-01

    During the last decade neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) has moved from being reserved for elderly and frail non-chemotherapy candidates to a primary systemic modality in selected patients with hormone sensitive breast cancer. Neoadjuvant hormonal treatment in patients with hormone receptor positive, HER-2 negative early breast cancer is proven to be an effective and safe option; it is associated with a higher rate of breast conserving surgery (BCS), may reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy and enables a delay of surgery for medical or practical reasons. Clinical responses range from 13% to 100% with at least 3 months of NET. Methods of assessing response should include MRI of the breast, particularly in lobular tumours. In studies comparing tamoxifen with aromatase inhibitors (AI), AI proved to be superior in terms of tumour response and rates of BCS. Change in Ki67 is accepted as a validated endpoint for comparing endocrine neoadjuvant agents. Levels of Ki67 during treatment are more closely related to long-term prognosis than pretreatment Ki67. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy provides a unique opportunity for studies of endocrine responsiveness and the development of new experimental drugs combined with systemic hormonal treatment. PMID:26776766

  20. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  1. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  2. Oncoplastic Surgical Techniques for Personalized Breast Conserving Surgery in Breast Cancer Patient with Small to Moderate Sized Breast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Dug; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Wan Wook; Jung, Jin Hyang

    2011-01-01

    Oncoplastic surgery has revolutionized the field of breast conserving surgery (BCS). The final aims of this technique are to obtain an adequate resection margin that will reduce the rate of local recurrence while simultaneously improving cosmetic outcomes. To obtain successful results after oncoplastic surgery, it is imperative that patients be risk-stratified based on risk factors associated with positive margins, that relevant imaging studies be reviewed, and that the confirmation of negative margins be confirmed during the initial operation. Patients who had small- to moderate-sized breasts are the most likely to be dissatisfied with the cosmetic outcome of surgery, even if the defect is small; therefore, oncoplastic surgery in this population is warranted. Reconstruction of the remaining breast tissue is divided into volume displacement and volume replacement techniques. The use of the various oncoplastic surgeries is based on tumor location and excised breast volume. If the excised volume is less than 100 g, the tumor location is used to determine which technique should be used, with the most commonly used technique being volume displacement. However, if the excised volume is greater than 100 g, the volume replacement method is generally used, and in cases where more than 150 g is excised, the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap may be used to obtain a pleasing cosmetic result. The local recurrence rate after oncoplastic surgery was lower than that of conventional BCS, as oncoplastic surgery reduced the rate of positive resection margins by resecting a wider section of glandular tissue. If the surgeon understands the advantages and disadvantages of oncoplastic surgery, and the multidisciplinary breast team is able to successfully collaborate, then the success rate of BCS with partial breast reconstruction can be increased while also yielding a cosmetically appealing outcome. PMID:22323910

  3. Multi-Institutional Experience of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Black vs White Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Whole Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Carl; Bai, Harrison; Neboori, Hanmanth; Takita, Cristiane; Motwani, Sabin; Wright, Jean L.; Hobeika, Georges; Haffty, Bruce G.; Jones, Tiffanie; Goyal, Sharad; Moran, Meena S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Given the paucity of data on racial disparities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the data from a multi-institutional cohort of DCIS patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast radiation therapy (RT) were analyzed to determine whether racial disparities or differences exist. Methods and Materials: A total of 533 white and 76 black DCIS patients from 3 university-based cancer centers were uniformly treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT. All patient data were collected and analyzed as a function of race. Results: The median follow-up was 5.2 years. No significant racial differences were seen in tumor size, age at diagnosis, estrogen receptor status, necrosis, or grade (all P>.05). Of the treatment parameters, the RT dose delivered, boost, positive margin rates, frequency of hormone receptor status assessment, and receipt of hormonal therapy for the 2 cohorts did not significantly differ (all P>.05). The local relapse-free survival was similar at 5 years (96.1% and 98.1%, P=.399) and 10 years (92.8% vs 95.8%, P=.360), with no significant overall survival difference at 10 years (94.0% vs 88.9%, P=.290) between the white and black patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, race was not an independent predictor of local relapse-free survival or overall survival when accounting for age, grade, and margin status. Conclusion: In our large cohort of DCIS patients uniformly treated at 3 institutions with breast conservation without any apparent differences in treatment delivery parameters, we demonstrated that the clinical and pathologic features and local survival outcomes did not differ as a function of race. Our results suggest that when black patients with DCIS are appropriately selected for breast conservation and receive adjuvant RT without racial disparities in the treatment parameters, differences in the outcomes as a function of race do not exist.

  4. Conservative surgical treatment of tongue hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Borello, Giovanni; Arcuri, Francesco; Nicolotti, Matteo; Brucoli, Matteo; Farri, Filippo; Valletti, Paolo Aluffi

    2012-07-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a vascular tumor that is believed to arise from the Zimmermann's pericytes, smooth muscles cells localized around the blood vessels. This tumor presents as a slowly enlarging painless mass with a clear predilection for the musculoskeletal system. The aim of this work was to introduce a peculiar case of a tongue hemangiopericytoma managed by conservative surgical treatment. PMID:22801154

  5. [Changes in the surgical treatment of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, T

    1988-01-01

    The principle in surgery for breast cancer is to clean out and remove en masse the primary lesion within the breast as well as the lymph nodes (metastases) in the vicinity. This fundamental approach to surgical intervention was established by Halsted and Meyer at the close of the nineteenth century. This has been termed typical mastectomy to this day and standard radical mastectomy has been the method used. Later, a more expanded type of radical surgery was performed on somewhat more advanced cases, but a less radical approach then came about. Since 1960, the excision of nodes in the cerebrum and cerebellum was not used for early cancer, and in some cases a more conservative approach in which only part of the breasts was removed resulted, as Europe and the United States were heavily toward reduced operations. Thus, it was considered that axillary expurgation was needed, but that excision of nodes in the cerebrum and cerebellum was not essential in every case. One approach is less aggressive, whether as to the expurgation or excision of the surrounding area of the breast; in certain cases, treatment may be combined with radiation and the surgery minimized. The above-mentioned operative procedure which leaves brain nodes intact has been called modified radical mastectomy. This is subdivided into the Auchincloss method, in which modes in the cerebellum are extirpated, and the Patey method, in which the cerebral nodes are preserved. In Japan this approach has been used for breast cancer in Stage I and Stage II, with surgery gradually becoming the mainstream. Conservative breast operation procedures such as tumor extirpation, partial breast removal or segmental resection are still rare in Japan but very common in Europe and the United States. Since remote metastases frequently occur through the circulation in breast cancer, in recent years it has generally been regarded as a whole-body disease and, in terms of the advance of the cancer in each case, the method of

  6. Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation: new standard in early breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Su; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Noorie; Lee, Sea-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) has been proved effective and safe and even better for late or acute radiation toxicity for early breast cancer. Moreover, it improves patient convenience, quality of life and is expected to be advantageous in the medical care system by reducing overall cost. In this review, we examined key randomized trials of HF-WBI, focusing on adequate patient selection as suggested by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) guideline and the radiobiologic aspects of HF-WBI in relation to its adoption into clinical settings. Further investigation to identify the current practice pattern or cost effectiveness is warranted under the national health insurance service system in Korea. PMID:27306774

  7. Water-conserving cooling tower treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mathie, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Water conservation in cooling towers and evaporative coolers can finally become a reality. Also, fouled closed hot and chilled water systems can be restored to near original efficiency using the same technology. The barrier limiting the traditional water treatment industry from serious involvement in water conservation is the lack of a really good chemical to control scale. Poor scale inhibitors are the reason for a heavy bleed. Minerals concentrated by evaporation is wasted to the sewer while low solids make-up water fills the tower. Water conservation is important because of the increasing usable water shortage, the cost to add infrastructure to deliver increasing amounts of water to accommodate growth and the limitations imposed on disposal to the sewer. Now, due to innovations in chemical treatment, users of cooling towers and evaporative coolers can conserve water. In this presentation the author assumes the audience has some knowledge of traditional water treatment. Except for a few general references to establish common understanding, the author confines his remarks to discussing an advanced technology developed by DIAS, Inc., and the economics of its use.

  8. Institutional Variation in the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Caprice C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hughes, Melissa E.; Edge, Stephen B.; Theriault, Richard; Wilson, John L.; Carter, W. Bradford; Blayney, Douglas W.; Niland, Joyce; Weeks, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between supply of subspecialty care and type of procedure preferentially performed for early stage breast cancer. Background Three surgical options exist for early stage breast cancer: (1) breast conserving surgery (BCS), (2) mastectomy with reconstruction (RECON), and (3) mastectomy alone. Current guidelines recommend that surgical treatment decisions should be based on patient preference if a patient is eligible for all 3. However, studies demonstrate persistent variation in the use of BCS and RECON. Methods Patients undergoing an operation for DCIS or stage I or II breast cancer at NCCN institutions between 2000 and 2006 were identified. Institutional procedure rates were determined. Spearman correlations measured the association between procedure types. Patient-level logistic regression models investigated predictors of procedure type and association with institutional supply of subspecialty care. Results Among 10,607 patients, 19% had mastectomy alone, 60% BCS, and 21% RECON. The institutional rate of BCS and RECON were strongly correlated (r = −0.80, P = 0.02). Institution was more important than all patient factors except age in predicting receipt of RECON or BCS. RECON was more likely for patients treated at an institution with a greater supply of reconstructive surgeons or where patients live further from radiation facilities. RECON was less likely at institutions with longer waiting times for surgery with reconstruction. Conclusions Even within the NCCN, a consortium of multidisciplinary cancer centers, the use of BCS and mastectomy with reconstruction substantially varies by institution and correlates with the supply of subspecialty care. PMID:21725233

  9. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI) delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT) are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT. PMID:25180098

  10. Breast Conservation Therapy Versus Mastectomy: Shared Decision-Making Strategies and Overcoming Decisional Conflicts in Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Margenthaler, Julie A; Ollila, David W

    2016-10-01

    Although breast-conserving therapy is considered the preferred treatment for the majority of women with early-stage breast cancer, mastectomy rates in this group remain high. The patient, physician, and systems factors contributing to a decision for mastectomy are complicated. Understanding the individual patient's values and goals when making this decision is paramount to providing a shared decision-making process that will yield the desired outcome. The cornerstones of this discussion include education of the patient, access to decision-aid tools, and time to make an informed decision. However, it is also paramount for the physician to understand that a significant majority of women with an informed and complete understanding of their surgical choices will still prefer mastectomy. The rates of breast conservation versus mastectomy should not be considered a quality measure alone. Rather, the extent by which patients are informed, involved in decision-making, and undergoing treatments that reflect their goals is the true test of quality. Here we explore some of the factors that impact the patient preference for breast conservation versus mastectomy and how shared decision-making can be maximized for patient satisfaction. PMID:27464606

  11. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  12. The Assessment of the Magnitude of Frontal Plane Postural Changes in Breast Cancer Patients After Breast-Conserving Therapy or Mastectomy - Follow-up Results 1 Year After the Surgical Procedure.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Iwona; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Hagner, Wojciech; Nowacka, Krystyna; Zegarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Polish women. Management of breast cancer includes surgical treatment as well as adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, and combination regimens. One of the adverse consequences of oncological management of breast cancer may involve changes in frontal plane body posture. The objective of the study was to assess the frontal plane body posture changes in women treated for breast cancer. A prospective study including 101 of female breast cancer patients subjected to surgical treatment in the period from October 2011 to October 2012 (mastectomy was performed in 51 cases while breast conserving therapy was administered in the remaining 50 cases). The body posture in the frontal plane was assessed using the computer-assisted postural assessment system with Moiré fringe analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed in pre-operational postural parameters of interest. Exam II revealed highly significant differences in SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Exam III revealed highly significant differences in PIA, SH, SD and SLA values; results suggesting more pronounced dysfunction were observed in the MAS group. Undesirable postural changes occur both in women who were treated with radical mastectomy and in those who underwent breast-conserving surgery; breast-conserving surgery is associated with decreased severity in postural abnormalities. PMID:26510430

  13. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905

  14. Patient preferences regarding intraoperative versus external beam radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael D; Conolly, Jay; Park, Catherine; Sakata, Theadora; Mohan, Aron J; Harrison, Brittany L; Hayes, Mitchell; Esserman, Laura J; Ozanne, Elissa M

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A Trial is an international randomized, prospective trial comparing intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for equivalence to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) following lumpectomy for invasive breast cancer in selected low-risk patients; early results suggest that outcomes are similar. In addition to effectiveness data and cost considerations, the preferences of patients should help inform practice. This study was undertaken to explore and quantify preference in choosing between IORT and the current standard, EBRT. Eligible subjects were current or past candidates for breast-conserving surgery and radiation being seen at the University of California, San Francisco Breast Care Center. A trade-off technique varying the risk of local recurrence for IORT was used to quantify any additional accepted risk that these patients would accept to receive either treatment. Patients were first presented with a slideshow comparing EBRT with the experimental IORT option before being asked their preferences given hypothetical 10-year local recurrence risks. Patients were then given a questionnaire on demographic, social and clinical factors. Data from 81 patients were analyzed. The median additional accepted risk to have IORT was 2.3 % (-9 to 39 %), mean 3.2 %. Only 7 patients chose to accept additional risk for EBRT; 22 accepted IORT at no additional risk; and the remaining 52 chose IORT with some additional risk. Patients weigh trade-offs of risks and benefits when presented with medical treatment choices. Our results show that the majority of breast cancer patients will accept a small increment of local risk for a simpler delivery of radiation. Further studies that incorporate outcome and side effect data from the TARGIT-A trial clarify the expected consequences of a local recurrence, and include an expanded range of radiation options that could help guide clinical decision making in this area. PMID:24292868

  15. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  16. Continuing Risk of Ipsilateral Breast Relapse After Breast-Conserving Therapy at Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Kreike, Bas; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Velde, Tony van de; Borger, Jacques; Peterse, Hans; Rutgers, Emiel; Bartelink, Harry; Vijver, Marc J. van de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Currently, the local treatment of most patients with early invasive breast cancer consists of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We have previously reported on the risk factors for ipsilateral breast relapse (IBR) in 1,026 patients treated with BCT after a median follow-up of 5.5 years. In the present study, we evaluated the IBR incidence and the risk factors for IBR after prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: We updated the disease outcome for all 1,026 patients using the clinical information collected from the medical registration of The Netherlands Cancer Institute and performed step-wise proportional hazard Cox regression analysis to identify the risk factors associated with an increased risk of IBR after BCT at long-term follow-up. Results: After a median follow-up of 13.3 years, 114 patients had developed an IBR as the first event. The IBR rate was 9.3% and 13.8%, respectively, at 10 and 15 years. Also, the increase in IBR was continuous without reaching a plateau, even after 15 years. Univariate analysis showed that involved surgical resection margins, young age, vascular invasion, and the presence and quantity of an in situ component are risk factors for IBR. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor-positive surgical resection margins (hazard ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-5.2, p = 0.0002) or the presence of vascular invasion (hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.2, p = 0.004) is the major independent risk factor for IBR. Conclusions: The data from long-term follow-up showed a constant increase in IBR among patients treated by BCT, even after 15 years, without reaching a plateau. Involved surgical resection margins and vascular invasion were the most important risk factors for IBR.

  17. [Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer: implications for the pathologist].

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Sophie; Perallon, Romain; Alunni, Jean-Philippe; Charitansky, Hélène; Leaha, Christina; Gonzalez, Aurélie Maran; Chateau, Marie-Christine; Simony-Lafontaine, Joelle; Jacot, William; Gutowski, Marian; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali

    2011-12-01

    These past few years, neoadjuvant strategy has taken an increasing place in the management of breast cancer patients. This strategy is mainly indicated to obtain a tumour bulk regression allowing a breast conserving surgery in patients that otherwise would have undergone mastectomy. Of note, development of new chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies has critically helped in the progress of neoadjuvant strategy as it is currently associated with better pathological response rates. In this context, the pathologist is at the crossroad of this multidisciplinary process. First, he provides on the initial core needle biopsy the tumour pathological characteristics that are critical for the choice of treatment strategy, i.e. histological type, histological grade, proliferative activity (mitotic count and Ki67/MIB1 index labeling), hormone receptor status (oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and HER2 status. Secondly, the pathologist evaluates the pathological response and the status of surgical margins with regards to the residual tumour on the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant treatment. These parameters are important for the management of the patient, since it has been shown that complete pathological response is associated with improved disease free survival. Several grading systems are used to assess the pathological response in breast and axillary lymph nodes. The most frequently used in France are currently the systems described by Sataloff et al. and Chevallier et al. In this review, we detail the different steps involving the pathologist in neoadjuvant setting, with special regards to the quality process and future perspectives such as emerging predictive biomarkers. PMID:22172117

  18. Outcomes in Black Patients With Early Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Michael A.; Mell, Loren K.; Hasselle, Michael D.; Karrison, Theodore G.; MacDermed, Dhara; Meriwether, Amber; Witt, Mary Ellyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2011-02-01

    Background: The race-specific impact of prognostic variables for early breast cancer is unknown for black patients undergoing breast conservation. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 1,231 consecutive patients {>=}40 years of age with Stage I-II invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy at the University of Chicago Hospitals and affiliates between 1986 and 2004. Patients were classified as either black or nonblack. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the effects of known prognostic factors and interactions with race. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 82 months. Thirty-four percent of patients were black, and 66% were nonblack (Caucasian, Hispanic, and Asian). Black patients had a poorer 10-year overall survival (64.6% vs. 80.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-2.06) and 10-year disease-free survival (58.1% vs. 75.4%; HR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18-1.89) compared with nonblack patients. Tumor sizes were similar between nonblack and black patients with mammographically detected tumors (1.29 cm vs. 1.20 cm, p = 0.20, respectively). Tumor size was significantly associated with overall survival (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.12-1.96) in black patients with mammographically detected tumors but not in nonblack patients (HR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.78-1.53), suggesting that survival in black patients depends more strongly on tumor size in this subgroup. Tests for race-size method of detection interactions were statistically significant for overall survival (p = 0.049), locoregional control (p = 0.036), and distant control (p = 0.032) and borderline significant for disease-free survival (p = 0.067). Conclusion: Despite detection at comparable sizes, the prognostic effect of tumor size in patients with mammographically detected tumors is greater for black than in nonblack patients.

  19. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan; Palen, Job van der; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the incidence and prognostic factors of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in a large, population-based, single-center study with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 3595 cases in which BCT was performed in 3824 women with stage I or II breast cancer. The incidence of IBTR was analyzed over time and was based on IBTR as first event. Results: The 15-year local relapse-free survival was 90.9%. The hazard estimates for IBTR showed a time course with 2 peaks, the first at approximately 5 years and the second, twice as high, at 12 years. Stratifying subjects by age and margin status showed that, for women ≤40 years old with negative margins, adjuvant systemic therapy led to a 5-fold reduced risk of recurrence compared to none, and the presence of lymph vascular space invasion (LVSI) had a 3-fold increased risk compared to its absence. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5) and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ in the lumpectomy specimen (HR 2.3) were the only 2 risk factors. Conclusions: We demonstrated a pattern in risk of IBTR over time, with 2 peaks, first at approximately 5 years and a second, much higher peak at approximately 12 years, especially for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old with tumor-free resection margins, we noted that the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy and the presence of LVSI were independent prognostic factors of IBTR. For women >40 years old, the presence of LVSI and the presence of lobular carcinoma in situ were independent risk factors.

  20. Similar Survival With Breast Conservation Therapy or Mastectomy in the Management of Young Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Usama; Morris, Christopher; Neuner, Geoffrey; Koshy, Matthew; Kesmodel, Susan; Buras, Robert; Chumsri, Saranya; Bao Ting; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Feigenberg, Steven

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival outcomes of young women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) or mastectomy, using a large, population-based database. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, information was obtained for all female patients, ages 20 to 39 years old, diagnosed with T1-2 N0-1 M0 breast cancer between 1990 and 2007, who underwent either BCT (lumpectomy and radiation treatment) or mastectomy. Multivariable and matched pair analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) of patients undergoing BCT and mastectomy. Results: A total of 14,764 women were identified, of whom 45% received BCT and 55% received mastectomy. Median follow-up was 5.7 years (range, 0.5-17.9 years). After we accounted for all patient and tumor characteristics, multivariable analysis found that BCT resulted in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.04; p = 0.16) and CSS (HR, 0.93; CI, 0.83-1.05; p = 0.26) similar to that of mastectomy. Matched pair analysis, including 4,644 BCT and mastectomy patients, confirmed no difference in OS or CSS: the 5-, 10-, and15-year OS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 92.5%, 83.5%, and 77.0% and 91.9%, 83.6%, and 79.1%, respectively (p = 0.99), and the 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates for BCT and mastectomy were 93.3%, 85.5%, and 79.9% and 92.5%, 85.5%, and 81.9%, respectively (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Our analysis of this population-based database suggests that young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates whether treated with BCT or mastectomy. These patients should be counseled appropriately regarding their treatment options and should not choose a mastectomy based on the assumption of improved survival.

  1. Treatment Modification in Young Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Anton; Salterberg, Annette; Untch, Michael; Liedtke, Cornelia; Stickeler, Elmar; Papathemelis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients not older than 40 years are referred to as young patients. These women benefit from chemo-, endocrine and anti-HER2 therapy to a similar degree as older women. Surgery and radiation therapy also follow the same recommendations. This manuscript deals with the following topics that need special consideration in young women: endocrine therapy and ovarian suppression; fertility protection and family planning; and genetic counselling. There is an on-going debate on whether tamoxifen is sufficient as an endocrine treatment in young patients with endocrine-responsive tumours or whether suppression of ovarian function in combination with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor should be preferred. Recent data suggest a benefit from ovarian suppression plus exemestane in women of 35 years or younger with high-risk breast cancer. However, increased side effects bear the risk of lesser compliance, which eventually results in higher mortality. Child bearing is nowadays frequently postponed to the 4th decade of life, thereby increasing the number of women who have not yet finished their reproductive desires when diagnosed with breast cancer. These patients are in urgent need of counselling for fertility protection. Breast cancer diagnosis at young age is an indication for a possible mutation in breast cancer susceptibility genes. This has an impact on the cancer risk of the whole family, especially the offspring. Drugs that are specifically targeted to cancer cells with genetic alterations that impair DNA repair are already entering the arsenal of oncologists. PMID:27031253

  2. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayes, I; Rumble, R B; Bowen, J; Dixon, P; Warde, P

    2012-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiotherapy that uses beams with multiple intensity levels for any single beam, allowing concave dose distributions and tighter margins than those possible using conventional radiotherapy. IMRT is ideal for treating complex treatment volumes and avoiding close proximity organs at risk that may be dose limiting and provides increased tumour control through an escalated dose and reduces normal tissue complications through organ at risk sparing. Given the potential advantages of IMRT and the availability of IMRT-enabled treatment planning systems and linear accelerators, IMRT has been introduced in a number of disease sites. This systematic review examined the evidence for IMRT in the treatment of breast cancer to quantify the potential benefits of this new technology and to make recommendations for radiation treatment programmes considering adopting this technique. Providing that avoidance of acute adverse effects associated with radiation is an outcome of interest, then IMRT is recommended over tangential radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery, based on a review of six published reports including 2012 patients. There were insufficient data to recommend IMRT over standard tangential radiotherapy for reasons of oncological outcomes or late toxicity. Future research should focus on studies with longer follow-up and provide data on late toxicity and disease recurrence rates. PMID:22748561

  4. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  5. Guideline implementation for breast healthcare in low- and middle-income countries: treatment resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Eniu, Alexandru; Carlson, Robert W; El Saghir, Nagi S; Bines, Jose; Bese, Nuran Senel; Vorobiof, Daniel; Masetti, Riccardo; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2008-10-15

    A key determinant of breast cancer outcome is the degree to which newly diagnosed cancers are treated correctly in a timely fashion. Available resources must be applied in a rational manner to optimize population-based outcomes. A multidisciplinary international panel of experts addressed the implementation of treatment guidelines and developed process checklists for breast surgery, radiation treatment, and systemic therapy. The needed resources for stage I, stage II, locally advanced, and metastatic breast cancer were outlined, and process metrics were developed. The ability to perform modified radical mastectomy is the mainstay of locoregional treatment at the basic level of breast healthcare. Radiation therapy allows for consideration of breast-conserving therapy, postmastectomy chest wall irradiation, and palliation of painful or symptomatic metastases. Systemic therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy is effective in the treatment of all biologic subtypes of breast cancer, but its provision is resource intensive. Although endocrine therapy requires few specialized resources, it requires knowledge of hormone receptor status. Targeted therapy against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (anti-HER-2) is very effective in tumors that overexpress HER-2/neu receptors, but cost largely prevents its use in resource-limited environments. Incremental allocation of resources can help address economic disparities and ensure equity in access to care. Checklists and allocation tables can support the objective of offering optimal care for all patients. The use of process metrics can facilitate the development of multidisciplinary, integrated, fiscally responsible, continuously improving, and flexible approaches to the global enhancement of breast cancer treatment. PMID:18837019

  6. Toremifene in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mustonen, Mika VJ; Pyrhönen, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Although more widespread screening and routine adjuvant therapy has improved the outcome for breast cancer patients in recent years, there remains considerable scope for improving the efficacy, safety and tolerability of adjuvant therapy in the early stage disease and the treatment of advanced disease. Toremifene is a selective estrogen receptor modifier (SERM) that has been widely used for decades in hormone receptor positive breast cancer both in early and late stage disease. Its efficacy has been well established in nine prospective randomized phase III trials compared to tamoxifen involving more than 5500 patients, as well as in several large uncontrolled and non-randomized studies. Although most studies show therapeutic equivalence between the two SERMs, some show an advantage for toremifene. Several meta-analyses have also confirmed that the efficacy of toremifene is at least as good as that of tamoxifen. In terms of safety and tolerability toremifene is broadly similar to tamoxifen although there is some evidence that toremifene is less likely to cause uterine neoplasms, serious vascular events and it has a more positive effect on serum lipids than does tamoxifen. Toremifene is therefore effective and safe in the treatment of breast cancer. It provides not only a useful therapeutic alternative to tamoxifen, but may bring specific benefits. PMID:25114854

  7. Tumour-adapted Reduction Mammoplasty – a New (Old) Breast Conserving Strategy: Review

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, M.; Dietrich, A.; Reinhard, J.; Steinwasser, R.; Eichbaum, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today over 70 % of patients treated for primary breast carcinoma in certified breast centres are managed with breast conserving surgery. The classical semicircular incision directly above the tumour, though in many cases easily carried out and associated with good cosmetic results, does have limitations. Unsatisfactory aesthetic results often occur when tumour location is unfavourable or when there is unfavourable tumour size relative to breast size. Distortion of the nipple, changes to breast shape and retraction of skin overlying surgical defects can occur. Tumour-adapted reduction mammoplasty/mastopexy or the “modified B technique” offer excellent chances of combining the oncological demands of breast surgery with satisfactory symmetrical cosmetic results. This article reviews a traditional, old operative technique that has been re-embraced in various new forms. PMID:26855438

  8. [Distal radius fractures: conservative or surgical treatment?].

    PubMed

    Mark, G; Ryf, C

    1993-07-01

    The "classical" Colles fracture of the distal radius is the most common fracture in the adult. In order to reduce the still rather high rate of permanent disability, this fracture involving a functionally important joint requires accurate reduction. The AO-fracture classification introduced by Müller not only defines the severity of an injury, but also allows for decision-making as to the most adequate treatment. Besides the purely conservative management by closed reduction and plaster cast for the type-A fractures, we have a number of other treatment modalities for the more complex-B and C-type fractures, such as closed reduction and percutaneous K-wire application or the use of the small external fixator as well as open reduction and internal fixation by plates and screws for a few selected indications. PMID:8211844

  9. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II–III Triple Negative Breast Cancer on Eligibility for Breast-conserving Surgery and Breast Conservation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Mehra; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Sikov, William M.; Berry, Donald A.; Jasinski, Sara; Weisberg, Tracey F.; Somlo, George; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Ollila, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) at increasing the rate of successful breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in triple negative breast cancer. Background Inducing tumor regression to permit BCT is often cited to support administration of NST. To quantify this benefit, we conducted a surgical companion study to CALGB40603, a randomized phase II, 2×2 factorial trial of neoadjuvant paclitaxel ± carboplatin ± bevacizumab (B) followed by doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide ± B in stage II–III triple negative breast cancer. Methods Before and after NST, treating surgeons evaluated BCT candidacy by clinico-radiographic criteria; surgery performed was at surgeon and patient discretion. We measured (1) conversion rates from BCT-ineligible to BCT-eligible, (2) surgical choices in BCT candidates, and (3) rates of successful BCT with tumor-free margins. Results Four hundred four patients were assessable for surgical outcomes. Two hundred nineteen (54%) were BCT candidates before NST. One hundred ninety-seven (90%) remained BCT candidates after NST, of whom 138 (70%) chose BCT, which was successful in 130 (94%). Of 185 (46%) who were not BCT candidates before NST, 78 (42%) converted to candidates with NST. Of these, 53 (68%) chose BCT with a 91% (48/53) success rate. The overall BCT-eligibility rate rose from 54% to 68% (275/404) with NST. Addition of carboplatin, B, or both increased conversion rates. Conclusions This is the first study to document prospectively a 42% conversion rate from BCT-ineligible to BCT-eligible, resulting in a 14% absolute increase in BCT eligibility. BCT was successful in 93% of patients who opted for it, but 31% of BCT-eligible patients still chose mastectomy. PMID:26222764

  10. The Kiricuta procedure in reconstructive surgical treatment of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J F; Bouchet, Y; Dupre, A

    1990-03-01

    A series of 50 patients with carcinoma of the breast underwent omental transposition. This palliative procedure is indicated for recurrences after conservative treatment, radiation necrosis and Stage III or IV ulcerated tumors. The operative technique is described in detail. Omentoplasties were performed upon 33 right and 17 left mammary areas. Forty-five right pedicled flaps and only four left areas were used. One patient died on the fourth postoperative day because of massive pulmonary embolus. Local repair was satisfactory in 76 per cent of the patients. Four patients presented with herniation of the abdominal wall at the site of omental tunneling. In three, the treatment consisted of sectioning the vascular pedicle and reinforcing the parietal closure with Dacron (polyester fiber) mesh. PMID:2305346

  11. [Results of conservative therapy in early breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gatĕk, J; Duben, J; Dudesek, B; Schön, J

    2000-05-01

    The authors present a review on the development of views on breast cancer from the beginning of the century and contemporary views on the problem, its solution world-wide and in the Czech Republic. They base on their own group of 475 patients of 1991-1998, they analyze the development of possible solutions of early breast cancer and their view on the discussed problem. With regard to favourable results they advocate progressive breast preserving operations associated with postoperative radiotherapy and the use of the method of sentinel nodes. PMID:10916438

  12. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. Methods One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Results Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. Conclusions For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations. PMID:23497574

  13. Modeling precision treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background First-generation molecular profiles for human breast cancers have enabled the identification of features that can predict therapeutic response; however, little is known about how the various data types can best be combined to yield optimal predictors. Collections of breast cancer cell lines mirror many aspects of breast cancer molecular pathobiology, and measurements of their omic and biological therapeutic responses are well-suited for development of strategies to identify the most predictive molecular feature sets. Results We used least squares-support vector machines and random forest algorithms to identify molecular features associated with responses of a collection of 70 breast cancer cell lines to 90 experimental or approved therapeutic agents. The datasets analyzed included measurements of copy number aberrations, mutations, gene and isoform expression, promoter methylation and protein expression. Transcriptional subtype contributed strongly to response predictors for 25% of compounds, and adding other molecular data types improved prediction for 65%. No single molecular dataset consistently out-performed the others, suggesting that therapeutic response is mediated at multiple levels in the genome. Response predictors were developed and applied to TCGA data, and were found to be present in subsets of those patient samples. Conclusions These results suggest that matching patients to treatments based on transcriptional subtype will improve response rates, and inclusion of additional features from other profiling data types may provide additional benefit. Further, we suggest a systems biology strategy for guiding clinical trials so that patient cohorts most likely to respond to new therapies may be more efficiently identified. PMID:24176112

  14. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  15. Effect of radiotherapy on the interpretation of routine follow-up mammography after conservative breast surgery: a randomized study.

    PubMed Central

    Holli, K.; Saaristo, R.; Isola, J.; Hyöty, M.; Hakama, M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiotherapy after conservative surgery causes fat necrosis, fibrosis, skin thickening and other parenchymal distortion of the breast. The interpretation of a mammogram of the irradiated breast may therefore be difficult. We studied the effect of radiotherapy on the interpretation of the routine mammography used in the follow-up of breast cancer patients. A total of 144 low-risk breast cancer patients were randomized to radiotherapy or to no further treatment after conservative surgery. The first routine follow-up mammography was performed 18 months after surgery and every 18 months after that. The number of mammography examinations was estimated per patient and per follow-up year. The number of extra diagnostic tests and the occurrence of positive findings were assessed per mammography session and per follow-up year. Further diagnostic tests prompted by difficulties in interpreting the mammogram were performed to an extent of 0.19 per mammography examination in the radiotherapy group and of 0.15 in the non-radiotherapy group, i.e. 1.3 times more often. Findings that turned out to be negative at confirmation were 2.0 times (P< 0.05) more common in the radiotherapy group. These false-positive findings were more common in the radiotherapy group than in the surgery group and only shortly after treatment. Mammography is more difficult to interpret after radiotherapy than after conservative surgery alone, especially shortly after treatment, and more often involves extra diagnostic tests and findings that will be negative at confirmation. PMID:9716041

  16. Income level and regional policies, underlying factors associated with unwarranted variations in conservative breast cancer surgery in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geographical variations in medical practice are expected to be small when the evidence about the effectiveness and safety of a particular technology is abundant. This would be the case of the prescription of conservative surgery in breast cancer patients. In these cases, when variation is larger than expected by need, socioeconomic factors have been argued as an explanation. Objectives: Using an ecologic design, our study aims at describing the variability in the use of surgical conservative versus non-conservative treatment. Additionally, it seeks to establish whether the socioeconomic status of the healthcare area influences the use of one or the other technique. Methods 81,868 mastectomies performed between 2002 and 2006 in 180 healthcare areas were studied. Standardized utilization rates of breast cancer conservative (CS) and non-conservative (NCS) procedures were estimated as well as the variation among areas, using small area statistics. Concentration curves and dominance tests were estimated to determine the impact of income and instruction levels in the healthcare area on surgery rates. Multilevel analyses were performed to determine the influence of regional policies. Results Variation in the use of CS was massive (4-fold factor between the highest and the lowest rate) and larger than in the case of NCS (2-fold), whichever the age group. Healthcare areas with higher economic and instruction levels showed highest rates of CS, regardless of the age group, while areas with lower economic and educational levels yielded higher rates of NCS interventions. Living in a particular Autonomous Community (AC), explained a substantial part of the CS residual variance (up to a 60.5% in women 50 to 70). Conclusion The place where a woman lives -income level and regional policies- explain the unexpectedly high variation found in utilization rates of conservative breast cancer surgery. PMID:21504577

  17. [Conservative lymphedema therapy - lymphological rehabilitation treatment].

    PubMed

    Apich, Gert

    2013-04-01

    The most important column in the conservative lymphedema therapy still represents the complex decongestive physical therapy/KPE.This is a multimodal therapy, which consists of four components. (1) skin restoration and/or skin care, (2) manual lymphatic drainage, (3) compression therapy and (4) decongestive exercises. The KPE is also divided into two phases. Phase 1-the decongestion-serves primarily the mobilization and transporting away the banked protein-rich oedema fluid and seamless transition into the Phase 2-the maintenance phase, which serves to preserve the achieved treatment success. The implementation of the KPE should be stage-adjusted, but depends also on the location (genital, head, face), and on co-existing comorbidities (congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, obesity, muscular-skeletal disorders, mental illness, etc.). It should be modified for children, elderly persons and for patients with malignant lymphedema. PMID:23645412

  18. [Conservative treatment in male urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Anding, R

    2014-03-01

    Prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of urinary incontinence are well studied in women; however, studies on male urinary incontinence focus on incontinence following surgery of the bladder or prostate, predominantly incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Aging men suffer from incontinence, most frequently urge incontinence (overactive bladder, OAB), nearly as often as women do.The domain of conservative therapy of urinary stress incontinence in men is pelvic floor training. It remains unclear whether biofeedback procedures, electrostimulation therapy, or magnetic stimulation therapy can enhance pelvic floor training. There are data suggesting that an off-label therapy with Duloxetin®, a selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI), improves urinary incontinence following radical prostatectomy. Antimuscarinic agents in combination with bladder training have been proven as safe and effective treatment in men with OAB. Data, however, suggest that men with OAB are far less frequently treated than women. PMID:24585116

  19. The Dynamic Tumor Bed: Volumetric Changes in the Lumpectomy Cavity During Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Brendan; Indelicato, Daniel J. Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Snead, Felicia E.; Morris, Christopher G.; Copeland, Edward M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude of volume change in the postoperative tumor bed before and during radiotherapy, and to identify any factors associated with large volumetric change. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with early-stage or preinvasive breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy at our institution between June 2006 and October 2007. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the breast were obtained shortly after surgery, before the start of radiotherapy (RT) for treatment planning, and, if applicable, before the tumor bed boost. Postoperative changes, seroma, and surgical clips were used to define the tumor bed through consensus agreement of 3 observers (B.P., D.I., and J.L.). Multiple variables were examined for correlation with volumetric change. Results: Between the first and last scan obtained (median time, 7.2 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased at least 20% in 86% of patients (n = 31) and at least 50% in 64% of patients (n = 23). From the postoperative scan to the planning scan (median time, 3 weeks), the tumor bed volume decreased by an average of 49.9%, or approximately 2.1% per postoperative day. From planning scan to boost scan (median interval, 7 weeks), the median tumor bed volume decreased by 44.6%, at an average rate of 0.95% per postoperative day. No single factor was significantly associated with a change in tumor bed volume greater than 20%. Conclusions: The average postlumpectomy cavity undergoes dramatic volumetric change after surgery and continues this change during RT. The rate of change is inversely proportional to the duration from surgery. In this study no factors studied predicted large volumetric change.

  20. Double-edged sword of radiotherapy: a cause of secondary angiosarcoma after breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ahmed, Balen; Vidya, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcomas are rare and aggressive malignant tumours of vascular or endothelial origin that can originate in the breast. They can be classified as primary or secondary, with the latter most commonly due to postoperative radiotherapy as part of breast conservation therapy (wide local excision and adjuvant radiotherapy) for breast cancer. We report a case of postirradiation secondary angiosarcoma in a 56-year-old woman, alongside a review of the current literature, to inform clinicians of its clinical presentation and characteristics as a high index of clinical suspicion is required for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27113794

  1. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    PubMed

    Manning, Aidan T; Sacchini, Virgilio S

    2016-02-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  2. Conservative mastectomies for breast cancer and risk-reducing surgery: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Aidan T.

    2016-01-01

    Demand for conservative mastectomies continues to increase as more patients choose to undergo breast reconstruction, often with simultaneous contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). In addition, the increasing use of risk-reducing surgery in high-risk groups has contributed to the increased use of these techniques. We have reviewed the indications and outcomes of a large group of patients undergoing nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) at this institution. In total, 728 nipple-sparing mastectomies (NSMs) were performed in 413 patients between 2000 and 2013, for treatment of breast cancer (n=269) or risk reduction (n=459). Of 728 NSMs performed, 177 (24.3%) were in patients known to have a BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutation, or a genetic variant of uncertain significance. There was an incidental finding of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive carcinoma in 22 (4.8%) and 8 (1.7%) of 459 prophylactic NSMs, respectively. In addition, unexpected invasive carcinoma was found in 17 of 98 therapeutic NSMs (17.3%) performed for DCIS. At median follow-up of 49 months, there were no known cases of local recurrence and only one case of regional recurrence. Immediate breast reconstruction was performed in 409 patients, most of whom underwent tissue expander/implant based procedures (n=401). Although 273 breasts (37.5%) had some evidence of skin desquamation at follow-up, most resolved spontaneously with 47 breasts (6.5%) requiring debridement. Other complications included hematoma in seven breasts (1%) and wound infection in 31 breasts (4.3%). Expander/implant removal was required in 20 cases (2.8%). The nipple-areola complex (NAC) was subsequently excised in 10 of 728 breasts (1.4%) due to oncologic concerns following assessment of retroareolar tissue. NSM was successful in most patients with an acceptable complication rate and in few patients subsequently undergoing removal of the NAC. Patients requiring mastectomy for breast cancer or risk reduction may now benefit from

  3. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  4. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for HER2+ breast cancers: A feasibility study evaluating BNCT for potential role in breast conservation therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Peter Anthony

    A novel Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) regimen for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancers has been proposed as an alternative to whole breast irradiation for breast conservation therapy patients. The proposed therapy regimen is based on the assumed production of boron delivery agents that would be synthesized from compounds of Trastuzumab (Herceptin ®) and oligomeric phosphate diesters (OPDs). The combination of the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody and the high boron loading capability of OPDs has led to the assumption that boron could be delivered to the HER2+ cancer cells at Tumor to Healthy Tissue ratios (T:H) of up to 35:1 and boron concentrations above 50 μg/g. This significantly increased boron delivery efficiency has opened new BNCT possibilities. This proof of concept study examined treatment parameters derived as the results in previous efforts in the context of patient-specific geometry and compared calculated dose results to those observed during actual patient therapy. These results were based on dose calculations performed with a set of calculated Kerma coefficients derived from tissues specific to the regions of interest for breast cancer. A comparison was made of the dose to the tumor region, the patient's skin, and the peripheral organs. The results of this study demonstrated that, given the performance of the proposed boron delivery agent, the BNCT treatment regimen is feasible. The feasibility is based on the findings that the equivalent dose could be delivered to the treatment volume with less dose to the skin and peripheral organs. This is anticipated to improve the treatment outcomes by maintaining local control of tumor cells while reducing dose to healthy tissues.

  5. From Radical Mastectomy to Breast-Conserving Therapy and Oncoplastic Breast Surgery: A Narrative Review Comparing Oncological Result, Cosmetic Outcome, Quality of Life, and Health Economy

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view. PMID:24167743

  6. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8-14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18-25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  7. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8–14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18–25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  8. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Jin; Lulla, Amriti; Hernandez, Liz; Gokare, Prashanth; Lim, Bora

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM) is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +), hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +), both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer. PMID:25400908

  9. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  10. Is standard breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in elderly breast cancer patients justified? A prospective measurement of acute toxicity according CTC-classification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast conserving therapy (BCT) is an accepted treatment for early-stage breast cancer. This study aimed to measure prospectively acute radiation-related toxicity and to create a comprehensive data base for long-term temporal analyses of 3D conformal adjuvant radiotherapy. The specific aspect of age has been neglected by traditional research. Therefore, the impact of age on acute BCT toxicity should be also specifically adressed. Methods Toxicity was measured in 109 patients at initiation (t1), during radiotherapy (t2-t7), and 6 weeks after treatment completion (t8) using a new topographic module. Organ systems were recorded in 15 scales and scored according to symptom intensity (grade 0-5) based on CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) -classification. Radiotherapy was virtually CT-based planned and applied with 6-MeV-photons. Mean total dose was 60.1 Gy. Patients were stratified by age in 3 Groups: <50, 50-60, and >60 years. Results Registered toxicity was generally low. Mean overall-grade climbed from 0.29-0.40 (t1-t7), and dropped to 0.23 (t8). Univariate analyses revealed slightly higher toxicity in older (> 60 years) versus young patients (< 50 years) in 2 scales only: breast-symmetry (p = 0.033), and arm function (p = 0.007). However, in the scale "appetite" toxicity was higher in younger (< 50 years) versus older (> 60 years) patients (p = 0.039). Toxicity differences in all other scales were not significant. Between older (> 60 years) and midaged patients (50-60 years) no significant differences in toxicity were found. This was also true for the comparison between young (< 50 years) versus midaged patient groups (50-60 years). Conclusion The treatment concept of BCT for breast cancer is generally well tolerated. The toxicity-measurement with the new topographic module is feasible. Not modified standard treatment for BC should be performed in elderly women. PMID:21050439

  11. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  12. Lipoplatin Treatment in Lung and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Manuela; Gianni, Lorenzo; Santelmo, Carlotta; Drudi, Fabrizio; Castellani, Cinzia; Affatato, Alessandra; Nicolini, Mario; Ravaioli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of cisplatin in cancer treatment represents an important achievement in the oncologic field. Many types of cancers are now treated with this drug, and in testicular cancer patients major results are reached. Since 1965, other compounds were disovered and among them carboplatin and oxaliplatin are the main Cisplatin analogues showing similar clinical efficacy with a safer toxicity profile. Lipoplatin is a new liposomal cisplatin formulation which seems to have these characteristics. Lipoplatin was shown to be effective in NSCLC both in phase 2 and phase 3 trials, with the same response rate of Cisplatin, a comparable overall survival but less toxicity. A new protocol aiming to elucidate the double capacity of Lipoplatin to act as a chemotherapeutic and angiogenetic agent in triple-negative breast cancer patients is upcoming. PMID:22295201

  13. Breast Cancer: subgroups specific blood-biomarkers for early / predictive diagnosis and personalized treatment — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Breast-conserving lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy has been shown to be an alternative strategy, competitive to mastectomy, in preventing mortality caused by breast cancer. However, besides negative short-term effects (blood flow disturbances, painful erythema, etc.) breast irradiation causes severe long-term side-effects (leucopenia, anemia, breast edema, fibrosis, increase of angiosarcoma, leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes). Therefore, the identification of individual susceptibility to radiation and improved patient-specific radiotherapy planning are highly desirable for personalised treatment in breast cancer. Why early and predictive diagnosis is crucial for long-term outcomes of breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death among women with an average incidence rate of 10-12 per 100 women. In 2005, breast cancer led to 502,000 deaths worldwide. Advanced stages of breast cancer lead to the development of metastasis predominantly in the lymph nodes, bone, lung, skin, brain, and liver. Although breast-MRI is currently the most sensitive diagnostic tool for breast imaging, its specificity is limited resulting in a negative impact for surgical management in approximately 9 % of cases. Early diagnosis has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial, enabling significantly enhanced therapy efficiency and possibly full recovery.

  14. Contralateral breast cancer and other second malignancies in patients treated by breast-conserving therapy with radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.M.; Amalric, R.; Brandone, H.; Ayme, Y.; Spitalier, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    Metachronous contralateral breast cancers and other second malignancies were evaluated in 2,850 patients treated between 1960 and 1981 primarily with radiotherapy (RT) either alone or following breast-conserving surgery. One hundred eighty-four contralateral cancers were observed in 22,491 patient-years of observation (818 per 10(5) patient-years), with a cumulative probability of 4.5% at 5, 7.9% at 10, and 11% at 15 and 20 years. Compared to patients with unilateral tumors, those destined to develop contralateral cancers were younger (mean age 51.9 vs 56.6) and more often gave a family history of breast cancer. Contralateral breast cancers were more frequent for more extensive tumors (T3 10% vs T1-26%; with inflammatory signs 10.6% without 6%), and in patients with ipsilateral local recurrence (with 9.1%, without 5.6%). Patients with contralateral cancers had a significantly less favorable survival experience (15-year actuarial survival after primary therapy 42%) than patients without contralateral cancer (15-year survival 65.5%). In early stage patients treated with conservative surgery and RT, contralateral cancer was not prognostically more favorable than ipsilateral breast recurrence. Among 72 other second malignancies (320 per 10(5) patient-years) were 2 soft tissue sarcomas in the irradiated area. This corresponds to an incidence of 21 cases per 10(5) patient-years for survivors beyond the fifth year. The possible influence of RT on contralateral cancers and other second malignancies is discussed.

  15. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  16. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-04-10

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  17. Patient, hospital, and surgeon factors associated with breast conservation surgery. A statewide analysis in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Kotwall, C A; Covington, D L; Rutledge, R; Churchill, M P; Meyer, A A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the trend of breast conservation surgery (BCS) in North Carolina over a 6-year period and to identify patient, hospital, and surgeon factors associated with the use of BCS. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite evidence that BCS is an appropriate method of treatment for early stage breast cancer, surgeons in the United States have been slow to adopt this treatment method. METHODS: Cases of primary breast cancer surgery in all 157 hospitals in the state from 1988 to 1993, inclusive (N = 20,760), were obtained from the State Medical Database Commission, Area Resource File, American Hospital Association and State Board of Medical Examiner's Databases. Multiple logistic regression was used to generate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to determine factors associated with BCS. RESULTS: The rate of BCS doubled from 7.3% in 1988 to 14.3% in 1993, with an overall rate of 10.2% (2117/ 20.760). Multiple logistic regression identified the following factors associated with BCS: patient age younger than 50 years of age (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.4, 2.1), patient age 50 to 69 years of age (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.4), private insurance (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.4), hospital bed size 401+(OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.6, 2.5), bed size 101 to 400 (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.3, 2.1), and surgeon graduation from medical school since 1981 (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Rates of BCS in North Carolina are low. Least likely to have BCS were women older than 70 years of age, without private insurance, treated at small hospitals by older surgeons. To increase the use of BCS, widespread education of surgeons, other health care providers, policy makers, and the general public is warranted. Images Figure 1. PMID:8857847

  18. Maintaining professional activity during breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ganem, G; Antoine, E-C; Touboul, C; Naman, H; Dohollou, N; Facchini, T; Coscas, Y; Lortholary, A; Catala, S; Jacquot, S; Lhomel, C; Eisinger, F

    2016-05-01

    The question of returning to work and pursuing professional activity during cancer treatment is an increasingly important consideration. The present work focuses on factors affecting the feasibility of maintaining professional activity during treatment for breast cancer, for women who wished to do so. Written questionnaires were collected from 216 patients between March and November 2012. Since the onset of their treatment, 31.4% of the women (68/216) had not been on sick-leave. The main factors associated with the pursuit of professional activity were: considering the availability of their physician to answer questions as unimportant [OR = 18.83 (3.60-98.53); P ≤ 0.05]; considering the diagnosis of cancer as likely to have a weak impact on career perspectives [OR = 4.07 (2.49-6.64); P ≤ 0.05]; not having any children in the household [OR = 3.87 (2.38-6.28); P ≤ 0.05]; being in a managerial position [OR = 3.13 (1.88-5.21); P ≤ 0.05]. Negative predictive factors were: physician mentioning adverse effects of the treatment [OR = 0.31 (0.16-0.58); P ≤ 0.05], and patient rating workload as high [OR = 0.26 (0.15-0.46); P ≤ 0.05]. As a result of advances in therapeutic strategies, more patients will expect healthcare professionals, as well as employers and occupational health societies, to prioritise issues pertaining to the maintenance of professional activities during cancer treatment. PMID:26891443

  19. Exploring circulating micro-RNA in the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Casey, Máire-Caitlín; Sweeney, Karl J; Brown, James Andrew Lawrence; Kerin, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy amongst females worldwide. In recent years the management of this disease has transformed considerably, including the administration of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting. Aside from increasing rates of breast conserving surgery and enabling surgery via tumour burden reduction, use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting allows monitoring of in vivo tumour response to chemotherapeutics. Currently, there is no effective means of identifying chemotherapeutic responders from non-responders. Whilst some patients achieve complete pathological response (pCR) to chemotherapy, a good prognostic index, a proportion of patients derive little or no benefit, being exposed to the deleterious effects of systemic treatment without any knowledge of whether they will receive benefit. The identification of predictive and prognostic biomarkers could confer multiple benefits in this setting, specifically the individualization of breast cancer management and more effective administration of chemotherapeutics. In addition, biomarkers could potentially expedite the identification of novel chemotherapeutic agents or increase their efficacy. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules. With their tissue-specific expression, correlation with clinicopathological prognostic indices and known dysregulation in breast cancer, miRNAs have quickly become an important avenue in the search for novel breast cancer biomarkers. We provide a brief history of breast cancer chemotherapeutics and explore the emerging field of circulating (blood-borne) miRNAs as breast cancer biomarkers for the neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Established molecular markers of breast cancer are outlined, while the potential role of circulating miRNAs as chemotherapeutic response predictors, prognosticators or potential therapeutic targets is discussed. PMID:26756433

  20. Breast cancer diagnosis and factors influencing treatment decisions in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Aziato, Lydia; Clegg-Lamptey, Joe Nat A

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in this study explored the reactions of women with breast cancer and identified factors influencing treatment decisions. A qualitative exploratory approach was employed. Participants were recruited from a tertiary hospital and a breast cancer support group. Purposive sampling recruited 12 women. It was found that women identified breast lesions accidentally or intentionally and that diagnosis was delayed. Emotional reactions to diagnosis included shock and sadness. Factors that influenced treatment were the influence of other people, alternative sources of treatment, faith and support, knowledge, "tuning the mind," and effects on intimacy. Health professionals should develop effective communication and counseling skills for clients. PMID:24750095

  1. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 ; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  2. Treatment options for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of different subtypes, characterized by their different clinicopathological characteristics, prognoses and responses to treatment. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer sensitive to hormonal treatments, as well as in patients whose malignant cells overexpress or amplify HER2. In contrast, mainly due to the lack of molecular targets, little progress has been made in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recent improved understanding of the natural history, pathophysiology, and molecular features of triple-negative breast cancers have provided new insights into management and therapeutic strategies for women affected with this entity. Ongoing and planned translational clinical trials are likely to optimize and improve treatment of women with this disease. PMID:20979652

  3. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  4. Double breast contour in primary aesthetic breast augmentation: incidence, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Médard de Chardon, Victor; Balaguer, Thierry; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lebreton, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    , physiopathogeny, prevention and treatment. Type I major risk factor is subpectoral augmentation of ptotic breasts (with medium to bad skin quality and loses muscle to gland attachments). The muscle at the inferior pole of the breast is a "brake" preventing implant to fill the envelope. This risk is increased with implant malposition, constitutional ptosis asymmetry with symmetrical implant placement and selection of an insufficient implant projection or dimensions. This deformity can be avoided with selection of a subglandular or dual plane (type II or III) placement, a sufficient implant volume or projection and anatomic prosthesis. Type II is related to a lowering of a well-defined submammary fold more commonly in constricted and dens glandular breasts. This deformity can be avoided with respecting the inframammary fold, radial incisions on the gland's posterior surface, and selection of anatomic implants. PMID:20224340

  5. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Cancer.gov

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  6. Treatment helps young women preserve fertility during breast cancer chemo

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have found that young women with breast cancer were able to better preserve their fertility during cancer treatments by using hormone-blocking drug injections that put them into temporary menopause. The results announced today at the annual me

  7. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2–3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  8. Clinical utility of exemestane in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Geuna, Elena; Milani, Andrea; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women, causing a significant mortality worldwide. Different endocrine strategies are available for the treatment of hormone-sensitive breast cancer, including antiestrogen tamoxifen and fulvestrant, as well as third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs), such as letrozole, anastrozole, and exemestane. In this review, we will focus on exemestane, its clinical use, and its side effects. Exemestane is a steroidal third-generation AI now used in all treatment settings for breast cancer. In the metastatic disease, it has been extensively investigated as the first-, second-, and further-line treatment and it is now registered for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer whose disease has progressed following antiestrogen therapy. A potential lack of cross-resistance with nonsteroidal AIs has been described, giving additional therapeutic opportunities in sequences of endocrine agents. Exemestane is also approved for the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal early breast cancer, either as upfront monotherapy for 5 years, as a switch following 2-3 years of tamoxifen, or as extended therapy beyond 5 years of adjuvant treatment. New promising data also showed a beneficial effect in young premenopausal early breast cancer patients, when administered together with ovarian suppression. Interesting results have also emerged when exemestane has been investigated as neodjuvant treatment as well as preventive agent in healthy women at high risk for breast cancer. Exemestane is generally well tolerated, with a side effect profile similar to that of other AIs, including menopausal symptoms, arthralgia, and bone loss. In conclusion, exemestane can be considered an effective and well-tolerated endocrine treatment option for all stages of breast cancer. PMID:26064072

  9. Breast conservation is an effective option in Black, medically indigent patients.

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Stuart H.; Landry, Jerome C.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of lumpectomy and postoperative radiotherapy in an African-American, medically indigent population. From 1980 through 1996, a retrospective chart review was undertaken of the patients treated with radiotherapy after lumpectomy at an inner city hospital, whose patients are primarily African American and uninsured. One hundred and one patients were treated with breast conservation during this time. Of those, 72 were African American and with invasive carcinoma. The data were analyzed using JMP IN (SAS Institute). The study found that African-American patients with invasive carcinoma had 95.2% local control at 5 years and 87.9% at 10 years. The disease-free survival was 84.6% at 5 years and 65.3% at 10 years. Patients that received less than 50 Gray to the tumor bed had inferior local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival (p < 0.0001 for all three). The 5-year and 10-year local control for DCIS, in a limited number of patients, was 95.2%. We conclude that lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment strategy in the high-risk population of African-American, medically indigent patients. The local control and disease-free survival compare favorably to published controls in this traditionally high-risk patient population. PMID:12078926

  10. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  11. Effect of oncological treatment on serum adipocytokine levels in patients with stage II–III breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    COSKUN, TEOMAN; KOSOVA, FUNDA; ARI, ZEKI; SAKARYA, ASLAN; KAYA, YAVUZ

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived hormones (adipocytokines), such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin and visfatin, and the pancreatic hormone insulin, have been suggested to play a role in carcinogenesis. we therefore hypothesized that the oncological treatment of breast cancer may alter the serum levels of these adipocytokines and insulin. In this study, we aimed to compare the serum levels of adipocytokines and insulin between the pre- and post-treatment period in patients with breast cancer. In this prospective study, 20 consecutive patients with stage II and III breast cancer underwent breast-conserving surgery or total mastectomy and/or axillary dissection. The patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, if necessary. Blood samples were obtained during the preoperative period and postoperatively after completion of the adjuvant therapy. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-treatment levels of visfatin, adiponectin and leptin. However, the serum insulin and resistin levels and insulin resistance were found to be statistically significantly increased following treatment (P<0.05). Post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance (r=0.45, P<0.05). Therefore, oncological treatment of stage II and III breast cancer did not affect visfatin, adiponectin and leptin levels, but statistically significantly increased resistin levels and insulin resistance. In addition, the post-treatment resistin levels were positively correlated with insulin resistance, suggesting that resistin may be involved in the development of insulin resistance in breast cancer patients following treatment. PMID:27123303

  12. Introduction to conservative mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Gercovich, F. Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy (CM) has become an established alternative in the treatment of breast cancer, offering by different techniques a good cosmetic outcome, as well as oncologic control. The different options to achieve these goals are presented. Oncoplastic treatment of breast cancer needs planning and knowledge of well-established plastic surgery techniques. PMID:26644998

  13. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  14. The impact of lobular carcinoma in situ in association with invasive breast cancer on the rate of local recurrence in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Shruti; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Goldstein, Neal S.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The significance of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) associated with invasive breast cancer in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT) remains controversial. We examined the impact of the presence and extent of LCIS associated with invasive breast cancer on clinical outcome in BCT patients. Methods and Materials: From 1980 to 1996, 607 cases of invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT. All slides were reviewed by a single pathologist. Positive margin was defined as presence of invasive carcinoma/ductal carcinoma in situ at the inked margin. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed for their association with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM). Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Results: Fifty-six patients (9%) had LCIS in association with invasive cancer. On univariate analysis, positive final margin, positive/no reexcision, smaller maximum specimen dimension, and the presence of LCIS predicted for IBTR. The 10-year IBTR rate was 14% for cases with LCIS vs. 7% without LCIS (p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, positive margin (p < 0.01), positive/no reexcision (p = 0.04), and presence of LCIS (p = 0.02) remained independently associated with IBTR; positive margin (p < 0.01) and LCIS (p = 0.04) were also associated with TR/MM failure. When examining only cases with negative final margins, the presence of LCIS remained associated with higher IBTR and TR/MM rates (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The presence of LCIS was independently associated with higher rate of IBTR and TR/MM after BCT for invasive breast cancer. LCIS may have significant premalignant potential and progress to an invasive IBTR at the site of index lesion. The adequacy of excision of LCIS associated with invasive carcinoma should be considered in patients undergoing BCT.

  15. The Association Between Biological Subtype and Isolated Regional Nodal Failure After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Raad, Rita Abi; Sreedhara, Meera B.A.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Harris, Jay R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of isolated regional nodal failure (RNF) among women with invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) and to determine factors, including biological subtype, associated with RNF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 1,000 consecutive women with invasive breast cancer who received breast-conserving surgery and RT from 1997 through 2002. Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy; none received trastuzumab. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was done in 617 patients (62%). Of patients with one to three positive nodes, 34% received regional nodal irradiation (RNI). Biological subtype classification into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, and basal subtypes was based on estrogen receptor status-, progesterone receptor status-, and HER-2-status of the primary tumor. Results: Median follow-up was 77 months. Isolated RNF occurred in 6 patients (0.6%). On univariate analysis, biological subtype (p = 0.0002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.008), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.02), and Grade 3 histology (p = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher RNF rates. Compared with luminal A, the HER-2 (p = 0.01) and basal (p = 0.08) subtypes were associated with higher RNF rates. The 5-year RNF rate among patients with one to three positive nodes treated with tangents alone was 2.4%; we could not identify a subset of these patients with a substantial risk of RNF. Conclusions: Isolated RNF is a rare occurrence after breast-conserving therapy. Patients with the HER-2 (not treated with trastuzumab) and basal subtypes appear to be at higher risk of developing RNF although this risk is not high enough to justify the addition of RNI. Low rates of RNF in patients with one to three positive nodes suggest that tangential RT without RNI is reasonable in most patients.

  16. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  17. Positive margins prediction in breast cancer conservative surgery: Assessment of a preoperative web-based nomogram.

    PubMed

    Alves-Ribeiro, Lídia; Osório, Fernando; Amendoeira, Isabel; Fougo, José Luís

    2016-08-01

    Margin status of the surgical specimen has been shown to be a prognostic and risk factor for local recurrence in breast cancer surgery. It has been studied as a topic of intervention to diminish reoperation rates and reduce the probability of local recurrence in breast conservative surgery (BCS). This study aims to validate the Dutch BreastConservation! nomogram, created by Pleijhus et al., which predicts preoperative probability of positive margins in BCS. Patients with diagnosis of breast cancer stages cT1-2, who underwent BCS at the Breast Center of São João University Hospital (BC-CHSJ) in 2013-2014, were included. Association and correlation were evaluated for clinical, radiological, pathological and surgical variables. Multivariable logistic regression and ROC curves were used to assess nomogram parameters and discrimination. In our series of 253 patients, no associations were found between margin status and other studied variables (such as age or family history of breast cancer), except for weight (p-value = 0.045) and volume (p-value = 0.012) of the surgical specimen. Regarding the nomogram, a statistically significant association was shown between cN1 status and positive margins (p-value = 0.014). No differences were registered between the scores of patients with positive versus negative margins. Discrimination analysis showed an AUC of 0.474 for the basic and 0.508 for the expanded models. We cannot assume its external validation or its applicability to our cohort. Further studies are needed to determine the validity of this nomogram and achieve a broader view of currently available tools. PMID:27326978

  18. What's New in Research and Treatment in Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... men What`s new in research and treatment in breast cancer in men? Research into the causes, prevention, and ... and research are done in women. Causes of breast cancer and breast cancer prevention Studies continue to uncover ...

  19. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past Issues / ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  20. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Staging and Treatment Past ... Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose ...

  1. New treatment option for women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a common breast cancer prevention drug, tamoxifen, in preventing breast cancer recurrence in young women who also receive post-surgical treatment to suppress ovarian funct

  2. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  3. Implant-based breast reconstruction following conservative mastectomy: one-stage vs. two-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-02-01

    Conservative mastectomy with preservation of the nipple areolar complex is now considered a safe and effective technique in properly selected patients. Good candidates for this procedure include women with small to moderate breast volume having therapeutic or prophylactic mastectomy. Both autologous and prosthetic options are available; however prosthetic techniques are performed more frequently. Prosthetic approaches include immediate 1-stage (direct to implant) or 2-atge (tissue expander/implant) techniques. Delayed prosthetic reconstruction is also possible with conservative mastectomy. This manuscript will review the 1-stage and 2-stage methods with an emphasis on indication, surgical techniques, and outcomes. PMID:26855908

  4. A systematic review and meta-analysis of Harmonic technology compared with conventional techniques in mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery with lymphadenectomy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hang; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Ferko, Nicole C; Patel, Leena; Soleas, Ireena M; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Background Mastectomy and breast-conserving surgery (BCS) are important treatment options for breast cancer patients. A previous meta-analysis demonstrated that the risk of certain complications can be reduced with the Harmonic technology compared with conventional methods in mastectomy. However, the meta-analysis did not include studies of BCS patients and focused on a subset of surgical complications. The objective of this study was to compare Harmonic technology and conventional techniques for a range of clinical outcomes and complications in both mastectomy and BCS patients, including axillary lymph node dissection. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing Harmonic technology and conventional methods in breast cancer surgery. Outcome measures included blood loss, drainage volume, total complications, seroma, necrosis, wound infections, ecchymosis, hematoma, hospital length of stay, and operating time. Risk of bias was analyzed for all studies. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models for mean differences of continuous variables and a fixed-effects model for risk ratios of dichotomous variables. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Across surgery types, compared to conventional techniques, Harmonic technology reduced total complications by 52% (P=0.002), seroma by 46% (P<0.0001), necrosis by 49% (P=0.04), postoperative chest wall drainage by 46% (P=0.0005), blood loss by 38% (P=0.0005), and length of stay by 22% (P=0.007). Although benefits generally appeared greatest in mastectomy patients with lymph node dissection, Harmonic technology showed significant reductions in complications in the BCS study subgroup. Conclusion In this meta-analysis of both mastectomy and BCS procedures, the use of Harmonic technology reduced the risk of most complications by about half across breast cancer surgery patients. These benefits may be due to superior hemostatic capabilities of Harmonic

  5. Lipid-based nanocarriers for breast cancer treatment - comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Talluri, Siddartha Venkata; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Karri, Veera Venkata Satyanarayana Reddy; Tummala, Shashank; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cancer-related disease as the most common non-cutaneous malignancy among women. Curative options for breast cancer are limited, therapeutically substantial and associated with toxicities. Emerging nanotechnologies exhibited the possibility to treat or target breast cancer. Among the nanoparticles, various lipid nanoparticles namely, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles have been developed over the years for the breast cancer therapy and evidences are documented. Concepts are confined in lab scale, which needs to be transferred to large scale to develop active targeting nanomedicine for the clinical utility. So, the present review highlights the recently published studies in the development of lipid-based nanocarriers for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26430913

  6. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies. PMID:26799758

  7. Perioperative interstitial irradiation in the conservative management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Jewell, W.R.; Mansfield, C.M.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-11-01

    Conservation of the breast in early breast cancer with limited resection and radiation is proving to be as effective as modified radical mastectomy in survival and in loco-regional control. Management at the University of Kansas Medical Center consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to facilitate perioperative irradiation with Iridium-192 to the tumor bed. An axillary node dissection is also performed at that time. Two to 3 weeks later external beam irradiation is delivered to the entire breast. One hundred and twenty-three breasts in 120 patients have been treated between June 1982 and June 1986. There were 49 pathological Stage I, 63 Stage II, 8 Stage III carcinomas, and 3 carcinomas in situ, consisting of 72 T1, 43 T2, 5 T3, and 3 TIS lesions. Patients have been followed for a median of 30 months. One patient had a ''true'' recurrence in the breast. Another patient developed recurrence in a different quadrant. Ninety percent of the patients had good to excellent cosmetic results, 7% were considered fair, and 3% had poor results. Seven patients developed mild arm edema, 4 were found to have moderate edema, and 1 had severe arm edema. Our preliminary results indicate that interstitial irradiation immediately after excision results in excellent local control, with very satisfactory cosmesis and no morbidity due to the simultaneous excision and irradiation.

  8. The role of preoperative systemic treatment in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Habib-Lisik, Maja; Zięba, Agnieszka; Potemski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The goal of preoperative pharmacotherapy in patients with breast cancer is to enable breast conserving surgery in stage T3N0-1M0 or radical mastectomy in patients with primary inoperative tumors (T1-4N0-3M0). The choice of optimal treatment should be based not only on risk factors resulting from the stage but also on predicted cancer responsiveness to the treatment. The breast cancer subtypes defined by immunohistochemical profile (expression of ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67) are characterized by different responsiveness to therapy. Complete response confirmed by histopathological evaluation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a positive prognostic factor in some breast cancer subtypes. This marker is not of value in postmenopausal patients with ER/PR+ HER2– tumors, who are candidates for neoadjuvant hormone therapy. These patients have a good prognosis if in a histopathological report after surgery there are features such as pT1, pN0, Ki67 < 3%, and ER Allred score ≥ 3. The goal of the paper is to present current knowledge about preoperative pharmacotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27358586

  9. Factors associated with patients in the Scottish Highlands who chose mastectomy when suitable for breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Majid; Hubbard, Gill; Abbott, Nick; Daltrey, Ian; Mullen, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite being suitable for breast conservation surgery (BCS) a proportion of women choose mastectomy. This study aimed to assess the pre-operative pathological and geographic factors associated with choosing mastectomy rather than BCS in a single centre that serves a large geographical area encompassing urban, rural and remote island populations. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients suitable for BCS between January 2011 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pre-operative pathological features were compared using the Pearson chi squared test as was distance to the treatment centre from the patient’s home. A questionnaire was sent to all those who chose mastectomy to identify the factors that influenced their decision. Results A total of 446 patients suitable for BCS were identified of which 46 (11%) chose to undergo mastectomy. Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to present symptomatically (P=0.009), have tumours larger than 20 mm at diagnostic imaging (P=0.001) and have positive axillary staging (P=0.004). Patients choosing mastectomy were more likely to live remotely (P=0.051). Those patients who chose mastectomy felt this gave a better long-term outcome (18 patients, 44%) and peace of mind (14 patients, 34%). Conclusions Adverse pre-operative pathological features were associated with patients choosing mastectomy rather than BCS. There was a trend for patients who chose mastectomy to live remotely from the treatment centre. Patients choosing mastectomy most commonly cited a better long-term outcome and peace of mind as the reason behind their decision. Understanding what influences a patient’s surgical choice will allow clinicians and patients to engage in a fully informed pre-operative decision making process. PMID:27563559

  10. Assessment of contralateral mammary gland dose in the treatment of breast cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Foteineas, Andreas; Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Caimi, Mariangela; Margari, Niki; Dilvoi, Maria; Pantelakos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To measure the dose distribution, related to the treatment planning calculations, in the contralateral mammary gland of breast cancer patients treated with accelerated hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. METHODS: Thirty-four prospectively selected female patients with right breast cancer (pN0, negative surgical margins) were treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy/fraction) was prescribed; it was requested that planning target volumes be covered by the 95% isodose line. The contralateral mammary gland was defined on CT simulation. The dose received was evaluated by dose volume histograms. RESULTS: The measured contralateral breast doses were: (1) Dose maximum: 290-448 cGy [Equivalent (Eq) 337-522 cGy]; (2) Mean dose: 45-70 cGy (Eq 524-815 cGy); and (3) Median dose: 29-47 cGy (337-547 cGy) for total primary breast dose of 42.5 Gy in 16 equal fractions. The spearman rho correlation showed statistical significance between the contralateral breast volume and maximum dose (P = 0.0292), as well as mean dose (P = 0.0025) and median dose (P = 0.046) to the breast. CONCLUSION: Minimizing the dose to the contralateral breast has to be one of the priorities of the radiation oncologist when using short schedules because of the radiosensitivity of this organ at risk. Further study is necessary to assess the long-term clinical impact of this schedule. PMID:22013502

  11. Outcome After Conservative Surgery and Breast Irradiation in 5,717 Patients With Breast Cancer: Implications for Supraclavicular Nodal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Scotti, Vieri; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Detti, Beatrice; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Cardillo, Carla Deluca; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and predictive factors of patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy to the whole breast only, without supraclavicular nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 5,717 patients with pT1-T4 breast cancer were treated at the University of Florence. The median age of the patient population was 55 years (range, 30-80 years). All patients were followed for a median of 6.8 years (range, 1-27 years). Adjuvant chemotherapy was recommended in 1,535 patients (26.9%). Tamoxifen was prescribed in 2,951 patients (51.6%). The patients were split into three groups according to number of positive axillary nodes (PAN): P1, negative axillary lymph nodes; P2, one to three PAN; P3, more than three PAN. Results: The P3 patients had a higher incidence of supraclavicular fossa recurrence (SFR) compared with P2 and P1 patients. However, the incidence of SFR in P3 patients was low (only 5.5%), whereas the incidence of distant metastases (DM) was 27.2%. Distant metastasis was the only independent prognostic factor for breast cancer survival. Additionally, in the subgroup of patients who developed local recurrence, DM was the most important death predictor. Conclusion: Our series suggests that isolated SFR in patients who did not receive supraclavicular radiotherapy is infrequent, as well as in those patients who have more than three PAN, and SFR seems not to influence the outcome, which depends on DM occurrence.

  12. [Acute hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast following treatment with Cumarin].

    PubMed

    Lüchtrath, H; Walkowsky, A

    1983-08-01

    A case of hemorrhagic necrosis of the breast is reported in a thirty-four year old woman who received Cumarin treatment for deep leg vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It was necessary to remove the breast. The microscopic examination showed complete blockage of the vessels by fibrin thrombi in almost all veins. The cause of this venous thrombosis was explained as a Shwartzman-Sanarelli-Phenomenon. PMID:6555120

  13. Surgical treatment of early breast cancer in day surgery.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Casà, Luigi; Noto, Antonio; Mercadante, Sebastiano

    2007-01-01

    Quadrantectomy and associated sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is currently employed in most breast surgery centres as the gold standard in the treatment of early breast cancer. This approach has a modest morbidity and can usually be performed in a day-surgery regimen, leading to best acceptance by the patients. This reports outlines the experience of our Breast Unit with quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery for early breast cancer. One hundred patients presenting to our institution with primary invasive breast cancer measuring less than 3 cm and clinically negative axillary nodes underwent quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery. For 60 women with breast cancer the sentinel node was negative, so the only definitive surgical treatment was performed in the day-surgery regimen; 40 patients with positive sentinel nodes were hospitalised a second time for axillary dissection. In these patients that needed clearance of the axilla, SLNB was performed on the only positive node in 22 cases (55%). None of the patients admitted for quadrantectomy and SLNB in day surgery required re-hospitalisation after discharge. All patients proved to be fully satisfied with early discharge from hospital when questioned on the occasion of subsequent monitoring. Short-stay surgical programs in early invasive breast cancer treatment are feasible today owing to the availability of less invasive approaches such as quadrantectomy and SLNB. There are two main pointers to a distinct advantage for this kind of approach, i.e. recovery and psychological adjustment. Recovery from surgery is faster and the patient tends to play down the seriousness of the operation and to have a better mental attitude to neoplastic disease. Moreover, when performing quadrantectomy with SLNB in day surgery fewer than 50% of breast cancer patients (40% in our experience) require another surgical treatment, concluding the surgery in a single session. PMID:18019641

  14. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  15. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-08-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  16. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  17. A cost comparison analysis of partial versus whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. . E-mail: wsuh@lroc.harvard.edu; Pierce, Lori J.; Vicini, Frank A.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To assess, if and for whom, there are cost savings associated with alternate breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques when compared with the conventional external beam-based whole-breast RT with a boost (WBRT-B). Methods and Materials: Treatment planning and delivery utilization data were modeled for eight different breast RT techniques: (1) WBRT-B: 60 Gy in 30 fractions; (2) WBRT: 50 Gy in 25 fractions; (3) WBRT-accelerated (AC): 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions; (4) WBRT-intensity-modulated RT (IMRT): 60 Gy in 30 fractions; (5) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI)-IC, MammoSite: 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions; (6) APBI-IT, HDR interstitial: 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions; (7) APBI three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT): 38.5 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions; or (8) APBI-IMRT: 38.5 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions. Costs incurred by payer (i.e., direct medical costs; 2003 Medicare Fee Schedule) and patient (i.e., direct nonmedical costs; time and travel) were estimated. Total societal costs were then calculated for each treatment approach. Results: Not all efforts to reduce overall treatment time result in total cost savings. The least expensive partial breast-based RT approaches were the external beam techniques (APBI-3D-CRT, APBI-IMRT). Any reduced cost to patients for the HDR brachytherapy-based APBI regimens were overshadowed by substantial increases in cost to payers, resulting in higher total societal costs; the cost of HDR treatment delivery was primarily responsible for the increased direct medical cost. For the whole breast-based RT approaches, treating without a boost (WBRT) or with WBRT-AC reduced total costs. Overall, WBRT-AC was the least costly of all the regimens, in terms of costs to society; APBI approaches, in general, were favored over whole-breast techniques when only considering costs to patients. Conclusions: Based on societal cost considerations, WBRT-AC appears to be the preferred approach. If one were to pursue a partial-breast RT

  18. Towards intra-operative diagnosis of tumours during breast conserving surgery by selective-sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Zaabar, Fazliyana; Rakha, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Koloydenko, Alexey; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is increasingly employed for the treatment of early stage breast cancer. One of the key challenges in BCS is to ensure complete removal of the tumour while conserving as much healthy tissue as possible. In this study we have investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for automated intra-operative evaluation of tumour excision. First, a multivariate classification model based on Raman spectra of normal and malignant breast tissue samples was built and achieved diagnosis of mammary ductal carcinoma (DC) with 95.6% sensitivity and 96.2% specificity (5-fold cross-validation). The tumour regions were discriminated from the healthy tissue structures based on increased concentration of nucleic acids and reduced concentration of collagen and fat. The multivariate classification model was then applied to sections from fresh tissue of new patients to produce diagnosis images for DC. The diagnosis images obtained by raster scanning RMS were in agreement with the conventional histopathology diagnosis but were limited to long data acquisition times (typically 10 000 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to ~5 h mm-2). Selective-sampling based on integrated auto-fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopy was used to reduce the number of Raman spectra to ~20 spectra mm-2, which is equivalent to an acquisition time of ~15 min for 5 × 5 mm2 tissue samples. This study suggests that selective-sampling Raman microscopy has the potential to provide a rapid and objective intra-operative method to detect mammary carcinoma in tissue and assess resection margins.

  19. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Housman, Douglas; Yang Qifeng; Toppmeyer, Deborah; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted.

  20. Impact of different type of cancer treatment on the effectiveness of breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Szloch, Joanna; Marczyk, Elżbieta; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    For women undergoing mastectomy as part of their breast cancer treatment, breast reconstruction is an important part of therapy. However, neoadjuvant, adjuvant treatments as well as other patient-related factors can compromise the results of breast reconstruction techniques. In this article we have reviewed current approaches to the management of complications and risks that neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies pose on breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Non-treatment related factors influencing reconstruction techniques were reviewed as well. PMID:27562472

  1. Profile of palbociclib in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehab, Moataz; Elbaz, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women. Each year, thousands die either because of disease progression or failure of treatment. Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes based on the molecular expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These receptors represent important therapeutic targets either through monoclonal antibodies or through small-molecule inhibitors directed toward them. However, up to 40% of patients develop either a primary or a secondary resistance to the current treatments. Therefore, there is an urgent need for investigating new targets in order to overcome the resistance and/or enhance the current therapies. Cell cycle is altered in many human cancers, especially in breast cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), especially CDK4 and CDK6, play a pivotal role in cell cycle progression that makes them potential targets for new promising therapies. CDK inhibition has shown strong antitumor activities, ranging from cytostatic antiproliferative effects to synergistic effects in combination with other antitumor drugs. In order to overcome the drawbacks of the first-generation CDK inhibitors, recently, new CDK inhibitors have emerged that are more selective to CDK4 and CDK6 such as palbociclib, which is the most advanced CDK4/6 inhibitor in trials. In preclinical studies, palbociclib has shown a very promising antitumor activity, especially against ERα+ breast cancer subtype. Palbociclib has gained world attention, and US the Food and Drug Administration has accelerated its approval for first-line treatment in combination with letrozole for the first-line systematic treatment of postmenopausal women with ERα+/HER2− locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential role of CDK inhibition in breast cancer treatment, and focus on palbociclib progress from preclinical studies to clinical trials with mentioning the

  2. Does Axillary Boost Increase Lymphedema Compared With Supraclavicular Radiation Alone After Breast Conservation?

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Shelly B. Freedman, Gary M.; Li Tianyu; Anderson, Penny R.; Ross, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine independent predictors of lymphedema (LE) after breast radiotherapy and to quantify added risks of LE from regional node irradiation (RNI). Materials and Methods: A total of 2,579 women with T1-2, N 0-3, M0 breast cancer treated with breast conservation between 1970 and 2005 were studied. A total of 2,169 patients (84%) received radiation to the breast (B), 226 (8.8%) to the breast and supraclavicular LNs (B+SC), and 184 (7.1%) to the breast, supraclavicular LNs, and a posterior axillary boost (B+SC+PAB). Median follow-up was 81 months (range, 3-271). Results: Eighteen percent of patients developed LE. LE risks were as follows: 16% (B), 23% (B+SC), and 31% (B+SC+PAB) (p < 0.0001). LE severity was greater in patients who had RNI (p = 0.0002). On multivariate analysis, RT field (p < 0.0001), obesity index (p = 0.0157), systemic therapy (p = 0.0013), and number of LNs dissected (p < 0.0001) independently predicted for LE. In N1 patients, the addition of a SC to tangents (p < 0.0001) and the addition of a PAB to tangents (p = 0.0017) conferred greater risks of LE, but adding a PAB to B+SC RT did not (p = 0.8002). In the N2 patients, adding a PAB increased the risk of LE 4.5-fold over B+SC RT (p = 0.0011). Conclusions: LE predictors included number of LNs dissected, RNI, obesity index, and systemic therapy. LE risk increased when a SC or PAB were added in the N1 subgroup. In the N2 patients, a PAB increased the risk over B+SC. The decision to boost the axilla must be weighed against the increased risk of LE that it imposes.

  3. Breast-Conserving Therapy: Radiotherapy Margins for Breast Tumor Bed Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Nijkamp, Jasper; Elkhuizen, Paula

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction position variability of the excision cavity (EC) and to compare the rib and breast surface as surrogates for the cavity. Additionally, we sought to determine the required margin for on-line, off-line and no correction protocols in external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients were studied who had been treated in the supine position for 28 daily fractions. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were regularly acquired according to a shrinking action level setup correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration of the ribs and sternum. The position of the excision area was retrospectively analyzed by gray value cone-beam computed tomography-to-computed tomography registration. Subsequently, three setup correction strategies (on-line, off-line, and no corrections) were applied, according to the rib and breast surface registrations, to estimate the residual setup errors (systematic [{sigma}] and random [{sigma}]) of the excision area. The required margins were calculated using a margin recipe. Results: The image quality of the cone-beam computed tomography scans was sufficient for localization of the EC. The margins required for the investigated setup correction protocols and the setup errors for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 8.3 mm ({sigma} = 3.0, {sigma} = 2.6), 10.6 mm ({sigma} = 3.8, {sigma} = 3.2), and 7.7 mm ({sigma} = 2.7, {sigma} = 2.9) for the no correction strategy; 5.6 mm ({sigma} = 2.0, {sigma} = 1.8), 6.5 mm ({sigma} = 2.3, {sigma} = 2.3), and 4.5 mm ({sigma} = 1.5, {sigma} = 1.9) for the on-line rib strategy; and 5.1 mm ({sigma} = 1.8, {sigma} = 1.7), 4.8 mm ({sigma} = 1.7, {sigma} = 1.6), and 3.3 mm ({sigma} = 1.1, {sigma} = 1.6) for the on-line surface strategy, respectively. Conclusion: Considerable geometric uncertainties in the position of the EC relative to the bony anatomy and breast surface have been observed. By using registration of the breast

  4. Mastalgia. Tailoring treatment to type of breast pain.

    PubMed

    Steinbrunn, B S; Zera, R T; Rodriguez, J L

    1997-11-01

    Breast pain is a common, often distressing problem among women. After significant disease is ruled out, most patients respond to simple reassurance. Others, however, require treatment because symptoms interfere with their lifestyle. The authors offer practical suggestions for tailoring treatment for these patients according to type of pain--cyclical mastalgia, non-cyclical mastalgia, or chest wall pain. PMID:9385340

  5. Dosimetric Evaluation of Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques for Breast Cancer After Conservative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuli; Wang, Yadi; Xu, Weidong; Jiang, Huayong; Liu, Qingzhi; Gao, Junmao; Yao, Bo; Hou, Jun; He, Heliang

    2015-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) potentially leads to a more favorite dose distribution compared to 3-dimensional or conventional tangential radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer after conservative surgery or mastectomy. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) among helical tomotherapy (HT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT), and forward-planned field in field (FP-FIF) IMRT techniques after breast-conserving surgery. Computed tomography scans from 20 patients (12 left sided and 8 right sided) previously treated with T1N0 carcinoma were selected for this dosimetric planning study. We designed HT, IP-IMRT, and FP-FIF plans for each patient. Plans were compared according to dose-volume histogram analysis in terms of PTV homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) as well as OARs dose and volume parameters. Both HI and CI of the PTV showed statistically significant difference among IP-IMRT, FP-FIF, and HT with those of HT were best (P < .05). Compared to FP-FIF, IP-IMRT showed smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung, heart, contralateral lung, and breast, while HT indicated smaller exposed volumes of ipsilateral lung but larger exposed volumes of contralateral lung and breast as well as heart. In addition, HT demonstrated an increase in exposed volume of ipsilateral lung (except for fraction of lung volume receiving >30 Gy and 20 Gy), heart, contralateral lung, and breast compared with IP-IMRT. For breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery, HT provides better dose homogeneity and conformity of PTV compared to IP-IMRT and FP-FIF techniques, especially for patients with supraclavicular lymph nodes involved. Meanwhile, HT decreases the OAR volumes receiving higher doses with an increase in the volumes receiving low doses, which is known to lead to an increased rate of radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Hence, composite factors including dosimetric advantage

  6. Oral health after breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Amódio, Juliana; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; Carrara, Helio Humberto Angotti; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimaraes; de Andrade, Jurandyr Moreira; dos Reis, Francisco José Candido

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Oral health can affect a patient's general health and quality of life. Given the increase in breast cancer survival rates, investigations of factors influencing the quality of life of survivors have gained importance. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize oral health in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We conducted a matched case-control study. Forty-eight women who survived breast cancer (age 62.1±9.1 years) and 48 healthy controls (age 61.8±8.6 years) were included. For each case and control, a complete oral evaluation chart was completed. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic periodontal disease was 98% in breast cancer survivors and 87% in controls. The breast cancer survivors had a median of 16 remaining teeth, whereas controls had a median of 22 remaining teeth (p = 0.03). The percentage of sites with gingival bleeding was 16.05% (0-100%) in breast cancer survivors and 0% (0-72%) in controls (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chronic periodontal disease and tooth loss were highly prevalent in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. To improve survivors' quality of life, a preventive oral health evaluation should be available prior to cancer treatment. PMID:25518024

  7. Clinicopathologic features and long-term outcome of patients with medullary breast carcinoma managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ha Vu-Nishino; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Ahrens, Willam A.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical characteristics and outcome of medullary carcinoma to infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast in a large cohort of conservatively managed patients with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Chart records of patients with invasive breast cancer managed with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) at the therapeutic radiology facilities of Yale University School of Medicine before 2001 were reviewed. Forty-six cases (1971-2001) were identified with medullary histology; 1,444 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma served as a control group. Results: The medullary cohort presented at a younger age with a higher percentage of patients in the 35 years or younger age group (26.1% vs. 6.6%, p < 0.00001). Twelve patients with medullary histology underwent genetic screening, and 6 patients were identified with deleterious mutations. This group showed greater association with BRCA1/2 mutations compared with screened patients in the control group (50.0% vs. 15.8%, p 0.0035). The medullary cohort was also significantly associated with greater T stage and tumor size (37.0% vs. 17.2% T2, mean size 3.2 vs. 2.5 cm, p 0.00097) as well as negative ER (84.9% vs. 37.6%, p < 0.00001) and PR (87.5% vs. 48.1%, p = 0.00001) status. As of February 2003, median follow-up times for the medullary and control groups were 13.9 and 14.0 years, respectively. Although breast relapse-free rates were not significantly different (76.7% vs. 85.2%), 10-year distant relapse-free survival in the medullary cohort was significantly better than in the control group (94.9% vs. 77.5%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Despite poor clinicopathologic features, patients with medullary histology demonstrate favorable long-term distant relapse-free survival. Local control rates of patients with medullary and infiltrating ductal carcinoma are comparable. These findings suggest that patients diagnosed with medullary carcinoma are appropriate candidates for

  8. Management of early breast cancer in older women: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Elomrani, Fadwa; Zine, Maryem; Afif, Mohamed; L’annaz, Saad; Ouziane, Imane; Mrabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is a common condition. It is a leading cause of death among women, and its incidence increases with age. Aging of the population and improvement of the quality of life of elders make it a major public health issue. We reviewed the literature to try to determine the management of breast cancer in older women. Methods We conducted a narrative review by literature searches using key words “breast cancer”, “elderly and older”, and “women” in Pubmed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The aim of this review is to summarize the management of early breast cancer in older women by discussing the controversies of screening in older women. Then, we try to define the optimal strategy for these women, either surgery alone or primary endocrine therapy. We also discuss the indications of lymph node dissection, and we evaluate the benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and the anti HER2 treatment for these women. Results More than 50% of patients with breast cancer are 65 years or older, and around 30% are more than 70 years old. Most randomized trials did not include older women. Hence, the treatment of breast cancer in older patients is based on the management provided to younger women. Regardless of age, the treatment must aim for the best efficiency. Advanced age in itself should not be a limitation to treatment. There are no standard guidelines set for elderly patients. Surgical treatment for older patients evolved to avoid mastectomy, and conservative mammary surgery was proposed, similar to that used in younger patients. The proportion of elderly patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy is increasing. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in older patients with breast cancer was analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy is beneficial to women with hormone receptor-negative tumors. In those with hormone receptor-positive tumors, adjuvant chemotherapy in association to trastuzumab is beneficial for HER2-positive tumors, and for women with HER2

  9. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  10. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer: optimal treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Cardonick, Elyce

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is diagnosed approximately once per 1,000 pregnancies; most commonly due to the reproductive age of the women, these include breast, cervical, melanoma, thyroid, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma diagnoses. As a single diagnosis, breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy. Cancer is expected to complicate pregnancy more often due to the trend for women to delay child bearing to later maternal ages. Delayed first birth is itself a risk factor for breast cancer. Termination of pregnancy has not been shown to afford a survival benefit. While protecting the interests of mother and unborn fetus, breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy with good outcomes for both. Some modification of the protocols used for nonpregnant women with suspicious palpable breast masses is required. This article reviews the challenges for physicians in making the diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy and upon diagnosis, counseling patients about treatment options. The consequences of diagnostic investigations and cancer treatment for the exposed fetus are also addressed. PMID:25395871

  11. Breast cancer and sexuality: multi-modal treatment options.

    PubMed

    Krychman, Michael L; Katz, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The sexual consequences of breast cancer and its treatments are well known and previously reviewed. Alterations in body image, with or without breast reconstruction, changes in sexual self-esteem and self-efficacy, vulvovaginal atrophy as a result of chemotherapy and/or adjuvant hormone therapy, and loss of libido secondary to dyspareunia and body image issues are common in survivors of breast cancer. Medications that are prescribed for long-term use including those in the class of aromatase inhibitors can have far-reaching implications on quality of life by contributing to vulvar and vaginal atrophic changes. While this is an important issue, there are few widely accepted treatments that have been evaluated for efficacy and safety for these sexual challenges in the breast cancer population. However, progress is being made in finding new and innovative solutions for many of the sexual problems faced by breast cancer survivors and their partners. Many institutions are now compelled to address survivorship concerns and addressing sexuality and intimacy are paramount issues in survivorship care. In this article, we present the evidence for the multimodal approach to the management of sexuality concerns in the breast cancer survivor. Pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and psychosocial interventions will be reviewed. PMID:22151953

  12. Clinical Outcome of Breast Conservation Therapy for Breast Cancer in Hong Kong: Prognostic Impact of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence and 2005 St. Gallen Risk Categories

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.-K. . E-mail: tkokyau@gmail.com; Soong, Inda S.; Chan, K.; Chan, M.; Cheung, P.; Lau, H.W.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of breast conservation therapy (BCT) for invasive breast cancers in our predominantly Chinese population. Methods and Materials: Clinical outcomes of 412 T1-2 invasive breast cancers treated by wide local excision and external radiotherapy from 1994 to 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. Only 7% lesions were first detected by mammograms. Adjuvant tamoxifen and chemotherapy were added in 74% and 45% patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up was 5.4 years. The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate, distant failure-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival were 4%, 92%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. The 5-year distant failure-free survival for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk categories (2005 St. Gallen) were 98%, 91%, and 80%, respectively (p 0.0003). Cosmetic results were good to excellent in more than 90% of the assessable patients. Grade 3 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 4.461; 95% CI, 1.216-16.360; p = 0.024), age (HR, 0.915; 95% CI, 0.846-0.990; p = 0.027), and close/positive final margins (HR, 3.499; 95% CI, 1.141-10.729; p = 0.028) were significant independent risk factors for IBTR. Both St. Gallen risk categories (p = 0.003) and IBTR (HR, 5.885; 95% CI, 2.494-13.889; p < 0.0005) were independent prognostic factors for distant failure-free survival. Conclusions: Despite the low percentage of mammographically detected lesions, the overall clinical outcome of BCT for invasive breast cancers in the Chinese population is comparable to the Western series. The 2005 St. Gallen risk category is a promising clinical tool, but further validation by large studies is warranted.

  13. Ten-Year Recurrence Rates in Young Women With Breast Cancer by Locoregional Treatment Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A. Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach.

  14. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. PMID:27258052

  15. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo; Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  16. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  17. Analysis of Treatment Efficacy, Cosmesis, and Toxicity Using the MAMMOSITE Breast Brachytherapy Catheter to Deliver Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: The William Beaumont Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, K. Kenneth; Vicini, Frank A. Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter; Ghilezan, Michel; Gilbert, Samuel B.S.; Kunzman, Jonathan B.S.; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To review our institution's experience of treating patients with the MammoSite (Cytyc Corp., Marlborough, MA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), for determining short-term treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to April 2006, 80 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT) received adjuvant radiation using the MammoSite (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions prescribed to 1.0 cm from the balloon surface). Twenty-three patients (29%) had Stage 0 breast cancer, 46 (57%) had Stage I breast cancer, and 11 (14%) had Stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up was 22.1 months. Results: Two ipsilateral breast-tumor recurrences (IBTRs) (2.5%) developed for a 3-year actuarial rate of 2.9% (no regional failures were observed). On molecular-based clonality assay evaluation, both recurrences were clonally related. Younger age at diagnosis was the only variable associated with IBTR (continuous variable, p = 0.044; categorical variable [<55 years vs. {>=}55 years], p = 0.012). The percentages of patients with good/excellent cosmetic results at 12 and 36 months were 96.9% and 88.2%, respectively (p = NS). Patients with applicator-to-skin spacing <7 mm and those who received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy exhibited lower rates of good/excellent cosmetic results, though the association was not statistically significant. The overall incidence of symptomatic seromas and any seromas was 10% and 45%, respectively. The overall incidence of fat necrosis and infections was 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusions: Early-stage breast-cancer patients treated with adjuvant APBI using the MammoSite catheter exhibited a 3-year treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity similar to those observed with other forms of interstitial APBI at this length of follow-up.

  18. Postoperative Seroma Formation After Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using Low-Kilovoltage X-Rays Given During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Welzel, Grit; Brade, Joachim

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and volume of seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with or without intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients with 73 breast cancers (IORT group) treated with IORT (20 Gy Intrabeam) as a boost during BCS were compared with 86 patients with 88 breast tumors (NO-IORT group) treated without IORT. Clinical examination and measurement of seroma volume on treatment-planning CT (CT-seroma) was done at median interval of 35 days after BCS. Results: Seroma were found on palpation in 37 patients (23%) and on CT in 105 patients (65%; median volume, 26.3 mL). Interval between BCS and CT was significantly shorter in patients with palpable seroma (median, 33 days) or CT-seroma (33 days) compared with those with no palpable seroma (36.5 days; p = 0.027) or CT-seroma (52 days, p < 0.001). The rate of palpable seroma was not different (IORT n = 17, 23%; NO-IORT n = 20, 23%; p = 0.933), whereas fewer patients required puncture in the IORT group [3 (4%) vs. 10 (11%)]. In contrast, more patients showed CT-seroma after IORT (IORT n = 59, 81%; NO-IORT n = 46, 52%; p < 0.001). The interval between BCS and CT was significantly shorter in patients with IORT as compared with the NO-IORT patients (median, 33 days vs. 41.5 days; p = 0.036). Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy with low-kilovoltage X-rays during BCS is not associated with an increased rate of palpable seroma or seroma requiring treatment. The rate of seroma formation on CT was higher after IORT compared with the NO-IORT group, which might be because of the shorter interval between BCS and CT.

  19. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Northern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh Chen, C.-J.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chen, Y.-C.; Lin, C.-Y.; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate health-related quality of life (QoL) and attitudes toward surgical procedures for breast cancer among patients in northern Taiwan. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twenty posttreatment breast cancer patients completed a QoL survey at two different hospitals in northern Taiwan. Patients (median age, 49 years; range, 32-69 years) had either undergone mastectomy (n = 157) or breast conservation treatment (BCT) (n 63). The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Breast questionnaire was used to assess QoL. The patients were also asked about breast reconstruction or use of an artificial breast or not, as well as the decision-making process. Result: There was no significant difference in QoL between patients treated with BCT or mastectomy. Significantly more mastectomy patients had had breast reconstruction or wore an artificial breast (49.7% vs. 3.2%; p < 0.001). Of those who had BCT, 81% would make the same choice again, compared with only 49% of mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). Only 7.6% of patients who made the treatment decision themselves were dissatisfied with their treatment, compared with 25% for whom the decision was made by someone else (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Taiwanese women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy did not report a worse QoL than those who received BCT, but they were more likely to be concerned about their resulting body image. Half would have chosen a less extensive procedure if they had it to do over. Women were more likely to be satisfied with the results of their treatment if they had decided themselves.

  1. Closed internal degloving injury with conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Lin; Lee, Wei-Che; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2008-02-01

    In the emergency department, we frequently manage patients with multiple contusions and bruise over the trunk without severe injuries. Emergency department discharge is a common option for these patients, and we may neglect the existence of closed internal degloving injury, which is a soft tissue injury with pelvic trauma, combining the subcutaneous tissue torn away from the underlying fascia followed by a cavity being filled with hematoma and liquefied fat created in the next few days (Harefuah 2006;145:111-3:66, J Trauma 1997;42:1046). We report the unusual occurrence of this entity in an 18-year-old man. He encountered a scooter accident and experienced a few days of hospitalization because of thoracispinal (T10 and T11) process fracture. He was discharged, but a fluctuating mass developed at the lumbar area 10 days later. The comprehensive survey excluded the cerebrospinal fluid leakage associated with spinal fracture, and internal degloving injury was diagnosed. Percutaneous drainage with compressive bondage was aggressively used. Even though the treatment course was time consuming, the lesion eventually disappeared 10 months after his first visit. PMID:18272136

  2. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  3. Simplified field-in-field technique for a large-scale implementation in breast radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M.; Campana, Francois; Dendale, Remi; Fourquet, Alain

    2012-07-01

    We wanted to evaluate a simplified 'field-in-field' technique (SFF) that was implemented in our department of Radiation Oncology for breast treatment. This study evaluated 15 consecutive patients treated with a simplified field in field technique after breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. Radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast irradiation to the total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and a boost of 16 Gy in 8 fractions to the tumor bed. We compared dosimetric outcomes of SFF to state-of-the-art electronic surface compensation (ESC) with dynamic leaves. An analysis of early skin toxicity of a population of 15 patients was performed. The median volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose was 763 mL (range, 347-1472) for SFF vs. 779 mL (range, 349-1494) for ESC. The median residual 107% isodose was 0.1 mL (range, 0-63) for SFF and 1.9 mL (range, 0-57) for ESC. Monitor units were on average 25% higher in ESC plans compared with SFF. No patient treated with SFF had acute side effects superior to grade 1-NCI scale. SFF created homogenous 3D dose distributions equivalent to electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves. It allowed the integration of a forward planned concomitant tumor bed boost as an additional multileaf collimator subfield of the tangential fields. Compared with electronic surface compensation with dynamic leaves, shorter treatment times allowed better radiation protection to the patient. Low-grade acute toxicity evaluated weekly during treatment and 2 months after treatment completion justified the pursuit of this technique for all breast patients in our department.

  4. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  5. The Role of Methylation in Breast Cancer Susceptibility and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pouliot, Marie-Christine; Labrie, Yvan; Diorio, Caroline; Durocher, Francine

    2015-09-01

    DNA methylation is a critical mechanism of epigenetic modification involved in gene expression programming, that can promote the development of several cancers, including breast cancer. The methylation of CpG islands by DNA methyltransferases is reversible and has been shown to modify the transcriptional activity of key proliferation genes or transcription factors involved in suppression or promotion of cell growth. Indeed, aberrant methylation found in gene promoters is a hallmark of cancer that could be used as non-intrusive biomarker in body fluids such as blood and plasma for early detection of breast cancer. Many biomarker genes have been evaluated for breast cancer detection. However, in the absence of a unique biomarker having the sufficient specificity and sensitivity, a panel of multiple genes should be used. Treatments targeting aberrant methylation by DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which trigger re-expression of silenced genes, are now available and allow for better treatment efficiency. PMID:26254344

  6. Sulfatase inhibitors for recidivist breast cancer treatment: A chemical review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ramanpreet; Singh, Jatinder; Singh, Dhandeep; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2016-05-23

    Steroid sulfatase (STS) plays a momentous role in the conversion of sulfated steroids, which are biologically inactive, into biologically active un-sulfated steroid hormones, which support the development and growth of a number of hormone-dependent cancers, including breast cancer. Therefore, inhibitors of STS are supposed to be potential drugs for the treatment of breast and other steroid-dependent cancers. The present review concentrates on broad chemical classification of steroid sulfatase inhibitors. The inhibitors reviewed are classified into four main categories: Steroid sulfamate based inhibitors; Steroid non-sulfamate based inhibitors; Non-steroidal sulfamate based inhibitors; Non-steroidal non-sulfamate based inhibitors. A succinct overview of current treatment of cancer, estradiol precursors, STS enzyme and its role in breast cancer is herein described. PMID:26974384

  7. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  8. Patient-Reported Quality of Life and Satisfaction with Cosmetic Outcomes After Breast Conservation and Mastectomy with and without Reconstruction: Results of a Survey of Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Li, Yun; Morrow, Monica; Janz, Nancy; Alderman, Amy; Graff, John; Hamilton, Ann; Katz, Steven; Hawley, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although breast conservation is therapeutically equivalent to mastectomy for most early-stage breast cancer patients, an increasing number are pursuing mastectomy, which may be followed by breast reconstruction. We sought to evaluate long-term quality of life (QOL) and cosmetic outcomes after different locoregional management approaches, as perceived by patients themselves. Methods We surveyed women diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer from 2005-07, as reported to the Los Angeles and Detroit population-based SEER registries. We received responses from 2290 women approximately 9 months after diagnosis (73% response rate) and from 1536 of these 4 years later. We evaluated QOL and patterns and correlates of satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes overall, and more specifically within the subgroup undergoing mastectomy with reconstruction, using multivariable linear regression. Results Of the 1450 patients who responded to both surveys and had not recurred, 963 underwent breast conserving surgery, 263 mastectomy without reconstruction, and 222 mastectomy with reconstruction. Cosmetic satisfaction was similar between those receiving breast conservation and those receiving mastectomy with reconstruction. Among patients receiving mastectomy with reconstruction, reconstruction type and radiation receipt were associated with satisfaction (p<0.001), with an adjusted scaled satisfaction score of 4.7 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction without radiation, 4.4 for patients receiving autologous reconstruction and radiation therapy, 4.1 for patients receiving implant reconstruction without radiation, and 2.8 for patients receiving implant reconstruction and radiation. Discussion Patient-reported cosmetic satisfaction was similar after breast conservation and after mastectomy with reconstruction. In patients undergoing post-mastectomy radiation, use of autologous reconstruction may mitigate radiation's deleterious impact on cosmetic outcomes. PMID:25654742

  9. Contrast-enhanced microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuqiang

    Contrast agents and heating agents have been proposed for microwave breast tumor imaging and treatment, respectively. The dielectric properties of the tumor are altered with contrast agents or heating agents that locally accumulate in the tumor. The resulting change in dielectric properties of the tumor has the potential to enhance the sensitivity of microwave imaging of breast tumors and increase the efficiency and selectivity of microwave thermal therapy of breast tumors. This dissertation addresses several key challenges in contrast-enhanced microwave imaging and treatment of breast tumors. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to enhance both the relative permittivity and effective conductivity of the host medium, and are promising as theranostic (integrated therapeutic and diagnostic) agents. Thus, our properties characterization work focuses on CNT dispersions. We performed in vitro microwave dielectric properties and heating response characterization of dispersions of CNTs treated by different functionalization methods and identified a CNT formulation that is very promising as a microwave theranostic agent. Stable dispersions of CNTs with concentrations up to 20 mg/ml are obtained with this formulation, and the enhanced microwave properties of these dispersions are extraordinary compared to the control. We also conducted in vivo dielectric properties characterization of mouse tumors with intra-tumoral injections of CNT dispersions and confirmed that the presence of CNTs increases the dielectric properties of the tumor. In parallel, we developed a contrast-enhanced microwave breast tumor imaging algorithm using sparse reconstruction methods. We demonstrated that this algorithm accurately localizes small tumors in 3D numerical breast phantoms. We also demonstrated the experimental feasibility of this method using physical breast phantoms. Lastly, we studied the sensitivity of the distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) to initial guesses and developed a

  10. Effect of Breast Volume on Treatment Reproducibility on a Tomotherapy Unit in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Offerman, Shannon; Lamba, Michael; Lavigne, Ruth

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the volume of a patient's breast is correlated with reliable daily setup in treatment of breast cancer with a helical tomotherapy treatment unit. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six consecutive patients with breast cancer were treated on a helical tomotherapy unit. During simulation, kilovoltage CT images were obtained for treatment planning. These were fused with daily megavoltage CT scans, and after setup based on skin marks and laser alignment the necessary shifts were carried out. The magnitude of daily shifts (in millimeters) was retrospectively obtained from the daily image fusions, and the breast volume was obtained from the treatment plan. A total of 873 fusion scans were reviewed. Random error for absolute and directional daily shifts was evaluated for correlation to volume. Variation over time was also evaluated. Results: Mean (SD) random shift for all patients in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions was 2.7 (2.0), 3.1 (1.5), and 3.2 (2.6) mm, respectively. Mean (SD) absolute distance shifted was 6.0 (3.5) mm. There was no significant correlation between mean absolute or mean directional daily shift and breast volume (0.08, 0.08, 0.22, and 0.07, respectively). There was no correlation between setup variation and time. Conclusions: In this cohort, there was no correlation between breast volume and degree of daily shift. There was no correlation between time course and setup variation. Therefore, setup variation does not improve or degrade with repeated treatment setups.

  11. Impact of intraoperative specimen mammography on margins in breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Tomoka; Sawaki, Masataka; Ishiguro, Junko; Adachi, Yayoi; Kotani, Haruru; Yoshimura, Akiyo; Hattori, Masaya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Iwata, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    A positive resection margin is one of the most significant risk factors for local breast cancer recurrence following breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Intraoperative specimen mammography (SMMG) is routinely used to evaluate the surgical margin at our institution. The aim of the present study was to assess the adequacy of SMMG for margin assessment. The patient cohort included 174 women who underwent BCS in 2006. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG were assessed by comparing the margins assessed by histological and radiological methods. It was also examined whether the rate of positive histological margins was decreased by re-excision following SMMG evaluation. A total of 23 false-negatives and 6 false-positives were determined by SMMG. The sensitivity and specificity of SMMG margin assessment for patients with primary breast cancer were 20.6 and 94.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 50% and the negative predictive value was 82.2%. A subgroup analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of SMMG in cases with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were higher compared with those in invasive ductal carcinoma. Furthermore, the positive histological margin rate was not affected by re-excision. Although the general usefulness of intraoperative SMMG was not proven, this procedure may be useful in specific cases, particularly those with DCIS and those diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy. A prospective study with exact criteria and a standard procedure is required. PMID:27588192

  12. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  13. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: Promise and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles’ potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  14. Breast Cancer and Pregnancy: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy presents a challenging situation for the patient, family, and caregivers. Case series have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of using anthracycline-based chemotherapy during the second and third trimesters. Additionally, patients should be seen, evaluated, and treated in a multidisciplinary setting with facilitated communication among the medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, obstetrician, radiation oncologist, pathologist, and radiologist. This review details the available data regarding the diagnosis and management of the pregnant breast cancer patient. PMID:21147871

  15. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: promise and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-05-28

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles' potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  16. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  17. [Current Conservative Treatment and Management Strategies of Skeletal Muscle Injuries].

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, T; Carl, H-D; Swoboda, B; Heinrich, M; Heiß, R; Grim, C; Engelhardt, M

    2016-06-01

    Muscle injuries frequently occur during sport and are one of the commonest injuries. The diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries impose high demands on medical treatment, in order to ensure successful regeneration and a rapid return to sport. Most of the injuries can be treated conservatively, as skeletal muscles have a high endogenous capacity for repair and regeneration. Conservative treatment includes initial on-field therapy. This is known as the "RICE" principle and is common and recommended for initial treatment for most sports injuries. The primary therapy target is to reduce pain, swelling and bleeding and thus to limit the initial inflammatory process and prevent further damage. During the first days after injury, brief immobilization helps to reduce the re-injury rate and accelerates the formation of granulation tissue. There are many possible additional treatments, including intramuscular injections, manipulation of the sacroiliac joint or rehabilitation programs, including stretching and strengthening. If the acute treatment phase is complete after 3 to 5 days, more active treatment, including trunk stabilisation, stretching and strengthening, can be started gradually. Despite their high prevalence, there have only been a few studies on the treatment and management of these injuries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the literature on the classification, pathobiology and treatment strategies for muscle injuries. PMID:27351158

  18. [The fertility-associated treatment of young breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunshu; Wu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    There is no treatment norm on the fertility issue of breast cancer patients. The clinical studies show that the effects of chemotherapy and endocrine treatment on menstrual cycle and ovarian function have connection with patients' age, therapeutic regimen and drug dose. The time to be pregnant should be decided according to the stage of tumor and the therapeutic regimen. The trimester of pregnancy and tumor stage should be considered when making the therapeutic regimen for the breast cancer patients during pregnancy. And it is not recommended to choose the induced abortion for the therapeutic aim. Theoretically, ovarian function inhibition drugs have great application prospects, while, of which the long-term affect on human body and the relation with tumor development need more researches to study. The available evidence-based practices consider that the pregnancy after breast cancer treatment has no adverse affects on the prognosis of early and middle stage breast cancer patients. More study results are needed to normalize and detail the therapeutic regimen and fertility guidance. PMID:26792357

  19. Pathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rupen; Rosso, Kelly; Nathanson, S David

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women worldwide. Prediction models stratify a woman’s risk for developing cancer and can guide screening recommendations based on the presence of known and quantifiable hormonal, environmental, personal, or genetic risk factors. Mammography remains the mainstay breast cancer screening and detection but magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have become useful diagnostic adjuncts in select patient populations. The management of breast cancer has seen much refinement with increased specialization and collaboration with multidisciplinary teams that include surgeons, oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, geneticist, reconstructive surgeons and patients. Evidence supports a less invasive surgical approach to the staging and management of the axilla in select patients. In the era of patient/tumor specific management, the advent of molecular and genomic profiling is a paradigm shift in the treatment of a biologically heterogenous disease. PMID:25114845

  20. Natural cures for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Shareef, Munazza; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Sarfraz, Maliha

    2016-05-01

    For centuries, herbs and plants have been used for medicinal purposes and as food as well. This review concerns about different types of plants that retain the immune stimulating and anti-tumor properties. Large variety of active phytochemicals such as carotenoids, flavonoids, ligands, polyphenolics, terpenoids, sulfides, lignans and plant sterols has been identified in different types of herbs. These phytochemicals have different mechanisms of action. They either stimulate the protective enzyme like glutathione transferase or prevent the cell proliferation. This review has centered on the biochemical properties of Allium sativum, Echinacea, Curcuma longa, Arctium lappa, Camellia sinensis, Panax ginseng and Flax seed. Extracts and juices of Withania somnifera, Amoora rohituka, Dysoxylum binectariferum and Vaccinium macrocarpon, respectively also used as anti-breast cancer. The volatile oils and extracts of these herbs and plants inhibit the synthesis of mevalonate that lessen the tumor growth and cholesterol synthesis. PMID:27275107

  1. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  2. Pain in Breast Cancer Treatment: Aggravating Factors and Coping Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro Godoy, Maria de Fatima; Pereira de Godoy, Livia Maria; Barufi, Stelamarys; de Godoy, José Maria Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate pain in women with breast cancer-related lymphedema and the characteristics of aggravating factors and coping mechanisms. The study was conducted in the Clinica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, with a group of 46 women who had undergone surgery for the treatment of breast cancer. The following variables were evaluated: type and length of surgery; number of radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions; continued feeling of the removed breast (phantom limb), infection, intensity of pain, and factors that improve and worsen the pain. The percentage of events was used for statistical analysis. About half the participants (52.1%) performed modified radical surgery, with 91.3% removing only one breast; 82.6% of the participants did not perform breast reconstruction surgery. Insignificant pain was reported by 32.60% of the women and 67.3% said they suffered pain; it was mild in 28.8% of the cases (scale 1–5), moderate in 34.8% (scale 6–9), and severe in 4.3%. The main mechanisms used to cope with pain were painkillers in 41.30% of participants, rest in 21.73%, religious ceremonies in 17.39%, and chatting with friends in 8.69%. In conclusion, many mastectomized patients with lymphedema complain of pain, but pain is often underrecognized and undertreated. PMID:25349741

  3. Manual lymphatic drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ezzo, Jeanette; Manheimer, Eric; McNeely, Margaret L; Howell, Doris M; Weiss, Robert; Johansson, Karin I; Bao, Ting; Bily, Linda; Tuppo, Catherine M; Williams, Anne F; Karadibak, Didem

    2016-01-01

    Background More than one in five patients who undergo treatment for breast cancer will develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). BCRL can occur as a result of breast cancer surgery and/or radiation therapy. BCRL can negatively impact comfort, function, and quality of life (QoL). Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), a type of hands-on therapy, is frequently used for BCRL and often as part of complex decongestive therapy (CDT). CDT is a fourfold conservative treatment which includes MLD, compression therapy (consisting of compression bandages, compression sleeves, or other types of compression garments), skin care, and lymph-reducing exercises (LREs). Phase 1 of CDT is to reduce swelling; Phase 2 is to maintain the reduced swelling. Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of MLD in treating BCRL. Search methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, WHO ICTRP (World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trial Registry Platform), and Cochrane Breast Cancer Group’s Specialised Register from root to 24 May 2013. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of women with BCRL. The intervention was MLD. The primary outcomes were (1) volumetric changes, (2) adverse events. Secondary outcomes were (1) function, (2) subjective sensations, (3) QoL, (4) cost of care. Data collection and analysis We collected data on three volumetric outcomes. (1) LE (lymphedema) volume was defined as the amount of excess fluid left in the arm after treatment, calculated as volume in mL of affected arm post-treatment minus unaffected arm post-treatment. (2) Volume reduction was defined as the amount of fluid reduction in mL from before to after treatment calculated as the pretreatment LE volume of the affected arm minus the post-treatment LE volume of the affected arm. (3) Per cent reduction was defined as the proportion of fluid reduced relative to the baseline excess volume, calculated as volume

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of whole-mount pathology processing for patients with early breast cancer undergoing breast conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, N.J. Look; Clarke, G.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holloway, C.M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obtaining accurate histopathologic detail for breast lumpectomy specimens is challenging because of sampling and loss of three-dimensional conformational features with conventional processing. The whole-mount (wm) technique is a novel method of serial pathologic sectioning designed to optimize cross-sectional visualization of resected specimens and determination of margin status. Methods Using a Markov chain cohort simulation cost-effectiveness model, we compared conventional processing with wm technique for breast lumpectomies. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated from the perspective of the Canadian health care system and compared using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (icers) for cost per quality-adjusted life–year (qaly) over a 10-year time horizon. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model with willingness-to-pay (wtp) thresholds of $0–$100,000. Costs are reported in adjusted 2014 Canadian dollars, discounted at a rate of 3%. Results Compared with conventional processing, wm processing is more costly ($19,989 vs. $18,427) but generates 0.03 more qalys over 10 years. The icer is $45,414, indicating that this additional amount is required for each additional qaly obtained. The model was robust to all variance in parameters, with the prevalence of positive margins accounting for most of the model’s variability. Conclusions After a wtp threshold of $45,414, wm processing becomes cost-effective and ultimately generates fewer recurrences and marginally more qalys over time. Excellent baseline outcomes for the current treatment of breast cancer mean that incremental differences in survival are small. However, the overall benefit of the wm technique should be considered in the context of achieving improved accuracy and not just enhancements in clinical effectiveness. PMID:26985143

  5. Alternative methods of conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Zarzycka, Maja; Rozek, Karina; Zarzycki, Michał

    2009-01-01

    Scoliosis is a deformity of the spine known since Hippocrates times. The value of certain methods of conservative treatment remains controversial. Some of them have only a psychological value both for the physician and his or her caregivers. Based on current literature and the Scoliosis Research Society Report of Alternative Methods of Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, we describe the effectiveness of various alternative methods, such as exercise, Dobosiewicz technique, Karski method, SEAS 02, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, ayurveda, ASCO treatment, biofeedback, chiropractic, Yoga, Feldenkrais method, Pilates method, massage therapy, rolfing, magnet therapy, surface electrical stimulation, PNF, Copes system, and bracing. PMID:19920282

  6. Uncaria tomentosa-Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma-Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  7. Uncaria tomentosa—Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo; Farias, Iria Luiza; Gutierres, Jessie; Dalmora, Sergio L.; Flores, Nélia; Farias, Julia; de Cruz, Ivana; Chiesa, Juarez; Morsch, Vera Maria; Chitolina Schetinger, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent neoplasm affecting women worldwide. Some of the recommended treatments involve chemotherapy whose toxic effects include leukopenia and neutropenia. This study assessed the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa (Ut) in reducing the adverse effects of chemotherapy through a randomized clinical trial. Patients with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma—Stage II, who underwent a treatment regimen known as FAC (Fluorouracil, Doxorubicin, Cyclophosphamide), were divided into two groups: the UtCa received chemotherapy plus 300 mg dry Ut extract per day and the Ca group that only received chemotherapy and served as the control experiment. Blood samples were collected before each one of the six chemotherapy cycles and blood counts, immunological parameters, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress were analyzed. Uncaria tomentosa reduced the neutropenia caused by chemotherapy and was also able to restore cellular DNA damage. We concluded that Ut is an effective adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PMID:22811748

  8. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio . E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.it; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters.

  9. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  10. Prevalence and treatment of menopausal symptoms among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Patricia F; Remington, Patrick L; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Allen, Catherine I; Newcomb, Polly A

    2002-06-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer often experience early menopause secondary to treatment effects, yet physicians may be reluctant to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the potential increased risk of recurrence. To assess the burden of menopausal symptoms, HRT use, and alternative treatments in recent breast cancer survivors, a population-based, case-control study was conducted among breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Wisconsin women 18-69 years old with a new diagnosis of breast cancer 8-11 months prior to interview (n = 110) and control subjects randomly selected from population lists (n = 73) responded to a standardized telephone questionnaire that elicited information on menopausal symptoms, estrogen and alternative therapies (prescription medications, vitamins, herbal preparations, soy products, acupuncture, chiropractic) used to alleviate symptoms. We used multivariate logistic regression to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for symptoms of menopause, use of estrogen, and use of alternative therapies. Breast cancer survivors were 5.3 (95% CI 2.7-10.2) times more likely to experience symptoms, 25 (95% CI 8.3-100) times less likely to use estrogen, and 7.4 (95% CI 2.5-21.9) times more likely to use alternatives than controls. Soy, vitamin E, and herbal remedies were the most common alternative therapies reported by participants; use was greater in cases compared to controls. Most soy users reported increasing soy products specifically to reduce the chances of a diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer. Among cases, tamoxifen users (n = 62) reported a higher prevalence of symptoms and a higher prevalence of alternative treatments. This is the first population-based survey of menopausal symptoms and treatments that compares breast cancer cases with disease-free controls. Cases are both more likely to experience menopausal symptoms and less likely to use HRT than controls. Instead, cases treat menopausal symptoms

  11. Dosimetric Effects of Setup Uncertainties on Breast Treatment Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harron, Elizabeth Christine McCallum, Hazel Mhairi; Lambert, Elizabeth Lyn; Lee, Daniela; Lambert, Geoffrey David

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the dosimetric impact of setup errors during the delivery of radiotherapy to the breast, and use this information to make recommendations on intervention tolerances for portal imaging of breast treatments. Translational and rotational setup errors were simulated for 10 recent breast patients using an Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning system. The effect of these errors on the breast and tumor bed target volumes receiving 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose were assessed. For the majority of patients, shifts of up to 10 mm or a 4 deg. patient rotation about the cranio-caudal axis had no significant effect on the dose distribution. Changes in dosimetry were more likely if the reference plan contained large hot or cold spots. For a typical patient, it is estimated that a shift of 5 mm in any one direction, or a 2 deg. patient rotation would not cause more than a 5% change in the target volume receiving between 95% and 107% of the prescribed dose. If combinations of errors occur, greater dosimetric changes would be expected. It is concluded that individual patient shifts of up to 5 mm or rotations about the cranio-caudal axis of 2 deg. or less are unlikely to affect dose-volume histogram parameters by an amount judged as clinically significant. Setup errors exceeding these values may cause large dosimetric changes for some patients, particularly those with larger hot or cold regions in the dose distribution, and intervention is therefore recommended.

  12. Outcomes of conservative treatment for ruptured lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Fang-Da; Liu, Jin-Tao; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The authors set up a prospective study of the effect of conservative treatment on a ruptured lumbar disc herniation in 89 patients, between June 2008 and June 2010. Seventy-two patients (81%) improved, while the other 17 (19%) needed surgery. The JOA score (best possible result: 29) was found to be significantly improved in the 72 patients of the conservative group, at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years (t-test: p < 0.001). At final follow-up, after 2 years, 84.7% of the patients in the conservative group had a good or excellent result. However, if the 17 surgical cases were included, this proportion dropped to 68.5%. The volume of the protrusion decreased significantly in the 72 patients of the conservative group: from 1422.52 +/- 539.10 mm3 to 102735 +/- 585.51 mm3 (paired t-test: p < 0.001). There was a definite correlation, in the conservative group, between the final resorption rate on the one hand and the percentage of combined excellent and good results on the other hand (72 cases; Spearman rank correlation coefficient: r 0.01 = 0.470, p < 0.001). PMID:24563981

  13. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  14. New Treatment Option for Young Women with Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment option for young women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer Posted: June 1, 2014 Contact: NCI Press Office 301-496-6641 A drug used for treating breast cancer, known as exemestane, is more effective than a ...

  15. Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  16. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotheapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and periphereal lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (actuarial) is 83%. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder results from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications, 18 were mild and 3 were serious.These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned. The results also compared with the great majority of surgical series reported in the literature, allowing us to conclude that patients treated with radiation have nothing to lose and much to gain by preserving the breast.

  17. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carla, Ripamonti; Fabio, Trippa; Gloria, Barone; Ernesto, Maranzano

    2013-01-01

    In breast cancer patients, bone is the most common site of metastases. Medical therapies are the basic therapy to prevent distant metastases and recurrence and to cure them. Radiotherapy has a primary role in pain relief, recalcification and stabilization of the bone, as well as the reduction of the risk of complications (e.g., bone fractures, spinal cord compression). Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclastic-mediated bone resorption are a well-established, standard-of-care treatment option to reduce the frequency, severity and time of onset of the skeletal related events in breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Moreover bisphosphonates prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss. Recent data shows the anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates, in particular, in postmenopausal women and in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression. Pain is the most frequent symptom reported in patients with bone metastases, and its prevention and treatment must be considered at any stage of the disease. The prevention and treatment of bone metastases in breast cancer must consider an integrated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26237068

  18. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Unnikrishnan, Nandini; Kapoor, Vikram; Arora, Dhruv; Khinnavar, Poonam K.

    2014-01-01

    An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD. PMID:25254122

  19. Primary female breast sarcoma: clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming; Mackley, Heath B.; Drabick, Joseph J.; Harvey, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast sarcoma (PBS) is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies with limited publications. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics of PBS and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Median age of PBS was 55–59 years and median OS was 108 months. Age, overlap or entire breast involvement, tumor histology, and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. In the multivariable analysis, tumor size, lymph node involvement, distant metastasis and histologic grade were correlated with survival outcomes (P < 0.001). In M0 patients, mastectomy was associated with worse survival outcomes compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR], 1.80; 95% CI, 1.31–2.47), regardless of tumor size, tumor grade, tumor histology or radiation history. Adjuvant radiation improved survival outcomes in patients with tumor size >5 cm (adjHR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43–0.91), but not in patients with tumor size ≤ 5 cm. Our study demonstrated clinicopathological characteristics of PBS in the US population and supports performing BCS if R0 resection can be achieved, with radiation if tumor size is over 5 cm. PMID:27510467

  20. Primary female breast sarcoma: clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Mackley, Heath B; Drabick, Joseph J; Harvey, Harold A

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast sarcoma (PBS) is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies with limited publications. We obtained data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program and performed analysis to determine clinicopathological characteristics of PBS and estimate their associations with overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Median age of PBS was 55-59 years and median OS was 108 months. Age, overlap or entire breast involvement, tumor histology, and tumor spread were associated with poor survival outcomes. In the multivariable analysis, tumor size, lymph node involvement, distant metastasis and histologic grade were correlated with survival outcomes (P < 0.001). In M0 patients, mastectomy was associated with worse survival outcomes compared with breast conservative surgery (BCS) (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR], 1.80; 95% CI, 1.31-2.47), regardless of tumor size, tumor grade, tumor histology or radiation history. Adjuvant radiation improved survival outcomes in patients with tumor size >5 cm (adjHR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43-0.91), but not in patients with tumor size ≤ 5 cm. Our study demonstrated clinicopathological characteristics of PBS in the US population and supports performing BCS if R0 resection can be achieved, with radiation if tumor size is over 5 cm. PMID:27510467

  1. [An overview of conservative treatment for low back pain].

    PubMed

    Gnjidić, Zoja

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain is the most frequent musculoskeletal complaint worldwide and leading cause of chronic disability. In this review we discuss knowledge about the role of management of non-invasive, conservative therapy for the nonspecific low back pain. Initial therapy includes modification of activity, pharmacological analgesic therapy and education of patients. In patients with sub acute or chronic low back pain, multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment approach is necessary with personalized and individual healthcare combined with different modality of therapy. PMID:22232958

  2. Treatment of complications from polyacrylamide hydrogel breast augmentation

    PubMed Central

    WEI, WANG

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAHG) is a medical soft tissue filling agent utilized for the treatment of a variety of soft tissue defects. However, postoperative complications occur that have to be alleviated. The aim of the present study was to examine the treatments of postoperative complications of mammoplasty augmentation with PAHG. Open suction techniques and partial mastectomies via periareolar incisions were performed in 28 patients who had been injected with PAHG for breast augmentation. The PAHG was removed precluding breast complications resulting from the hydrogel injections. The symptoms disappeared completely, and the results were satisfactory following removal of the PAHG. In conclusion, the periareolar approach is valuable and removes PAHG to the greatest extent. PMID:27347035

  3. Fulminant hepatitis following chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shoushtari, Ali Hakim; Shaw, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    A woman in her early 50s was admitted to the intensive care unit with nausea, altered mental status and hepatic failure. She had a history of asymptomatic chronic hepatitis B and recently received chemotherapy for breast cancer. A diagnosis of hepatitis B reactivation (HBR) was made, but unfortunately she died of liver failure. Controversies around testing for hepatitis B prior to giving immunosuppressive treatments and the use of prophylactic antiviral therapy to prevent HBR are discussed. PMID:23307451

  4. Molecular response to aromatase inhibitor treatment in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Alan; Urruticoechea, Ander; Dixon, J Michael; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Ashworth, Alan; Drury, Suzanne; Larionov, Alexey; Young, Oliver; White, Sharon; Miller, William R; Evans, Dean B; Dowsett, Mitch

    2007-01-01

    Background Aromatase inhibitors such as anastrozole and letrozole are highly effective suppressants of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women and are the most effective endocrine treatments for hormone receptor positive breast cancer in such women. Little is known of the molecular effects of these agents on human breast carcinomas in vivo. Methods We randomly assigned primary estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients to treatment with anastrozole or letrozole for 2 weeks before surgery. Expression profiling using cDNA arrays was conducted on pretreatment and post-treatment biopsies. Sample pairs from 34 patients provided sufficient RNA for analysis. Results Profound changes in gene expression were seen with both aromatase inhibitors, including many classical estrogen-dependent genes such as TFF1, CCND1, PDZK1 and AGR2, but also many other genes that are likely to represent secondary responses; decrease in the expression of proliferation-related genes were particularly prominent. Many upregulated genes are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling, including collagens and members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family (LUM, DCN, and ASPN). No significant differences were seen between letrozole and anastrozole in terms of molecular effects. The gene changes were integrated into a Global Index of Dependence on Estrogen (GIDE), which enumerates the genes changing by at least twofold with therapy. The GIDE varied markedly between tumours and related significantly to pretreatment levels of HER2 and changes in immunohistochemically detected Ki67. Conclusion Our findings identify the transcriptional signatures associated with aromatase inhibitor treatment of primary breast tumours. Larger datasets using this approach should enable identification of estrogen-dependent molecular changes, which are the determinants of benefit or resistance to endocrine therapy. PMID:17555561

  5. Observed outcomes on the use of oxidized and regenerated cellulose polymer for breast conserving surgery – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rassu, Pier Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidized regenerated cellulose polymer (ORCP) may be used for reshaping and filling lack of volume in breast-conserving surgery (BCS). The study aimed to observe both the aesthetic and diagnostic outcomes in patients with different age, BMI, breast volume, and breast tissue composition over 36 months after BCS with ORCP. Patients and methods 18 patients with early breast cancer and with proliferative benign lesions underwent BCS with ORCP that was layered in three-dimensional wafer, and placed into the Chassaignac space between the mammary gland and the fascia of pectoralis major with no fixation. After surgery, patients started a clinical and instrumental 36-month follow-up with mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cytological examination with fine needle aspiration when seroma occurred. Results Below the median age of 66 years old no complications were observed even in case both of overweight, and large breasts with low density. Over the median age seromas occurred with either small or large skin retraction, with the exception of 1 patient having quite dense breasts and low BMI, which had no complications. In elderly patients, 1 case with quite dense breasts and high BMI showed severe seroma and skin retraction, while 1 case with low BMI and less dense breasts highlighted milder complications. Conclusion During 36 months after BCS with ORCP, a significant correlation between positive diagnostic and aesthetic outcomes and low age, dense breasts, and low BMI of patient was observed. Despite of the few number of cases, either low BMI, or high breast density improved the aesthetic outcomes and reduced the entity of complications even in the elderly patients. PMID:26865976

  6. Unlocking the power of cross-species genomic analyses: identification of evolutionarily conserved breast cancer networks and validation of preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christina N; Green, Jeffrey E

    2008-01-01

    The application of high-throughput genomic technologies has revealed that individual breast tumors display a variety of molecular features that require more personalized approaches to treatment. Several recent studies have demonstrated that a cross-species analytic approach provides a powerful means to filter through genetic complexity by identifying evolutionarily conserved genetic networks that are fundamental to the oncogenic process. Mouse-human tumor comparisons will provide insights into cellular origins of tumor subtypes, define interactive oncogenetic networks, identify potential novel therapeutic targets, and further validate as well as guide the selection of genetically engineered mouse models for preclinical testing. PMID:18828875

  7. Hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plataniotis, George

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after tumorectomy in early breast cancer patients is an established treatment modality which conventionally takes 6-7 wk to complete. Shorter RT schedules have been tested in large multicentre randomized trials and have shown equivalent results to that of standard RT (50 Gy in 25 fractions) in terms of local tumor control, patient survival and late post-radiation effects. Some of those trials have now completed 10 years of follow-up with encouraging results for treatments of 3-4 wk and a total RT dose to the breast of 40-42.5 Gy with or without boost. A reduction of 50% in treatment time makes those RT schedules attractive for both patients and health care providers and would have a significant impact on daily RT practice around the world, as it would accelerate patient turnover and save health care resources. However, in hypofractionated RT, a higher (than the conventional 1.8-2 Gy) dose per fraction is given and should be managed with caution as it could result in a higher rate of late post-radiation effects in breast, heart, lungs and the brachial plexus. It is therefore advisable that both possible dose inhomogeneity and normal tissue protection should be taken into account and the appropriate technology such as three-dimensional/intensity modulated radiation therapy employed in clinical practice, when hypofractionation is used. PMID:21160631

  8. A prognosis classifier for breast cancer based on conserved gene regulation between mammary gland development and tumorigenesis: a multiscale statistical model.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yingpu; Chen, Baozhen; Guan, Pengfei; Kang, Yujia; Lu, Zhongxian

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel cancer genes for molecular therapy and diagnosis is a current focus of breast cancer research. Although a few small gene sets were identified as prognosis classifiers, more powerful models are still needed for the definition of effective gene sets for the diagnosis and treatment guidance in breast cancer. In the present study, we have developed a novel statistical approach for systematic analysis of intrinsic correlations of gene expression between development and tumorigenesis in mammary gland. Based on this analysis, we constructed a predictive model for prognosis in breast cancer that may be useful for therapy decisions. We first defined developmentally associated genes from a mouse mammary gland epithelial gene expression database. Then, we found that the cancer modulated genes were enriched in this developmentally associated genes list. Furthermore, the developmentally associated genes had a specific expression profile, which associated with the molecular characteristics and histological grade of the tumor. These result suggested that the processes of mammary gland development and tumorigenesis share gene regulatory mechanisms. Then, the list of regulatory genes both on the developmental and tumorigenesis process was defined an 835-member prognosis classifier, which showed an exciting ability to predict clinical outcome of three groups of breast cancer patients (the predictive accuracy 64∼72%) with a robust prognosis prediction (hazard ratio 3.3∼3.8, higher than that of other clinical risk factors (around 2.0-2.8)). In conclusion, our results identified the conserved molecular mechanisms between mammary gland development and neoplasia, and provided a unique potential model for mining unknown cancer genes and predicting the clinical status of breast tumors. These findings also suggested that developmental roles of genes may be important criteria for selecting genes for prognosis prediction in breast cancer. PMID:23565194

  9. Conservative surgery followed by radical radiotherapy in the management of stage I carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, M.R.; Arraztoa, J.; Sole, J.; Rodriguez, R.

    1982-10-01

    Since October 1976, the treatment policy in our Radiotherapy Center for Stage I carcinoma of the breast has been excision of the tumor mass, when it was cosmetically suitable, followed by irradiation to the breast and peripheral lymphatics. Eighty-three patients were admitted between October 1976 and March 1980. They underwent local excision of the tumor and then received 5000 rad in 5 weeks to the breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain lymph nodes. Each field was treated every day. A boost was then given to the scar, bringing the dose up to 6500 rad, calculated at maximum tumor depth, depending upon the size of the tumor prior to surgery. Cosmetic results were quite good, and the local control rate at 54 months is 98%. The survival with no evidence of disease (NED) at 54 months (acturarial) is 83%. There have been 10 failures: 8 distant, 1 local (in axilla, controlled by surgery, actually NED), and 1 local and distant (scar and brain). Both failures were found with 12 months after treatment, and 8/10 of the failures within 24 months. Twenty-one out of 83 patients have had complications (25.3%); of these, 28.8% were surgical and the remainder resulted from radiotherapy after surgery, either from radiotherapy alone or from combination of treatments. Of the total of 21 complications 18 were mild and 3 were serious. Of those 3 serious complications (3.6%), 2 were a result of radiotherapy, and one because an ill-advised axillary dissection prior to radiotherapy gave a negative axilla and a serious arm edema and painful shoulder. This was the worst complication in the total of 83 patients. These results compare favorably with the results achieved in the same Hospital with radical surgery as far as local tumor control and survival with no evidence of disease (NED) is concerned.

  10. Combination treatment of tamoxifen with risperidone in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wei-Lan; Lin, Hui-Yi; Wu, Hung-Ming; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen has long been used and still is the most commonly used endocrine therapy for treatment of both early and advanced estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in pre- and post-menopause women. Tamoxifen exerts its cytotoxic effect primarily through cytostasis which is associated with the accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Apoptotic activity can also be exerted by tamoxifen which involves cleavage of caspase 9, caspase 7, caspase 3, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak have also been observed. In addition, stress response protein of GRP 94 and GRP 78 have also been induced by tamoxifen in our study. However, side effects occur during tamoxifen treatment in breast cancer patients. Researching into combination regimen of tamoxifen and drug(s) that relieves tamoxifen-induced hot flushes is important, because drug interactions may decrease tamoxifen efficacy. Risperidone has been shown to be effective in reducing or eliminating hot flushes on women with hormonal variations. In this present study, we demonstrated that combination of tamoxifen with risperidone did not interfered tamoxifen-induced cytotoxic effects in both in vitro and in vivo models, while fluoxetine abrogated the effects of tamoxifen. This is the first paper suggesting the possibility of combination treatment of tamoxifen with risperidone in breast cancer patients, providing a conceivable resolution of tamoxifen-induced side effects without interfering the efficacy of tamoxifen against breast cancer. PMID:24886861

  11. Improvements in breast cancer survival between 1995 and 2012 in Denmark: The importance of earlier diagnosis and adjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Ejlertsen, Bent; Mouridsen, Henning T; Christiansen, Peer

    2016-06-01

    Background Breast cancer mortality has declined from 1995 through 2012 which may be attributed to earlier diagnosis, changes in lifestyle risk factors, and improved treatments. To a large extent the relative contribution of these modalities are unknown. Mammography screening was introduced late in Denmark; in 1995 around 20% of the Danish female population aged 50-69 was covered by population-based screening, and this was in 2008 extended to the entire population. Breast conserving surgery gradually replaced mastectomy, and sentinel node biopsy was introduced. In the same period adjuvant treatment was extended considerable. Methods A population-based study of 68 842 breast cancer patients registered in the clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 1995-2012. Comprehensive data on prognostic factors, comorbidity and treatment together with complete follow-up for survival were used to evaluate improvements in mortality and standardized mortality rate in successive time periods. Results The results from this study demonstrated a significant improvement in prognosis in successive time periods covering 1995-2012. Apart from patients with a high Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) improvements were seen in all subgroups of patients. Prognostic factors were more favorable in the latest time period accordingly to the introduction of nationwide screening. In the study period adjuvant treatment was extended considerable. Conclusion The impact of screening was by nature of limited magnitude. The modified treatment strategies implemented by the use of nationwide guidelines seemed to have a major impact on the substantial survival improvements. PMID:26797010

  12. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. Methods and analysis All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case–control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about ‘fat grafting and breast reconstruction’ and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and

  13. Using surface markers for MRI guided breast conserving surgery: a feasibility survey.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Siegler, Peter; Modhafar, Amen; Holloway, Claire M B; Plewes, Donald B; Martel, Anne L

    2014-04-01

    Breast MRI is frequently performed prior to breast conserving surgery in order to assess the location and extent of the lesion. Ideally, the surgeon should also be able to use the image information during surgery to guide the excision and this requires that the MR image is co-registered to conform to the patient's position on the operating table. Recent progress in MR imaging techniques has made it possible to obtain high quality images of the patient in the supine position which significantly reduces the complexity of the registration task. Surface markers placed on the breast during imaging can be located during surgery using an external tracking device and this information can be used to co-register the images to the patient. There remains the problem that in most clinical MR scanners the arm of the patient has to be placed parallel to the body whereas the arm is placed perpendicular to the patient during surgery. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of co-registration based on a surface marker approach and, in particular, to determine what effect the difference in a patient's arm position makes on the accuracy of tumour localization. Obtaining a second MRI of the patient where the patient's arm is perpendicular to body axes (operating room position) is not possible. Instead we obtain a secondary MRI scan where the patient's arm is above the patient's head to validate the registration. Five patients with enhancing lesions ranging from 1.5 to 80 cm(3) in size were imaged using contrast enhanced MRI with their arms in two positions. A thin-plate spline registration scheme was used to match these two configurations. The registration algorithm uses the surface markers only and does not employ the image intensities. Tumour outlines were segmented and centre of mass (COM) displacement and Dice measures of lesion overlap were calculated. The relationship between the number of markers used and the COM-displacement was also studied. The lesion COM

  14. Using surface markers for MRI guided breast conserving surgery: a feasibility survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Siegler, Peter; Modhafar, Amen; Holloway, Claire M. B.; Plewes, Donald B.; Martel, Anne L.

    2014-04-01

    Breast MRI is frequently performed prior to breast conserving surgery in order to assess the location and extent of the lesion. Ideally, the surgeon should also be able to use the image information during surgery to guide the excision and this requires that the MR image is co-registered to conform to the patient’s position on the operating table. Recent progress in MR imaging techniques has made it possible to obtain high quality images of the patient in the supine position which significantly reduces the complexity of the registration task. Surface markers placed on the breast during imaging can be located during surgery using an external tracking device and this information can be used to co-register the images to the patient. There remains the problem that in most clinical MR scanners the arm of the patient has to be placed parallel to the body whereas the arm is placed perpendicular to the patient during surgery. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of co-registration based on a surface marker approach and, in particular, to determine what effect the difference in a patient’s arm position makes on the accuracy of tumour localization. Obtaining a second MRI of the patient where the patient’s arm is perpendicular to body axes (operating room position) is not possible. Instead we obtain a secondary MRI scan where the patient’s arm is above the patient’s head to validate the registration. Five patients with enhancing lesions ranging from 1.5 to 80 cm3 in size were imaged using contrast enhanced MRI with their arms in two positions. A thin-plate spline registration scheme was used to match these two configurations. The registration algorithm uses the surface markers only and does not employ the image intensities. Tumour outlines were segmented and centre of mass (COM) displacement and Dice measures of lesion overlap were calculated. The relationship between the number of markers used and the COM-displacement was also studied. The lesion COM

  15. Systemic chemotherapy as a new conservative treatment for intraocular retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Takaaki

    2004-02-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood. With advances in the methods for early detection of this disease, the survival rate is over 90% in developed countries. The management of intraocular retinoblastoma has gradually changed over the past few decades. Every effort has been made to save life, with the preservation of the eye and sight, if possible. External beam radiotherapy has been a standard treatment for medium and large, or visually threatening, intraocular retinoblastoma, but it markedly increases the risk of cosmetic deformities and secondary cancer in children with germline RB mutations. For the past decade, primary systemic chemotherapy called "chemoreduction" has been employed to avoid radiotherapy and enucleation. This article gives an overview of the results of current trials of primary chemoreduction for intraocular retinoblastoma, and discusses its role and its limitations in conservative treatment. The article also discusses future directions to expand the indications for this treatment. Many children with advanced intraocular retinoblastoma could be spared external beam radiotherapy and enucleation, mostly as a result of chemoreduction and focal methods. Chemoreduction combined with focal treatments will continue to play an important role in the conservative management of children with intraocular retinoblastoma, possibly even in children with advanced disease, with the combined use of multidrug-resistance modulators. PMID:15162821

  16. Conservative Treatment for Bilateral Displaced Proximal Humerus Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Velutini-Becker, Ricardo; Aguilar-Alcalá, Luis D

    2016-01-01

    Proximal humerus fracture represents five to eight percent of all fractures and is twice as common in women than in men. Most cases of displaced fracture of the proximal humerus are treated surgically; it is probable that more cases are preferred to be treated surgically greater than required. The optimal treatment for these fractures remains controversial, but physicians have a tendency to treat via open reduction and fixation with angular locking plates or glenohumeral arthroplasty.  We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with bilateral displaced proximal humeral fracture. Conservative treatment was initiated with two hanging casts, achieving radiological reduction on week one. After two additional weeks of casting, treatment continued with radiologic control and home physical therapy, ultimately an excellent functional outcome and adequate radiological reduction was obtained.    Even in bilaterally displaced proximal humerus fractures, conservative treatment can be an efficient option, reducing complications, reaching adequate functional results and acceptable radiographic reduction.​ PMID:27489750

  17. Conservative Care in Successful Treatment of Abamectin Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Jamali, Seyed Reza; Heidari Gorji, Ali Morad

    2014-01-01

    Human intoxication with abamectin is an uncommon but potentially fatal cause of pesticide poisoning. In this study a 42-year-old man was intoxicated with 3600 mg abamectin orally. On admission patient was fully alert with the smell of the poison from the mouth. Vital signs were normal and conjunctiva was hyperemic. Conservative cares such as gastric lavage was performed and charcoal was administered. After 2.5 hours, the patient gradually developed altered mental status as drowsiness, hypotension, tachycardia and dermal erythema. He was treated with H1 and H2 blockers and vasoactive agents and after 2 days was discharged in good condition. In comparison with organophosphates, abamectin intoxication has less risk in humans. However, consumption of large amounts in human can be fatal. Altered mental status could be considered as the first sign of abamectin intoxication. Normal level of consciousness is the best indicator of improvement of the condition. Conservative treatment is recommended. PMID:25948975

  18. Conservative care in successful treatment of abamectin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Jamali, Seyed Reza; Heidari Gorji, Ali Morad

    2014-01-01

    Human intoxication with abamectin is an uncommon but potentially fatal cause of pesticide poisoning. In this study a 42-year-old man was intoxicated with 3600 mg abamectin orally. On admission patient was fully alert with the smell of the poison from the mouth. Vital signs were normal and conjunctiva was hyperemic. Conservative cares such as gastric lavage was performed and charcoal was administered. After 2.5 hours, the patient gradually developed altered mental status as drowsiness, hypotension, tachycardia and dermal erythema. He was treated with H1 and H2 blockers and vasoactive agents and after 2 days was discharged in good condition. In comparison with organophosphates, abamectin intoxication has less risk in humans. However, consumption of large amounts in human can be fatal. Altered mental status could be considered as the first sign of abamectin intoxication. Normal level of consciousness is the best indicator of improvement of the condition. Conservative treatment is recommended. PMID:25948975

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey: recommendations for ex situ conservation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C G; Gaiotto, F A; Costa, M A; Martinez, R A

    2011-01-01

    The yellow-breasted capuchin monkey, Cebus xanthosternos, is one of the most endangered species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In situ conservation for this species is problematic due to habitat destruction; therefore, captive conservation has been considered as an alternative strategy. A Studbook for C. xanthosternos has been kept for more than 20 years; however, no genetic data has been collected. Our aim was to provide a preliminary assessment of the genetic variability of C. xanthosternos in captivity in Brazil and compare it with data from the wild. Microsatellite and mtDNA sequencing were carried out in 40 samples from five Brazilian institutions registered in the international Studbook and compared with 8 samples collected in a wild population from REBIO-Una/BA. DNA for analysis was extracted from hair, feces and blood. Our results showed that two of the five captive groups assessed had a genetic variability comparable to wild animals. However, the other three groups apparently require urgent management to improve its genetic variability. Considering that inbreeding effects are more pronounced in captivity due to lack of gene flow, our data indicate a need to increase population size by introducing newly rescued individuals into these captive groups. Our results are the first attempt to provide genetic information for captive C. xanthosternos in Brazil. PMID:21823097

  20. [Systemic treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, S; Conforti, R; Bonneterre, J; Bachelot, T; Le Rhun, E; Bernard-Marty, C

    2015-02-01

    An increase in the incidence of breast cancer patients with brain metastases has been observed over the last years, mainly because the recent development of new drugs including therapies targeting HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) resulted in an increased survival of these patients. With HER2+ patients living longer and the well-known neurotropism of HER2+ tumour cells, the resulting high incidence of brain metastases is not really surprising. Moreover, brain metastases more often occur within a context of existing extracranial metastases. These need to be treated at the same time in order to favourably impact patients' survival. Consequently, the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases clearly relies on a multidisciplinary approach, including systemic treatment. A working group including neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists and oncologists was created in order to provide French national guidelines for the management of brain metastases within the "Association des neuro-oncologues d'expression française" (ANOCEF). The recommendations regarding the systemic treatment in breast cancer patients are reported here including key features of their management. PMID:25662600

  1. [Breast-preserving treatment of breast carcinoma: analysis of surgical, pathologic-anatomic and radiotherapeutic data of 291 cases].

    PubMed

    Schwegler, N; Kern, T; Lazovic, N; Notter, M

    1996-01-01

    291 breast cancer patients treated with conserving surgery and subsequent locoregional irradiation were studied. The method of surgery consisted of 200 lumpectomies, 76 quadrantectomies and 15 with either a wide excision or with an atypical resection. In at least 42.6% (124 out of 291), the tumor had been within 10 mm distance to the margin of resected specimen, in 13.4% (39 out of 291) the tumor even reached the border. In the other reports, a numerical description of the distance to the margins was not given. Postoperative radiotherapy was applied with 50 Gy cobalt-60/6-MeV photons to include the whole breast. A boost of tangentially opposed photon beams was added, replacing a technique with direct electron fields used in an earlier period during three years. The supraclavicular fossa received 46 Gy, the retrosternal pathway was covered with 45 to 50 Gy photons/electrons. Locoregional failure after an average observation time of 39.5 months was 4.5% (13 out of 291), within the target volume 3.8% (11 out of 291. The 39 cases on which the tumor reached the margin of resection, 92.3% (36 out of 39) remained free of recurrences. With a tumor-free resection line but a maximal distance of 10 mm, one recurrence (1.2% or 1 out of 85) was found. With the application of tangential photon beams to the tumor bed, which technically allowed sparing skin parts but also slightly reduced daily doses, the incidence of telangiectasis could be lowered to 2.5%. An anatomical was model was constructed to resemble a patient in the treatment position. Dosimeters were implanted and verified by computed tomography. Measurements of the radiation fields were performed within the breast, the lung and along the mammaria-interna chain. Minimal angle changes of 5 degrees decreased the retrosternal dose down with the amount of 56.5%, 10 degrees of 75% and 15 degrees of 85.7%. In contrast, moving the central axis medially by 1 cm and 2 cm increased the lung dose 2.2 and 4.4 times, respectively

  2. Breast cancer causes and treatment: where are we going wrong?

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    This discussion paper seeks to provoke thoughts about cancer research in general, and why breast cancer in particular is not yet “curable”. It asks the question – are we looking at the disease in the right way? Should we regard cancer as a progressive state, which is part of aging? Should we tailor treatment to “reset” the system or slow progression rather than try using toxic and aggressive therapy to kill every cancer cell (and sometimes also the patient)? The thesis is presented that we need to revisit our fundamental beliefs about the disease and then ask why we cling to beliefs that clearly are no longer valid. The paper also questions the role of ethics boards in hampering research and discusses the concept that breast cancer is an industry with vested interests involving profiteering by preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic players. Finally, the paper suggests some ways forward based on emerging concepts in system biology and epigenetics. PMID:24648764

  3. Breast cancer causes and treatment: where are we going wrong?

    PubMed

    Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    This discussion paper seeks to provoke thoughts about cancer research in general, and why breast cancer in particular is not yet "curable". It asks the question - are we looking at the disease in the right way? Should we regard cancer as a progressive state, which is part of aging? Should we tailor treatment to "reset" the system or slow progression rather than try using toxic and aggressive therapy to kill every cancer cell (and sometimes also the patient)? The thesis is presented that we need to revisit our fundamental beliefs about the disease and then ask why we cling to beliefs that clearly are no longer valid. The paper also questions the role of ethics boards in hampering research and discusses the concept that breast cancer is an industry with vested interests involving profiteering by preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic players. Finally, the paper suggests some ways forward based on emerging concepts in system biology and epigenetics. PMID:24648764

  4. Tailored Tamoxifen Treatment for Breast Cancer Patients: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Jager, Nynke G L; Linn, Sabine C; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-08-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine agent, is widely used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. It has greatly reduced disease recurrence and mortality rates of breast cancer patients, however, not all patients benefit from tamoxifen treatment because in approximately 25% to 30% of the patients the disease recurs. Many researchers have sought to find factors associated with endocrine treatment outcome in the past years, however, this quest has not been finished. In this article, we focus on a factor that might influence outcome of tamoxifen treatment: interpatient variability in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics. In recent years it has become clear that tamoxifen undergoes extensive metabolism and that some of the formed metabolites are much more pharmacologically active than tamoxifen itself. Despite the wide interpatient variability in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, all patients receive a standard dose of 20 mg tamoxifen per day. Different approaches can be pursued to individualize tamoxifen dosing: genotyping, phenotyping, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring seems to be the most direct and promising approach, however, further clinical research is warranted to establish the added value of individual dosing in tamoxifen treatment optimization. PMID:25997856

  5. Factors Associated with Waiting Time for Breast Cancer Treatment in a Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedey, Florence; Wu, Lily; Ayettey, Hannah; Sanuade, Olutobi A.; Akingbola, Titilola S.; Hewlett, Sandra A.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Cole, Helen V.; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in Ghana. Data are limited on the predictors of poor outcomes in breast cancer patients in low-income countries; however, prolonged waiting time has been implicated. Among breast cancer patients who received treatment at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, this study…

  6. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ≤3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  7. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  8. POST-TREATMENT REGRET AMONG YOUNG BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Joan R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The study addresses: (1) what women regret about their breast cancer treatment five years later, and (2) what characteristics of disease and treatment predict post-treatment regret. Method Interviews were conducted with breast cancer survivors in the San Francisco Bay Area. Participants were interviewed following diagnosis. Five years later, women were asked whether they had any regrets about their cancer treatment (N=449). Qualitative analysis was used to identify regret content, and logistic regression was used to determine what characteristics of treatment predicted regret. Results 42.5% of women in the sample regretted some aspect of treatment. The most common regrets were primary surgery (24.1%), chemotherapy and/or radiation (21.5%), reconstruction (17.8%), and problems with providers (13.1%). In addition, women regretted inactions (59.2%) (actions that they did not take) more than actions that they did take (30.4%). This represents a novel finding in the study of post-treatment regret, which has largely focused on regrets over actions. Quantitative analysis revealed that women who were anxious about the future (OR=1.32; p=.03) or had problems communicating with physicians (OR=1.26; p=.02) during treatment were more likely to express regret 5 years later. In addition, women with new or recurrent cancers 5 years later were significantly more likely to regret some aspect of their primary treatment (OR=5.81; p<.001). Conclusion This research supports addressing the psychosocial aspects of cancer care and improving physician-patient communication. Evidence is also provided for addressing the unique emotional needs of women with recurrent cancers, who may experience an undue burden of regret. PMID:20878843

  9. Long-term Outcomes of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lalani, Nafisha; Paszat, Lawrence; Sutradhar, Rinku; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Hanna, Wedad; Slodkowska, Elzbieta; Done, Susan J.; Miller, Naomi; Youngson, Bruce; Tuck, Alan; Sengupta, Sandip; Elavathil, Leela; Chang, Martin C.; Jani, Prashant A.; Bonin, Michel; and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Whole-breast radiation therapy (XRT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) may decrease the risk of local recurrence, but the optimal dose regimen remains unclear. Past studies administered 50 Gy in 25 fractions (conventional); however, treatment pattern studies report that hypofractionated (HF) regimens (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) are frequently used. We report the impact of HF (vs conventional) on the risk of local recurrence after BCS for DCIS. Methods and Materials: All women with DCIS treated with BCS and XRT in Ontario, Canada from 1994 to 2003 were identified. Treatment and outcomes were assessed through administrative databases and validated by chart review. Survival analyses were performed. To account for systematic differences between women treated with alternate regimens, we used a propensity score adjustment approach. Results: We identified 1609 women, of whom 971 (60%) received conventional regimens and 638 (40%) received HF. A total of 489 patients (30%) received a boost dose, of whom 143 (15%) received conventional radiation therapy and 346 (54%) received HF. The median follow-up time was 9.2 years. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 49-65 years). On univariate analyses, the 10-year actuarial local recurrence–free survival was 86% for conventional radiation therapy and 89% for HF (P=.03). On multivariable analyses, age <45 years (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4; P<.0001), high (HR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.3; P=.02) or intermediate nuclear grade (HR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.1-6.6; P=.04), and positive resection margins (HR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.0-2.1; P=.05) were associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. HF was not significantly associated with an increased risk of local recurrence compared with conventional radiation therapy on multivariate analysis (HR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.5-1.2; P=.34). Conclusions: The risk of local recurrence among individuals treated with HF regimens

  10. The use of sequential X-ray, CT and MRI in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyu; Tan, Hongna; Gao, Jianbo; Wei, Yan; Yu, Zhan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the value of sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative evaluation of breast-conserving surgeries. In total, 76 patients with indications for breast-conserving surgery due to complicated breast cancer participated in the study and were assigned to either control or observation group (n=38 per group). The patients in the control group were evaluated with two sets of random combinations of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT or MRI with ultrasound inspection, whereas the patients in the observation group were evaluated by sequential inspection methods of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI. A comparison of surgery outcomes, incidence of complications, rate of positive surgical margins, and recurrence and survival rates in the groups during a follow-up period of 24 months was made. Comparisons of the preoperative evaluation results for tumor number, average maximum diameter, number of lymphatic metastatic groups and number of metastatic lymph nodes in the observation group showed the numbers to be significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conversely, the comparisons of age, tumor distribution and T-staging yielded no significant differences, validating the analysis. The percentage of successful breast-conserving surgeries in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while the incidence of complications in the observation group was lower (P<0.05). The rate of positive surgical margins and the recurrence rate of cancer in the observation group were lower than those in the control group, and the survival rate in the observation group was higher, with differences having statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, the sequential application of molybdenum target X-ray, MSCT and MRI during the preoperative evaluation for breast-conserving surgery positively affects

  11. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  12. [TOS (thoracic outlet syndrome)--a challenge to conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Lindgren, K A

    1997-10-01

    Functional impairment and pain in the upper extremities may indicate a functional deficit in the thoracic outlet. Static work posture, trauma and whiplash injury may be predisposing factors. The younger generation who often spend long hours in front of a computer are in danger of becoming a future risk group. The primary care physician should be familiar with the syndrome which can be identified by careful clinical examination. Timely intervention can prevent much of the disabling symptomatology. Treatment is primarily conservative and should be aimed at the restoration of functional capacity. As in other disorders, the individual constellation of symptoms is dependent on circumstantial factors, an aspect meriting particular attention in treatment and follow-up. Optimisation of ergonomic conditions is important feature of treatment, and long-term follow-up is necessary. Transient exacerbation is not an indication for surgical treatment. If cervical and thoracic outlet function has normalised but the patient still has symptoms, then the differential diagnosis should be reconsidered. Examination and treatment of patients with pain in the upper extremities requires the collaboration of the physician and physical and occupational therapists. Treatment can be delivered in the primary care setting. PMID:9411397

  13. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  14. Conservative treatment of isolated condylar fractures in growing patients.

    PubMed

    Chatzistavrou, Evangelia K; Basdra, Efthimia K

    2007-01-01

    Traumas to the mandible in children, due to falls or traffic accidents, can involve fractures in the condylar area. Without timely and proper diagnosis, such fractures may give rise to serious problems, such as growth disturbances of the face and disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Orthodontists are often involved in the diagnosis of condylar fractures but, more importantly, they should be involved in the successful conservative management of the fracture. The aim of this article is to present 5 cases of isolated condylar fractures in children (2 boys, 3 girls; age range 4.5 to 10 years) who were diagnosed and treated solely by a conservative orthopedic approach, involving the use of a functional appliance (activator). After a follow-up period of 1 year, clinical and radiologic examination indicated, due to the growth potential of the condyles during childhood, successful healing and remodeling had occurred in all 5 cases and no discomfort or complications were reported. A conservative treatment approach for an isolated condylar fracture, using a functional appliance during the growth period, can lead to complete restoration of the fractured area and re-establishment of physiologic function of the stomatognathic system with no signs of disturbance in dentofacial development. PMID:17902329

  15. Sentinel lymph node biopsy can be omitted in DCIS patients treated with breast conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    van Roozendaal, L M; Goorts, B; Klinkert, M; Keymeulen, K B M I; De Vries, B; Strobbe, L J A; Wauters, C A P; van Riet, Y E; Degreef, E; Rutgers, E J T; Wesseling, J; Smidt, M L

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer guidelines advise sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on core biopsy at high risk of invasive cancer or in case of mastectomy. This study investigates the incidence of SLNB and SLN metastases and the relevance of indications in guidelines and literature to perform SLNB in order to validate whether SLNB is justified in patients with DCIS on core biopsy in current era. Clinically node negative patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 with only DCIS on core needle biopsy were selected from a national database. Incidence of SLN biopsy and metastases was calculated. With Fisher exact tests correlation between SLNB indications and actual presence of SLN metastases was studied. Further, underestimation rate for invasive cancer and correlation with SLN metastases was analysed. 910 patients were included. SLNB was performed in 471 patients (51.8 %): 94.5 % had pN0, 3.0 % pN1mi and 2.5 % pN1. Patients undergoing mastectomy had 7 % SLN metastases versus 3.5 % for breast conserving surgery (BCS) (p = 0.107). The only factors correlating to SLN metastases were smaller core needle size (p = 0.01) and invasive cancer (p < 0.001). Invasive cancer was detected in 16.7 % by histopathology with 15.6 % SLN metastases versus only 2 % in pure DCIS. SLNB showed metastases in 5.5 % of patients; 3.5 % in case of BCS (any histopathology) and 2 % when pure DCIS was found at definitive histopathology (BCS and mastectomy). Consequently, SLNB should no longer be performed in patients diagnosed with DCIS on core biopsy undergoing BCS. If definitive histopathology shows invasive cancer, SLNB can still be considered after initial surgery. PMID:27083179

  16. Conservative treatment of arterial pseudoaneurism in patients with behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Citgez, B; Cipe, G; Toydemir, T; Karatepe, O

    2013-02-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a rare disease, of unknown origin that generally causes an inflammation in the subcutaneous tissue, eyes and brain vessels, and related with the immune system, predominantly seen in male patients and the mean age at onset is mainly in the third decade. The aim of the study was to present our experiences with the cases of arterial pseudoaneurysms that we treated conservatively without surgical or radiological intervention. Eleven patients with Behcet's disease who developed arterial pseudoaneuryms and responsed to the medical treatment are included in the study. The operation requirement, the complication rates, and factors that influence morbidity and mortality are evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 29,5 (18-35) years. Nine of the patients were male and 2 were female. The mean period of hospitalization was 18 (11-34) days. Six patients redeveloped aneurysm during their follow-up. Three of these patients were treated with surgery. Five patients had no complication during an average of 20 months of follow-up period. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of Behcet's disease. Despite the good response to conservative treatment at the beginning period, the patients should be closely followed up and redevelopment of the aneurysm should be kept in mind. PMID:23482359

  17. 76 FR 47518 - Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of “Smart” Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 430 and 431 Energy Conservation Program: Treatment of ``Smart'' Appliances in Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of...

  18. Breast cancer: major risk factors and recent developments in treatment.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Wafa; Aslam, Bilal; Javed, Ijaz; Khaliq, Tanweer; Muhammad, Faqir; Ali, Asghar; Raza, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common in women worldwide, with some 5-10% of all cases due to inherited mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Obesity, hormone therapy and use of alcohol are possible causes and over-expression of leptin in adipose tissue may also play a role. Normally surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy allow a good prognosis where screening measures are in place. New hope in treatment measures include adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant therapy, and introduction of mono-clonal antibodies and enzyme inhibitors. PMID:24870721

  19. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, Vratislav; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Bani, Mayada; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was < 3 cm, resection margins were clear by at least 2 mm, no lymph node metastases existed, age was >35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (D{sub ref} = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects {>=}Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  20. Cosmetic Analysis Following Breast-Conserving Surgery and Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate cosmetic outcomes in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 151 patients with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients had stage Tis-T2 tumors of ≤3 cm that were excised with negative margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. Both the patients and the treating radiation oncologist qualitatively rated cosmesis as excellent, good, fair, or poor over time and ascribed a cause for changes in cosmesis. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated quantitatively by percentage of breast retraction assessment (pBRA). Patients also reported their satisfaction with treatment over time. Results: Median follow-up was 55 months. The rates of excellent-to-good cosmesis reported by patients and the treating radiation oncologist were 92% and 97% pretreatment, 91% and 97% at 3 to 4 months' follow-up, 87% and 94% at 2 years, and 92% and 94% at 3 years, respectively. Breast infection and adjuvant chemotherapy were independent predictors of a fair-to-poor cosmetic outcome at 3 years. Compared to pretreatment pBRA (7.35), there was no significant change in pBRA over time. The volume receiving more than 150 Gy (V150) was the only significant predictor of pBRA. The majority of patients (86.6%) were completely satisfied with their treatment. Conclusions: Patients and the treating physician reported a high rate of excellent-to-good cosmetic outcomes at all follow-up time points. Acute breast infection and chemotherapy were associated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy does not significantly change breast size as measured by pBRA.

  1. Improving size, lymph node metastatic rate, breast conservation, and mortality of invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island women, a well-screened population.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Natalie G; Cady, Blake; Fulton, John P; Law, Calvin; Chung, Maureen A

    2012-10-01

    The beneficial impact of screening mammography on breast cancer outcome continues to be debated as demonstrated by guidelines published by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. A previous report from Rhode Island, which has a very high rate of mammographic screening, demonstrated significant improvements in invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality through 2001. This report updates data through 2008 to determine whether previous favorable trends continued. Rhode Island Cancer Registry data regarding invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality in 17,522 female residents diagnosed between 1987 and 2008, inclusive, were analyzed for demographic and pathological factors. Data were analyzed by four time periods: 1987-1992, 1993-1998, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008 and overall. Statistically significant improvements occurred over the four successive time periods, in mean cancer size (23.7, 20.9, 19.6, and 19.3 mm, p < 0.0001), pathologic grade (Grade I: 12, 15, 19, and 17 %; Grade III 57, 41, 36, and 35 %, p < 0.0001), breast conserving surgery (38, 56, 67, and 71 %, p < 0.0001) and mortality (37.3, 31.4, 25.1, and 22.6 per 100,000/year, p < 0.0001). The results showed that high screening rates favorably impacted presentation of and mortality from invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island. From 1987 to 2008, there has been a 39 % decline in breast cancer mortality considering 5 year periods (37.3 vs. 22.6 deaths per 100,000) and 41 % comparing the period from 1990 to 2008, which may exceed the goal of 50 % mortality reduction by 2015 established by the American Cancer Society. PMID:22933028

  2. Conserved E2F mediated metastasis in mouse models of breast cancer and HER2 positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Rennhack, Jonathan; Andrechek, Eran

    2015-01-01

    To improve breast cancer patient outcome work must be done to understand and block tumor metastasis. This study leverages bioinformatics techniques and traditional genetic screens to create a novel method of discovering potential contributors of tumor progression with a focus on tumor metastasis. A database of 1172 of expression data from a variety of mouse models of breast cancer was assembled and queried using previously defined oncogenic activity signatures. This analysis revealed high activity of the E2F family of transcription factors in the MMTV-Neu mouse model. A genetic cross of MMTV-Neu mice into an E2F1 null, E2F2 null, or E2F3 heterozygous background revealed significant changes in tumor progression specifically reductions in tumor latency and metastasis with E2F1 or E2F2 loss. These findings were found to be conserved in human HER2 positive patients. Patients with high E2F1 activity were shown to have worse outcomes such as relapse free survival and distant metastasis free survival. This study shows conserved mechanisms of tumor progression in human breast cancer subtypes and analogous mouse models and underlies the importance of increased research into the characterization of and comparisons between mouse and human tumors to identify which mouse models resemble each subtype of human breast cancer. PMID:26682278

  3. Breast Cancer in Young Women: Poor Survival Despite Intensive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fredholm, Hanna; Eaker, Sonja; Frisell, Jan; Holmberg, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is uncommon in young women and correlates with a less favourable prognosis; still it is the most frequent cancer in women under 40, accounting for 30–40% of all incident female cancer. The aim of this study was to study prognosis in young women, quantifying how much stage at diagnosis and management on the one hand, and tumour biology on the other; each contribute to the worse prognosis seen in this age group. Methodology/Principal Findings In a registry based cohort of women aged 20–69 (n = 22 017) with a primary diagnosis of invasive breast cancer (1992–2005), women aged 20–34 (n = 471), 35–39 (n = 858) and 40–49 (n = 4789) were compared with women aged 50–69 years (n = 15 899). The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio and the relative excess mortality (RER) were calculated. The cumulative 5-year relative survival ratio was lowest in women aged 20–34. The RER was 2.84 for women aged 20–34 and decreased with increasing age (RER 1.76 and 1.17 for women aged 35–39 and 40–49, respectively). The excess risk was, however, present only in disease stages I and II. For women aged 20–34 with stage I disease RER was 4.63, and 6.70 in the subgroup with tumour size 1–10 mm. The absolute difference in stage I between the youngest and the reference groups amounted to nearly 8%, with a 90% 5-year survival in women aged 20–34. In stages IIa and IIb, the relative excess risk was not as dramatic, but the absolute differences approached 15%. The youngest women with small tumours generally received more aggressive treatment than women in older age groups. Conclusions After correction for stage, tumour characteristics and treatment, age remained an independent risk factor for breast cancer death in women <35 years of age. The excess risk for young women was only seen in early stages of disease and was most pronounced in women with small tumours. Young women affected by breast cancer have a high risk of dying

  4. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for

  5. A systematic review of decision aids for patients making a decision about treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicholas Zdenkowski; Butow, Phyllis; Tesson, Stephanie; Boyle, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Several complex treatment decisions may be offered to women with early stage breast cancer, about a range of treatments from different modalities including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids can facilitate shared decision-making and improve decision-related outcomes. We aimed to systematically identify, describe and appraise the literature on treatment decision aids for women with early breast cancer, synthesise the data and identify breast cancer decisions that lack a decision aid. A prospectively developed search strategy was applied to MEDLINE, the Cochrane databases, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and abstract databases from major conferences. Data were extracted into a pre-piloted form. Quality and risk of bias were measured using Qualsyst criteria. Results were synthesised into narrative format. Thirty-three eligible articles were identified, evaluating 23 individual treatment decision aids, comprising 13 randomised controlled trial reports, seven non-randomised comparative studies, eight single-arm pre-post studies and five cross-sectional studies. The decisions addressed by these decision aids were: breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy (+/- reconstruction); use of chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy; radiotherapy; and fertility preservation. Outcome measures were heterogeneous, precluding meta-analysis. Decisional conflict decreased, and knowledge and satisfaction increased, without any change in anxiety or depression, in most studies. No studies were identified that evaluated decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Decision aids are available and improved decision-related outcomes for many breast cancer treatment decisions including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy could not be found, and may be warranted. PMID:27017240

  6. The impact of age on changes in quality of life among breast cancer survivors treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bantema-Joppe, E J; de Bock, G H; Woltman-van Iersel, M; Busz, D M; Ranchor, A V; Langendijk, J A; Maduro, J H; van den Heuvel, E R

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of young age on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) by comparing HRQoL of younger and older breast cancer patients, corrected for confounding, and of young patients and a general Dutch population. Methods: The population consisted of breast cancer survivors (stage 0-III) after breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy. Health-related quality of life was prospectively assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The association between age (⩽50; 51–70; ⩾70 years) and HRQoL over time was analysed with mixed modelling. The clinical relevance of differences between/within age groups was estimated with Cohen's D and consensus-based guidelines. The HRQoL data from the young patient cohort were compared with Dutch reference data at 3 years after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 1420 patients completed 3200 questionnaires. Median follow-up was 34 (range 6–70) months. Median age was 59 (range 28–85) years. Compared with older subjects, young women reported worse HRQoL in the first year after radiotherapy, but clinical relevance was limited. Three years after radiotherapy, HRQoL values in the younger group were equal to those in the reference population. Pain and fatigue after radiotherapy improved, with medium clinical relevance. Conclusions: Three years after radiotherapy for breast cancer, young age was not a risk factor for decreased HRQoL. PMID:25602967

  7. Triple-negative breast cancer: treatment challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Joëlle; Lousberg, Laurence; Schroeder, Hélène; Jerusalem, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are defined by the absence of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the absence of HER2 overexpression. These cancers represent a heterogeneous breast cancer subtype with a poor prognosis. Few systemic treatment options exist besides the use of chemotherapy (CT). The heterogeneity of the disease has limited the successful development of targeted therapy in unselected patient populations. Currently, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. However, intense research is ongoing to identify specific targets and develop additional and better systemic treatment options. Standard adjuvant and neoadjuvant regimens include anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, and taxanes. Platinum-based CT has been proposed as another CT option of interest in TNBC. We review the role of this therapy in general, and particularly in patients carrying BRCA germ-line mutations. Available data concerning the role of platinum-based CT in TNBC were acquired primarily in the neoadjuvant setting. The routine use of platinum-based CT is not yet recommended by available guidelines. Many studies have reported the molecular characterization of TNBCs. Several actionable targets have been identified. Novel therapeutic strategies are currently being tested in clinical trials based on promising results observed in preclinical studies. These targets include androgen receptor, EGFR, PARP, FGFR, and the angiogenic pathway. We review the recent data on experimental drugs in this field. We also discuss the recent data concerning immunologic checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27284266

  8. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  9. Breast conserving therapy with accelerated partial breast versus external beam whole breast irradiation: comparison of imaging sequela and complications in a matched population.

    PubMed

    Monticciolo, Debra L; Biggs, Kelly; Gist, Ashley K; Sincleair, Spencer T; Hajdik, Rodney L; Nipper, Michael L; Schnitker, James B

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate and compare the imaging sequela and complications of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with those occurring in patients treated with standard external beam therapy. Patient selection included those who met the criteria for possible ABPI: age 45 or older; cancer stage T1N0M0 or ductal carcinoma in situ 3 cm or less, and negative surgical margins. One hundred and ninety seven had complete records and films available for review. Ninety-seven (49%) were treated with APBI (MammoSite) and 100(51%) were treated with external beam. Image findings for APBI versus external beam were: distortion 90(93%) versus 83(83%), seroma 67(69%) versus 7(7%), skin edema 52(54%) versus 47(47%), increased stroma 75(77%) versus 66(66%), calcifications 10(10%) versus 6(6%), and fat necrosis 12(12%) versus 6(6%). For APBI, skin and stromal edema was more commonly focal. At imaging, the seroma rate was statistically and significantly different between the two treatment modes (p < 0.0001). For patients treated with APBI, seroma formation was not related to balloon size and only weakly related to lumpectomy cavity size. The complication rate was significantly higher for those treated with APBI (36 versus 20%) and the types and treatment of complications differed. There were three recurrences among the APBI group and none among those treated with external beam radiation. PMID:21306469

  10. Factors of influence on acute skin toxicity of breast cancer patients treated with standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Standard 3D-CRT after BCS may cause skin toxicity with a wide range of intensity including acute effects like erythema or late effects. In order to reduce these side effects it is mandatory to identify potential factors of influence in breast cancer patients undergoing standard three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of the breast and modern systemic therapy. Materials/Methods Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 211 breast cancer patients (median age 52,4 years, range 24–77) after BCS consecutively treated in our institution with 3D-CRT (50 Gy whole breast photon radiotherapy followed by 16 Gy electron boost to the tumorbed) were evaluated with special focus on documented skin toxicity at the end of the 50 Gy-course. Standardized photodocumentation of the treated breast was done in each patient lying on the linac table with arms elevated. Skin toxicity was documented according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC)-score. Potential influencing factors were classified in three groups: patient-specific (smoking, age, breast size, body mass index = BMI, allergies), tumor-specific (tumorsize) and treatment-specific factors (antihormonal therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, chemotherapy). Uni- and multivariate statistical analyses were done using IBM SPSS version 19. Results After 50 Gy 3D-CRT to the whole breast 28.9% of all 211 patients had no erythema, 62.2% showed erythema grade 1 (G1) and 8.5% erythema grade 2. None of the patients had grade 3/4 (G3/4) erythema. In univariate analyses a significant influence or trend on the development of acute skin toxicities (erythema G0 versus G1 versus G2) was observed for larger breast volumes (p=0,004), smoking during radiation therapy (p=0,064) and absence of allergies (p=0,014) as well as larger tumorsize (p=0,009) and antihormonal therapy (p=0.005). Neither patient age, BMI nor choice of chemotherapy showed any significant effect on higher grade toxicity. In the multivariate

  11. Frequency and Correlates of Posttraumatic-Stress-Disorder-Like Symptoms after Treatment for Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Matthew J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Assessed Quality Of Life (QOL) and symptoms similar to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in women posttreatment for breast cancer. Negatively related PTSD symptomatology to QOL, income, and age. Time since treatment, type of cytotoxic treatment, and stage of disease were unrelated to PTSD symptoms. Suggests that in breast cancer survivors,…

  12. Towards an optimal multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer treatment for older women.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Nemica; Menjak, Ines; Trudeau, Maureen; Mehta, Rajin; Wright, Frances; Leahey, Angela; Ellis, Janet; Gallagher, Damian; Moore, Jennifer; Bristow, Bonnie; Kay, Noreen; Szumacher, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer presents specifc concerns that are unique to the needs of older female patients. While treatment of early breast cancer does not vary greatly with age, the optimal management of older women with breast cancer often requires complex interdisciplinary supportive care due to multiple comorbidities. This article reviews optimal approaches to breast cancer in women 65 years and older from an interdisciplinary perspective. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE, choosing articles concentrated on the management of older breast cancer patients from the point of view of several disciplines, including geriatrics, radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, psychooncology, palliative care, nursing, and social work. This patient population requires interprofessional collaboration from the time of diagnosis, throughout treatment and into the recovery period. Thus, we recommend an interdisciplinary program dedicated to the treat ment of older women with breast cancer to optimize their cancer care. PMID:26897863

  13. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana.

  14. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  15. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  16. Evaluation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Prognostic Marker for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Yang Qifeng; Goyal, Sharad; Harris, Lyndsay; Chung, Gina; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important protein involved in the process of angiogenesis that has been found to correlate with relapse-free and overall survival in breast cancer, predominantly in locally advanced and metastatic disease. A paucity of data is available on the prognostic implications of VEGF in early-stage breast cancer; specifically, its prognostic value for local relapse after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) is largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to assess VEGF expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with BCT and to correlate the clinical and pathologic features and outcomes with overexpression of VEGF. Methods and Materials: After obtaining institutional review board approval, the paraffin specimens of 368 patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with BCT between 1975 and 2005 were constructed into tissue microarrays with twofold redundancy. The tissue microarrays were stained for VEGF and read by a trained pathologist, who was unaware of the clinical details, as positive or negative according the standard guidelines. The clinical and pathologic data, long-term outcomes, and results of VEGF staining were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 6.5 years. VEGF expression was positive in 56 (15%) of the 368 patients. Although VEGF expression did not correlate with age at diagnosis, tumor size, nodal status, histologic type, family history, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or HER-2 status, a trend was seen toward increased VEGF expression in the black cohort (26% black vs. 13% white, p = .068). Within the margin-negative cohort, VEGF did not predict for local relapse-free survival (RFS) (96% vs. 95%), nodal RFS (100% vs. 100%), distant metastasis-free survival (91% vs. 92%), overall survival (92% vs. 97%), respectively (all p >.05). Subset analysis revealed that VEGF was highly predictive of local RFS in node-positive, margin

  17. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  18. Basal Subtype of Invasive Breast Cancer Is Associated With a Higher Risk of True Recurrence After Conventional Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Sreedhara, Meera; Freer, Phoebe E.; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Harris, Jay R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. Results: At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Conclusions: Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal

  19. Locoregional treatment outcomes for breast cancer patients with ipsilateral supraclavicular metastases at diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Valero, Vicente; Fornage, Bruno; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the locoregional efficacy of multimodality treatment for breast cancer patients who present with ipsilateral supraclavicular (SCV) disease without systemic metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 71 patients with ipsilateral SCV involvement at presentation. SCV involvement in 16 patients (23%) was diagnosed by ultrasound examination only, without palpable disease. All patients were treated with curative intent using neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCT), and radiotherapy. Results: The 5-year SCV control, locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 77%, 30%, and 47%, respectively. Patients with persistent SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by physical examination had a lower rate of LRC (64% vs. 86%, p = 0.026), as did those with persistent SCV disease by ultrasound examination (66% vs. 96%, p = 0.007). Of those with a complete response of SCV disease by physical examination after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, those with persistently abnormal ultrasound findings had significantly worse disease-free survival (0% vs. 55%, p = 0.03). BCT was not associated with lower rates of LRC (82% for BCT vs. 76% for mastectomy, p = 0.80). Conclusion: Radiotherapy achieved excellent LRC after surgery for patients with ipsilateral SCV metastases who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For patients who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease by physical examination, ultrasonography of the SCV fossa may help assess the risk of disease recurrence. SCV involvement should not be considered a contraindication for BCT.

  20. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  1. IOERT as anticipated tumor bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer--results of a case series after 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fastner, Gerd; Reitsamer, Roland; Ziegler, Ingrid; Zehentmayr, Franz; Fussl, Christoph; Kopp, Peter; Peintinger, Florentia; Greil, Richard; Fischer, Thorsten; Deutschmann, Heinrich; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate retrospectively rates of local (LCR) and locoregional tumor control (LRCR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) who were treated with preoperative chemotherapy (primary systemic treatment, PST) followed by breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and either intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (IOERT) preceding whole-breast irradiation (WBI) (Group 1) or with WBI followed by an external tumor bed boost (electrons or photons) instead of IOERT (Group 2). From 2002 to 2007, 83 patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer were enrolled in Group 1 and 26 in Group 2. All patients received PST followed by BCS and axillary lymph node dissection. IOERT boosts were applied by single doses of 9 Gy (90% reference isodose) versus external boosts of 12 Gy (median dose range, 6-16) in 2 Gy/fraction (ICRU). WBI in both groups was performed up to total doses of 51-57 Gy (1.7-1.8 Gy/fraction). The respective median follow-up times for Groups 1 and 2 amount 59 months (range, 3-115) and 67.5 months (range, 13-120). Corresponding 6-year rates for LCR, LRCR, metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival and overall survival were 98.5, 97.2, 84.7, 89.2 and 86.4% for Group 1 and 88.1, 88.1, 74, 92 and 92% for Group 2, respectively, without any statistical significances. IOERT as boost modality during BCS in LABC after PST shows a trend to be superior in terms of LCR and LRCR in comparison with conventional boosts. PMID:24995409

  2. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the cancer removed (lumpectomy or breast-conserving surgery) might not need reconstruction, but sometimes they do. Breast reconstruction is done by a plastic surgeon. Should I have breast reconstruction? Breast reconstruction ...

  3. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  4. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  5. Vitamin D: Are We Ready to Supplement for Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Crew, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a potentially modifiable risk factor that may be targeted for breast cancer prevention and treatment. Preclinical studies support various antitumor effects of vitamin D in breast cancer. Numerous observational studies have reported an inverse association between vitamin D status, including circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, and breast cancer risk. The relationship between vitamin D and mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk, remains unclear. Studies analyzing the link between genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D pathway genes and breast cancer incidence and prognosis have yielded inconsistent results. Vitamin D deficiency among breast cancer patients has been associated with poorer clinical outcomes and increased mortality. Despite a number of clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, the efficacy, optimal dosage of vitamin D, and target blood level of 25(OH)D for breast cancer prevention have yet to be determined. Even with substantial literature on vitamin D and breast cancer, future studies need to focus on gaining a better understanding of the biologic effects of vitamin D in breast tissue. Despite compelling data from experimental and observational studies, there is still insufficient data from clinical trials to make recommendations for vitamin D supplementation for breast cancer prevention or treatment. PMID:23533810

  6. Results of breast conservation therapy from a single-institution community hospital in Hawaii with a predominantly Japanese population

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemori, Mark . E-mail: mtkanemori@aol.com; Prygrocki, Maria C.T.R.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome data from breast conservation therapy performed at the Kuakini Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The remarkably low rates of recurrence found in this study prompted a review of the literature and evaluation of the prognostic factors that may explain these results. Methods and materials: The data from patients with Tis, T1 or T2 breast tumors, treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy during the 12-year period between January 1990 and December 2001 were retrospectively reviewed and compared to results found in national publications. Results: Current follow-up data was available in 97.1% of patients who met these criteria, identifying a total of 896 patients who were analyzed in this study. With a median follow-up exceeding 6 years, the local in-breast failure rate was 0.67%. Survival data was superior to the National Cancer Data Base for each stage of disease. Conclusion: This low rate of local relapse is extraordinary and unmatched by the published results generally cited in the literature. The findings are consistent with other studies reporting unusually low rates of breast cancer recurrence in patients of Japanese ancestry.

  7. Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma Versus Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Survival and Response to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Sen, Fatma; Tambas, Makbule; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Eralp, Yesim; Saip, Pinar; Karanlik, Hasan; Fayda, Merdan; Kucucuk, Seden; Onder, Semen; Yavuz, Ekrem; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut; Igci, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) differs from classic invasive ductal carcinomas regarding incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis. The purpose of this study was to compare patients with MBC with clinicopathologic and treatment-matched patients with triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC) in terms of response to treatment, progression, and survival.Fifty-four patients with MBC and 51 with TNBC, who were treated at Istanbul University, Institute of Oncology, between 1993 and 2014, were included in the study. After correctly matching the patients with 1 of the 2 groups, they were compared to determine differences in response to treatment, disease progression, clinical course, and survival.At a median follow-up of 28 months, 18 patients (17.1%) died and 27 (25.5%) had disease progression. Metaplastic histology was significantly correlated with worse 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) (51 ± 9% vs. 82 ± 6%, P = 0.013) and overall survival (OS) (68 ± 8% vs. 94 ± 4%, P = 0.009) compared with TNBC histology. Patients who received taxane-based chemotherapy (CT) regimens or adjuvant radiotherapy had significantly better PFS (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001) and OS (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) compared with others. In the multivariate analysis, MBC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.09, P < 0.001), presence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) (HR: 12.8, P = 0.05), and metastasis development at any time during the clinical course (HR: 38.7, P < 0.001) were significant factors that decreased PFS, whereas metastasis development was the only independent prognostic factor of OS (HR: 23.8, P = 0.009).MBC is significantly correlated with worse PFS and OS compared with TNBC. Patients with MBC are resistant to conventional CT agents, and more efficient treatment regimens are required. PMID:26717372

  8. A Stable and Conservative Interface Treatment of Arbitrary Spatial Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Nordstrom, Jan; Gottlieb, David

    1998-01-01

    Stable and accurate interface conditions are derived for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The conditions are functionally independent of the spatial order of accuracy and rely only on the form of the discrete operator. We focus on high-order finite-difference operators that satisfy the summation-by-parts (SBP) property. We prove that stability is a natural consequence of the SBP operators used in conjunction with the new boundary conditions. In addition, we show that the interface treatments are conservative. New finite-difference operators of spatial accuracy up to sixth order are constructed: these operators satisfy the SBP property. Finite-difference operators are shown to admit design accuracy (p(sup th)-order global accuracy) when (p - 1)(sup th)-order stencil closures are used near the boundaries if the physical boundary conditions are implemented to at least p(sup th)-order accuracy. Stability and accuracy are demonstrated on the nonlinear Burgers' equation for an twelve-subdomain problem with randomly distributed interfaces.

  9. Supportive care during treatment for breast cancer: resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Fatima; Bese, Nuran; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; Ginsburg, Ophira; Grunberg, Steven M; Gralla, Richard J; Steyn, Ann; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Knaul, Felicia Marie; Aapro, Matti S; Andersen, Barbara L; Thompson, Beti; Gralow, Julie R; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer patients may have unmet supportive care needs during treatment, including symptom management of treatment-related toxicities, and educational, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. Delivery of supportive care is often a low priority in low- and middle-income settings, and is also dependent on resources available. This consensus statement describes twelve key recommendations for supportive care during treatment in low- and middle-income countries, identified by an expert international panel as part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit for Supportive Care, which was held in October 2012, in Vienna, Austria. Panel recommendations are presented in a 4-tier resource-stratified table to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services during treatment to breast cancer patients, starting at a basic level of resource allocation and incrementally adding program resources as they become available. These recommendations include: health professional and patient and family education; management of treatment related toxicities, management of treatment-related symptoms of fatigue, insomnia and non-specific pain, and management of psychosocial and spiritual issues related to breast cancer treatment. Establishing supportive care during breast cancer treatment will help ensure that breast cancer patients receive comprehensive care that can help 1) improve adherence to treatment recommendations, 2) manage treatment-related toxicities and other treatment related symptoms, and 3) address the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of breast cancer and breast cancer treatments. PMID:24001709

  10. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (<1/cm2) limited to the boost area was evident in 2 out of 39 patients. The compliance with the treatment was excellent (100%). Conclusion The radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer

  11. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  12. Role of breast-feeding in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Huffman, S L; Combest, C

    1990-09-01

    Recent studies have again shown the beneficial effects of breast-feeding in preventing morbidity and mortality from diarrhoea in infants. A case-control study in Brazil has shown that young infants who are not breast-fed have a 25-time greater risk of dying of diarrhoea than those who are exclusively breast-fed. A longitudinal study in the urban slums of Lima, Peru found that exclusively breast-fed infants have a reduced risk of diarrhoeal morbidity when compared with infants receiving only water in addition to breast-milk. Both these studies, along with numerous others in developing countries, point to the need to extend the duration of exclusive breast-feeding to at least 4-6 months. A review of concerned studies throughout the world shows that even in malnourished women, breast-milk output is sufficient to maintain growth of infants up to this age. The addition of early food supplements to infants fed under prevailing environmental conditions in developing countries leads to their increased diarrhoeal attacks and associated reduced food intake. This results in worsened nutritional status of the affected infants. Breast-feeding helps maintain hydration status during diarrhoeal episodes. Studies in Peru, India, and Nigeria have shown that breast-feeding can be continued during diarrhoea when the infants often refuse other foods, specially non-human milk. Thus, breast-feeding is important in providing necessary calories and protein during a time when a loss of appetite for other foods is common. Diarrhoeal disease control programmes need to modify service delivery to ensure that breast-feeding mothers are not separated from their infants while being treated with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) as inpatients or outpatients. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) should be given to infants with cup and spoon rather than bottles, in order not to interfere with suckling. When in a health system bottles are used for treatment, an implicit credibility is given to their role in

  13. Surgical decision making in conservative mastectomies

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Nicola; Nava, Maurizio Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We present some clinical advice to drive the decision process in performing conservative mastectomies. Several factors are taken into consideration to indicate these techniques. First of all, we need to identify patients who need a mastectomy due to the extension of the disease. In this case we suggest assessing patients anthropometric characteristics (breast volume—ptosis), and personal preferences regarding the extension of surgical treatment. Small, medium size, without ptosis or with moderate ptosis can be better served by standard nipple-sparing mastectomy. Large and ptotic breast can be removed and reconstructed performing a skin-reducing mastectomy. Mastectomies cannot replace breast conservation and should be discouraged whenever breast-conserving surgery can be performed with good results. However, in some selected cases, and especially in patients with small breast, conservative mastectomies with contralateral reshape can yield favourable results. PMID:26855911

  14. The Use of Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography Before Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy to Identify Patients Likely to Be Treated Safely With Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akashi-Tanaka, Sadako; Fukutomi, Takashi; Sato, Natsuko; Iwamoto, Eriko; Watanabe, Toru; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Ando, Masashi; Miyakawa, Kunihisa; Hasegawa, Tadashi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To select suitable candidates for breast-conserving treatment (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), based on the classification of tumors into localized or diffuse types using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT). Summary Background Data: A relatively high rate of loco-regional failure after BCT has been reported with breast cancer downstaged by NAC. Accurate assessment of the suitability of BCT and the response to NAC, before the initiation of NAC, will allow the optimal selection of an appropriate therapeutic course. Methods: We evaluated 110 consecutive patients with operable breast carcinomas measuring 3-cm or more in diameter by CE-CT after NAC treatment with doxorubicin and docetaxel at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, from May 1998 to November 2001. Lesions were classified as either localized or diffuse types by mammography (MMG), ultrasonography (US), and CE-CT. Results: Tumors designated as localized type by MMG, US, and CE-CT were reduced to tumors less than 3.0 cm (P < 0.0001) in a concentric circle (P < 0.0001). Localized tumors by CE-CT were treated safely with BCT maintaining a negative margin status (P = 0.01). In contrast, diffuse type tumors shrunk into a mosaic pattern consisting of tumors larger than 3.1 cm. Tumors classified as localized by CE-CT responded better pathologically than diffuse tumors (P = 0.0365). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that morphologic type by CE-CT and histologic type were significant predictors of candidates for safe BCT. Conclusions: The classification of tumors into either localized or diffuse types, using CE-CT before NAC administration, accurately predicts which tumors will be suitable candidates for BCT after NAC. PMID:14745332

  15. Innovative combination of therapeutic mammoplasty and expandable-implant breast augmentation for immediate partial breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Choo, A.M.H.; Forouhi, P.; Malata, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic mammoplasty is used in the treatment of suitably-sized and appropriately-located breast cancers to achieve adequate cancer excision, resulting in well-shaped but smaller breasts. In patients wishing to maintain or increase their breast size, simultaneous augmentation will be required. Presentation of case A 48-year-old female underwent an “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy”. She required mastectomy for a multifocal cancer of the right breast and breast conservation for a unifocal localised cancer in the upper part of the left breast. She requested right immediate breast reconstruction and hoped for larger breasts than she had. Due to complications during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the right reconstruction plan was changed from a deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap to an implant-based technique. On the left, an extended superomedial pedicle therapeutic mammoplasty was combined with a subpectoral augmentation using an expandable-implant. Discussion The use of expandable-implants for reconstruction of partial mastectomy defects in combination with therapeutic mammoplasty has not been reported. This case report shows that such “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is feasible. Conclusion A “novel” oncoplastic technique herein termed “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is described for partial breast reconstruction during the treatment of a patient with bilateral breast cancer. It enabled adequate treatment of her cancer while reshaping the breast and achieving the desired larger breast size. It should be considered in selected breast-conservation patients who wish to maintain or increase their breast size. PMID:27132043

  16. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  17. Systemic treatment strategies for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Budhi Singh; Sharma, Suresh C; Chanana, Priyanka; Jhamb, Swaty

    2014-05-10

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the lack of immunohistochemical expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (EGFR2). Most TNBC has a basal-like molecular phenotype by gene expression profiling and shares clinical and pathological features with hereditary BRCA1 related breast cancers. This review evaluates the activity of available chemotherapy and targeted agents in TNBC. A systematic review of PubMed and conference databases was carried out to identify randomised clinical trials reporting outcomes in women with TNBC treated with chemotherapy and targeted agents. Our review identified TNBC studies of chemotherapy and targeted agents with different mechanisms of action, including induction of synthetic lethality and inhibition of angiogenesis, growth and survival pathways. TNBC is sensitive to taxanes and anthracyclins. Platinum agents are effective in TNBC patients with BRCA1 mutation, either alone or in combination with poly adenosine diphosphate polymerase 1 inhibitors. Combinations of ixabepilone and capecitabine have added to progression-free survival (PFS) without survival benefit in metastatic TNBC. Antiangiogenic agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with chemotherapy produced only modest gains in PFS and had little impact on survival. TNBC subgroups respond differentially to specific targeted agents. In future, the treatment needs to be tailored for a specific patient, depending on the molecular characteristics of their malignancy. TNBC being a chemosensitive entity, combination with targeted agents have not produced substantial improvements in outcomes. Appropriate patient selection with rationale combinations of targeted agents is needed for success. PMID:24829859

  18. Systemic treatment strategies for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Budhi Singh; Sharma, Suresh C; Chanana, Priyanka; Jhamb, Swaty

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the lack of immunohistochemical expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (EGFR2). Most TNBC has a basal-like molecular phenotype by gene expression profiling and shares clinical and pathological features with hereditary BRCA1 related breast cancers. This review evaluates the activity of available chemotherapy and targeted agents in TNBC. A systematic review of PubMed and conference databases was carried out to identify randomised clinical trials reporting outcomes in women with TNBC treated with chemotherapy and targeted agents. Our review identified TNBC studies of chemotherapy and targeted agents with different mechanisms of action, including induction of synthetic lethality and inhibition of angiogenesis, growth and survival pathways. TNBC is sensitive to taxanes and anthracyclins. Platinum agents are effective in TNBC patients with BRCA1 mutation, either alone or in combination with poly adenosine diphosphate polymerase 1 inhibitors. Combinations of ixabepilone and capecitabine have added to progression-free survival (PFS) without survival benefit in metastatic TNBC. Antiangiogenic agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with chemotherapy produced only modest gains in PFS and had little impact on survival. TNBC subgroups respond differentially to specific targeted agents. In future, the treatment needs to be tailored for a specific patient, depending on the molecular characteristics of their malignancy. TNBC being a chemosensitive entity, combination with targeted agents have not produced substantial improvements in outcomes. Appropriate patient selection with rationale combinations of targeted agents is needed for success. PMID:24829859

  19. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Domain, Delora; Singletary, S. Eva; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age.

  20. Lapatinib for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Takeda, A; Picot, J; von Keyserlingk, C; Clegg, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lapatinib for the treatment of advanced or metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The scope included women with advanced, metastatic or recurrent HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who have had previous therapy that includes trastuzumab. Outcomes were time to progression, progression-free survival, response rates, overall survival, health-related quality of life and adverse effects. The submission's evidence came from one randomised controlled trial (RCT) of reasonable methodological quality, although it was not powered to detect a statistically significant difference in mean overall survival. Median time to progression was longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm than in the capecitabine monotherapy arm {27.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.4 to 49.4] versus 18.6 [95% CI 9.1 to 36.9] weeks; hazard ratio 0.57 [95% CI 0.43 to 0.77; p = 0.00013]}. Median overall survival was very similar between the groups [67.7 (95% CI 58.9 to 91.6) versus 66.6 (95% CI 49.1 to 75.0) weeks; hazard ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.12; p = 0.177)]. Median progression-free survival was statistically significantly longer in the lapatinib plus capecitabine group than in the capecitabine monotherapy group [27.1 (95% CI 24.1 to 36.9) versus 17.6 (95% CI 13.3 to 20.1) weeks; hazard ratio 0.55 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.74); p = 0.000033]. The manufacturer's economic model to estimate progression-free and overall survival for patients with HER2-positive advanced/metastatic breast cancer who had relapsed following treatment with an anthracycline, a taxane and trastuzumab was appropriate for the disease area. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for lapatinib plus

  1. Treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament rupture in the athlete. Conservative versus surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Renström, P A

    1999-01-01

    -free, whereas surgery had serious, though infrequent, complications. Functional treatment produced no more sequelae than casting with or without surgical repair. Secondary surgical repair, even years after an injury, has results comparable to those of primary repair, so even competitive athletes can receive initial conservative treatment. Sequelae of lateral ligament injuries are common. After conservative or surgical treatment, 10 to 30% of patients have chronic symptoms, including persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, pain, muscle weakness and 'giving-way'. Well-designed physical therapy programmes usually reduce instability. For individuals with chronic instability refractory to conservative measures, surgery may be needed. Subtalar instability should be carefully evaluated when considering surgery. PMID:10028133

  2. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  3. Ophthalmic Metastasis of Breast Cancer and Ocular Side Effects from Breast Cancer Treatment and Management: Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulos, Theodore; Koutsandrea, Chryssanthi; Kardara, Evgenia; Ladas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases occurring in women, and its incidence increases over the years. It is the main site of origin in ocular metastatic disease in women, and, due to its hematogenous nature of metastatic spread, it affects mainly the uveal tissue. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the clinical manifestations of the breast cancer ocular metastatic disease, alongside the side effects of the available treatment options for the management and regression of the systematic and ophthalmic disease. PMID:26078956

  4. The timing of breast and axillary surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilli, Zahraa; Boughey, Judy C

    2016-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has traditionally been used in locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, allowing for a reduction in disease volume and therefore optimizing surgical resection of disease in the breast. NAC impacts both the tumor in the breast and the lymph nodes and may allow for the option of breast-conserving surgery and avoiding an axillary dissection. The aim of this review is to discuss the considerations and timing of surgical treatment of the breast and the axilla following NAC in patients with breast cancer. PMID:27164853

  5. The Right Treatment for the Right Patient – Personalised Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scharl, A.; Kühn, T.; Papathemelis, T.; Salterberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    The probability of healing breast cancer has been greatly improved in recent decades through the introduction and optimisation of multi-modal therapies and interdisciplinary treatments. Today, in addition to surgery or radiation, most patients receive a systemic treatment. To prevent excessive treatment, patients whose prognosis is so good that certain adjuvant therapies can be foregone or reduced must be identified. A lack of compliance with therapy, especially in the endocrine therapies stretching over years, is a further problem. As only treatments that are also carried out can improve chances of survival, efforts to improve compliance must be intensified. Studies show that lifestyle changes influence the efficiency of medication on the one hand, and on the other hand can also by themselves achieve a relevant improvement of the prognosis. Therefore, it is time not only to treat the tumour, but to also focus on the patient as a whole in therapeutic interventions. PMID:26257405

  6. Factors Related to Incomplete Treatment of Breast Cancer in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Mark; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Ahwah, Baffour; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Merajver, Sofia D.; Schmid, Kendra; Soliman, Amr S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The burden of cancer in Africa is an enlarging public health challenge. Breast cancer in Ghana is the second most common cancer among Ghanaian women and the proportion of diagnosed patients who complete prescribed treatment is estimated to be very limited, thereby potentially adding to lower survival and poor quality of life after diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify the patient and system factors related to incomplete treatment of breast cancer among patients. Methods This study was conducted at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. We interviewed 117 breast cancer patients and next of kin of breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2008 to 2010. Results Islamic religion, seeking treatment with traditional healers, and lack of awareness about national health insurance coverage of breast cancer treatment were predictors of incomplete treatment. Conclusions The results of this study support that Ghanaian women with diagnosed breast cancer have multiple addressable and modifiable patient factors that may deter them from completing the prescribed treatment. The results highlight the need for developing and testing specific interventions about the importance of completing treatment with a special focus on addressing religious, cultural, and system navigation barriers in developing countries. PMID:25282667

  7. Interventions to Alleviate Symptoms Related to Breast Cancer Treatments and Areas of Needed Research

    PubMed Central

    Janelsins, Michelle C; Mustian, Karen M; Peppone, Luke J; Sprod, Lisa K; Shayne, Michelle; Mohile, Supriya; Chandwani, Kavita; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Morrow, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    Treatments for breast cancer produce a host of side effects, which can become debilitating. Some cancer treatment-related side effects occur in up to 90% of patients during treatment and can persist for months or years after treatment has ended. As the number of breast cancer survivors steadily increases, the need for cancer control intervention research to alleviate side effects also grows. This review provides a general overview of recent clinical research studies of selected topics in the areas of symptom management for breast cancer with a focus on cognitive difficulties, fatigue, cardiotoxicity, bone loss, insomnia, and cancer pain. We review both pharmacological and behavioral intervention clinical research studies, conducted with breast cancer patients and survivors. Additionally, clinical perspectives on symptom management and recommendations for areas of needed research are provided. PMID:22855701

  8. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  9. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Christopher; LeRoy, Angie; Karuga, Maryanne

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26247972

  10. Targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sandra; Fonseca, Joana; Silva, Patrícia M A; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. As in other malignancies, aneuploidy is a common feature of breast cancer and influences its behavior. Aneuploidy has been linked to inappropriate activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a surveillance mechanism that, in normal cells, prevents anaphase onset until correct alignment of all chromosomes at the metaphase is achieved. Interestingly, the widely used anti-microtubule drugs, vinca alkaloids and taxanes, kill cancer cells through chronic arrest in mitosis as a consequence of chronic SAC activation. Deregulated SAC has been reported in breast cancer in many reports and presents an attractive therapeutic strategy. We present here a review of the current knowledge on the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in breast cancer, and discuss the potential of SAC components as targets for breast cancer therapies. PMID:25731686

  11. Serial Assessment of Therapeutic Response to a New Radiosensitization Treatment, Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer Using Breast Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaogawa, Shin; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Tsuzuki, Akira; Akima, Ryo; Itoh, Kenji; Morio, Kazuo; Yasunami, Hiroaki; Onogawa, Masahide; Kariya, Shinji; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: We have developed a new radiosensitization treatment called Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II). Using KORTUC II, we performed breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without any surgical procedure for elderly patients with breast cancer in stages I/II or patients refusing surgery. Since surgery was not performed, histological confirmation of the primary tumor region following KORTUC II treatment was not possible. Therefore, to precisely evaluate the response to this new therapy, a detailed diagnostic procedure is needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic response to KORTUC II treatment in patients with stage I/II breast cancer using annual breast contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Twenty-one patients with stage I/II breast cancer who were elderly and/or refused surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent MRI prior to and at 3 to 6 months after KORTUC II, and then approximately biannually thereafter. Findings from MRI were compared with those from other diagnostic modalities performed during the same time period. Results: KORTUC II was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. All of 21 patients showed a clinically complete response (cCR) on CE MRI. The mean period taken to confirm cCR on the breast CE MRI was approximately 14 months. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 61.9 months at the end of October 2014. Conclusions: The therapeutic effect of BCT using KORTUC II without surgery could be evaluated by biannual CE MRI evaluations. Approximately 14 months were required to achieve cCR in response to this therapy. PMID:26703733

  12. Sexual functioning in young women in the context of breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. The number of breast cancer survivors has been growing because of earlier detection and improved treatment. Young women under 50 years of age account for relatively small percentage of all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. However, their medical and psychosocial context of the disease is unique. Breast cancer is diagnosed at the most productive time in life. Concerns about childbearing, partner rejection, sexual function, body image, sexual attractiveness and career are common. For all these reasons experience of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment among young women requires special attention. Researches indicate that oncological treatment may negatively affect female sexual functioning. Chemotherapy is one of the greatest risk factors of sexual dysfunctions, especially when it results in medication-induced menopause. The duration and severity of sexual problems depend on a wide variety of factors: medical, psychological and interpersonal. These side effects may last for many years after the end of treatment. It is known that breast cancer affects both patients and their partners. The first sexual experience after surgery may be a turning point in sexual adaptation in couples. Communication is crucial in this process. More knowledge about sexual difficulties and sexual adaptation process of young breast cancer survivors (YBCSs) and their partners is needed. Knowing protective and risk factors is necessary to identify couples at risk for sexual dysfunctions in order to professionally support them in the best way and at the right time. PMID:24416553

  13. Perspectives of the Breast Cancer Survivorship Continuum: Diagnosis through 30 Months Post-Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hulett, Jennifer M.; Armer, Jane M.; Stewart, Bob R.; Wanchai, Ausanee

    2015-01-01

    This study explored breast cancer survivors’ perspectives regarding their experiences of the survivorship continuum from diagnosis through 30 months post-treatment. The sample included women (N = 379) with newly-diagnosed breast cancer undergoing treatment at a Midwestern university-affiliated cancer center. Semi-structured interviews were conducted using the Lymphedema and Breast Cancer Questionnaire at time of diagnosis, post-operatively, quarterly during the first year, and then semi-annually thereafter through 30 months post-treatment. A mixed-methodology was used to analyze participants’ comments. Themes central to long-term survivorship experiences included social support, positive worldviews, breast cancer and lymphedema health literacy, religious/spiritual beliefs, self-empowerment, and recovery expectations. These themes were consistent with a psychoneuroimmunological model of health in which psychosocial variables mediate stress and influence health outcomes. Qualitative data showed that social support and positive worldviews were the two themes with the most significant impact on long-term breast cancer survivorship experiences. Survivors expressed a need to advance their health care literacy in order to share ownership of breast cancer and lymphedema treatment decisions. Since breast cancer is an immune-mediated disease, long-term survivorship planning should address psychosocial factors that influence the long-term psychological distress associated with immune dysfunction. PMID:26030800

  14. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro® polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  15. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Hiraku Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Kazuya; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  16. Breast cancer treatment--later pregnancy and survival.

    PubMed

    Kasum, M

    2006-01-01

    Although breast cancer (BC) affects patients at older age, it occurs more frequently in premenopausal women due to better diagnostic methods and an increasing trend towards delay in childbearing. The increasing population of women with BC delaying childbearing may be of concern regarding the effect of treatment on later pregnancy, as well as the influence of pregnancy on the prognosis of disease and survival. Radiotherapy has shown no adverse effects on the clinical outcome in the offspring except diminished lactation. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after chemotherapy have shown no congenital anomalies, although sometimes a high abortion rate (10-29%) has been demonstrated. Currently, several fertility-sparing options, including the use of endocrine therapy and assisted reproductive technologies, cryopreservation and ovarian tissue transplantation, are very promising. The survival of BC patients is not decreased by a subsequent pregnancy; compared with the non-pregnant group their survival rates are often the same or better, with favourable relative risks and lower recurrence of metastases. PMID:16800246

  17. 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after breast conserving surgery: Correlation with molecular markers of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozguven, Salih; Inanir, Sabahat; Turoglu, Halil Turgut; Erdil, Tanju Yusuf; Ugurlu, Mustafa Umit; Gulluoglu, Bahadir

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of 2-(fluorine-18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) early after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in patients with breast cancer (BC) and whether we can determine which molecular biomarkers of breast carcinoma put the patients at risk. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study involved 88 patients with histologically proven T1 or T2 BC, who were treated with BCS and underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT study. The correlation between biological markers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2], and Ki-67) of the primary tumor and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings was analyzed. Results: 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated the presence of BC disease (locoregional disease [LRD], distant metastases, or contralateral BC) in 26 of 88 patients (29.5%). Regarding immunohistochemical profiles, BC expressing high levels of Ki-67 were associated with an increased percentage of LRD, which was the major recurrence pattern on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Although the BC disease was observed more commonly in patients with HER2 positivity compared to those of HER2 negative, the difference did not reach statistical significance. The patients with T2 tumor or a higher histopathological grade had a higher percentage of BC disease. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that patients with early stage BC treated with BCS have a remarkable risk of the presence of BC even early after surgery, and there was a clinically important relationship between 18F-FDG PET/CT findings and biological markers of BC. These findings suggest that high-risk molecular biomarkers (Ki-67, HER2) can be taken into account in the decision-making the process for both preoperative imaging and planning of the surgical approach. PMID:27385883

  18. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  19. A new surgical strategy for breast conservation in locally advanced breast cancer that achieves a good locoregional control rate: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Moneer, M; Ismael, S; Khaled, H; El-Gantery, M; Zaghloul, M S; El-Didi, M

    2001-06-01

    The scope of breast conserving surgery has recently expanded to include locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients who are downstaged following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). However, the efficacy of this approach in achieving adequate locoregional control of disease is in doubt. Some reports have attributed the failure to the association of NACT-induced tumour downstaging which can leave multifocal in situ and invasive lesions around the main tumour mass. In the present study, in order to eradicate all possible tumour satellites, a very wide local excision that included the whole original tumour-bearing area was performed regardless of the expected wide defect. This defect was then immediately reconstructed by an ipsilateral pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap. The study included 26 patients with LABC without evidence of primary tumour-multicentricity. Tumours were downstaged following NACT. The early cosmetic outcome was good in the majority of cases. Early complications were minimal. Twenty-two patients had a mean follow up period of 30.2 (range 7-50) months. In those evaluable cases, locoregional control of the disease was excellent (100%) but distant metastases occurred in seven cases (31.8%). PMID:14965588

  20. Current medical treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lumachi, Franco; Santeufemia, Davide A; Basso, Stefano MM

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers (BC) are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and thus endocrine therapy (ET) should be considered complementary to surgery in the majority of patients. The advantages of oophorectomy, adrenalectomy and hypophysectomy in women with advanced BC have been demonstrated many years ago, and currently ET consist of (1) ovarian function suppression (OFS), usually obtained using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa); (2) selective estrogen receptor modulators or down-regulators (SERMs or SERDs); and (3) aromatase inhibitors (AIs), or a combination of two or more drugs. For patients aged less than 50 years and ER+ BC, there is no conclusive evidence that the combination of OFS and SERMs (i.e., tamoxifen) or chemotherapy is superior to OFS alone. Tamoxifen users exhibit a reduced risk of BC, both invasive and in situ, especially during the first 5 years of therapy, and extending the treatment to 10 years further reduced the risk of recurrences. SERDs (i.e., fulvestrant) are especially useful in the neoadjuvant treatment of advanced BC, alone or in combination with either cytotoxic agents or AIs. There are two types of AIs: type I are permanent steroidal inhibitors of aromatase, while type II are reversible nonsteroidal inhibitors. Several studies demonstrated the superiority of the third-generation AIs (i.e., anastrozole and letrozole) compared with tamoxifen, and adjuvant therapy with AIs reduces the recurrence risk especially in patients with advanced BC. Unfortunately, some cancers are or became ET-resistant, and thus other drugs have been suggested in combination with SERMs or AIs, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (palbociclib) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus. Further studies are required to confirm their real usefulness. PMID:26322178

  1. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field. PMID:27312135

  2. The expanding role of pertuzumab in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Horno, I; Cortés, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer tumors that demonstrate gene amplification or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are classified as HER2-positive. They account for approximately 15% of all breast cancers and represent an adverse prognostic factor. Over the past years, many new therapies have become available for the treatment of breast cancer. Particularly, the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer has developed with the arrival of anti-HER2 targeted therapies that have been proven to increase survival in both the metastatic and early-stage settings of the disease. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting HER2, significantly improves survival in HER2-positive breast cancer. Nevertheless, it is still a challenge to evolve anti-HER2 therapies, as the disease may progress. Pertuzumab inhibits HER2 by binding to a different HER2 epitope than trastuzumab and represents a complementary mechanism of action to trastuzumab. The efficacy and safety of pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab with or without chemotherapy have been demonstrated in both advanced and early stages of HER2-positive breast cancer. Herein, we review the available data on the use of pertuzumab for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26056489

  3. Reduction of Breast Density Following Tamoxifen Treatment Evaluated by 3-D MRI: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chang, Daniel; Wang, Yi-Ting; Nie, Ke; Chang, Ruey-Feng; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Su, Min-Ying

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the change of breast density in women receiving tamoxifen treatment using 3-D MRI. Sixteen women were studied. Each woman received breast MRI before and after tamoxifen. The breast and the fibroglandular tissue were segmented using a computer-assisted algorithm, based on T1-weighted images. The fibroglandular tissue volume (FV) and breast volume (BV) were measured and the ratio was calculated as the percent breast density (%BD). The changes in breast volume (ΔBV), fibroglandular tissue volume (ΔFV), and percent density (Δ%BD) between two MRI studies were analyzed and correlated with treatment duration and baseline breast density. The ΔFV showed a reduction in all 16 women. The Δ%BD showed a mean reduction of 5.8%. The reduction of FV was significantly correlated with baseline FV (P<0.001) and treatment duration (P=0.03). The percentage change in FV was correlated with duration (P=0.049). The reduction in %BD was positively correlated with baseline %BD (p=0.02). Women with higher baseline %BD showed more reduction of %BD. 3D MRI may be useful for the measurement of the small changes of ΔFV and Δ%BD after tamoxifen. These changes can potentially be used to correlate with the future reduction of cancer risk. PMID:20832226

  4. Is Ki-67 Expression Prognostic for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)?

    SciTech Connect

    Hafeez, Farhaan; Neboori, Hanmanth J.; Harigopal, Malini; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yang, Qifeng; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein whose expression is strongly up-regulated in proliferating cells and can be used to determine the growth fraction in clonal cell populations. Although there are some data to suggest that Ki-67 overexpression may be prognostic for endpoints such as survival or postmastectomy recurrence, further elucidation of its prognostic significance is warranted. Specifically after breast conservation therapy (BCT) (defined in this setting as breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy), whether Ki-67 predicts for locoregional recurrence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess Ki-67 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients to determine whether a significant independent association between Ki-67 and locoregional relapse exists. Methods and Materials: Ki-67 staining was conducted on a tissue microarray of 438 patients previously treated with BCT, and expression was analyzed with clinicopathologic features and outcomes from our database. Results: Ki-67 expression was more prevalent in black patients (37% of black patients vs 17% of white patients, P<.01), younger patients (27% of patients aged ≤50 years vs 15% of patients aged >50 years, P<.01), estrogen receptor (ER)–negative tumors (25% of ER-negative tumors vs 17% of ER-positive tumors, P=.04), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu–positive tumors (35% of HER2-positive tumors vs 18% of HER2-negative tumors, P=.01), and larger tumors (26% of T2 tumors vs 16% of T1 tumors, P=.03). On univariate/multivariate analysis, Ki-67 did not predict for overall survival (74.4% vs 72.6%), cause-specific survival (82.9% vs 82.1%), local relapse-free survival (83.6% vs 88.5%), distant metastasis-free survival (76.1% vs 81.4%), recurrence-free survival (65.5% vs 74.6%), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (81.6% vs 84.7%): P>.05 for all. Conclusions: Ki-67 appears to be a surrogate marker for aggressive disease and

  5. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  6. Time to diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer: results from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, 1991-1995.

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, L S; May, D S; Richardson, L C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined times to diagnosis and treatment for medically underserved women screened for breast cancer. METHODS: Intervals from first positive screening test to diagnosis to initiation of treatment were determined for 1659 women 40 years and older diagnosed with breast cancer. RESULTS: Women with abnormal mammograms had shorter diagnostic intervals than women with abnormal clinical breast examinations and normal mammograms. Women with self-reported breast symptoms had shorter diagnostic intervals than asymptomatic women. Diagnostic intervals were less than 60 days in 78% of cases. Treatment intervals were generally 2 weeks or less. CONCLUSIONS: Most women diagnosed with breast cancer were followed up in a timely manner after screening. Further investigation is needed to identify and then address factors associated with longer diagnostic and treatment intervals to maximize the benefits of early detection. PMID:10630153

  7. Concerns about Breast Cancer, Pain, and Fatigue in Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Primary Treatment.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Chelsea R; Fisher, Hannah M; Antoni, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer often endorse psychosocial concerns prior to treatment, which may influence symptom experiences. Among these, low perceived social support relates to elevated fatigue. Those with low social support perceptions may also experience a greater sense of rejection. We sought to determine if social rejection concerns post-surgery predict fatigue interference 12 months later in women with non-metastatic breast cancer. Depressive symptoms and pain severity after completion of adjuvant therapy (six months post-surgery) were examined as potential mediators. Women (N = 240) with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited 2-10 weeks post-surgery. Multiple regression analyses examined relationships among variables adjusting for relevant covariates. Greater rejection concerns at study entry predicted greater fatigue interference 12 months later (p < 0.01). Pain severity after adjuvant therapy partially mediated the relationship between social rejection concerns and fatigue interference, with significant indirect (β = 0.06, 95% CI (0.009, 0.176)) and direct effects (β = 0.18, SE = 0.07, t(146) = 2.78, p < 0.01, 95% CI (0.053, 0.311)). Therefore, pain levels post-treatment may affect how concerns of social rejection relate to subsequent fatigue interference. Interventions targeting fears of social rejection and interpersonal skills early in treatment may reduce physical symptom burden during treatment and into survivorship. PMID:27571115

  8. [Treatment of psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and the breast feeding : Psychotherapy and other nondrug therapies].

    PubMed

    Kittel-Schneider, S; Reif, A

    2016-09-01

    The majority of women suffering from psychiatric disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding prefer psychotherapy and other nonpharmacological treatment over psychopharmacological treatment although the risk of malformations and postnatal complications in children exposed to psychopharmacological drugs must be regarded as acceptable in moderate to severely ill patients. Data are lacking, but several psychotherapeutic and biological treatments as well as noninvasive brain stimulation procedures have been investigated to treat depressive episodes and anxiety disorders in pregnancy and the breast feeding. In mild to moderate depressive episodes different psychotherapy treatments and counseling are significantly more effective in reducing depressive symptoms than no treatment.The same seems to be true for anxiety disorders; however, studies on this are sparse. Treatment by telephone and internet also seems to improve symptoms, which is of interest especially in the less flexible group of breast feeding women and for the development of future health care structures. Noninvasive stimulation treatment has been shown to be an effective nonpharmacological therapeutic option. Data for other recent noninvasive brain stimulation treatments and biological treatments as well as exercise therapy are sparse. In severe and delusional cases as well as treatment-resistant depressive episodes, electroconvulsive therapy should be considered in pregnant women. Because several patients prefer nonpharmacological therapy during this period, those should be applied if available and feasible. Regarding nonpharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia during pregnancy and the breast feeding, no recommendation can currently be given. PMID:27448177

  9. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2014-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:24771774

  10. [Axillary treatment in breast cancer: surgery, radiotherapy, or none of these?].

    PubMed

    Boersma, Liesbeth J; van der Sangen, Maurice J C

    2015-01-01

    The AMAROS trial showed that substituting axillary lymph node dissection by radiotherapy of the axillary and periclavicular nodes (ART) in patients with sentinel node (SN) metastases results in less lymphoedema, without a significant difference in the 5-year axillary recurrence rate (ARR). Three surgical studies showed no increase in ARR after omitting axillary treatment in cases of limited SN metastases, provided that adjuvant systemic therapy and tangential breast radiotherapy were applied. On the other hand, several recent radiotherapy trials, including a meta-analysis by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group, showed that regional radiotherapy improves disease-free survival where there are positive axillary nodes. In view of the low ARR and good overall survival with contemporary breast cancer treatments, limiting axillary treatment and its associated morbidity is a logical development. However, it is too early to omit axillary treatment in all SN-positive patients. ART is a safe next step in reducing axillary treatment. PMID:26488194

  11. Treatment of Breast and Prostate Cancer by Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Potential Risks and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Ray, K J; Sibson, N R; Kiltie, A E

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer and prostate cancer are the most common cancers diagnosed in women and men, respectively, in the UK, and radiotherapy is used extensively in the treatment of both. In vitro data suggest that tumours in the breast and prostate have unique properties that make a hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment schedule advantageous in terms of therapeutic index. Many clinical trials of hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment schedules have been completed to establish the extent to which hypofractionation can improve patient outcome. Here we present a concise description of hypofractionation, the mathematical description of converting between conventional and hypofractionated schedules, and the motivation for using hypofractionation in the treatment of breast and prostate cancer. Furthermore, we summarise the results of important recent hypofractionation trials and highlight the limitations of a hypofractionated treatment regimen. PMID:25752244

  12. Treatment of Breast and Prostate Cancer by Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Potential Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ray, K.J.; Sibson, N.R.; Kiltie, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer and prostate cancer are the most common cancers diagnosed in women and men, respectively, in the UK, and radiotherapy is used extensively in the treatment of both. In vitro data suggest that tumours in the breast and prostate have unique properties that make a hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment schedule advantageous in terms of therapeutic index. Many clinical trials of hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment schedules have been completed to establish the extent to which hypofractionation can improve patient outcome. Here we present a concise description of hypofractionation, the mathematical description of converting between conventional and hypofractionated schedules, and the motivation for using hypofractionation in the treatment of breast and prostate cancer. Furthermore, we summarise the results of important recent hypofractionation trials and highlight the limitations of a hypofractionated treatment regimen. PMID:25752244

  13. Systemic treatment approaches in her2-negative advanced breast cancer—guidance on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Joy, A.A.; Ghosh, M.; Fernandes, R.; Clemons, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, many patients still develop disease recurrence; others present with de novo metastatic disease. For most patients with advanced breast cancer, the primary treatment intent is noncurative—that is, palliative—in nature. The goals of treatment should therefore focus on maximizing symptom control and extending survival. Treatments should be evaluated on an individualized basis in terms of evidence, but also with full respect for the wishes of the patient in terms of acceptable toxicity. Given the availability of extensive reviews on the roles of endocrine therapy and her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)–targeted therapies for advanced disease, we focus here mainly on treatment guidelines for the non-endocrine management of her2-negative advanced breast cancer in a Canadian health care context. PMID:25848337

  14. Aromatase inhibitor treatment for breast cancer: short-term effect on bone health

    PubMed Central

    Uygun, Kazım; Binnetoğlu, Emine; Korkmaz, Ayşe Nurdan; Aşık, Mehmet; Şen, Hacer; Güneş, Fahri; Eroğlu, Mustafa; Gökmen, Ferhat; Temiz, Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study Aim of this study was to examine the effects of aromatase inhibitors (AIs), which are used in every phase of breast cancer treatment, on the bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods Menopausal female patients who were diagnosed with stages 1–3 breast cancer and who were planned for anastrazole or letrozole as adjuvant therapy were examined. After the patients’ BMD was measured, 45 patients without osteoporosis were included in the study. Six months after AI therapy started, the patients’ BMD was measured again. Results In this study, we tried to show that there was a statistical difference in the BMD of 45 patients before and 6 months after treatment. Among all measurements (femur and lumbar T-scores), the femur Z-score (p = 0.52) was the only score that was not statistically significant. Statistical significance (p < 0.01) was detected in comparative analysis of the other measurements. According to this analysis, a significant loss of BMD was seen even in the first six months after AI treatment was introduced. Conclusions Female patients with breast cancer are at higher risk for bone loss and fractures than healthy women. In this study, we showed the negative effects on BMD of aromatase inhibitor therapy, one of the main contributions to osteoporosis in women with breast cancer. This study is the first to quantify the short-term effect of AI treatment on BMD in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. PMID:26793021

  15. Nanotechnology-based treatment for chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Rachman, Ilya M.; Senn, Sean; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-08-01

    Background: Treatment of metastatic cancer remains a formidable clinical challenge. Better therapeutic options with improved tissue penetration and tumor cell uptake are urgently needed. Targeted nanotherapy, for improved delivery, and combinatory drug administration aimed at inhibiting chemo-resistance may be the solution. Purpose: The study was performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of polymeric PEG-PE micelles, co-loaded with curcumin (CUR) and doxorubicin (DOX), and targeted with anti-GLUT1 antibody (GLUT1) against MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods: MDA-MB-231 DOX-resistant cells were treated with non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted CUR and DOX micelles as a single agent or in combination. Tumor cells were also inoculated in female nude mice. Established tumors were treated with the micellar formulations at a dose of 6 mg/kg CUR and 1 mg/kg DOX every 2 d for a total of 7 injections. Results: CUR+DOX-loaded micelles decorated with GLUT1 had a robust killing effect even at low doses of DOX in vitro. At the doses chosen, non-targeted CUR and CUR+DOX micelles did not exhibit significant tumor inhibition versus control. However, GLUT1-CUR and GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles showed a significant tumor inhibition effect with an improvement in survival. Conclusion: We showed a dramatic improvement in efficacy between the non-targeted and GLUT1-targeted formulations both in vitro and in vivo. Also, importantly, the addition of CUR to the micelle, has restored sensitivity to DOX, with resultant tumor growth inhibition. Hence, we confirmed that GLUT1-CUR+DOX micelles are effective in vitro and in vivo and deserve further investigation.

  16. Current status of conservative treatment of deep carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Juliana; Soares, Giulia Marins; Ribeiro, Apoena de Aguiar

    2014-06-01

    Traditionally, deep carious lesions are treated by removal of all carious tissue, which may lead to pulp exposure. To minimize this risk, conservative carious tissue removal techniques have been proposed, including partial removal and stepwise excavation. However, there is no consensus in the literature about which is the better technique. Thus, the aim of this article is to describe and discuss the main techniques for carious tissue removal, according to scientific evidence. It was observed that both stepwise excavation and partial carious tissue removal presented lower pulp exposure rates and higher success rates. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians must be aware that conservative carious tissue removal techniques, such as stepwise excavation and partial carious tissue removal, present lower pulp exposure rates and higher success rates than traditional methods. PMID:25073228

  17. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication. PMID:26824094

  18. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  19. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  20. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  1. 7 CFR 631.7 - Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conservation treatment eligible for cost sharing. 631.7 Section 631.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS...

  2. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  3. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  4. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  5. Cryosurgery in the treatment of women with breast cancer-a review.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw; Rzaca, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Cryoablation could be an alternative to surgical excision of breast cancer. The cytotoxic potential of cryosurgery has been shown in both animal models and studies conducted on humans. There are several advantages to be gained from ablation performed at very low temperatures and these include the method's simplicity, lack of pain, low morbidity, cost-effectiveness, and potential for positive cryo-immunologic effects. This manuscript reviews data concerning the use of cryoablation in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25083502

  6. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  7. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru; Pan, I-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Teressa; Liang, Ji-An; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  8. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  9. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  10. Disparities in late stage diagnosis, treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural residence among women in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Markossian, Talar W; Hines, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the outcomes of late stage breast cancer diagnosis, receiving first course treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural/urban residence in Georgia. The authors used cross-sectional and follow-up data (1992-2007) for Atlanta and Rural Georgia cancer registries that are part of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (N = 23,500 incident breast cancer cases in non-Hispanic whites or non-Hispanic African Americans). Multilevel modeling and Cox proportional hazard models revealed that compared to whites, African American women had significantly increased odds of late stage diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, p = 0.0001) and unknown tumor stage (OR = 1.27, p = 0.0001), decreased odds of receiving radiation (OR = 0.93, p = 0.041) or surgery (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0001), and increased risk of death following breast cancer diagnosis (hazard rate ratio [HR] = 1.50, p = 0.0001). Increased age was significantly associated with the odds of late/unknown stage at diagnosis, worse treatment, and survival. Women residing in rural areas had significantly decreased odds of receiving radiation and surgery with radiation (OR = 0.59, p = 0.0001), and for receiving breast-conserving surgery compared to mastectomy (OR = 0.73, p = 0.005). Factors affecting each level of the breast cancer continuum are distinct and should be examined separately. Efforts are needed to alleviate disparities in breast cancer outcomes in hard-to-reach populations. PMID:22591230

  11. Considerations arising from requests from patients for a bilateral mastectomy who are eligible for breast-conserving surgery: Factors weighing for and against performing the operation

    PubMed Central

    FANCELLU, ALESSANDRO

    2016-01-01

    Rates of mastectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) are increasing in patients with unilateral breast cancer who would be candidates for receiving breast-conserving surgery, according to recent studies. One reason for this finding is the entitlement of patients to choose to undergo a bilateral mastectomy as a surgery option. The present case report details the case of a 52-year-old woman, eligible for breast conservation, who had no high risk of developing a contralateral breast cancer, but who asked for a bilateral mastectomy and immediate reconstruction instead of breast-conserving surgery. The request for a bilateral mastectomy was declined on the basis that it would be unnecessary for the patient, and an excessive intervention; the patient subsequently obtained an independent second opinion, and she underwent a bilateral mastectomy with implant reconstruction prior to receiving wound care and follow-up at our institution. At follow-up 1 year later, the patient complained of sensations of general discomfort, sexual difficulties and a loss of sensation in the nipples. On the basis of the clinical outcomes of the bilateral mastectomy and the patient's experience of the operation, the present case study highlights a need for surgeons to clearly inform patients presenting with unilateral breast cancer about the attendant risks and real benefits of bilateral mastectomy, in order to reach a mutual decision in terms of health care that is not fuelled by anxiety or an overestimation of the risk of developing secondary cancer. Bilateral mastectomy should be attentively evaluated as an option only in patients with a higher-than-average risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. PMID:27347213

  12. Delay of Treatment Initiation Does Not Adversely Affect Survival Outcome in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Eunshin; Kim, Jongjin; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies examining the relationship between time to treatment and survival outcome in breast cancer have shown inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to analyze the overall impact of delay of treatment initiation on patient survival and to determine whether certain subgroups require more prompt initiation of treatment. Materials and Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of stage I-III patients who were treated in a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2008. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to evaluate the impact of interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation in breast cancer and various subgroups. Results A total of 1,702 patients were included. Factors associated with longer delay of treatment initiation were diagnosis at another hospital, medical comorbidities, and procedures performed before admission for surgery. An interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation as a continuous variable or with a cutoff value of 15, 30, 45, and 60 days had no impact on disease-free survival (DFS). Subgroup analyses for hormone-responsiveness, triple-negative breast cancer, young age, clinical stage, and type of initial treatment showed no significant association between longer delay of treatment initiation and DFS. Conclusion Our results show that an interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation of 60 days or shorter does not appear to adversely affect DFS in breast cancer. PMID:26511801

  13. A conservative treatment approach using direct composite resins for anterior teeth eroded by lemon sucking.

    PubMed

    Passos, Vanara Florencio; de Souza, Andre Mattos Brito; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Bombonatti, Juliana Campos Fraga Soares; Santiago, Sergio Lima

    2013-08-01

    An excessively acidic diet results in the progressive deterioration of dental health, with functional, esthetic, and biological consequences. Previously, rehabilitation required placing numerous full crowns and root canal treatments; however, with improved adhesive techniques, a more conservative approach may be utilized to preserve tooth structure. This article describes 2 cases that utilized conservative dental treatments (involving direct composite resins with minimal preparation of the tooth structure) to treat eroded dentition induced by lemon sucking. PMID:23928446

  14. Combined Use of Metformin and Everolimus Is Synergistic in the Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunshan; Wei, Junmin; Li, Li; Fan, Cong; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and leads to decreased protein synthesis and decreased cancer cell proliferation in many experimental systems. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as metformin have similar actions in keeping with the TSC2/1 pathway linking activation of AMPK to inhibition of mTOR. Histopathological and biochemical studies of breast cancer show frequent dysregulation of the AMPK and the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and metformin in the treatment of breast cancer cells. This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of everolimus alone or in combination with metformin on breast cancer cells. MTT assay was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of the drugs on breast cancer cells in vitro. SCID mice injected with HCC1428 cells followed by different treatments were used to assess the in vivo efficacy of different agents. Data showed that the combination of everolimus and metformin exerted synergistic inhibitory effects on the growth of breast cancer cells both in culture and in a mouse xenograft model. Further, this combination abrogated S6 and 4EBP1phosphorylation. Collectively, we suggest that the combination of everolimus and metformin may be an effective regimen for treatment of breast cancer, hence warranting further evaluation of the combination in the clinic. PMID:26351208

  15. Lymphedema following breast cancer treatment and impact on quality of life: a review.

    PubMed

    Taghian, Nadine R; Miller, Cynthia L; Jammallo, Lauren S; O'Toole, Jean; Skolny, Melissa N

    2014-12-01

    Lymphedema resulting from breast cancer treatment is a chronic condition which can significantly compromise quality of life. We sought to review various aspects of breast-cancer related lymphedema including measurement techniques, definitions, risk factors, and specifically, impact on physical, psychological, and emotional well-being of women treated for breast cancer. For the purpose of this review, we performed a literature search using PubMed for articles on lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment published since 1997. While improvements in breast cancer therapy have contributed to a decrease in the incidence of lymphedema, the overall negative impact the condition has on patients and survivors has remained unchanged. The development of lymphedema results in physical impairments including compromised function, diminished strength, fatigue, and pain in the affected arm. Affected women may have decreased self-confidence resulting from a distorted body image. Negative emotions reported by women with lymphedema include anxiety, frustration, sadness, anger, fear, and increased self-consciousness. Lymphedema secondary to breast cancer treatment remains a significant quality of life issue, with known consequences related to a woman's physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. PMID:25085806

  16. Novel and Highly Compressed Schedules for the Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Atif J; Ahlawat, Stuti; Goyal, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Our thinking about radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last several years. Increasingly patients and physicians together are making the decision to use altered fractionation rather than standard 6-7 weeks of conventional whole breast treatment plus lumpectomy bed boost. Adjuvant hypofractionated whole breast irradiation is now viewed as a preferred strategy for many eligible women, and can be completed in 3-4 weeks. Adjuvant accelerated partial breast irradiation is another alternative that is typically delivered in 8-10 fractions over 4-5 days. With improvements in delivery techniques, there has been renewed interest in shortening treatment times even further, with novel intraoperative approaches and ultrashort courses of external beam RT. This article provides a summary of the status and future directions in intraoperative and ultrashort course RT schedules used in the treatment of breast cancer. Outlined are the benefits as well as the drawbacks of these techniques for abbreviated breast RT. PMID:26617209

  17. [Neoadjuvant treatment in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinhua; Liu, Shiwei; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Ling; Li, Ting; Duan, Xuening

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among females worldwide. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer represents a subtype with aggressive behavior, poor response to treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Anti-HER2-based neoadjuvant treatment has improved clinical outcomes of patients with HER2-positive disease. Pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant treatment indicates a favorable prognosis. With the development of HER2-targeted therapy and neoadjuvant treatment, numerous studies focus on the predictive factors of pCR or therapeutic resistance of anti-HER2 therapy. Identification of novel predictive factors in HER2-positive breast cancer, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, will be helpful for clinical decision. PMID:26850663

  18. Clinical Factors Associated With Seroma Volume Reduction in Breast-Conserving Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tzu-I J.; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Minkema, Danny; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Mourik, Anke M. van; Cassee, Jorien; Hurkmans, Coen; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To correlate clinical factors with seroma volume and reduction; and to determine whether cone-beam CT (CBCT) could be used clinically to monitor seroma reduction. Patients and Methods: This investigation included 102 women from five institutions with stage T1-2 breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Two CT scans were acquired: the planning CT (CT1) and a second CT (CT2) during radiotherapy (RT). Seroma was contoured on all scans, and correlations between seroma characteristics and clinical factors were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. In a substudy, 10 of the 102 patients received multiple CBCT scans during RT. Seroma were contoured by two observers in the substudy. Fifteen time points at which CT and CBCT were performed within 2 days were identified. The levels of correlation in seroma contours between CBCT and CT and between the two observers were examined. Results: The mean relative seroma reduction from CT1 to CT2 was 54% (p < 0.001). A significant inverse relationship was found between relative seroma reduction per week and number of RT fractions given by univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.01, 0.03). The mean difference in contoured seroma volumes between CT and CBCT was 12% (3.3 cm{sup 3}). When assessing the relative difference in seroma contours between Observer 1 and Observer 2, an interobserver difference of 12% was demonstrated. Neither discrepancy was clinically significant. Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to hinder seroma reduction. Volume discrepancies between CBCT and CT were minor, with low interobserver variation, indicating that CBCT might be useful in monitoring seroma reduction.

  19. Impact of Radiation in Critical Organs in Radiotherapy Treatment of Breast and Lung Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-02-01

    Various 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques are commonly used in the treatment of cancerous tumors at appropriate prescription doses (PDs). The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of radiation in heart and lungs in left breast and left lung cancer patients treated using 3DCRT techniques. Treatment plans for the eight breast cancer patients (n=8), eight lung cancer patients at early stage (m=8), and eight lung cancer patients at stage II and III (k=8) were evaluated. Relative complication probabilities (RCPs) for the irradiated organs were computed from the plans using HART [Med. Phys. 36, p.2547 (2009)] program at PD. The RCPs were found to be (i) 2.3% (n=8, PD=56 Gy), 6.4% (m=8, PD=30.7 Gy), and 16.7% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the heart, (ii) 1% (n=6, PD=58.4 Gy) for the left lung, and (iii) 7% (m=6, PD=31 Gy) and 5.3% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the whole lung. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages in the treatment of breast cancer. Therefore, simple 3DCRT based whole-breast irradiation and partial lung treatment techniques can offer promising results while adequately sparing the organs in the treatment of breast and lung cancers. )

  20. Treatment of brain metastases from HER-2-positive breast cancer: current status and new concepts.

    PubMed

    Bartolotti, Marco; Franceschi, Enrico; Brandes, Alba A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common source of brain metastases (BM). The incidence of BM in breast cancer patients has increased over the past decade, especially among patients with HER-2-positive breast cancer. This is probably due to how aggressive the HER-2-positive disease is but also to the prolongation of survival obtained with current treatments, which allow good control of extracranial disease but are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. At present, whole-brain radiotherapy, surgery and radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy represent the cornerstone of treatment for BM, while the role of pharmacological therapy remains uncertain. Lapatinib demonstrated activity against BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer in small Phase II and retrospective studies, mainly in combination with capecitabine, and cases of dramatic responses to such treatment are present in literature. In this review we focus on the available clinical data regarding the treatment of BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer and on new concepts about the treatment and evaluation of the CNS response. PMID:24156325

  1. A conservative treatment of zonal boundaries for Euler equation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Finite-difference calculations require the generation of a grid for the region of interest. A zonal approach, wherein the given region is subdivided into zones and the grid for each zone is generated independently, makes the grid-generation process for complicated topologies and for regions requiring selective grid refinement a fairly simple task. This approach results in new boundaries within the given region, that is, zonal boundaries at the interfaces of the various zones. The zonal-boundary scheme (the integration scheme used to update the points on the zonal boundary) for the Euler equations must be conservative, accurate, stable, and applicable to general curvilinear coordinate systems. A zonal-boundary scheme with these desirable properties is developed in this study. The scheme is designed for explicit, first-order-accurate integration schemes but can be modified to accommodate second-order-accurate explicit and implicit integration schemes. Results for inviscid flow, including supersonic flow over a cylinder, blast-wave diffraction by a ramp, and one-dimensional shock-tube flow are obtained on zonal grids. The conservative nature of the zonal-boundary scheme permits the smooth transition of the discontinuities associated with these flows from one zone to another. The calculations also demonstrate the continuity of contour lines across zonal boundaries that can be achieved with the present zonal scheme.

  2. A Conservation Treatment of Zonal Boundaries for Euler Equation Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    1986-01-01

    Finite-difference calculations require the generation of a grid for the region of interest. A zonal approach, wherein the given region is subdivided into zones and the grid for each zone is generated independently, makes the grid-generation process for complicated topologies and for regions requiring selective grid refinement a fairly simple task. This approach results in new boundaries within the given region, that is, zonal boundaries at the interfaces of the various zones. The zonal-boundary scheme (the integration scheme used to update the points on the zonal boundary) for the Euler equations must be conservative, accurate, stable, and applicable to general curvilinear coordinate systems. A zonal-boundary scheme with these desirable properties is developed in this study. The scheme is designed for explicit, first-order-accurate integration schemes but can be modified to accommodate second-order-accurate explicit and implicit integration schemes. Results for inviscid flow, including supersonic flow over a cylinder, blast-wave diffraction by a ramp, and one-dimensional shock-tube flow are obtained on zonal grids. The conservative nature of the zonal-boundary scheme permits the smooth transition of the discontinuities associated with these flows from one zone to another. The calculations also demonstrate the continuity of contour lines across zonal boundaries that can be achieved with the present zonal scheme.

  3. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  4. New developments in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nahta, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 20%–30% of metastatic breast cancers show increased expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) tyrosine kinase. Two HER2-specific therapies are currently approved for clinical treatment of patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer. Trastuzumab is a monoclonal antibody against HER2 and is approved for first-line treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Lapatinib is a small molecule dual inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and HER2 tyrosine kinases, and is approved for trastuzumab-refractory disease. Although trastuzumab is a highly effective therapy for patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, a significant number of patients in the initial clinical trials of trastuzumab monotherapy showed resistance to trastuzumab-based therapy. Further, among those who did respond, the initial trials indicated that the median time to progression was less than 1 year. Similarly, lapatinib is effective in a subset of trastuzumab-refractory cases, but the majority of patients display resistance. This review discusses the multiple molecular mechanisms of resistance that have been proposed in the literature. In addition, novel agents that are being tested for efficacy against HER2-positive breast cancer, including the antibodies pertuzumab and trastuzumab-DM1 and the immunotoxin affitoxin, are reviewed. The introduction of trastuzumab has revolutionized the clinical care of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and has resulted in dramatic reductions in recurrences of early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer. The development and implementation of gene- and protein-based assays that measure potential molecular predictors of trastuzumab resistance will allow individualization of HER2-targeted therapeutic approaches, and may ultimately improve treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23869176

  5. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  6. [Results of conservative treatment for regressive vesicoureteral reflux in childhood].

    PubMed

    Popadiuk, S; Korzon, M; Plata, K

    1995-09-01

    The study involved 112 children with 169 confirmed vesicoureteric reflux grades I, II, III. During anti-bacterial treatment which lasted at last two years, spontaneous regression occurred in 82% of the vesicoureteral reflux. Renal scars were observed in 8% of the cases. Initially urinary tract infection was diagnosed in 84% of the children. This figure was reduced to 8% after anti-bacterial treatment. 54% of the observed children had associated diseases (anaemia, chronic enteropathy, bronchitis and pneumonia). The results confirmed the efficiency of anti-bacterial treatment in children with vesicoureteral reflux grades I, II, III. PMID:8650025

  7. Targeting MCM2 function as a novel strategy for the treatment of highly malignant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shinya; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kurata, Morito; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Highly malignant tumors express high levels of the minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) protein, which is associated with advanced tumor grade, advanced stage, and poor prognosis. In a previous study, we showed that Friend leukemia virus (FLV) envelope protein gp70 bound MCM2, impaired its nuclear translocation, and enhanced DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in FLV-infected hematopoietic cells when the cells expressed high levels of MCM2. Here, we show that MCM2 is highly expressed in clinical samples of invasive carcinoma of the breast, especially triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and in cancer stem cell (CSC) marker-positive breast cancer cells. To generate a cancer therapy model using gp70, we introduced the gp70 protein into the cytoplasm of murine breast cancer cells that express high levels of MCM2 by conjugating the protein transduction domain (PTD) of Hph-1 to gp70 (Hph- 1-gp70). Hph-1-gp70 was successfully transduced into the cytoplasm of breast cancer cells. The transduced protein enhanced the DNA damage-induced apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, an MCM2-targeted strategy using Hph-1-gp70 treatment to induce DNA damage might be a successful therapy for highly malignant breast cancers such as TNBC and for the eradication of CSC-like cells from breast cancer tissue. PMID:26430873

  8. Dosimetric effects of air pocket sizes in MammoSite treatment as accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Jessica; Blough, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    MammoSite Brachytherapy System had been used as one of the Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) techniques since 2002. The clinical results from several clinical institutions had shown comparable treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity, to other APBI techniques. During MammoSite treatment, air cavities had been one of the primary issues causing treatment cancellation or delay. With the tolerance of the air volume less than 10% of the total Planning Target Volume (PTV) been set, there is still no data available to show the actual dose delivered to the breast tissue with the existence of the air pocket. In this paper, Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP5) was used to model a hypothesis MammoSite phantom with different sizes of air pockets, and compared to the calculation results from the treatment planning system (TPS) without heterogeneous corrections. It was found that without heterogeneous corrections, the difference between the TPS and MCNP5 calculations in the air cavity surface doses and PTV point doses can be up to 2.02% and 3.61%, respectively, with the balloon and air pocket size combinations calculated in this paper. Based on the distance from the point of interest to the balloon surface, an approximate dose can be calculated using the linear relationship found in this study. These equations provide a quick and simple way to predict the actual dose delivered to the breast soft tissue located within the PTV. With the equation applied to the dose from the TPS, the dose error caused by the air pocket during MammoSite treatment can be reduced to the minimum. PMID:20160678

  9. [Galvanic current in the conservative treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, A V; Iftodiĭ, A G; Stoliar, V F

    1990-10-01

    Experiments were conducted on 42 adult dogs with a model of acute pancreatitis to study the degree of antibiotic storage in the pancreatic tissue in different variants of intralesional+ electrophoresis. Optimum concentration of the antibiotic was produced in transverse galvanization of the zone of the pancreas. Clinical observations over 63 patients with various forms of acute pancreatitis bear evidence that the method raises the efficacy of nonoperative treatment in the oedematous stage of the process and reduces the duration of treatment. PMID:2283730

  10. On the Conservative Interface Treatment for Multi-Block Viscous Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Shyy, W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure-based multi-block computational method is developed for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear grid systems. The scheme is based on the semi-implicit type flow solver with the staggered grid. Issues concerning the mass and momentum flux treatments at the discontinuous grid interface are addressed. Systematic numerical experiments for different interface treatments involving (1) straightforward interpolation, (2) globally conservative scheme, and (3) locally conservative scheme have been conducted. It is demonstrated that mass conservation has to be maintained locally, at the grid interface, with accuracy compatible with that of the scheme used in interior domain. Direct interpolation or globally conservative interface treatment of mass flux can not yield solutions with desirable accuracy.

  11. Promising oncolytic agents for metastatic breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cody, James J; Hurst, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    New therapies for metastatic breast cancer patients are urgently needed. The long-term survival rates remain unacceptably low for patients with recurrent disease or disseminated metastases. In addition, existing therapies often cause a variety of debilitating side effects that severely impact quality of life. Oncolytic viruses constitute a developing therapeutic modality in which interest continues to build due to their ability to spare normal tissue while selectively destroying tumor cells. A number of different viruses have been used to develop oncolytic agents for breast cancer, including herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, reovirus, and others. In general, clinical trials for several cancers have demonstrated excellent safety records and evidence of efficacy. However, the impressive tumor responses often observed in preclinical studies have yet to be realized in the clinic. In order for the promise of oncolytic virotherapy to be fully realized for breast cancer patients, effectiveness must be demonstrated in metastatic disease. This review provides a summary of oncolytic virotherapy strategies being developed to target metastatic breast cancer.

  12. Antiangiogenic mechanisms and factors in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Gill, Jessica M.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is known to metastasize in its latter stages of existence. The different angiogenic mechanisms and factors that allow for its progression are reviewed in this article. Understanding these mechanisms and factors will allow researchers to design drugs to inhibit angiogenic behaviors and control the rate of tumor growth. PMID:27013929

  13. Effect of 3 postmortem electrical stimulation treatments on the quality of early deboned broiler breast meat.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H; Savage, E M; Lawrence, K

    2010-08-01

    The present experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) immediately prescalding (PS), ES immediately postdefeathering (PD), or PS combined with PD (PSPD) on the quality of early deboned (2 h) broiler breast muscles, pectoralis major (fillets), and pectoralis minor (tenders). No stimulation, early-deboned (2 h), and 24-h deboned (24 h) fillets were used for the comparison. The 42-d-old broiler carcasses were electrically stimulated with pulsed current at 200 V for 30 s over a 90-s time interval (total of 1 min over 180 s for PSPD), and breast meat was deboned 2 h postmortem. Quality indicators evaluated were CIE L*, a*, and b* color and pH of the raw fillets and cook yields and Warner-Bratzler (WB) shear force of the fillets and tenders. There were no differences in raw fillet color, pH, and cook yields of both the fillets and tenders between the 3 ES treatments. Effects of different ES treatments on meat WB shear force values varied with breast muscles. For the fillets, the average WB shear force values of both the PS and PSPD samples, which were not different from each other, were significantly lower than those of the PD samples. For the tenders, there were no differences in the average shear force values between the 3 ES treatments. Regardless of ES treatment and breast muscle, early deboned broiler breast meat from ES carcasses required significantly less force to shear than the 2-h control. These results indicate that ES can tenderize early deboned poultry breast muscles; however, the effectiveness of ES tenderization varies with ES treatments for the fillets. The PS treatment is more effective in reducing fillet shear values than PD, and there is no further reduction in shear values with PSPD compared with the PS treatment. PMID:20634531

  14. Rationale and pre-clinical efficacy of a novel anti-EMP2 antibody for the treatment of invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maoyong; Maresh, Erin L.; Helguera, Gustavo F.; Kiyohara, Meagan; Qin, Yu; Ashki, Negin; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Aziz, Najib; Gordon, Lynn K.; Braun, Jonathan; Elshimali, Yahya; Soslow, Robert A.; Penichet, Manuel L.; Goodglick, Lee; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in biology and medicine, the incidence and mortality due to breast cancer world-wide is still unacceptably high. Thus, there is an urgent need to discover new molecular targets. In this paper, we show evidence for a novel target in human breast cancer, the tetraspan protein epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2). Using tissue tumor arrays, protein expression of EMP2 was measured and found to be minimal in normal mammary tissue, but it was upregulated in 63% of invasive breast cancer tumors and in 73% of triple negative tumors tested. To test the hypothesis that EMP2 may be a suitable target for therapy, we constructed a fully human IgG1 antibody specific for a conserved domain of human and murine EMP2. Treatment of breast cancer cells with the anti-EMP2 IgG1 significantly inhibited EMP2 mediated signaling, blocked FAK/Src signaling, inhibited invasion, and promoted apoptosis in vitro. In both human xenograft and syngeneic metastatic tumor monotherapy models, anti-EMP2 IgG1 retarded tumor growth without detectable systemic toxicity. This anti-tumor effect was in part attributable to a potent ADCC response as well as direct cytotoxicity induced by the monoclonal antibody. Together, these results identify EMP2 as a novel therapeutic target for invasive breast cancer. PMID:24448822

  15. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. PMID:26686064

  16. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy. PMID:21356563

  17. Breast Cancer: Conventional Diagnosis and Treatment Modalities and Recent Patents and Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Nounou, Mohamed I.; ElAmrawy, Fatema; Ahmed, Nada; Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Goda, Satyanarayana; Syed-Sha-Qhattal, Hussaini

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide. However, increased survival is due to the dramatic advances in the screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments. Over the course of the last decade, many acquisitions have taken place in this critical field of research in the pharmaceutical industry. Advances in molecular biology and pharmacology aided in better understanding of breast cancer, enabling the design of smarter therapeutics able to target cancer and respond to its microenvironment efficiently. Patents and research papers investigating diagnosis and treatment strategies for breast cancer using novel technologies have been surveyed for the past 15 years. Various nanocarriers have been introduced to improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs, including liposomes, polymeric micelles, quantum dots, nanoparticles, and dendrimers. This review provides an overview of breast cancer, conventional therapy, novel technologies in the management of breast cancer, and rational approaches for targeting breast cancer. HIGHLIGHTS Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. However, survival rates vary widely, optimistically heading toward a positive trend. Increased survival is due to the drastic shift in the screening methods, early diagnosis, and breakthroughs in treatments. Different strategies of breast cancer classification and staging have evolved over the years. Intrinsic (molecular) subtyping is essential in clinical trials and well understanding of the disease. Many novel technologies are being developed to detect distant metastases and recurrent disease as well as to assess response to breast cancer management. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take novel breast cancer therapeutics to potential clinical application. Most of the recent research papers and patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the breast tumor

  18. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  19. A role for the androgen receptor in the treatment of male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Davis, Carter T; Silberman, Sandra; Spector, Neil; Zhang, Tian

    2016-02-01

    Male breast cancer (BC) is relatively rare, making up less than 1% of all breast cancer cases in the United States. Treatment guidelines for male BC are derived from studies on the treatment of female BC, and are based molecular and clinical characteristics, such as hormone receptor positivity. For female estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers, the standard of care includes three classes of endocrine therapies: selective estrogen receptor modulators, aromatase inhibitors, and pure anti-estrogens. In contrast to female ER+ breast cancers, there is less known about the optimal treatment for male ER+ BC. Furthermore, in contrast to ER, less is known about the role of the androgen receptor (AR) in male and female BC. We report here the treatment of a 28-year-old man with metastatic AR+, ER+ breast cancer otherwise refractory to chemotherapy, who has had a durable clinical response to hormonal suppression with the combination of aromatase inhibition (Letrozole) in conjunction with a GnRH agonist (Leuprolide). PMID:26669267

  20. Multiparametric and Multimodality Functional Radiological Imaging for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Early Treatment Response Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Stearns, Vered; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; El Khouli, Riham; Bluemke, David A.; Wahl, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among US women, and the chance of a woman developing breast cancer sometime during her lifetime is one in eight. Early detection and diagnosis to allow appropriate locoregional and systemic treatment are key to improve the odds of surviving its diagnosis. Emerging data also suggest that different breast cancer subtypes (phenotypes) may respond differently to available adjuvant therapies. There is a growing understanding that not all patients benefit equally from systemic therapies, and therapeutic approaches are being increasingly personalized based on predictive biomarkers of clinical benefit. Optimal use of established and novel radiological imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, which have different biophysical mechanisms can simultaneously identify key functional parameters. These methods provide unique multiparametric radiological signatures of breast cancer, that will improve the accuracy of early diagnosis, help select appropriate therapies for early stage disease, and allow early assessment of therapeutic benefit. PMID:26063885

  1. Clinical application of high-throughput genomic technologies for treatment selection in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale collaborative initiatives using next-generation DNA sequencing and other high-throughput technologies have begun to characterize the genomic landscape of breast cancer. These landmark studies have identified infrequent driver mutations that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention with approved or investigational drug treatments, among other important discoveries. Recently, many institutions have launched molecular screening programs that apply high-throughput genomic technologies to patients with advanced solid malignancies, including breast cancer, to inform clinical decision-making. This article provides an overview of the recent molecular insights in breast cancer, including potentially actionable somatic alterations, the technological platforms currently available in a clinical diagnostics setting to detect these alterations, and ongoing institutional or regional molecular screening programs in advanced breast cancer. PMID:24135425

  2. Conservative Treatment Is Sufficient for Acute Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability With Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Kap Jung; Cha, Yong Han; Choy, Won Sik

    2016-09-01

    Treatments for acute distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability with distal radius fracture vary from conservative to operative treatment, although it seems to be no consensus regarding which treatment is optimal. This prospective randomized study was designed to compare the clinical outcomes for operative and conservative treatment of acute DRUJ instability with distal radius fracture, according to the presence or absence and type of ulnar styloid process fracture and the degree of its displacement. Between July 2008 and February 2013, we enrolled 157 patients who exhibited an unstable DRUJ during intraoperative manual stress testing (via the ballottement test) after fixation of the distal radius. Patients were classified according to the type of the ulnar styloid process fracture, using preoperative wrist radiography, and each group was divided into subgroups, according to their treatment method. We then compared the clinical outcomes between the conservative and operative treatments, using their range of motion; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; modified Mayo wrist score; and grip strength. At 3 months after surgery, among patients without ulnar styloid process fracture, the flexion-extension range was 79 ± 15° after supination sugar-tong splinting (group A-1), 91 ± 14° after DRUJ transfixation (group A-2), and 89 ± 10° after arthroscopic triangular fibrocartilage complex repair (group A-3); the operative treatments provided greater joint motion ranges than conservative treatment. The groups with ulnar styloid process fractures at the tip (group B) or base (group C) also exhibited better clinical outcomes after the operative treatments, compared with after the conservative treatment. However, at the final follow-up, groups A-1, A-2, and A-3 exhibited similar flexion-extension ranges (122 ± 25°, 119° ± 18°, and 120° ± 16°, respectively) and modified Mayo wrist scores (87 ± 7, 89 ± 8, and 85 ± 9). Thus, the conservative and

  3. Nonisocentric Treatment Strategy for Breast Radiation Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang Xing, Lei; Horst, Kathleen C.; Bush, Karl

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To propose a nonisocentric treatment strategy as a special form of station parameter optimized radiation therapy, to improve sparing of critical structures while preserving target coverage in breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: To minimize the volume of exposed lung and heart in breast irradiation, we propose a novel nonisocentric treatment scheme by strategically placing nonconverging beams with multiple isocenters. As its name suggests, the central axes of these beams do not intersect at a single isocenter as in conventional breast treatment planning. Rather, the isocenter locations and beam directions are carefully selected, in that each beam is only responsible for a certain subvolume of the target, so as to minimize the volume of irradiated normal tissue. When put together, the beams will provide an adequate coverage of the target and expose only a minimal amount of normal tissue to radiation. We apply the nonisocentric planning technique to 2 previously treated clinical cases (breast and chest wall). Results: The proposed nonisocentric technique substantially improved sparing of the ipsilateral lung. Compared with conventional isocentric plans using 2 tangential beams, the mean lung dose was reduced by 38% and 50% using the proposed technique, and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving ≥20 Gy was reduced by a factor of approximately 2 and 3 for the breast and chest wall cases, respectively. The improvement in lung sparing is even greater compared with volumetric modulated arc therapy. Conclusions: A nonisocentric implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy has been proposed for breast radiation therapy. The new treatment scheme overcomes the limitations of existing approaches and affords a useful tool for conformal breast radiation therapy, especially in cases with extreme chest wall curvature.

  4. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population. PMID:25479913

  5. Cardiovascular surveillance in breast cancer treatment: A more individualized approach is needed.

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; Ottevanger, Nelleke; Atsma, Femke; Cramer, Maarten J; Leiner, Tim; Poortmans, Philip

    2016-07-01

    Newly developed treatment strategies for breast cancer have reduced mortality rates over the past decades. Patients with breast cancer represent a heterogeneous population. Differences in the severity of the disease require diverse treatment options. Women have distinct individual risk patterns for cardiovascular disease that may affect their susceptibility to cardiotoxicity during therapy. While breast cancer treatment is targeted more on tumor and patient characteristics, a tailored individual approach with early and late cardiosurveillance is not yet implemented in routine care. Newly available cardiac imaging techniques are better suited to the early detection of cardiotoxicity and should be used more often in those patients at highest risk, as the early intervention afforded will improve their quality of life and prognosis. PMID:27180161

  6. Sorafenib and nilotinib resensitize tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells to tamoxifen treatment via estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Astrid M; Thrane, Susan; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Yde, Christina W

    2014-11-01

    Tamoxifen‑resistant breast cancer is a major clinical problem and new treatment strategies are highly warranted. In this study, the multitargeting kinase inhibitors sorafenib and nilotinib were investigated as potential new treatment options for tamoxifen‑resistant breast cancer. The two compounds inhibited cell growth, reduced expression of total estrogen receptor α (ER), Ser118-phosphorylated ER, FOXA1 and AIB1 and resensitized tamoxifen‑resistant cells to tamoxifen. The ER downmodulator fulvestrant exerted strong growth inhibition of tamoxifen‑resistant cells and addition of sorafenib and nilotinib could not further suppress growth, showing that sorafenib and nilotinib exerted growth inhibition via ER. In support of this, estradiol prevented sorafenib and nilotinib mediated growth inhibition. These results demonstrate that sorafenib and nilotinib act via ER and ER-associated proteins, indicating that these kinase inhibitors in combination with tamoxifen may be potential new treatments for tamoxifen‑resistant breast cancer. PMID:25175082

  7. Breast density measurements using ultrasound tomography for patients undergoing tamoxifen treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Boyd, Norman; Gierach, Gretchen

    2013-03-01

    Women with high breast density have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Women treated with the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer experience a 50% reduction in risk of contralateral breast cancer and overall reduction of similar magnitude has been identified among high-risk women receiving the drug for prevention. Tamoxifen has been shown to reduce mammographic density, and in the IBIS-1 chemoprevention trial, risk reduction and decline in density were significantly associated. Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an imaging modality that can create tomographic sound speed images of the breast. These sound speed images are useful because breast density is proportional to sound speed. The aim of this work is to examine the relationship between USTmeasured breast density and the use of tamoxifen. So far, preliminary results for a small number of patients have been observed and are promising. Correlations between the UST-measured density and mammographic density are strong and positive, while relationships between UST density with some patient specific risk factors behave as expected. Initial results of UST examinations of tamoxifen treated patients show that approximately 45% of the patients have a decrease in density in the contralateral breast after only several months of treatment. The true effect of tamoxifen on UST-measured density cannot yet be fully determined until more data are collected. However, these promising results suggest that UST can be used to reliably assess quantitative changes in breast density over short intervals and therefore suggest that UST may enable rapid assessment of density changes associated with therapeutic and preventative interventions.

  8. Arrowhead approach for malignancies in the lower hemisphere of the breast

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Breast conservation treatment (BCT) is the preferred modality of treatment for early breast cancer. However, a moderate proportion of women will develop deformity and those with tumours in the lower hemisphere of the breast pose a particular challenge. Here, a technique is described which allows acceptable cosmetic outcome in women with small or medium-sized breasts without the use of therapeutic mammoplasty or volume replacement with flaps. PMID:26855913

  9. Arrowhead approach for malignancies in the lower hemisphere of the breast.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mona Poh-Choo

    2016-02-01

    Breast conservation treatment (BCT) is the preferred modality of treatment for early breast cancer. However, a moderate proportion of women will develop deformity and those with tumours in the lower hemisphere of the breast pose a particular challenge. Here, a technique is described which allows acceptable cosmetic outcome in women with small or medium-sized breasts without the use of therapeutic mammoplasty or volume replacement with flaps. PMID:26855913

  10. Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Proliferation Managed by Conservative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natália Galvão; Oliveira, Denise Tostes; Rodrigues, Moacyr Tadeu Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma is a distinguishable entity of ameloblastomas, characterized by slow growth and being relatively locally aggressive. Three histological types are recognized according to the degree of ameloblastomatous epithelial extension, namely, luminal, intraluminal, and mural types. This classification has a direct bearing on their biological behavior, treatment, and prognosis. However, there is difficulty in determining the most appropriate form of treatment for unicystic ameloblastoma. We present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma that occurred in the right posterior mandible of 19-year-old girl, which was enucleated and did not recur after 12-month follow-up. PMID:27610259

  11. Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Proliferation Managed by Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma is a distinguishable entity of ameloblastomas, characterized by slow growth and being relatively locally aggressive. Three histological types are recognized according to the degree of ameloblastomatous epithelial extension, namely, luminal, intraluminal, and mural types. This classification has a direct bearing on their biological behavior, treatment, and prognosis. However, there is difficulty in determining the most appropriate form of treatment for unicystic ameloblastoma. We present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma that occurred in the right posterior mandible of 19-year-old girl, which was enucleated and did not recur after 12-month follow-up. PMID:27610259

  12. Sorafenib in breast cancer treatment: A systematic review and overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zafrakas, Menelaos; Papasozomenou, Panayiota; Emmanouilides, Christos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the current role of sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor in the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS An extensive search of the literature until March 2016 was carried out in Medline and clinicaltrials.gov, by using the search terms “sorafenib” and “breast cancer”. Papers found were checked for further relevant publications. Overall, 21 relevant studies were found, 18 in advanced breast cancer (16 in stage IV and two in stages III-IV) and three in early breast cancer. RESULTS Among studies in advanced breast cancer, there were two trials with sorafenib as monotherapy, four trials of sorafenib in combination with taxanes, two in combination with capecitabine, one with gemcitabine and/or capecitabine, one with vinorelbine, one with bevacizumab, one with pemetrexed and one with ixabepilone, three trials of sorafenib in combination with endocrine therapy and two trials in women with brain metastases undergoing whole brain radiotherapy. In addition, there was one trial of sorafenib added to standard chemotherapy in the adjuvant setting, and two trials in the neoadjuvant setting. In general, sorafenib was well tolerated in breast cancer patients, though its dosage had to be adjusted in some trials, and discontinuation rates were high, particularly for the combination of sorafenib with anastrozole. Sorafenib monotherapy and combinations with taxanes, bevacizumab and ixabepilone showed inadequate efficacy, while efficacy results from combinations with gemcitabine and/or capecitabine and possibly tamoxifen were more promising. CONCLUSION At present, sorafenib should not be used for the treatment of breast cancer outside of clinical trials and more clinical data are needed in order to support its standard use in breast cancer therapy. PMID:27579253

  13. Window Treatment Phase I and Other Energy II Conservation Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Philip E.

    Six different energy-saving treatments for large window areas were tested by Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TCCC) to coordinate energy saving with building design. The TCCC building has an open space design with 33,000 square feet of external glass and other features causing heating problems and high energy costs. Phase I of the…

  14. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I found something when I did my breast self-exam. What should I do now? How often should I have mammograms? I have breast cancer. What are my treatment options? How often should I do breast self-exams? I have breast cancer. Is my daughter ...

  16. Conservative orthodontic treatment of mandibular bilateral condyle fracture.

    PubMed

    Gašpar, Goran; Brakus, Ivan; Kovačić, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is rare in children younger than the age of 5 years (range 0.6%-1.2%), and they can require different clinical treatment strategies compared with fractures in the adult population because of concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A 5-year-old girl with a history of falling from a bicycle 7 hours earlier was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Multislice computed tomographic examination demonstrated a bilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle neck associated with minimal fracture of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla. The multislice computed tomographic scan also demonstrated dislocation on the right condyle neck and, on the left side, a medial inclination of approximately 45 degrees associated with greenstick fracture of the right parasymphysis region. In this particular case, orthodontic rubber elastics in combination with fixed orthodontic brackets provided good results in the treatment of bilateral condyle neck fractures associated with greenstick fracture of parasymphysis. PMID:25098573

  17. Iatrogenic dissection of the descending aorta: Conservative or endovascular treatment?

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Argiriou, Michalis; Kratimenos, Theodoros; Karameri, Vasiliki; Dedeilias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is without any doubt a standard technique and the treatment of choice of severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in very high-operative risk patients. However, a number of complications may occur and has been described. Improper valve position, valve migration, paravalvular regurgitation, conduction disturbances, stroke and aortic dissection have been succeeded despite the perfection of the technique. For anyone of the complications above described, a solution may be invented. We present an interesting case of an 81-year-old woman with severe AVS treated through TAVI due to very high operative risk. This female, 12 days later presented with thoracic pain and shortness of breath and through the computed tomography of the chest performed was diagnosed a dissection of the descending aorta. She successfully underwent on thoracic endovascular aortic repair. In this report, we refer the bibliographic data and we discuss the treatment options in these cases. PMID:27397470

  18. Cardiovascular Late Effects and Exercise Treatment in Breast Cancer: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jessica M; Adams, Scott C; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Jones, Lee W

    2016-07-01

    Advances in detection and supportive care strategies have led to improvements in cancer-specific and overall survival after a diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. These improvements, however, are associated with an increase in competing forms of morbidity and mortality, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD). Indeed, in certain subpopulations of patients, CVD is the leading cause of mortality after early breast cancer, and these women also have an increased risk of CVD-specific morbidity, including an elevated incidence of coronary artery disease and heart failure compared with their sex- and age-matched counterparts. Exercise treatment is established as the cornerstone of primary and secondary prevention of CVD in multiple clinical populations. The potential benefits of exercise treatment to modulate CVD or CVD risk factors before, immediately after, or in the months/years after adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer have received limited attention. We discuss the risk and extent of CVD in patients with breast cancer, review the pathogenesis of CVD, and highlight existing evidence from select clinical trials investigating the efficacy of structured exercise treatment across the CVD continuum in early breast cancer. PMID:27343744

  19. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  20. CE: Late and Long-Term Sequelae of Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Megan; Keenan, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    : More than 12% of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives, and 78% of them can be expected to survive for at least 15 years. More than 2.8 million breast cancer survivors currently reside in the United States. After breast cancer treatment, as many as 90% of survivors report physical problems that can reduce functional ability, produce or exacerbate emotional problems, negatively affect body image, and diminish quality of life. Many survivors will seek care for late and long-term effects of treatment, which will not necessarily be recognized as such by health care providers and appropriately treated. In this article, the authors discuss the underlying causes of late and long-term sequelae of breast cancer treatment and describe effective assessment and management strategies. They focus specifically on the most common and potentially debilitating upper body effects of breast cancer surgery and external radiation therapy: lymphedema, axillary web syndrome, postmastectomy pain syndrome, rotator cuff syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, arthralgias, cervical radiculopathy, and brachial plexopathy. PMID:27171589

  1. [Sarmiento's method of conservative treatment of leg fractures].

    PubMed

    Dewijze, M; Pe, M; Tondeur, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors present a prospective series of 32 fractures of the tibia, treated by Sarmiento's technique. Consolidation of the fracture has been obtained in 3 to 4 months. Five open tibia fractures healed in 4 months. Functional recovery is complete in 90% of the cases. Two failures needed late surgical treatment (one centro-medullary nailing and one plate-fixation). These fractures are studied in detail. PMID:3984632

  2. Positive anterior margins in breast conserving surgery: Does it matter? A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ang, Su C; Tapia, Grace; Davidson, Emily J; Kahramangil, Bora; Mak, Cindy; Carmalt, Hugh; Warrier, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Positive margins are associated with an increased risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR); therefore re-excision of positive margins is recommended. Involvement of anatomically non-breast margins, such as anterior margins, has been associated to a lower risk of IBTR than radial margins. Although many surgeons do not re-excise positive anterior margins (PAM); there is no consensus regarding this approach. The objective of this study is to find evidence that assesses this practice. A systemic literature review was performed through six databases from January 1995 to July 2014. Studies that discussed anatomical location of involved margins in BCS were included. Six studies were identified evaluating PAM. One study reported a 2.5% rate of IBTR in patients with non-negative margins treated with radiotherapy (of which 23% had a PAM). Another study showed 4% of residual disease after re-excision of PAM, but did not report IBTR rates. A later observational study reported that 87.5% of positive anterior and posterior margins were re-excised. One survey from America and one from the UK showed that 47% and 71% of surgeons would not re-excise PAM, respectively. A later survey in the UK reported that 43.8% of surgeons would not re-excise PAM in DCIS, whilst 29.2% would not for invasive carcinoma. Common surgical practices to not re-excise PAM contradict current guidelines that recommend obtaining negative margins to reduce the risk of IBTR. However, there is little evidence detailing the relationship between PAM and IBTR rates. Low residual disease after re-excision of PAM supports the limited benefit of re-excise this margin; however further studies are required to evaluate this topic. PMID:27060552

  3. Conservative treatment for thoroughbred racehorses with intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, S Z; Dixon, P M

    2005-09-17

    Race records were obtained for 31 thoroughbred racehorses that were treated conservatively (rest, improvement of fitness and/or use of a tongue tie) for dorsal displacement of the soft palate, and for 62 matched control horses. Their racing performance, based on prize money won, was compared for three races run before and after the disorder was diagnosed. Nineteen (61 per cent) of the conservatively treated horses had higher earnings after conservative treatment than before treatment, compared with 27 (43.5 per cent) of the controls. There was a significant (P=0.049) increase in the earnings of the horses treated conservatively, but there was no significant difference in the earnings of the control group. PMID:16170000

  4. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  5. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  6. Cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy following conservative surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren . E-mail: wsuh@lroc.harvard.edu; Hillner, Bruce E.; Pierce, Lori J.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and materials: A Markov model was constructed for a theoretical cohort of 55-year-old women with DCIS over a life-time horizon. Probability estimates for local noninvasive (N-INV), local invasive (INV), and distant recurrences were obtained from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-17. Utilities for eight nonmetastatic health states were collected from both healthy women and DCIS patients. Direct medical (2002 Medicare fee schedule) and nonmedical costs (time and transportation) of RT were ascertained. Results: For BCS + RT vs. BCS alone, the estimated N-INV and INV rates at 12 years were 9% and 8% vs. 16% and 18%, respectively. The incremental cost of adding RT was $3300 despite an initial RT cost of $8700 due to higher local recurrence-related salvage costs incurred with the BCS alone strategy. An increase of 0.09 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) primarily reflected the lower risk of INV with RT, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $36,700/QALY. Sensitivity analyses revealed the ICER to be affected by baseline probability of a local recurrence, relative efficacy of RT in preventing INV, negative impact of an INV on quality of life, and cost of initial RT. Cost of salvage BCS + RT and source of utilities (healthy women vs. DCIS patients) influenced the ICER albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions: Addition of RT following BCS for patients with DCIS should not be withheld because of concerns regarding its cost-effectiveness.

  7. The role of taxanes in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Capri, G; Tarenzi, E; Fulfaro, F; Gianni, L

    1996-02-01

    The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel are undergoing extensive evaluation in women with breast cancer in the United States and in Europe. Their dose-limiting toxicity is neutropenia. Paclitaxel also causes peripheral neuropathy, while docetaxel can cause unpredictable and severe skin toxicity, as well as edema and effusions due to a capillary leak syndrome. Due to threshold pharmacodynamics and nonlinear pharmacokinetics, tolerability of paclitaxel is schedule dependent. Single-agent paclitaxel was very active in multiple phase II trials in patients with different numbers and types of prior chemotherapy and disease extent (20% to 60% complete plus partial responses). Effective doses ranged from 135 to 250 mg/m2. Activity was observed with all infusion schedules (1, 3, and 24 hours) and in women with anthracycline-resistant tumors (25% to 38%). The use of a 96-hour infusion schedule was very active in anthracycline-refractory patients (48%) and in women who failed short infusion taxanes. The drug is undergoing extensive evaluation in combination with doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and antimetabolites. Very promising efficacy was observed for paclitaxel by 3-hour infusion plus bolus doxorubicin (approximately 40% complete responses and 50% partial responses). The combination also caused a high incidence of clinically reversible congestive heart failure(14% to 18%). Docetaxel also has very good efficacy in breast cancer, with approximately 70% major responses in untreated patients and more than 50% in anthracycline-resistant tumors. There is no evidence that efficacy and tolerability are schedule dependent as is the case for paclitaxel. At recommended doses (100 or 75 mg/m2 by 1-hour infusion every 3 weeks), docetaxel causes a fluid retention syndrome that may affect quality of life. Its common onset after multiple cycles may limit the use of docetaxel for palliation in metastatic breast cancer. These results clearly indicate that the taxanes will become a

  8. The use of microdebrider for the treatment of accessory axillary breast.

    PubMed

    Jeremy, Sun Mingfa; Jack, Chong Si; Vincent, Yeow Kok Leng; Evan, Woo Kok Yen

    2012-11-01

    Accessory axillary breast tissue can be fairly common occurring in 2-6% of women. Treatment modalities thus far include direct excision as well as liposuction. While direct excision allows for accessible and adequate tissue resection, it results in long unsightly scars and the creation of significant amount of dead space. This may be complicated by seroma and haematoma formation. Liposuction is not without its drawbacks either. It is often very difficult to remove fibro-glandular breast tissue resulting in inadequate excision, thus leaving behind a visible core of breast tissue. This has led some surgeons to use a combination of direct excision and liposuction to manage accessory axillary breast tissue. Hence, we present the use of the microdebrider for sharp and precise excision of accessory axillary breast tissue. This day procedure can be performed through a single 5-mm incision which is well hidden in the axillary skin folds while allowing the operator the amount of control needed to accurately remove fibro-glandular breast tissue and restore an aesthetically pleasing contour to the axilla. PMID:22735506

  9. A three-field monoisocentric inverse breast treatment planning technique without half-beam blocking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiezhi; Dilworth, Joshua T; Marina, Ovidiu; Chen, Peter; Benedetti, Lisa; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a three-field monoisocentric inverse treatment planning method without half-beam blocks for breast cancer radiation treatments. Three-field monoisocentric breast treatment planning with half-beam blocks limits the tangential field length to 20 cm. A dual-isocenter approach accommodates patients with larger breasts, but prolongs treatment time and may introduce dose uncertainty at the matching plane due to daily setup variations. We developed a novel monoisocentric, three-field treatment planning method without half-beam blocking. The new beam-matching method utilizes the full field size with a single isocenter. Furthermore, an open/IMRT hybrid inverse optimization method was employed to improve dose uniformity and coverage. Geometric beam matching was achieved by rotating the couch, collimator, and gantry together. Formulae for three-field geometric matching were derived and implemented in Pinnacle scripts. This monoisocentric technique can be used for patients with larger breast size. The new method has no constraints on the length of tangential fields. Compared with the dual-isocenter method, it can significantly reduce patient setup time anduncertainties. PMID:26699305

  10. What non-prescription treatments do UK women with breast cancer use?

    PubMed

    Catt, S; Fallowfield, L; Langridge, C

    2006-07-01

    Understanding the self-prescribing behaviours of patients as well as their attitudes towards prescribed medication regimens is essential if healthcare professionals are to support treatment adherence and avoid unwanted pharmacological interactions and compromises in treatment efficacy. Evidence shows that women with breast cancer are particularly likely to use complementary and alternative therapies. This paper describes the reported treatment profile of a sample of 208 women with breast cancer in the UK. The information was gathered as part of a study exploring the preferences for injection or tablets in the administration of breast cancer treatment. Almost two-thirds of the sample were currently taking prescribed breast cancer treatment, mostly a single hormone therapy. Prescribed medications for co-morbid diseases were also common, and 53% of the women were self-medicating mainly with supplements, principally vitamins, various oils and minerals. In line with other studies, higher levels of education, socio-economic status and internal locus of control were associated with non-prescription use as well as a body mass index <30. PMID:16882125

  11. Antihormonal treatment associated musculoskeletal pain in women with breast cancer in the adjuvant setting

    PubMed Central

    Seber, Selcuk; Solmaz, Dilek; Yetisyigit, Tarkan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antihormonal treatment is an effective therapy in the adjuvant setting. However, musculoskeletal pain is a common adverse effect encountered in patients receiving this treatment. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for the development of antihormonal treatment-associated musculoskeletal pain (AHAMP) and its impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey of 78 consecutive breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment for early-stage breast cancer in an academic medical oncology clinic was conducted. AHAMP was assessed by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQOL was assessed by self-administered short form 36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast subscale surveys. Results AHAMP was found to be present in 37 (47.7%) patients. In multivariate regression analysis, having a normal body mass index (<30 kg/m2), cigarette smoking, and low serum vitamin D level (20 ng/mL) were found to be independent risk factors. In HRQOL assessment, physical and mental scores were found to be significantly lower in patients with joint arthralgia. Conclusion AHAMP has an adverse effect on the quality of life of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant antihormonal treatment, and assessment of predictive factors is important for identification of patient groups at risk of developing this condition. PMID:27563249

  12. Effectiveness of conservative treatments for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Arianne P.; Ostelo, Raymond W. J. G.; van Os, Ton A. G.; Peul, Wilco C.; Koes, Bart W.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome are mostly treated conservatively first. The effect of the conservative treatments remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of conservative treatments of the lumbosacral radicular syndrome (sciatica). Relevant electronic databases and the reference lists of articles up to May 2004 were searched. Randomised clinical trials of all types of conservative treatments for patients with the lumbosacral radicular syndrome selected by two reviewers. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality and the clinical relevance. Because the trials were considered heterogeneous we decided not to perform a meta-analysis but to summarise the results using the rating system of levels of evidence. Thirty trials were included that evaluated injections, traction, physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation, medication, and acupuncture as treatment for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome. Because several trials indicated no evidence of an effect it is not recommended to use corticosteroid injections and traction as treatment option. Whether clinicians should prescribe physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation or medication could not be concluded from this review. At present there is no evidence that one type of treatment is clearly superior to others, including no treatment, for patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome. PMID:17415595

  13. Laser immunotherapy for the treatment of human breast cancer: one-year follow up results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; Adalsteinsson, Orn; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Li, Xiaosong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the breast cancer patient tolerance and the toxicity of Laser immunotherapy (LIT), the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Ten stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options. No toxicity or significant adverse reactions were observed and the treatment was well tolerated by all patients. Almost all the treated patients have had positive responses: A majority of patients experienced large-scale reduction of primary breast tumors, and all the stage IV patients experienced either complete or significant reductions in distant metastases in the lungs, liver, bone, and the brain, indicating a strong systemic effect of the treatment. We also report two cases of triple negative breast cancer patients that showed limited or no response to LIT.

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Part of Multimodal Treatment in a Bulky Leptomeningeal Recurrence of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Eric C; Shaughnessy, Joseph N

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastatic to the brain and/or leptomeningeal spread of disease is a frequently encountered clinical situation, especially given the extended course of disease in these patients. Systemic therapies can often effectively prolong extracranial disease control, making effective strategies to control central nervous system-based disease even more critical. We present a case of bulky leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer in the setting of prior whole brain radiation therapy. In order to treat the patient’s bulky disease and leptomeningeal spread while avoiding the potential toxicities of repeat whole brain radiation, the patient was treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and intrathecal chemotherapy. This is the first report of this treatment approach for leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer. The patient had an excellent response to treatment and durable intracranial control. PMID:27081584

  15. [Systemic treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer: cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Thomas; Le Rhun, Emilie; Labidi-Gally, Intidar; Heudel, Pierre; Gilabert, Marine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of brain metastases is increasing in breast cancer. Brain metastases represent a poor-prognosis disease for which local treatments continue to play a major role. In spite of the presence of a physiological blood-brain barrier limiting their activity, some systemic treatments may display a significant antitumor activity at the central nervous system level. In HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with brain metastases not previously treated with whole brain radiotherapy, capecitabine and lapatinib combination obtains a volumetric reponse in two thirds of patients (LANDSCAPE study). If confirmed, these results could modify in selected patients the layout of therapeutic strategies. Promoting novel targeted approaches and innovative therapeutic combinations is a critical need to improve survival of breast cancer patients with brain metastases. PMID:23305997

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Part of Multimodal Treatment in a Bulky Leptomeningeal Recurrence of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertke, Matthew H; Burton, Eric C; Shaughnessy, Joseph N

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastatic to the brain and/or leptomeningeal spread of disease is a frequently encountered clinical situation, especially given the extended course of disease in these patients. Systemic therapies can often effectively prolong extracranial disease control, making effective strategies to control central nervous system-based disease even more critical. We present a case of bulky leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer in the setting of prior whole brain radiation therapy. In order to treat the patient's bulky disease and leptomeningeal spread while avoiding the potential toxicities of repeat whole brain radiation, the patient was treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery and intrathecal chemotherapy. This is the first report of this treatment approach for leptomeningeal relapse of breast cancer. The patient had an excellent response to treatment and durable intracranial control. PMID:27081584

  17. Learning from social media: utilizing advanced data extraction techniques to understand barriers to breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rachel A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Vaz-Luis, Ines; Keating, Nancy L

    2016-07-01

    Past examinations of breast cancer treatment barriers have typically included registry, claims-based, and smaller survey studies. We examined treatment barriers using a novel, comprehensive, social media analysis of online, candid discussions about breast cancer. Using an innovative toolset to search postings on social networks, message boards, patient communities, and topical sites, we performed a large-scale qualitative analysis. We examined the sentiments and barriers expressed about breast cancer treatments by Internet users during 1 year (2/1/14-1/31/15). We categorized posts based on thematic patterns and examined trends in discussions by race/ethnicity (white/black/Hispanic) when this information was available. We identified 1,024,041 unique posts related to breast cancer treatment. Overall, 57 % of posts expressed negative sentiments. Using machine learning software, we assigned treatment barriers for 387,238 posts (38 %). Barriers included emotional (23 % of posts), preferences and spiritual/religious beliefs (21 %), physical (18 %), resource (15 %), healthcare perceptions (9 %), treatment processes/duration (7 %), and relationships (7 %). Black and Hispanic (vs. white) users more frequently reported barriers related to healthcare perceptions, beliefs, and pre-diagnosis/diagnosis organizational challenges and fewer emotional barriers. Using a novel analysis of diverse social media users, we observed numerous breast cancer treatment barriers that differed by race/ethnicity. Social media is a powerful tool, allowing use of real-world data for qualitative research, capitalizing on the rich discussions occurring spontaneously online. Future research should focus on how to further employ and learn from this type of social intelligence research across all medical disciplines. PMID:27339067

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  19. Case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in kidney allograft: Conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tienza, Antonio; Hevia, Mateo; Merino, Imanol; Velis, Jose Maria; Algarra, Ruben; Pascual, Juan Ignacio; Zudaire, Juan Javier; Robles, Jose Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute necrotizing infection with gas in the kidney and perinephric space that carries a bad prognosis. Apart from its predisposing clinical entities, diabetes mellitus and immune-incompetence are quite common in patients with this infection. We report a case of a 53-year-old kidney transplant recipient diabetic male, suffering from recurrent fever, abdominal pain and nausea episodes. Immediate broad-spectrum antibiotics were administered and percutaneous drainage was performed after the diagnosis. The bacteria involved were Stahpylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. After 4 weeks of antibiotic treatment and abscesses drainage, the case was resolved. Consecutives urine cultures and ultrasonographies confirm the complete resolution of the disease. We discuss the predisposing factors, clinical presentation and management. PMID:24839494

  20. Conservative Treatment of a Gossypiboma Causing Uterine Wound Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Taner A.; Ozyurek, Sefik E.; Gundogdu, Elif C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case with gossypiboma following cesarean section which led to uterine wound dehiscence. A 30-year-old woman had been submitted to an emergency cesarean section 4 months previously at another hospital. Clinical and ultrasound findings revealed a large intra-abdominal mass and diffuse peritonitis. At laparotomy, a gossypiboma causing an abscess and uterine wound dehiscence with necrosis of the margins was detected. We performed repetitive wound debridements under broad-spectrum antibiotic cover and eventually resutured the incision. Although hysterectomy has so far been the choice of treatment in the literature once a uterine wound dehiscence had occurred, it was possible in this case to preserve the uterus. PMID:24106624

  1. [Personal experiences with conservative treatment of central retinal degeneration].

    PubMed

    Pojda, S M; Bandych-Biniszkiewiczowa, D

    1992-01-01

    21 patients (40 eyes) aged 27-84 years (15 women and 6 men) were treated orally with cavinton 3 x 5 mg, sadamine++ 3 X 75 mg, cinnarizine++ 3 X 40 mg, vit. A+E 3 X 1 caps. daily. Intramuscularly++ were given vit. B1 25 mg, vit. B12 1000 micrograms, geriocaine++ 100 mg, and not in all sadamine++ 300 mg daily. Improvement of visual acuity for distance was observed in 31 eyes (77.5%) and for near vision in 17 eyes (42.5%). Within 34 eyes with visual field abnormalities in 9 the central or pericentral scotomas were observed. After medical treatment the central scotomas were diminished in 6 eyes (66.6%) and the enlargement of peripheral visual border from 10 to 30 degree in 10 eyes (40%) were observed. PMID:1635363

  2. Conservation Strategies in the Genus Hypericum via Cryogenic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bruňáková, Katarína; Čellárová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Hypericum, cryoconservation offers a strategy for maintenance of remarkable biodiversity, emerging from large inter- and intra-specific variability in morphological and phytochemical characteristics. Long-term cryostorage thus represents a proper tool for preservation of genetic resources of endangered and threatened Hypericum species or new somaclonal variants with unique properties. Many representatives of the genus are known as producers of pharmacologically important polyketides, namely naphthodianthrones and phloroglucinols. As a part of numerous in vitro collections, the nearly cosmopolitan Hypericum perforatum – Saint John’s wort – has become a suitable model system for application of biotechnological approaches providing an attractive alternative to the traditional methods for secondary metabolite production. The necessary requirements for efficient cryopreservation include a high survival rate along with an unchanged biochemical profile of plants regenerated from cryopreserved cells. Understanding of the processes which are critical for recovery of H. perforatum cells after the cryogenic treatment enables establishment of cryopreservation protocols applicable to a broad number of Hypericum species. Among them, several endemic taxa attract a particular attention due to their unique characteristics or yet unrevealed spectrum of bioactive compounds. In this review, recent advances in the conventional two-step and vitrification-based cryopreservation techniques are presented in relation to the recovery rate and biosynthetic capacity of Hypericum spp. The pre-cryogenic treatments which were identified to be crucial for successful post-cryogenic recovery are discussed. Being a part of genetic predisposition, the freezing tolerance as a necessary precondition for successful post-cryogenic recovery is pointed out. Additionally, a beneficial influence of cold stress on modulating naphthodianthrone biosynthesis is outlined. PMID:27200032

  3. Conservation Strategies in the Genus Hypericum via Cryogenic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bruňáková, Katarína; Čellárová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Hypericum, cryoconservation offers a strategy for maintenance of remarkable biodiversity, emerging from large inter- and intra-specific variability in morphological and phytochemical characteristics. Long-term cryostorage thus represents a proper tool for preservation of genetic resources of endangered and threatened Hypericum species or new somaclonal variants with unique properties. Many representatives of the genus are known as producers of pharmacologically important polyketides, namely naphthodianthrones and phloroglucinols. As a part of numerous in vitro collections, the nearly cosmopolitan Hypericum perforatum - Saint John's wort - has become a suitable model system for application of biotechnological approaches providing an attractive alternative to the traditional methods for secondary metabolite production. The necessary requirements for efficient cryopreservation include a high survival rate along with an unchanged biochemical profile of plants regenerated from cryopreserved cells. Understanding of the processes which are critical for recovery of H. perforatum cells after the cryogenic treatment enables establishment of cryopreservation protocols applicable to a broad number of Hypericum species. Among them, several endemic taxa attract a particular attention due to their unique characteristics or yet unrevealed spectrum of bioactive compounds. In this review, recent advances in the conventional two-step and vitrification-based cryopreservation techniques are presented in relation to the recovery rate and biosynthetic capacity of Hypericum spp. The pre-cryogenic treatments which were identified to be crucial for successful post-cryogenic recovery are discussed. Being a part of genetic predisposition, the freezing tolerance as a necessary precondition for successful post-cryogenic recovery is pointed out. Additionally, a beneficial influence of cold stress on modulating naphthodianthrone biosynthesis is outlined. PMID:27200032

  4. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast

  5. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant

  6. Evaluation of superficial dosimetry between treatment planning system and measurement for several breast cancer treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Das, Indra J.; Bartlett, Gregory K.; Zhang Hualin; Thompson, Elizabeth; Zook, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric accuracy in radiation treatment of breast cancer is critical for the evaluation of cosmetic outcomes and survival. It is often considered that treatment planning systems (TPS) may not be able to provide accurate dosimetry in the buildup region. This was investigated in various treatment techniques such as tangential wedges, field-in-field (FF), electronic compensator (eComp), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Under Institutional Review Board (IRB) exemption, radiotherapy treatment plans of 111 cases were retrospectively analyzed. The distance between skin surface and 95% isodose line was measured. For measurements, Gafchromic EBT2 films were used on a humanoid unsliced phantom. Multiple layers of variable thickness of superflab bolus were placed on the breast phantom and CT scanned for planning. Treatment plans were generated using four techniques with two different grid sizes (1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm{sup 2}) to provide optimum dose distribution. Films were placed at different depths and exposed with the selected techniques. A calibration curve for dose versus pixel values was also generated on the same day as the phantom measurement was conducted. The DICOM RT image, dose, and plan data were imported to the in-house software. On axial plane of CT slices, curves were drawn at the position where EBT2 films were placed, and the dose profiles on the lines were acquired. The calculated and measured dose profiles were separated by check points which were marked on the films before irradiation. The segments of calculated profiles were stretched to match their resolutions to that of film dosimetry. Results: On review of treatment plans, the distance between skin and 95% prescribed dose was up to 8 mm for plans of 27 patients. The film measurement revealed that the medial region of phantom surface received a mere 45%-50% of prescribed dose. For wedges, FF, and eComp techniques, region around the