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Sample records for breast therapeutic genetic

  1. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  2. Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Angela R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I

    2007-09-01

    Deleterious mutations in two breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been identified in breast and ovarian cancer families. Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are candidates for additional risk reduction measures such as intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. Additional susceptibility genes have been identified, including PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, CASP8, PBRL and BRIP1. Yet, many women with a personal or family history suggestive of a hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer undergo genetic testing and no significant genetic alteration is found. Thus, there are other susceptibility genes that have not been identified, and it is likely that the remaining familial contribution to breast cancer will be explained by the presence of multiple low penetrance alleles that coexist to confer high penetrance risks (a polygenic model). The American Cancer Society has identified cancer prevention as a key component of cancer management and there is interest in developing individualized cancer prevention focused on identifying high risk individuals who are most likely to benefit from more aggressive risk reduction measures. Breast cancer risk assessment and genetic counseling are currently provided by genetic counselors, oncology nurse specialist, geneticists, medical and surgical oncologists, gynecologists and other health care professionals, often working within a multidisciplinary clinical setting. Current methods for risk assessment and predictive genetic testing have limitations and improvements in molecular testing and risk assessment tools is necessary to maximize individual breast cancer risk assessment and to fulfill the promise of cancer prevention. PMID:17508290

  3. Bacterial Effector Nanoparticles as Breast Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herrera Estrada, Lina; Padmore, Trudy J; Champion, Julie A

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial pathogens trigger cell death by a variety of mechanisms, including injection of effector proteins. Effector proteins have great potential as anticancer agents because they efficiently subvert a variety of eukaryotic signaling pathways involved in cancer development, drug resistance, and metastasis. In breast cancer, MAPK and NFκB pathways are known to be dysregulated. YopJ, an effector from Yersinia pestis, downregulates MAPK and NFκB pathways to induce cell death in specific cell types. We expressed YopJ in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), forming self-assembled protein nanoparticles with diameters of 100 nm. YopJ-GST nanoparticles efficiently delivered protein to cells, replacing the need for the pathogen secretion mechanism for effector delivery to cells. These nanoparticles induced dose and time dependent death in SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. After 72 h, 97% of cells died, significantly more than with the same molar dose of doxorubicin. Treatment with sublethal doses of nanoparticles decreased cell migration in vitro and downregulated the MAPK ERK 1/2 pathway, which has been correlated to metastasis. Exposure to a panel of breast cancer cell lines showed that YopJ-GST nanoparticles are cytotoxic to different subtypes, including doxorubicin resistant cells. However, they were not cytotoxic to NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Thus, YopJ-GST nanoparticles demonstrate the potential of effector proteins as breast cancer therapeutics with selective cytotoxicity and the capacity to decrease metastatic predictive behaviors. PMID:26800341

  4. Innovative combination of therapeutic mammoplasty and expandable-implant breast augmentation for immediate partial breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Choo, A.M.H.; Forouhi, P.; Malata, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic mammoplasty is used in the treatment of suitably-sized and appropriately-located breast cancers to achieve adequate cancer excision, resulting in well-shaped but smaller breasts. In patients wishing to maintain or increase their breast size, simultaneous augmentation will be required. Presentation of case A 48-year-old female underwent an “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy”. She required mastectomy for a multifocal cancer of the right breast and breast conservation for a unifocal localised cancer in the upper part of the left breast. She requested right immediate breast reconstruction and hoped for larger breasts than she had. Due to complications during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the right reconstruction plan was changed from a deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap to an implant-based technique. On the left, an extended superomedial pedicle therapeutic mammoplasty was combined with a subpectoral augmentation using an expandable-implant. Discussion The use of expandable-implants for reconstruction of partial mastectomy defects in combination with therapeutic mammoplasty has not been reported. This case report shows that such “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is feasible. Conclusion A “novel” oncoplastic technique herein termed “augmentation-therapeutic mastopexy” is described for partial breast reconstruction during the treatment of a patient with bilateral breast cancer. It enabled adequate treatment of her cancer while reshaping the breast and achieving the desired larger breast size. It should be considered in selected breast-conservation patients who wish to maintain or increase their breast size. PMID:27132043

  5. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  6. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  7. Oncoplastic techniques in breast surgery for special therapeutic problems

    PubMed Central

    Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sukarayothin, Thongchai; Leesombatpaiboon, Monchai; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Kongdan, Youwanush

    2016-01-01

    Resection of large tumors can be challenging, from the view point of breast preservation. Oncoplastic techniques are a valuable component of breast surgery in patients with large breast tumors who desire breast preservation. These techniques have been shown to be oncologically safe, while maintaining acceptable breast cosmesis. For locally advanced or recurrent breast cancers, the goals of surgery include local disease control and palliation of clinical symptoms. Oncoplastic surgery is also effective and oncologically safe in these situations. The need to completely remove all foci of cancers with adequate surgical margins often requires the displacement of adjacent or distant skin and soft tissue to cover the resulting soft tissue defect. Sometimes doing so can be cosmetically pleasing as well. In this article we present three special therapeutic problems in three distinct conditions, all resolved with oncoplastic techniques: the benign breast condition, malignant breast condition, and the palliative setting. PMID:26855912

  8. Oncoplastic techniques in breast surgery for special therapeutic problems.

    PubMed

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sukarayothin, Thongchai; Leesombatpaiboon, Monchai; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Kongdan, Youwanush

    2016-02-01

    Resection of large tumors can be challenging, from the view point of breast preservation. Oncoplastic techniques are a valuable component of breast surgery in patients with large breast tumors who desire breast preservation. These techniques have been shown to be oncologically safe, while maintaining acceptable breast cosmesis. For locally advanced or recurrent breast cancers, the goals of surgery include local disease control and palliation of clinical symptoms. Oncoplastic surgery is also effective and oncologically safe in these situations. The need to completely remove all foci of cancers with adequate surgical margins often requires the displacement of adjacent or distant skin and soft tissue to cover the resulting soft tissue defect. Sometimes doing so can be cosmetically pleasing as well. In this article we present three special therapeutic problems in three distinct conditions, all resolved with oncoplastic techniques: the benign breast condition, malignant breast condition, and the palliative setting. PMID:26855912

  9. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  10. Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159053.html Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Lifestyle may matter even more ... be especially powerful for women at relatively high genetic risk of breast cancer, researchers found. "Those genetic ...

  11. Therapeutic potential of chemokine signal inhibition for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is incurable by current therapies including chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that tumor-infiltrating macrophages promote establishment of the lethal metastatic foci and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Recent studies suggest that the accumulation of these macrophages is regulated by a chemokine network established in the tumor microenvironment. In this perspective paper, we elaborate on the chemokine signals that can attract monocytes/macrophages to the site of metastasis, and discuss whether inhibition of these chemokine signals can represent a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26275794

  12. Metformin: A therapeutic opportunity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2010-01-01

    Two important, related pathways are involved in cancer growth. The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) signaling pathway, which is activated when nutrients are available, and the adenosine mono-phosphateactivated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, activated when cells are starved for carbohydrates. Metformin inhibits transcription of key gluconeogenesis genes in the liver, increases glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, and decreases circulating insulin levels. Metformin reduces levels of circulating glucose, increases insulin sensitivity, and reduces insulin resistance associated hyperinsulinemia. At the level of cell signaling, metformin activates AMPK. There are extensive pre-clinical data showing the anticancer effects of metformin in all breast cancer subtypes as well as in cytotoxic therapy-resistant models. These data, and the epidemiological and retrospective data supporting the antineoplastic effects of metformin, provide the rationale to study the role of metformin for breast cancer therapy in a variety of clinical settings. PMID:20215559

  13. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27263934

  14. Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F.; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:21090693

  15. Genetic characterization of breast cancer and implications for clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Felipe C; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A; Lambros, Maryou B; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a genetic disease caused by the accumulation of mutations in neoplastic cells. In the last few years, high-throughput microarray-based molecular analysis has provided increasingly more coherent information about the genetic aberrations in breast cancer. New biomarkers and molecular techniques are slowly becoming part of the diagnostic and prognostic armamentarium available for pathologists and oncologists to tailor the therapy for breast cancer patients. In this review, we will focus on the contribution of breast cancer somatic genetics to our understanding of breast cancer biology and its impact on breast cancer patient management. PMID:19754664

  16. Molecular subtyping of breast cancer: opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Mullan, P B; Millikan, R C

    2007-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that breast cancer is not one disease but many separate diseases. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling has demonstrated subtypes with distinct phenotypic features and clinical responses. Prominent among the new subtypes is 'basal-like' breast cancer, one of the 'intrinsic' subtypes defined by negativity for the estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptors and positivity for cytokeratins-5/6. Focusing on basal-like breast cancer, we discuss how molecular technologies provide new chemotherapy targets, optimising treatment whilst sparing patients from unnecessary toxicity. Clinical trials are needed that incorporate long-term follow-up of patients with well-characterised tumour markers. Whilst the absence of an obvious dominant oncogene driving basal-like breast cancer and the lack of specific therapeutic agents are serious stumbling blocks, this review will highlight several promising therapeutic candidates currently under evaluation. Thus, new molecular technologies should provide a fundamental foundation for better understanding breast and other cancers which may be exploited to save lives. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957336

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases as breast cancer drivers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Radisky, Evette S.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been identified as poor prognosis markers for breast cancer patients and as drivers of many facets of the tumor phenotype in experimental models. Early enthusiasm for MMPs as therapeutic targets was tempered following disappointing clinical trials that utilized broad spectrum, small molecule catalytic site inhibitors. However, subsequent research has continued to define key roles for MMPs as breast cancer promoters, to elucidate the complex roles that that these proteins play in breast cancer development and progression, and to identify how these roles are linked to specific and unique biochemical features of individual members of the MMP family. Here, we provide an overview of the structural features of the MMPs, then discuss clinical studies identifying which MMP family members are linked with breast cancer development and new experimental studies that reveal how these specific MMPs may play unique roles in the breast cancer microenvironment. We conclude with a discussion of the most promising avenues for development of therapeutic agents capable of targeting the tumor-promoting properties of MMPs. PMID:25961550

  18. Therapeutic Targeting of Casein Kinase 1δ in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Laura H.; Lafite, Marie; Quereda, Victor; Grant, Wayne; Chen, Weimin; Bibian, Mathieu; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Chang, Jenny C.; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Duckett, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific drivers of human cancer is required to instruct the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that CSNK1D is amplified and/or overexpressed in human breast tumors and that CK1δ is a vulnerability of human breast cancer subtypes overexpressing this kinase. Specifically, selective knockdown of CK1δ, or treatment with a highly selective and potent CK1δ inhibitor, triggers apoptosis of CK1δ-expressing breast tumor cells ex vivo, tumor regression in orthotopic models of triple negative breast cancer, including patient-derived xenografts, and tumor growth inhibition in HER2+ breast cancer models. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a hallmark of human tumors overexpressing CK1δ, that disabling CK1δ blocks nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and T cell factor transcriptional activity, and that constitutively active β-catenin overrides the effects of inhibition or silencing of CK1δ. Thus, CK1δ inhibition represents a promising strategy for targeted treatment in human breast cancer with Wnt/β-catenin involvement. PMID:26676609

  19. Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159053.html Healthy Living May Offset Genetic Breast Cancer Risk Lifestyle may matter even more when your ... Women who carry common gene variants linked to breast cancer can still cut their risk of the disease ...

  20. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  1. Congenital Aniridia: Clinic, Genetics, Therapeutics, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Silva, R.; Falcão-Reis, F.; Rocha-Sousa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare condition related to a deficiency in the PAX6 gene expression, which may occur as a result of a family inheritance or a sporadic occurrence. Additionally, this condition may occur as an isolated ocular phenotype or in association with a systemic syndrome. The most common abnormality is iris hypoplasia; however, a panocular disease which also affects the cornea, anterior chamber of the eye, lens, and the posterior segment with presence of optic nerve and foveal hypoplasia is also evident. The development of keratopathy, glaucoma, and cataract is frequent and its presence has implications in the patient's visual acuity. Managing aniridia is challenging since the focus is on treating the previously mentioned disorders, and the outcomes are often disappointing. In this paper, we shall review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical characteristics of patients with aniridia. We shall also make a review of the therapeutic options for the several conditions affecting this syndrome and consider the genetics and prognostic factors. PMID:27355034

  2. The Tyrosine Kinome Dictates Breast Cancer Heterogeneity and Therapeutic Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jacqueline R; Siegel, Peter M; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2016-09-01

    Phospho-tyrosine signaling networks control numerous biological processes including cellular differentiation, cell growth and survival, motility, and invasion. Aberrant regulation of the tyrosine kinome is a hallmark of malignancy and influences all stages of breast cancer progression, from initiation to the development of metastatic disease. The success of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors strongly validates the clinical relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation networks in breast cancer pathology. However, a significant degree of redundancy exists within the tyrosine kinome. Numerous receptor and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases converge on a core set of signaling regulators, including adaptor proteins and tyrosine phosphatases, to amplify pro-tumorigenic signal transduction pathways. Mutational activation, amplification, or overexpression of one or more components of the tyrosine kinome represents key contributing events responsible for the tumor heterogeneity that is observed in breast cancers. It is this molecular heterogeneity that has become the most significant barrier to durable clinical responses due to the development of therapeutic resistance. This review focuses on recent literature that supports a prominent role for specific components of the tyrosine kinome in the emergence of unique breast cancer subtypes and in shaping breast cancer plasticity, sensitivity to targeted therapies, and the eventual emergence of acquired resistance. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1971-1990, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392311

  3. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  4. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements. PMID:25261721

  5. Sarcoma of bone following therapeutic irradiation for breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, M.A.; Rodger, A.; Langlands, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    Four patients with sarcoma arising in bone following therapeutic irradiation for breast carcinoma are presented, along with a review of the 40 patients who have been previously reported in the literature. The majority of these lesions arose in the scapula and the most frequently reported histology is osteosarcoma. The incidence of these lesions has been reported as 0.05% to 0.23% in three previous series. The average latent period between irradiation and the diagnosis of the sarcoma is 10.9 years with a range of 4.5-24 years. The average survival following diagnosis in this series was 2.4 months, which is comparable to other series. However, one patient treated by forequarter amputation and another treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy survived 4 and 3 years, respectively.

  6. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Shashni, Babita; Sharma, Karun; Dhillon, Sarinder K.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar R.; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2013-01-01

    PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23431283

  7. NCI launches largest-ever study of breast cancer genetics in black women

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Genetic Study in African-Ancestry Populations initiative is a collaborative research project that will identify genetic factors that may underlie breast cancer disparities. It is the largest study ever to investigate how genetic and biol

  8. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  9. IRAK1 is a therapeutic target that drives breast cancer metastasis and resistance to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Wee, Zhen Ning; Yatim, Siti Maryam J M; Kohlbauer, Vera K; Feng, Min; Goh, Jian Yuan; Bao, Yi; Yi, Bao; Lee, Puay Leng; Zhang, Songjing; Wang, Pan Pan; Lim, Elgene; Tam, Wai Leong; Cai, Yu; Ditzel, Henrik J; Hoon, Dave S B; Tan, Ern Yu; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic tumour recurrence due to failed treatments remains a major challenge of breast cancer clinical management. Here we report that interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1) is overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers, in particular triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), where it acts to drive aggressive growth, metastasis and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. We show that IRAK1 overexpression confers TNBC growth advantage through NF-κB-related cytokine secretion and metastatic TNBC cells exhibit gain of IRAK1 dependency, resulting in high susceptibility to genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1. Importantly, paclitaxel treatment induces strong IRAK1 phosphorylation, an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression, enrichment of cancer stem cells and acquired resistance to paclitaxel treatment. Pharmacologic inhibition of IRAK1 is able to reverse paclitaxel resistance by triggering massive apoptosis at least in part through inhibiting p38-MCL1 pro-survival pathway. Our study thus demonstrates IRAK1 as a promising therapeutic target for TNBC metastasis and paclitaxel resistance. PMID:26503059

  10. Therapeutic landscapes and living with breast cancer: the lived experiences of Thai women.

    PubMed

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is an "emotionally debilitating disease" that affects the lives of women of all ages. In this paper, we discuss the lived experience of breast cancer among women in southern Thailand and situate our discussions within the concept of therapeutic landscapes. We adopted a feminist framework as our research methodology and employed qualitative and innovative methods. The therapeutic landscapes of healing involved multiple levels of landscape changes including body, home, neighbourhood, health care and cultural contexts. Our findings offer a particular insight into the role of emotions, cultural beliefs, and practices in forming therapeutic landscapes among women living with breast cancer in Thailand. It is crucial that health care providers understand the emotional experiences of women with breast cancer and their particular cultural needs for emotional healing landscapes. Our findings could be used as evidence for developing culturally appropriate therapeutic strategies and interventions for women with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25635373

  11. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26988439

  12. Genetic tests to identify risk for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Julie; Venne, Vickie; Berse, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the currently available genetic tests that identify hereditary risk for breast cancer. Data sources Systematic review of scientific literature, clinical practice guidelines, and data published by test manufacturers. Conclusion Changes in gene patent laws and advances in sequencing technologies have resulted in rapid expansion of genetic testing. While BRCA1/2 are the most recognized genes linked to breast cancer, several laboratories now offer multi-gene panels to detect many risk-related mutations. Implication for Nursing Practice Genetic testing will be increasingly important in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. Oncology and advanced practice nurses need to understand risk factors, significance of various genetic tests, and patient counseling. PMID:25951739

  13. Great expectations: historical perspectives on genetic breast cancer testing.

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, B H

    1999-01-01

    Women who test positive for a genetic breast cancer marker may have more than a 50% chance of developing the disease. Although past screening technologies have sought to identify actual breast cancers, as opposed to predisposition, the history of screening may help predict the societal response to genetic testing. For decades, educational messages have encouraged women to find breast cancers as early as possible. Such messages have fostered the popular assumption that immediately discovered and treated breast cancers are necessarily more curable. Research, however, has shown that screening improves the prognosis of some--but not all--breast cancers, and also that it may lead to unnecessary interventions. The dichotomy between the advertised value of early detection and its actual utility has caused particular controversy in the United States, where the cultural climate emphasizes the importance of obtaining all possible medical information and acting on it. Early detection has probably helped to lower overall breast cancer mortality. But it has proven hard to praise aggressive screening without exaggerating its merits. Women considering genetic breast cancer testing should weight the benefits and limitations of early knowledge. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:10358693

  14. Mechanisms and therapeutic advances in the management of endocrine-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) pathway plays a critical role in breast cancer development and progression. Endocrine therapy targeting estrogen action is the most important systemic therapy for ER positive breast cancer. However its efficacy is limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. Mechanisms responsible for endocrine resistance include deregulation of the ER pathway itself, including loss of ER expression, post-translational modification of ER, deregulation of ER co-activators; increased receptor tyrosine kinase signaling leading to activation of various intracellular pathways involved in signal transduction, proliferation and cell survival, including growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Mitogen activated kinase (MAPK)/ERK, fibroblast growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor; alterations in cell cycle and apoptotic machinery; Epigenetic modification including dysregulation of DNA methylation, histone modification, and nucleosome remodeling; and altered expression of specific microRNAs. Functional genomics has helped us identify a catalog of genetic and epigenetic alterations that may be exploited as potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of response. New treatment combinations targeting ER and such oncogenic signaling pathways which block the crosstalk between these pathways have been proven effective in preclinical models. Results of recent clinical studies suggest that subsets of patients benefit from the combination of inhibitor targeting certain oncogenic signaling pathway with endocrine therapy. Especially, inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway, a key component implicated in mediating multiple signaling cascades, offers a promising approach to restore sensitivity to endocrine therapy in breast cancer. We systematically reviewed important publications cited in PubMed, recent abstracts from ASCO annual

  15. Emerging therapeutic targets in metastatic progression: A focus on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Kang, Yibin

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is the underlying cause of death for the majority of breast cancer patients. Despite significant advances in recent years in basic research and clinical development, therapies that specifically target metastatic breast cancer remain inadequate, and represents the single greatest obstacle to reducing mortality of late-stage breast cancer. Recent efforts have leveraged genomic analysis of breast cancer and molecular dissection of tumor-stromal cross-talk to uncover a number of promising candidates for targeted treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Rational combinations of therapeutic agents targeting tumor-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental components provide a promising strategy to develop precision treatments with higher specificity and less toxicity. In this review, we discuss the emerging therapeutic targets in breast cancer metastasis, from tumor-intrinsic pathways to those that involve the host tissue components, including the immune system. PMID:27000769

  16. The genomic landscape of breast cancer as a therapeutic roadmap.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Matthew J; Perou, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    The application of high-throughput techniques to profile DNA, RNA, and protein in breast cancer samples from hundreds of patients has profoundly increased our knowledge of the disease. The etiologic events that drive breast cancer are finally coming into focus and should be used to set priorities for clinical trials. In this Prospective, we summarize some of the headline conclusions from 6 recent breast cancer "omics profiling" articles in Nature, with an emphasis on the implications for systemic therapy. PMID:23319768

  17. Inflammatory breast cancer: unique biological and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Wendy A

    2015-11-01

    Through the concerted efforts of many patients, health-care providers, legislators, and other supporters, the past decade has seen the development of the first clinics dedicated to the care of patients with inflammatory breast cancer in the USA and other countries. Together with social networking, advocacy, and education, a few specialised centres have had substantial increases in patient numbers (in some cases ten times higher), which has further expanded the community of science and advocacy and increased the understanding of the disease process. Although inflammatory breast cancer is considered rare, constituting only 2-4% of breast cancer cases, poor prognosis means that patients with the disease account for roughly 10% of breast cancer mortality annually in the USA. I propose that the unique presentation of inflammatory breast cancer might require specific, identifiable changes in the breast parenchyma that occur before the tumour-initiating event. This would make the breast tissue itself a tumour-promoting medium that should be treated as a component of the pathology in multidisciplinary treatment and should be further studied for complementary targets to inhibit the pathobiology that is specific to inflammatory breast cancer. PMID:26545845

  18. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  19. Therapeutic reduction mammoplasty in large-breasted women with cancer using superior and superomedial pedicles

    PubMed Central

    Denewer, Adel; Shahatto, Fayez; Elnahas, Waleed; Farouk, Omar; Roshdy, Sameh; Khater, Ashraf; Hussein, Osama; Teima, Saleh; Hafez, Mohammed; Zidan, Samir; Shams, Nazem; Kotb, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgical management of breast cancer in large-breasted women presents a real challenge. This study aims to evaluate the outcome of therapeutic reduction mammoplasty in large-breasted women with breast cancer using superior and superomedial pedicles, situated at any breast quadrant except for the central and upper medial quadrants. Methods Fifty women with breast cancer and large breasts underwent simultaneous bilateral reduction mammoplasty. The weight of the tissue removed ranged from 550 g to 1050 g and the tumor-free safety margins by frozen section were in the range of 4 cm to 12 cm. Results The age of the patients ranged from 36 to 58 (median 43) years and tumor size ranged from 1 cm to 4 cm. The cosmetic outcomes were excellent in 32 patients (64%), good in 15 (30%) patients, and fair in three patients (6%). The follow-up period was 8–36 (mean 20) months, with no local recurrence or systemic metastasis. Conclusion Therapeutic reduction mammoplasty using superior and superomedial pedicles was shown to be oncologically safer than traditional conservative surgery. This oncoplastic procedure yields a satisfactory esthetic outcome with lower morbidity in large-breasted women with breast cancer. PMID:24367203

  20. Breast Cancer Genetic Counseling: A Surgeon’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agnese, Doreen M.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2016-01-01

    As surgeons who care for patients with breast cancer, the possibility of a cancer diagnosis being related to a hereditary predisposition is always a consideration. Not only are we as surgeons always trying to identify these patients and families but also we are often asked about a potential hereditary component by the patients and their family members. It is therefore critical that we accurately assess patients to determine who may benefit from genetic testing. Importantly, the potential benefit for identifying a hereditary breast cancer extends beyond the patient to other family members and the risk may not be only for the development of breast cancers, but for other cancers as well. This review was written from the perspective of a surgeon with additional training in cancer genetics in an effort to provide a unique perspective on the issue and feel that a review of some of the more practical considerations is important. PMID:26858951

  1. The Genomic Landscape of Breast Cancer as a Therapeutic Roadmap

    PubMed Central

    Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    The application of high throughput techniques to profile DNA, RNA and protein in breast cancer samples from hundreds of patients has profoundly increased our knowledge of the disease. The etiological events that drive breast cancer are finally coming into focus and should be used to set priorities for clinical trials. In this Research Focus we summarize some of the headline conclusions from six recent breast cancer ‘omics profiling’ papers in Nature, with an emphasis on the implications for systemic therapy. PMID:23319768

  2. Breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Chase, Margot E; Lin, Kant Y; Long, William B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report on breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics is to review the evidence for the efficacy of surveillance for early detection, bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy, and chemoprevention in preventing breast cancer and improving survival of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. This collective review highlights radiologic screening of patients with this genetic predisposition for cancer as well as discusses cancer risk reduction strategies and reproductive concerns in female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. It has now been well documented that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has a higher sensitivity than mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer in patients predisposed to breast cancer. We also emphasize that a new diagnostic device, molecular breast imaging (MBI), is now available and may be as sensitive as MRI. To date, this exciting technology, MBI, has not been used in studies of patients with BRCA1/2 genes. We also discuss in more detail the unique psychological ramifications of female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. These women face unique choices regarding management of their high risk for breast and ovarian cancer that impact their reproductive options. Despite their high levels of concern, few female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers consider assisted reproduction technologies such as pregnancy surrogate, cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos, or implantation genetic diagnosis to select embryos without BCRA1/2 mutation. Further research must be undertaken to explore the risk management of patients with inherited cancer predisposition and to incorporate these preferences into clinical care. PMID:19105530

  3. Recent genetic findings in schizophrenia and their therapeutic relevance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 loci are now associated with schizophrenia risk as identified by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genome-wide association studies. These findings mean that ‘genes for schizophrenia’ have unquestionably been found. However, many questions remain unanswered, including several which affect their therapeutic significance. The SNPs individually have minor effects, and even cumulatively explain only a modest fraction of the genetic predisposition. The remainder likely results from many more loci, from rare variants, and from gene–gene and gene–environment interactions. The risk SNPs are almost all non-coding, meaning that their biological significance is unclear; probably their effects are mediated via an influence on gene regulation, and emerging evidence suggests that some key molecular events occur during early brain development. The loci include novel genes of unknown function as well as genes and pathways previously implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, e.g. NMDA receptor signalling. Genes in the latter category have the clearer therapeutic potential, although even this will be a challenging process because of the many complexities concerning the genetic architecture and mediating mechanisms. This review summarises recent schizophrenia genetic findings and some key issues they raise, particularly with regard to their implications for identifying and validating novel drug targets. PMID:25315827

  4. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials.

    PubMed

    Zatz, Mayana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country. PMID:27575431

  5. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, Mayana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country. PMID:27575431

  6. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications of Histone Epigenetic Modulators in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Louise; Gallagher, William M; O'Connor, Darran P; Ní Chonghaile, Tríona

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and great advancements have been made for individualised patient treatment. Through understanding the underlying altered biology in the different subtypes of breast cancer, targeted therapeutics have been developed. Unfortunately, resistance to targeted therapy, intrinsic or acquired, is a recurring theme in cancer treatment. Epigenetic-mediated resistance to targeted therapy has been identified across different types of cancer. In addition, tumorigenesis has also been linked to altered expression of epigenetic modifiers. Due to the reversible nature of epigenetic modifications, epigenetic proteins are appealing as therapeutic targets in both the primary and relapsed/resistant setting. In this review, we will discuss the current state of targetable epigenetic histone modifications and their diagnostic and therapeutic implications in breast cancer. PMID:26895288

  7. New trends in breast cancer surgery: a therapeutic approach increasingly efficacy and respectful of the patient

    PubMed Central

    FRANCESCHINI, G.; SANCHEZ, A. MARTIN; DI LEONE, A.; MAGNO, S.; MOSCHELLA, F.; ACCETTA, C.; MASETTI, R.

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has undergone continuous and profound changes over the last 40 years. The evolution from aggressive and mutilating treatment to conservative approach has been long, but constant, despite the controversies that appeared every time a new procedure came to light. Today, the aesthetic satisfaction of breast cancer patients coupled with the oncological safety is the goal of the modern breast surgeon. Breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the gold standard approach for patients with early stage breast cancer and the recent introduction of “oncoplastic techniques” has furtherly increased the use of breast-conserving procedures. Mastectomy remains a valid surgical alternative in selected cases and is usually associated with immediate reconstructive procedures. New surgical procedures called “conservative mastectomies” are emerging as techniques that combine oncological safety and cosmesis by entirely removing the breast parenchyma sparing the breast skin and nipple-areola complex. Staging of the axilla has also gradually evolved toward less aggressive approaches with the adoption of sentinel node biopsy and new therapeutic strategies are emerging in patients with a pathological positivity in sentinel lymph node biopsy. The present work will highlight the new surgical treatment options increasingly efficacy and respectful of breast cancer patients. PMID:26712068

  8. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  9. Therapeutic potential of stem cells expressing suicide genes that selectively target human breast cancer cells: Evidence that they exert tumoricidal effects via tumor tropism

    PubMed Central

    YI, BO-RIM; CHOI, KELVIN J.; KIM, SEUNG U.; CHOI, KYUNG-CHUL

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide and is classified into ductal and lobular carcinoma. Breast cancer as well as lobular carcinoma is associated with various risk factors such as gender, age, female hormone exposure, ethnicity, family history and genetic risk factor-associated genes. Genes associated with a high risk of developing breast cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, PTEN, CHEK2 and ATM. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy are used to treat breast cancer but these therapies, except for surgery, have many side-effects such as alopecia, anesthesia, diarrhea and arthralgia. Gene-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (GEPT) or suicide gene therapy, may improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy without side-effects. GEPT most often involves the use of a viral vector to deliver a gene not found in mammalian cells and that produces enzymes which can convert a relatively non-toxic prodrug into a toxic agent. Examples of these systems include cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC), carboxyl esterase/irinotecan (CE/CPT-11), and thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (TK/GCV). Recently, therapies based on genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) using a GEPT system have received a great deal of attention for their clinical and therapeutic potential to treat breast cancer. In this review, we discuss the potential of GESTECs via tumor tropism effects and therapeutic efficacy against several different types of cancer cells. GESTECs represent a useful tool for treating breast cancer without inducing injuries associated with conventional therapeutic modalities. PMID:22736197

  10. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D. Gareth; Abraham, Jean E.; Earl, Helena M.; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A.; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer–specific survival. Methods: We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)–negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10–8). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. Conclusions: This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. PMID:25890600

  11. Genetic testing and breast cancer: the women's point of view.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, P; Leccese, A

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Western countries (130,000 cases per year in Europe) and accounts for 20-25% of all malignancies in European women. In the past few years medical journals have focused greater attention on the quality and quantity of information provided to consumers; there is a general consensus amongst physicians on the importance of having better informed consumers. This change in attitude is influencing greatly the physician-patient relationship and political decisions. Breast cancer associations, like the National Breast Cancer Coalition in the USA or EUROPA DONNA, the European Breast Cancer Coalition in Europe, have pushed for involvement in the discussion of any phase of illness, and have a particular interest in preventive medicine. The identification of high-risk women by genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is largely debated, in particular regarding patient counseling, and psychosocial and legislative support. This article reports the different points of view raised by women's movements, so that useful suggestions may be provided to improve breast cancer prevention modalities. PMID:15280186

  12. Breast cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Sudeshna; Nandy, Argha; Hor, Pooja; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), characterized by the CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) marker, are attributed with features that are demonstrated by the disease itself, such as growth of tumor, recurrence, metastases, and multiple drug resistance. This review concerns the emergence and expediency of BCSCs in treating relapse and advanced cases of breast cancer. One of the ideal ways of detecting and eliminating BCSCs would be to tweak certain molecular receptors in the desired pathway, which would require extensive and comprehensive knowledge about these cell signaling pathways. Although hedgehog (Hh), Notch, and Wnt signaling are of prime concern, governing tumorigenesis and cancer stem cell (CSC) renewal, designing chemotherapeutic or molecular targeted therapies is still a tricky arena to venture into, as these pathways play a vital role in normal mammary gland development. Thus selective inhibition of pathway receptors needs to be investigated in the future. PMID:23127340

  13. Breast cancer stem cells, pathways and therapeutic perspectives 2011.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Anjana

    2013-06-01

    The evidence for the existence of a heterogeneous population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) responsible for the initiation and maintenance of cancer has been characterized for several tumors recently. Purification and molecular characterization of normal human mammary stem cells from cultured mammospheres has been achieved, providing evidence supporting a model in which breast tumor heterogeneity is a reflection of a number of CSC-like cells in the tumor. A number of experimental methodologies have been developed to characterize epithelial stem cells, including the expression of cell surface or intracellular markers, mammosphere formation, exclusion of fluorescent dye by a side population, retention of the radionucleotide label, etc. Methodologies have also been successfully employed to identify tumorigenic cells within breast cancers. The most important characteristics of stem cells are the capacity for self-renewal and the regulation of the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. In the mammary gland, signaling pathways, such as Hedgehog (Hh), Wnt/β-catenin, and Notch, play a role in embryogenesis and organogenesis and maintenance of tissues in the adult through regulation of the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Breast TAAs include epitopes from proteins, such as carcinoembryonic antigen and NYBR-1, which are involved in tissue differentiation. Targeting BCSCs may be achieved by a number of approaches such as chemotherapy sensitization of BCSCs, differentiating therapy, targeting stem cell elimination, targeting signaling pathways and drug transporters, and inhibition of regulatory pathways involved in self-renewal. Targeting cells which have the potential to metastasize will be an important aspect of the BCSC field as these are the cells that cause the majority of morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. PMID:24426422

  14. Prevention of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients. Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Beuzeboc, Philippe; Scholl, Suzy

    2014-01-01

    One in four breast cancer patients is at risk of developing bone metastases in her life time. The early prevention of bone metastases is a crucial challenge. It has been suggested that the use of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in the adjuvant setting may reduce the persistence of disseminated tumor cells and thereby might improve outcome, specifically in a population of patients with a low estrogen microenvironment. More recently, the results of a large meta-analysis from 41 randomized trials comparing a bisphosphonate (BP) to placebo or to an open control have been presented at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Meeting. Data on 17,016 patients confirm that adjuvant BPs, irrespective of the type of treatment or the treatment schedule and formulation (oral or intra-venously (IV)), significantly reduced bone recurrences and improved breast cancer survival in postmenopausal women. No advantage was seen in premenopausal women. BPs are soon likely to become integrated into standard practice. Published data on the mechanisms involved in tumor cell seeding from the primary site, in homing to bone tissues and in the reactivation of dormant tumor cells will be reviewed; these might offer new ideas for innovative combination strategies. PMID:26237389

  15. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Haitao; Yao, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12). CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26356032

  16. Expression and therapeutic targeting of dopamine receptor-1 (D1R) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borcherding, D C; Tong, W; Hugo, E R; Barnard, D F; Fox, S; LaSance, K; Shaughnessy, E; Ben-Jonathan, N

    2016-06-16

    Patients with advanced breast cancer often fail to respond to treatment, creating a need to develop novel biomarkers and effective therapeutics. Dopamine (DA) is a catecholamine that binds to five G protein-coupled receptors. We discovered expression of DA type-1 receptors (D1Rs) in breast cancer, thereby identifying these receptors as novel therapeutic targets in this disease. Strong to moderate immunoreactive D1R expression was found in 30% of 751 primary breast carcinomas, and was associated with larger tumors, higher tumor grades, node metastasis and shorter patient survival. DA and D1R agonists, signaling through the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, suppressed cell viability, inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Fenoldopam, a peripheral D1R agonist that does not penetrate the brain, dramatically suppressed tumor growth in two mouse models with D1R-expressing xenografts by increasing both necrosis and apoptosis. D1R-expressing primary tumors and metastases in mice were detected by fluorescence imaging. In conclusion, D1R overexpression is associated with advanced breast cancer and poor prognosis. Activation of the D1R/cGMP/PKG pathway induces apoptosis in vitro and causes tumor shrinkage in vivo. Fenoldopam, which is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved to treat renal hypertension, could be repurposed as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with D1R-expressing tumors. PMID:26477316

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of bone metastases in breast cancer: Proven and emerging therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Nadia; Sanità, Patrizia; Delle Monache, Simona; Alesse, Edoardo; Angelucci, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic occurrence is the principal cause of death in breast cancer patients. The high osteotropism makes breast cancer the most common primary tumor type associated with metastatic bone disease. The peculiar clinical aspects associated with metastases limited to the skeletal system suggest considering these cases as a distinctive subset of metastatic patients with a better prognosis. Because bone is frequently the first metastatic site in disease relapse, it is feasible that the next improvement in therapeutic options for bone metastatic disease could be associated with an improvement of survival expectation and quality of life in breast cancer patients. Study of the molecular basis of bone remodeling and breast cancer osteotropism has allowed identification of several therapeutic candidates involved in formation and progression of bone metastases. These targets are frequently the determinants of positive feedback between the tumor and bone cells whose clinical outcome is osteolytic lesions. In this review, we discuss the physiopathologic features underlying targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the aberrant bone remodeling associated with breast cancer metastases. PMID:25114849

  18. Therapeutic strategies and mechanisms of tumorigenesis of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Emde, Anna; Köstler, Wolfgang J; Yarden, Yosef

    2012-12-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is overexpressed in approximately 25% of breast cancers. HER2 acts as a signal amplifier for its siblings, namely three different transmembrane receptors that collectively bind with 11 distinct growth factors of the EGF family. Thus, overexpression of HER2 confers aggressive invasive growth in preclinical models and in patients. Specific therapies targeting HER2 include monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as heat shock protein and sheddase inhibitors. Two of these drugs have shown impressive - yet mostly transient - efficacy in patients with HER2 overexpressing breast cancer. We highlight the biological roles of HER2 in breast cancer progression, and overview the available therapeutic armamentarium directed against this receptor-kinase molecule. Focusing on the mechanisms that confer resistance to individual HER2 targeting agents, we envisage therapeutic approaches to delay or overcome the evolvement of resistance in patients. PMID:20951604

  19. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  20. Non-genetic therapeutic approaches to Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Rebecca B; Elliott, Christina; Zarros, Apostolos; Baillie, George S

    2016-07-15

    Canavan disease (CD) is a rare leukodystrophy characterized by diffuse spongiform white matter degeneration, dysmyelination and intramyelinic oedema with consequent impairment of psychomotor development and early death. The molecular cause of CD has been identified as being mutations of the gene encoding the enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA) leading to its functional deficiency. The physiological role of ASPA is to hydrolyse N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid (NAA), producing l-aspartic acid and acetate; as a result, its deficiency leads to abnormally high central nervous system NAA levels. The aim of this article is to review what is currently known regarding the aetiopathogenesis and treatment of CD, with emphasis on the non-genetic therapeutic strategies, both at an experimental and a clinical level, by highlighting: (a) major related hypotheses, (b) the results of the available experimental simulatory approaches, as well as (c) the relevance of the so far examined markers of CD neuropathology. The potential and the limitations of the current non-genetic neuroprotective approaches to the treatment of CD are particularly discussed in the current article, in a context that could be used to direct future experimental and (eventually) clinical work in the field. PMID:27288788

  1. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  2. KIFC1 is a novel potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Boohaker, Rebecca J; Zhai, Ling; Padmalayam, Indira; Wennerberg, Krister; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin-like protein KIFC1, a normally nonessential kinesin motor, plays a critical role in centrosome clustering in cancer cells and is essential for the survival of cancer cells. Herein, we reported that KIFC1 expression is up-regulated in breast cancer, particularly in estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative and triple negative breast cancer, and is not associated with epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. In addition, KIFC1 is highly expressed in all 8 tested human breast cancer cell lines, but is absent in normal human mammary epithelial cells and weakly expressed in 2 human lung fibroblast lines. Moreover, KIFC1 silencing significantly reduced breast cancer cell viability. Finally, we found that PJ34, a potent small molecule inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, suppressed KIFC1 expression and induced multipolar spindle formation in breast cancer cells, and inhibited cell viability and colony formation within the same concentration range, suggesting that KIFC1 suppression by PJ34 contributes to its anti-breast cancer activity. Together, these results suggest that KIFC1 is a novel promising therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:26177331

  3. Orphan nuclear receptors in breast cancer pathogenesis and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Riggins, Rebecca B; Mazzotta, Mary M; Maniya, Omar Z; Clarke, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear receptors comprise a large family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate many key processes in normal and neoplastic tissues. Most nuclear receptors share a common, highly conserved domain structure that includes a carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. However, a subgroup of this gene family is known as the orphan nuclear receptors because to date there are no known natural ligands that regulate their activity. Many of the 25 nuclear receptors classified as orphan play critical roles in embryonic development, metabolism, and the regulation of circadian rhythm. Here, we review the emerging role(s) of orphan nuclear receptors in breast cancer, with a particular focus on two of the estrogen-related receptors (ERRalpha and ERRgamma) and several others implicated in clinical outcome and response or resistance to cytotoxic or endocrine therapies, including the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors, nerve growth factor-induced B, DAX-1, liver receptor homolog-1, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha. We also propose that a clearer understanding of the function of orphan nuclear receptors in mammary gland development and normal mammary tissues could significantly improve our ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent breast cancer. PMID:20576803

  4. Imaging Diagnostic and Therapeutic Targets - Steroid Receptors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Amy M.; Clark, Amy S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Linden, Hannah M.; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) are important steroid hormone receptor biomarkers used to determine prognosis and predict benefit from endocrine therapies for breast cancer patients. Receptor expression is routinely measured in biopsy specimens using immunohistochemistry, although such testing can be challenging particularly in the setting of metastatic disease. ERα and PR can be quantitatively assayed non-invasively with positron emission tomography (PET). This approach provides the opportunity to assess receptor expression and function in “real-time”, within the entire tumor, and across distant sites of metastatic disease. This article reviews the current evidence of ERα and PR PET imaging as predictive and early response biomarkers for endocrine therapy. PMID:26834106

  5. Cystosarcoma phylloides of the breast: a new therapeutic proposal.

    PubMed

    Contarini, O; Urdaneta, L F; Hagan, W; Stephenson, S E

    1982-04-01

    An analysis of forty cases of cystosarcoma phylloides of the breast was undertaken to clarify the relationship between histology, surgical treatment and prognosis of this fibroepithelial tumor. Thirty-eight female patients 12 to 85 years of age, treated for this diagnosis over a 17-year period, were studied retrospectively. Histologically malignant lesions were diagnosed in 17 cases: six were treated by local excision, one by subcutaneous mastectomy with prosthetic implant, four by simple mastectomy, three by modified, two by radical mastectomy, and one by biopsy only. Of the 23 histologically benign tumors, 18 were treated by local excision, three had simple mastectomy, and one had subcutaneous mastectomy with prosthetic implant. Three recurrences, observed (7.5%) among patients with benign tumors, were locally excised. Wide local reexcision has controlled the disease to date after average follow-up of 32 months. In the malignant group, metastases developed in four patients (10%). Three of these patients are dead of disease and one is being treated by chemotherapy. Malignant histology seemed to correlate directly to the presence of pain (46.6%), size of the tumor (average 7 cm in diameter), and older age (average 52 years), but there was no correlation with prognosis. Recent reports on the subject advocate wide local excision for small benign lesions and simple mastectomy for larger or malignant ones. Our data indicates that the histologic appearance does not correlate with the clinical behavior of this neoplasm, and the choice of the procedure does not alter the long-term result, provided that the tumor is completely excised. More radical procedures than wide local excision are not justified for cystosarcoma phylloides which behaves more like a soft tissue sarcoma than a breast gland tumor. PMID:6282155

  6. ERα-Negative and Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Molecular Features and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Qiang; Russo, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a type of aggressive breast cancer lacking the expression of estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). TNBC patients account for approximately 15% of total breast cancer patients and are more prevalent among young African, African-American and Latino women patients. The currently available ER-targeted and Her-2-based therapies are not effective for treating TNBC. Recent studies have revealed a number of novel features of TNBC. In the present work, we comprehensively addressed these features and discussed potential therapeutic approaches based on these features for TNBC, with particular focus on: 1) the pathological features of TNBC/basal-like breast cancer; 2) E2/ERβ – mediated signaling pathways; 3) G-protein coupling receptor-30/epithelial growth factor receptor (GPCR-30/EGFR) signaling pathway; 4) interactions of ERβ with breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2); 5) chemokine CXCL8 and related chemokines; 6) altered microRNA signatures and suppression of ERα expression/ERα-signaling by micro-RNAs; 7) altered expression of several pro-oncongenic and tumor suppressor proteins; and 8) genotoxic effects caused by oxidative estrogen metabolites. Gaining better insights into these molecular pathways in TNBC may lead to identification of novel biomarkers and targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of TNBC. PMID:19527773

  7. Punica granatum and its therapeutic implications on breast carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Vini, Ravindran; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2015-01-01

    Punica granatum has a recorded history of pharmacological properties which can be attributed to its rich reservoir of phytochemicals. Investigations in recent years have established its tremendous potential as an antitumorogenic agent against various cancers including breast cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. The plausible role of Punica as a therapeutic agent, as an adjuvant in chemotherapy, and its dietary implications as chemopreventive agent in breast cancer have been explored. Mechanistic studies have revealed that Punica extracts and its components, individually or in combination, can modulate and target key proteins and genes involved in breast cancer. Our earlier finding also demonstrated the role of methanolic extract of pomegranate pericarp in reducing proliferation in breast cancer by binding to estrogen receptor at the same time not affecting uterine weight unlike estradiol or tamoxifen. This review analyses other plausible mechanisms of Punica in preventing the progression of breast cancer and how it can possibly be a therapeutic agent by acting at various steps of carcinogenesis including proliferation, invasion, migration, metastasis, angiogenesis, and inflammation via various molecular mechanisms. PMID:25857627

  8. Possible Genetic Predisposition to Lymphedema after Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Beth; Lose, Felicity; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Francois, Mathias; Ferguson, Kaltin; Janda, Monika; Yates, Patsy; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Known risk factors for secondary lymphedema only partially explain who develops lymphedema following cancer, suggesting that inherited genetic susceptibility may influence risk. Moreover, identification of molecular signatures could facilitate lymphedema risk prediction prior to surgery or lead to effective drug therapies for prevention or treatment. Recent advances in the molecular biology underlying development of the lymphatic system and related congenital disorders implicate a number of potential candidate genes to explore in relation to secondary lymphedema. Methods and Results We undertook a nested case-control study, with participants who had developed lymphedema after surgical intervention within the first 18 months of their breast cancer diagnosis serving as cases (n=22) and those without lymphedema serving as controls (n=98), identified from a prospective, population-based, cohort study in Queensland, Australia. TagSNPs that covered all known genetic variation in the genes SOX18, VEGFC, VEGFD, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, RORC, FOXC2, LYVE1, ADM, and PROX1 were selected for genotyping. Multiple SNPs within three receptor genes, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, and RORC, were associated with lymphedema defined by statistical significance (p<0.05) or extreme risk estimates (OR <0.5 or >2.0). Conclusions These provocative, albeit preliminary, findings regarding possible genetic predisposition to secondary lymphedema following breast cancer treatment warrant further attention for potential replication using larger datasets. PMID:22404826

  9. Neuro-vascular link: from genetic insights to therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and nerves (neurogenesis) is of great medical relevance. It is well known that dysregulation of angiogenesis leads to tissue ischemia, cancer, inflammation and other disorders, while a dysfunction of the nerve system contributes to motorneuron disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALs) and other neurodegenerative diseases. The observations of Andreas Vesalius--Belgian anatomist of the 16th century--that patterning ofvessels and nerves show more than remarkable similarities, are currently revisited in exciting studies. Indeed, often, vessels and nerves even track alongside each other. Recent genetic studies revealed that vessels and nerves share many more common principles and signals for navigation, proliferation and survival than previously suspected. For instance, gene inactivation studies in mice and zebrafish showed that axon guidance signals regulate vessel navigation. Conversely, prototypic angiogenic factors such as VEGF control neurogenesis and regulate axon and neuron guidance, independently of their angiogenic activity. The next coming years promise to become an exciting journey to further unravel the molecular basis and explore the therapeutic potential of the neurovascular link. PMID:20120252

  10. Asymmetry in Family History Implicates Nonstandard Genetic Mechanisms: Application to the Genetics of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Clarice R.; Shi, Min; DeRoo, Lisa A.; Taylor, Jack A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Umbach, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies typically target inherited autosomal variants, but less studied genetic mechanisms can play a role in complex disease. Sex-linked variants aside, three genetic phenomena can induce differential risk in maternal versus paternal lineages of affected individuals: 1. maternal effects, reflecting the maternal genome's influence on prenatal development; 2. mitochondrial variants, which are inherited maternally; 3. autosomal genes, whose effects depend on parent of origin. We algebraically show that small asymmetries in family histories of affected individuals may reflect much larger genetic risks acting via those mechanisms. We apply these ideas to a study of sisters of women with breast cancer. Among 5,091 distinct families of women reporting that exactly one grandmother had breast cancer, risk was skewed toward maternal grandmothers (p<0.0001), especially if the granddaughter was diagnosed between age 45 and 54. Maternal genetic effects, mitochondrial variants, or variant genes with parent-of-origin effects may influence risk of perimenopausal breast cancer. PMID:24651610

  11. Therapeutic effects of cytoprotective agent on breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinjia; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Yu, Zhuang; Wang, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Most patients will choose breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery, while radiotherapy will damage skin and soft tissue so that will have adverse effect on reconstruction. In this study, we assume that the usage of Amifostine can reduce the incidence of complications after breast reconstruction so that provides more choices of reconstruction operation. Dividing SD rats into surgical placement expansion material group (include 15 ml normal saline) and simple operation group. Then further divide the former into non intervention group , radiation group and Radiation therapy combined with Amie amifostine treatment group. The decubation is 45 days after operation. Macroscopic evaluate the complications of skin and soft tissue by ImageJ. There is no obvious complications of skin and soft tissue for control group, radiotherapy alone group and radiotherapy with application of Amifostine group by macroscopic evaluation. The animals that are in expanded object group, damage probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is lower than that of radiotherapy alone group (30% vs. 69%, P=0.041). ImageJ shows the necrosis probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is obvious lower than radiotherapy alone group (6.96% vs. 12.94%, P=0.019). In conclusion, prevention and treatment of Amifostine can significantly reduce the complications of skin and soft tissue which is helpful to breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery. PMID:26885163

  12. Therapeutic effects of cytoprotective agent on breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    He, Xinjia; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wei; Yu, Zhuang; Wang, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Most patients will choose breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery, while radiotherapy will damage skin and soft tissue so that will have adverse effect on reconstruction. In this study, we assume that the usage of Amifostine can reduce the incidence of complications after breast reconstruction so that provides more choices of reconstruction operation. Dividing SD rats into surgical placement expansion material group (include 15 ml normal saline) and simple operation group. Then further divide the former into non intervention group , radiation group and Radiation therapy combined with Amie amifostine treatment group. The decubation is 45 days after operation. Macroscopic evaluate the complications of skin and soft tissue by ImageJ. There is no obvious complications of skin and soft tissue for control group, radiotherapy alone group and radiotherapy with application of Amifostine group by macroscopic evaluation. The animals that are in expanded object group, damage probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is lower than that of radiotherapy alone group (30% vs. 69%, P=0.041). ImageJ shows the necrosis probability of skin and soft tissue when use Amifostine is obvious lower than radiotherapy alone group (6.96% vs. 12.94%, P=0.019). In conclusion, prevention and treatment of Amifostine can significantly reduce the complications of skin and soft tissue which is helpful to breast reconstruction after breast cancer surgery. PMID:26885163

  13. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genetics Predicts Candidate Therapeutic Genetic Interactions at the Mammalian Replication Fork

    PubMed Central

    van Pel, Derek M.; Stirling, Peter C.; Minaker, Sean W.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Hieter, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality has gained popularity as a rational guide for predicting chemotherapeutic targets based on negative genetic interactions between tumor-specific somatic mutations and a second-site target gene. One hallmark of most cancers that can be exploited by chemotherapies is chromosome instability (CIN). Because chromosome replication, maintenance, and segregation represent conserved and cell-essential processes, they can be modeled effectively in simpler eukaryotes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we analyze and extend genetic networks of CIN cancer gene orthologs in yeast, focusing on essential genes. This identifies hub genes and processes that are candidate targets for synthetic lethal killing of cancer cells with defined somatic mutations. One hub process in these networks is DNA replication. A nonessential, fork-associated scaffold, CTF4, is among the most highly connected genes. As Ctf4 lacks enzymatic activity, potentially limiting its development as a therapeutic target, we exploited its function as a physical interaction hub to rationally predict synthetic lethal interactions between essential Ctf4-binding proteins and CIN cancer gene orthologs. We then validated a subset of predicted genetic interactions in a human colorectal cancer cell line, showing that siRNA-mediated knockdown of MRE11A sensitizes cells to depletion of various replication fork-associated proteins. Overall, this work describes methods to identify, predict, and validate in cancer cells candidate therapeutic targets for tumors with known somatic mutations in CIN genes using data from yeast. We affirm not only replication stress but also the targeting of DNA replication fork proteins themselves as potential targets for anticancer therapeutic development. PMID:23390603

  15. Autophagy and Apoptotic Crosstalk: Mechanism of Therapeutic Resistance in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Joelle; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    While breast cancer patients benefit from the use of HER2 inhibitors, many fail therapy and become resistant to treatment, indicating a critical need to prevent treatment failure. A number of studies have emerged that highlight the catabolic process of autophagy in breast cancer as a mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy and targeted inhibitors. Furthermore, recent research has begun to dissect how autophagy signaling crosstalks with apoptotic signaling. Thus, a possible strategy in fighting resistance is to couple targeting of apoptotic and autophagy signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss how cellular response by autophagy circumvents cell death to promote resistance of breast cancers to HER2 inhibitors, as well as the potential avenues of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26997868

  16. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country. PMID:24289553

  17. Genetic Polymorphism and Expression of CXCR4 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Brajão de Oliveira, Karen; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Banin Hirata, Bruna Karina; de Almeida, Felipe Campos; Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton Freire; Trugilo, Kleber Paiva; Guembarovski, Alda Fiorina Maria Losi; Jorge Sobrinho, Walter; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 genetic polymorphisms, as well as their expression level, have been associated with cancer development and prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of CXCR4 rs2228014 polymorphism on its mRNA and protein expression in breast cancer samples. It was observed that patients presented higher CXCR4 mRNA relative expression (5.7-fold) than normal mammary gland, but this expression was not correlated with patients clinicopathological features (nuclear grade, nodal status, ER status, PR status, p53 staining, Ki67 index, and HER-2 status). Moreover, CXCR4 mRNA relative expression also did not differ regarding the presence or absence of T allele (p = 0.301). In the immunohistochemical assay, no difference was observed for CXCR4 cytoplasmic protein staining in relation to different genotypes (p = 0.757); however, high cytoplasmic CXCR4 staining was verified in invasive breast carcinoma (p < 0.01). All in all, the results from present study indicated that rs2228014 genetic variant does not alter CXCR4 mRNA or protein expression. However, this receptor was more expressed in tumor compared to normal tissue, in both RNA and protein levels, suggesting its promising applicability in the general context of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26576337

  18. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  19. Cystosarcoma phylloides of the breast: a review of clinical, pathological and therapeutic option in 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Sheen-Chen, S M; Chou, F F; Chen, W J

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings and therapeutic options in 18 patients with cystosarcoma phylloides were retrospectively studied and analysed. Painless breast lump was the most common clinical penetration. An accurate pre-operative diagnosis was obtained in only six patients (33.3%). Intraoperative frozen section examination was performed in nine patients and the diagnosis was cystosarcoma phylloides in five patients, benign breast tumor in four patients with a 55.5% yield. The final pathological results revealed benign form cystosarcoma phylloides in 17 patients and malignant form in one patient. Seven patients, including the one with malignant form tumor, underwent wide excision with an adequate margin of normal breast tissue. One patient underwent subcutaneous mastectomy due to the huge size of tumor. The remaining 11 patients with presumed diagnosis of fibroadenoma or breast cancer underwent simple excision. There was no local recurrence or distant metastasis in any of the 18 patients, with a mean follow-up time of 31.5 months. On the basis of this data, wide excision with an adequate margin of normal breast tissue may be the preferred initial therapy for cystosarcoma phylloides. For those patients undergoing simple excision, the follow-up option may be acceptable if microscopic examination reveals no unrecognised amputation of tumor. PMID:1651293

  20. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making. PMID:26951551

  1. Breast cancer risk assessment using genetic variants and risk factors in a Singapore Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic variants for breast cancer risk identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Western populations require further testing in Asian populations. A risk assessment model incorporating both validated genetic variants and established risk factors may improve its performance in risk prediction of Asian women. Methods A nested case-control study of female breast cancer (411 cases and 1,212 controls) within the Singapore Chinese Health Study was conducted to investigate the effects of 51 genetic variants identified in previous GWAS on breast cancer risk. The independent effect of these genetic variants was assessed by creating a summed genetic risk score (GRS) after adjustment for body mass index and the Gail model risk factors for breast cancer. Results The GRS was an independent predictor of breast cancer risk in Chinese women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of breast cancer for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of the GRS were 1.26 (0.90 to 1.76), 1.47 (1.06 to 2.04) and 1.75 (1.27 to 2.41) respectively (P for trend <0.001). In addition to established risk factors, the GRS improved the classification of 6.2% of women for their absolute risk of breast cancer in the next five years. Conclusions Genetic variants on top of conventional risk factors can improve the risk prediction of breast cancer in Chinese women. PMID:24941967

  2. Therapeutic effect of taxanes on metastatic breast cancer of various immunohistochemical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    FUKADA, IPPEI; ARAKI, KAZUHIRO; KOBAYASHI, KOKORO; KOBAYASHI, TAKAYUKI; HORII, RIE; AKIYAMA, FUTOSHI; TAKAHASHI, SHUNJI; IWASE, TAKUJI; ITO, YOSHINORI

    2016-01-01

    Taxane drugs play a central role in chemotherapy for breast cancer. However, previous studies have reported that taxanes are relatively ineffective in patients with operable luminal breast cancer compared with other subtypes. Between January 2000 and August 2008, 293 patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with taxanes in The Cancer Institute Hospital of The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research and were included in the present study. The patients were divided into 4 subtypes based on the immunohistochemically evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. The clinicopathological features, response rate (RR) and time to progression (TTP) were analyzed retrospectively. In total, 159 patient tissues were classified as luminal type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2−), 28 patient tissues were classified as luminal-HER2 type (ER+ and/or PgR+ and HER2+), 57 patient tissues were classified as HER2 type (ER−, PgR− and HER2+), and 49 patient tissues were classified as triple-negative type (ER−, PgR− and HER2−). Among the 4 subtypes, the clinical benefit rate was 51.6, 78.6, 71.9 and 40.8%, respectively. There were significant differences in TTP between subtypes (median TTP, 8.3 months in luminal, 14.1 months in luminal-HER2, 10.6 months in HER2, and 4.2 months in triple-negative; P<0.001). Patients with luminal type tumors had a significantly longer TTP than patients with triple-negative type tumors. The present data suggested that the immunohistochemical subtypes were associated with the therapeutic effect of taxanes for metastatic breast cancer and that taxanes yielded an acceptable RR and TTP in luminal metastatic breast cancer. Additional investigations are required to elucidate the predictive markers of taxane therapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer in each immunohistochemical subtype. PMID:27347197

  3. Using Genetic Testing to Guide Therapeutic Decisions in Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawala, Neal K

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Genetic analysis of human cardiomyopathy has rapidly transitioned from a strictly research endeavor to a diagnostic tool readily available to clinicians across the globe. In contemporary practice, genetic testing improves the efficiency of family evaluations and clarifies the etiology of ambiguous clinical presentations. The great promise of genetic diagnosis is to enable preventative therapies for individuals at high risk of future disease development, a strategy that is under active clinical investigation. However, in the present and future, careful interpretation of DNA sequence variation is critical, and can be ensured by referral to a specialized cardiovascular genetics clinic. PMID:23794152

  4. Tutorial dialogues and gist explanations of genetic breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Colin L; Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F; Cedillos-Whynott, Elizabeth M; Brust-Renck, Priscila G; Weil, Audrey M

    2015-09-01

    The intelligent tutoring system (ITS) BRCA Gist is a Web-based tutor developed using the Shareable Knowledge Objects (SKO) platform that uses latent semantic analysis to engage women in natural-language dialogues to teach about breast cancer risk. BRCA Gist appears to be the first ITS designed to assist patients' health decision making. Two studies provide fine-grained analyses of the verbal interactions between BRCA Gist and women responding to five questions pertaining to breast cancer and genetic risk. We examined how "gist explanations" generated by participants during natural-language dialogues related to outcomes. Using reliable rubrics, scripts of the participants' verbal interactions with BRCA Gist were rated for content and for the appropriateness of the tutor's responses. Human researchers' scores for the content covered by the participants were strongly correlated with the coverage scores generated by BRCA Gist, indicating that BRCA Gist accurately assesses the extent to which people respond appropriately. In Study 1, participants' performance during the dialogues was consistently associated with learning outcomes about breast cancer risk. Study 2 was a field study with a more diverse population. Participants with an undergraduate degree or less education who were randomly assigned to BRCA Gist scored higher on tests of knowledge than those assigned to the National Cancer Institute website or than a control group. We replicated findings that the more expected content that participants included in their gist explanations, the better they performed on outcome measures. As fuzzy-trace theory suggests, encouraging people to develop and elaborate upon gist explanations appears to improve learning, comprehension, and decision making. PMID:25921818

  5. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n=4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments. PMID:25970776

  6. Fucose decorated solid-lipid nanocarriers mediate efficient delivery of methotrexate in breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garg, Neeraj K; Singh, Bhupinder; Jain, Ashay; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Sharma, Rajeev; Tyagi, Rajeev K; Kushwah, Varun; Jain, Sanyog; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-10-01

    The present study is designed to engineer fucose anchored methotrexate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to target breast cancer. The developed nano-carriers were characterized with respect to particle size, PDI, zeta potential, drug loading and entrapment, in-vitro release etc. The characterized formulations were used to comparatively assess cellular uptake, cell-viability, apoptosis, lysosomal membrane permeability, bioavailability, biodistribution, changes in tumor volume and animal survival. The ex-vivo results showed greater cellular uptake and better cytotoxicity at lower IC50 of methotrexate in breast cancer cells. Further, we observed increased programmed cell death (apoptosis) with altered lysosomal membrane permeability and better rate of degradation of lysosomal membrane in-vitro. On the other hand, in-vivo evaluation showed maximum bioavailability and tumor targeting efficiency with minimum secondary drug distribution in various organs with formulated and anchored nano-carrier when compared with free drug. Moreover, sizeable reduction in tumor burden was estimated with fucose decorated SLNs as compared to that seen with free MTX and SLNs-MTX. Fucose decorated SLNs showed promising results to develop therapeutic interventions for breast cancer, and paved a way to explore this promising and novel nano-carrier which enables to address breast cancer. PMID:27268228

  7. The influence of genetic ancestry and ethnicity on breast cancer survival associated with genetic variation in the TGF-β-signaling pathway: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Abbie; Stern, Marianna C.; Hines, Lisa; Wolff, Roger K.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; John, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    The TGF-β signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation. We evaluated genetic variation in this pathway, its association with breast cancer survival, and survival differences by genetic ancestry and self-reported ethnicity. The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study includes participants from the 4-Corners Breast Cancer Study (n = 1391 cases) and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study (n=946 cases) who have been followed for survival. We evaluated 28 genes in the TGF-β signaling pathway using a tagSNP approach. Adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) was used to test the gene and pathway significance by Native American (NA) ancestry and by self-reported ethnicity (non-Hispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic/NA). Genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway was associated with overall breast cancer survival (PARTP = 0.05), especially for women with low NA ancestry (PARTP =0.007) and NHW women (PARTP =0.006). BMP2, BMP4, RUNX1. and TGFBR3 were significantly associated with breast cancer survival overall (PARTP=0.04, 0.02, 0.002, and 0.04 respectively). Among women with low NA ancestry associations were: BMP4 (PARTP = 0.007), BMP6 (PARTP = 0.001), GDF10 (PARTP=0.05), RUNX1 (PARTP=0.002), SMAD1 (PARTP=0.05), and TGFBR2 (PARTP=0.02). A polygenic risk model showed that women with low NA ancestry and high numbers of at-risk alleles had twice the risk of dying from breast cancer as did women with high NA ancestry. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway influences breast cancer survival. Associations were similar when the analyses were stratified by genetic ancestry or by self-reported ethnicity. PMID:24337772

  8. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  9. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  10. Combined genetic and nutritional risk models of triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; Levine, Edward A; Franco, Vivian I; Allen, Glenn O; Gong, Feng; Zhang, Yanbin; Hu, Jennifer J

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) presents clinical challenges due to unknown etiology, lack of treatment targets, and poor prognosis. We examined combined genetic and nutritional risk models of TNBC in 354 breast cancer cases. We evaluated 18 DNA-repair nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) and dietary/nutritional intakes. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines models were used to select nutrients of interest and define cut-off values for logistic regression models. Our results suggest that TNBC was associated with 6 DNA-repair nsSNPs, ERCC4 R415Q (rs1800067), MSH3 R940Q (rs184967), MSH6 G39E (rs1042821), POLD1 R119H (rs1726801), XRCC1 R194W (rs1799782), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) and/or deficiencies in 3 micronutrients (zinc, folate, and β-carotene). Combined analyses of these 6 nsSNPs and 3 micronutrients showed significant association with TNBC: odds ratios = 2.77 (95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.64) and 10.89 (95% confidence interval = 3.50-33.89) for 2 and at least 3 risk factors, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest that multiple genetic and nutritional factors are associated with TNBC, particularly in combination. Our findings, if validated in larger studies, will have important clinical implication that dietary modulations and/or micronutrient supplementations may prevent or reverse TNBC phenotype, so tumors can be treated with less toxic therapeutic strategies, particularly in genetically susceptible women. PMID:25023197

  11. Serum 5-LOX: a progressive protein marker for breast cancer and new approach for therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Shekhar, Shashank; Rai, Nitish; Kaur, Punit; Parshad, Rajinder; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-09-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway has emerged to have a role in carcinogenesis. There is an evidence that both 12-LOX and 5-LOX have procarcinogenic role. We have previously reported the elevated level of serum 12-LOX in breast cancer patients. This study evaluated the serum level of 5-LOX in breast cancer patients and its in vitro inhibition assessment with peptide inhibitor YWCS. The level of 5-LOX was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide inhibitor of 5-LOX was designed by molecular modeling and kinetic assay was performed by spectrophotometry. The siRNA mediated 5-LOX gene silencing was performed to investigate the effect on proliferation of MDA-MB-231, breast cancer cell line. The serum 5-LOX level in breast cancer (5.69±1.97ng/µl) was almost 2-fold elevated compared to control (3.53±1.0ng/µl) (P < 0.0001). The peptide YWCS had shown competitive inhibitory effects with IC50, 2.2 µM and dissociation constant (K D), 4.92×10(-8) M. The siRNA mediated knockdown of 5-LOX, resulted in the decreased gene expression for 5-LOX and increased cell death in MDA-MB-231 cell line and thereby play a key role in reducing tumor proliferation. Thus, it can be concluded that 5-LOX is one of the potential serum protein marker for breast cancer and a promising therapeutic target for the same. PMID:27432812

  12. Differences between invasive lobular and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: results and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Sousa, Romualdo; Metzger-Filho, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most common histologic subtype of breast cancer (BC): ILC differs from invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) in its clinicopathological characteristics and responsiveness to systemic therapy. From the clinical standpoint, data suggest that ILC derives a distinct benefit from systemic therapy compared to IDC. In addition, comprehensive molecular analyses have been reported for ILCs, confirming that these tumors have specific genomic profiles compared to IDC. Despite these differences, clinical trials and practical clinical guidelines tend to treat BC as a single entity. Here we discuss these clinical and molecular data and their therapeutic implications. PMID:27482285

  13. The application of gold nanoparticles as a promising therapeutic approach in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kafshdooz, Leila; Kafshdooz, Taiebeh; Razban, Zohreh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-08-01

    The development of specialized nanoparticles (NPs) for use in the detection and treatment of cancer is increasing. In the last few years, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been greatly studied in biological and photothermal therapeutic status. AuNPs can bind to a wide range of organic molecules, and their synthesis is easy. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of AuNPs, their contributions to tumor destruction, their toxicity, and their potential in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:25871281

  14. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  15. New therapeutic opportunities in epilepsy: a genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven

    2010-11-01

    Epilepsy is a common and serious neurological disorder. Despite recent advances in drug therapy, treatment for epilepsy is still largely empirical and rational prescribing based on the mechanism of action in an individual patient is generally not possible. Genetic studies have identified an increasing collection of disease-causing genes providing a fundamental molecular foundation on which to build this understanding, at least for some forms of epilepsy. The impact of these genetic discoveries is likely to be wide reaching-from the discovery and validation of new drug targets to the potential to enable rational prescribing based on genetic makeup and even further through animal experimentation to tease out molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to hyperexcitable neuronal networks causing epilepsy. Here we discuss how we can use knowledge of genetic mechanisms to improve treatment strategies now and into the future. PMID:20705092

  16. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Arreola, M. Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Castro, Julieta I.; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Carrero, Julio C.; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system. PMID:25165728

  17. Evaluation of carbonic anhydrase IX as a therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis using a series of in vitro breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol; Meehan, James; Mullen, Peter; Supuran, Claudiu; Dixon, J. Michael; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Winum, Jean-Yves; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Pavathaneni, Nanda-Kumar; Jarman, Edward J.; Renshaw, Lorna; Um, InHwa; Kay, Charlene; Harrison, David J.; Kunkler, Ian H.; Langdon, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative, resistant or metastatic disease are major factors in breast cancer mortality, warranting novel approaches. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is implicated in survival, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and inhibition provides an innovative therapeutic strategy. The efficacy of 5 novel ureido-substituted sulfamate CAIX inhibitors were assessed in increasingly complex breast cancer models, including cell lines in normoxia and hypoxia, 3D spheroids and an ex-vivo explant model utilizing fresh biopsy tissue from different breast cancer subtypes. CAIX expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray (TMA) of 92 paired lymph node and primary breast cancers and 2 inhibitors were appraised in vivo using MDA-MB-231 xenografts. FC11409B, FC9398A, FC9403, FC9396A and S4 decreased cell proliferation and migration and inhibited 3D spheroid invasion. S4, FC9398A and FC9403A inhibited or prevented invasion into collagen. FC9403A significantly reversed established invasion whilst FC9398A and DTP348 reduced xenograft growth. TMA analysis showed increased CAIX expression in triple negative cancers. These data establish CAIX inhibition as a relevant therapeutic goal in breast cancer, targeting the migratory, invasive, and metastatic potential of this disease. The use of biopsy tissue suggests efficacy against breast cancer subtypes, and should provide a useful tool in drug testing against invasive cancers. PMID:26259239

  18. Genetic Variations in ABCG2 Gene Predict Breast Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinical Outcomes after Treatment with Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huizhe; Liu, Yong; Kang, Hui; Xiao, Qinghuan; Yao, Weifan; Zhao, Haishan; Wang, Enhua; Wei, Minjie

    2015-01-01

    The genetic variants of the ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G, member 2 (ABCG2) are known to be involved in developing cancer risk and interindividual differences in chemotherapeutic response. The polymorphisms in ABCG2 gene were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP assays. We found that ABCG2 G34A GA/AA genotype, C421A AA genotype, and haplotypes 34A-421C and 34G-421A were significantly associated with increased risk for developing breast carcinoma. Furthermore, ABCG2 C421A AA homozygote had a significant enhanced therapeutic response in patients with neoadjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Moreover, ABCG2 G34A AA genotype carriers displayed a longer OS in ER positive patients or PR positive patients after postoperative anthracycline-based chemotherapy. These results suggested that the ABCG2 polymorphisms might be a candidate pharmacogenomic factor to assess susceptibility and prognosis for breast carcinoma patients. PMID:26634205

  19. miRNA – Therapeutic tool in breast cancer? Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge about involvement of microRNAs in breast cancer, and their potential in the clinic, published in scientific journals searched in Pubmed/Medline database until March 2014. Results MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of 21–25 nucleotide small RNAs molecules. Currently, it is well known that miRNA plays a key role in all cellular processes of the organism including tumour initiation and progression. Many studies have shown that circulating miRNAs are attractive, easily detectable tumour biomarkers. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is clinically established that different subtypes may respond differently to therapies, give metastases and present drug resistance. MicroRNAs have a potential as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools in breast cancer. Conclusion Molecular knowledge is crucial for choosing the most effective therapy for individual patients. MicroRNAs holds a great potential in anticancer therapy. PMID:25859396

  20. Therapeutic application of ultrasound-guided 8-gauge Mammotome system in presumed benign breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao-jun; Chen, Xin; Tu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Wu, Cheng-yi; Yang, Guang-lun

    2011-01-01

    The stereotactic or ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Mammotome, MMT) system is a minimally invasive surgical technique. Increasingly, it is used to remove benign breast lesions as management. To evaluate the therapeutic value of 8-gauge ultrasound-guided MMT system (UMS) in presumed benign breast lesions, a retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. The parameters used in this analysis included lesion size, location, breast imaging reporting and data system for ultrasound category, histopathologic diagnosis, and others. A total of 1,119 women whose mean ages were 36.6 years (range: 12-71, SD: 9.6) underwent 2,167 consecutive 8-gauge UMS procedures. Among the patients, 298 cases (26.63%) did not have palpable mass, 430 (38.43%) had multiple lesions, and 237 (21.18%) had bilateral ones. The average size of excised lesions was 15.8 mm (range: 5-55, SD: 6.7) in the largest dimension, including 294 lesions < 10 mm (13.57%); 1,359 lesions, 10-19 mm (62.71%); 420 lesions, 20-29 mm (19.38%), and 94 lesions ≥ 30 mm (4.34%). Predominant lesions (81.59%) were solid on ultrasound image and nearly half (48.59%) of them were localized in the upper outer quadrant. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed that the overwhelming majority of specimens (96.61%) were benign, most of which manifested as fibroadenoma and fibrocystic changes, while high-risk lesions were revealed in 31 (2.29%) cases and malignancies in 15 (1.11%). Average time for procedure was 8.6 minutes (range: 3.5-38, SD: 5.4) and mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 9.3 (range: 2-42, SD: 3.7). Complete excision was achieved predominantly (99.82%). Complications (59, 5.27%) in which hematoma (41, 3.66%) was the majority were acceptable. In conclusion, the 8-gauge UMS procedure is a safe and potent therapeutic management with satisfactory cosmetic outcome for benign and high-risk breast lesions, especially for bilateral, multiple, and

  1. Nanoassembly of probucol enables novel therapeutic efficacy in the suppression of lung metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Cao, Haiqiang; Jiang, Shijun; Liu, Zeying; He, Xinyu; Yu, Haijun; Li, Yaping

    2014-11-01

    Metastasis is one of the major obstacles hindering the success of cancer therapy. The directed nanoassembly of probucol results in the "DNP" system, which greatly improves the oral delivery of probucol and subsequently leads to a novel therapeutic efficacy of probucol in the suppression of lung metastasis of breast cancer. DNP is formed by employing the intermolecular hydrophobic interactions between probucol and polyethylene glycol p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)-phenyl ether (also known as Triton X-100). After oral administration, the probucol concentration in the intestines is surprisingly about 200 times higher if it is applied as DNP rather than free probucol; it can be absorbed into intestinal enterocytes via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and transported into the systemic circulation through the lymphatic pathway. Moreover, the oral bioavailability of probucol is significantly higher-13.55 times higher-when applied as DNP in place of free probucol. The drug concentration in major organs is also significantly increased. The in vitro measurements show that the migration and invasion abilities of 4T1 cells are obviously inhibited by DNP. In particular, in an orthotopic metastatic breast cancer model, the notable suppression of lung metastasis from DNP is observed, but no effect is seen from the free-probucol suspension. As a result, the directed drug nanoassembly may open a new route for enhancing oral drug delivery and enable new therapeutic abilities for probucol against cancer metastasis. PMID:24930590

  2. Genetic/familial high-risk assessment: breast and ovarian, version 1.2014.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, Beth; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Horton, Carolyn; Kaklamani, Virginia; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer; Madlensky, Lisa; Marcom, P Kelly; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Pasche, Boris; Reiser, Gwen; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whelan, Alison; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary A; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-09-01

    During the past few years, several genetic aberrations that may contribute to increased risks for development of breast and/or ovarian cancers have been identified. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian focus specifically on the assessment of genetic mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, TP53, and PTEN, and recommend approaches to genetic testing/counseling and management strategies in individuals with these mutations. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines includes recommendations regarding diagnostic criteria and management of patients with Cowden Syndrome/PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. PMID:25190698

  3. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Breast Reconstruction Surgery and Therapeutic Mammoplasty: Prospective Evaluation 1 Year Post-Surgery with BREAST-Q Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Laxmi; Busheri, Laleh; Dixit, Santosh; Patel, Chaula; Dhar, Upendra; Koppiker, Chaitanyanand

    2015-12-01

    Breast Cancer (BC) treatment leads to mutilation and destruction of breast shape with negative effects on body image and self-esteem.One of the main goals of reconstructive and oncoplastic breast surgery is to satisfy patients and improve their quality of life (QoL).Therefore, it is important to assess the patient experience post-surgery by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that focus on the patient's perception of the surgery and surgical care, as well as psychosocial well-being and physical functioning. The objective of the current study was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction such as breast appearance including implant type in a selective sample of women who underwent breast reconstruction surgery using implants. Participants in this prospective study were women, (age 26-75 years) that were newly diagnosed with breast carcinoma. All consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction between January 2013 and October 2014 were asked to complete the BREAST-Q questionnaire 1 year after surgery. 120 patients underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using implant. While 38 patients underwent reconstruction with opposite breast reduction symmertization, 27 patients underwent therapeutic mammoplasty. The response rate for BREAST-Q questionnaire completion was 98 % with 147 out of 150 study participants completed the questionnaire. From the data collected from 147 patients, the responses could be distributed into 4 distinct groups based on the reconstruction outcomes namely "very much satisfied" (93 %) or "definitely and mostly satisfied" (94 %) or "satisfied" with the outcome (88 %) or "definitely agree on having reconstruction rather than the alternative of having no breast "(91 %).The results showed significant improvement in all four areas that were evaluated after surgery namely satisfaction with the appearance of the breasts, psychosocial, sexual and physical well-being. While the reconstruction surgery had an overall

  5. Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian, Version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary B; Pilarski, Robert; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Berry, Michael; Buys, Saundra S; Crawford, Beth; Farmer, Meagan; Friedman, Susan; Garber, Judy E; Khan, Seema; Klein, Catherine; Kohlmann, Wendy; Kurian, Allison; Litton, Jennifer K; Madlensky, Lisa; Marcom, P Kelly; Merajver, Sofia D; Offit, Kenneth; Pal, Tuya; Rana, Huma; Reiser, Gwen; Robson, Mark E; Shannon, Kristen Mahoney; Swisher, Elizabeth; Voian, Nicoleta C; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whelan, Alison; Wick, Myra J; Wiesner, Georgia L; Dwyer, Mary; Kumar, Rashmi; Darlow, Susan

    2016-02-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian provide recommendations for genetic testing and counseling and risk assessment and management for hereditary cancer syndromes. Guidelines focus on syndromes associated with an increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer and are intended to assist with clinical and shared decision-making. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year included multigene testing, risk management recommendations for less common genetic mutations, and salpingectomy for ovarian cancer risk reduction. The panel also discussed revisions to genetic testing criteria that take into account ovarian cancer histology and personal history of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26850485

  6. CCR2-V64I genetic polymorphism: a possible involvement in HER2+ breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Banin-Hirata, Bruna Karina; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Mazzuco, Tânia Longo; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Ceribelli, Jesus Roberto; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2016-05-01

    Many tumor cells express chemokines and chemokine receptors, and these molecules can affect both tumor progression and anti-tumor immune response. Genetic polymorphisms of some chemokine receptors were found to be closely related to malignant tumors, especially in metastasis process, including breast cancer (BC). Considering this, it was investigated a possible role for CCR2-V64I (C-C chemokine receptor 2) and CCR5-Δ32 (C-C chemokine receptor 5) genetic variants in BC context. Patients were divided into subgroups according to immunohistochemical profile of estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression. No significant associations were found in relation to susceptibility (CCR2-V64I: OR 1.32; 95 % CI 0.57-3.06; CCR5-∆32: OR 1.04; 95 % CI 0.60-1.81), clinical outcome (tumor size, lymph nodes commitment and/or distant metastasis, TNM staging and nuclear grade) or therapeutic response (recurrence and survival). However, it was found a significant correlation between CCR2-V64I allelic variant and HER2 immunohistochemical positive samples (p = 0.026). All in all, we demonstrate, for the first time, a positive correlation between CCR2 receptor gene polymorphism and a subgroup of BC related to poor prognosis, which deserves further investigation in larger samples for validation. PMID:25716470

  7. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. PMID:25910782

  8. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  9. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy and Breast Cancer Treatment: Review of Stem Cell Research and Potential Therapeutic Impact Against Cardiotoxicities Due to Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Thomas E.; George, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    A new problem has emerged with the ever-increasing number of breast cancer survivors. While early screening and advances in treatment have allowed these patients to overcome their cancer, these treatments often have adverse cardiovascular side effects that can produce abnormal cardiovascular function. Chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy have both been linked to cardiotoxicity; these therapeutics can cause a loss of cardiac muscle and deterioration of vascular structure that can eventually lead to heart failure (HF). This cardiomyocyte toxicity can leave the breast cancer survivor with a probable diagnosis of dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy (DCM or RCM). While current HF standard of care can alleviate symptoms, other than heart transplantation, there is no therapy that replaces cardiac myocytes that are killed during cancer therapies. There is a need to develop novel therapeutics that can either prevent or reverse the cardiac injury caused by cancer therapeutics. These new therapeutics should promote the regeneration of lost or deteriorating myocardium. Over the last several decades, the therapeutic potential of cell-based therapy has been investigated for HF patients. In this review, we discuss the progress of pre-clinical and clinical stem cell research for the diseased heart and discuss the possibility of utilizing these novel therapies to combat cardiotoxicity observed in breast cancer survivors. PMID:25405100

  11. Managing patients at genetic risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Holly J; Padia, Shilpa A; May, Maureen; Grobmyer, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary syndromes that increase the risk of breast cancer are not common, but it is critical to recognize and manage them appropriately. This paper reviews the management of patients with the most common hereditary breast cancer syndromes, ie, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, Cowden syndrome (PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. PMID:26974991

  12. Genetic Variants Associated with Breast Cancer Risk: Comprehensive Field Synopsis, Meta-Analysis, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Over 1,000 reports have been published during the past two decades on associations between genetic variants in candidate genes and breast cancer risk. Results have been generally inconsistent. We conducted literature searches and meta-analyses to provide a field synopsis of the current understanding of the genetic architecture of breast cancer risk. Methods Systematic literature searches for candidate gene association studies of breast cancer risk were conducted in two stages using PubMed on or before February 28, 2010. A total of 24,500 publications were identified, of which, 1,059 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses were conducted for 279 genetic variants in 128 candidate genes or chromosomal loci that had a minimum of three data sources available. Variants with significant associations by meta-analysis were assessed using the Venice criteria and scored as having strong, moderate, or weak cumulative evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Findings Fifty-one variants in 40 genes showed statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. Cumulative epidemiologic evidence for an association with breast cancer risk was graded as strong for 10 variants in six genes (ATM, CASP8, CHEK2, CTLA4, NBN, and TP53), moderate for four variants in four genes (ATM, CYP19A1, TERT, and XRCC3), and weak for 37 additional variants. Additionally, in meta-analyses that included a minimum of 10,000 cases and 10,000 controls, convincing evidence of no association with breast cancer risk was identified for 45 variants in 37 genes. Interpretation While most genetic variants evaluated in previous candidate gene studies showed no association with breast cancer risk in meta-analyses, 14 variants in 9 genes were found to have moderate to strong evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Further evaluation of these variants is warranted. PMID:21514219

  13. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Hines, Lisa M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Presson, Angela P.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P ARTP = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P ARTP = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P ARTP = 0.03) and ER−/PR− tumors (P ARTP = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process. PMID:24670917

  14. Genetic variants in interleukin genes are associated with breast cancer risk and survival in a genetically admixed population: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Torres-Mejia, Gabriella; John, Esther M; Giuliano, Anna R; Hines, Lisa M; Stern, Mariana C; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Presson, Angela P; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-08-01

    Interleukins (ILs) are key regulators of immune response. Genetic variation in IL genes may influence breast cancer risk and mortality given their role in cell growth, angiogenesis and regulation of inflammatory process. We examined 16 IL genes with breast cancer risk and mortality in an admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases and 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases and 1585 controls) women. Adaptive Rank Truncated Product (ARTP) analysis was conducted to determine gene significance and lasso (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify potential gene by gene and gene by lifestyle interactions. The pathway was statistically significant for breast cancer risk overall (P ARTP = 0.0006), for women with low NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.01), for premenopausal women (P(ARTP) = 0.02), for estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.03) and ER-/PR- tumors (P(ARTP) = 0.02). Eight of the 16 genes evaluated were associated with breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL2RA, IL4, IL6 and IL10); four genes were associated with breast cancer risk among women with low NA ancestry (IL1B, IL6, IL6R and IL10), two were associated with breast cancer risk among women with high NA ancestry (IL2 and IL2RA) and four genes were associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (IL1A, IL1B, IL2 and IL3). IL4, IL6R, IL8 and IL17A were associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. We confirmed associations with several functional polymorphisms previously associated with breast cancer risk and provide support that their combined effect influences the carcinogenic process. PMID:24670917

  15. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  16. Subverting Subversion: A Review on the Breast Cancer Microenvironment and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Ethan; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    This review combines the recent research on the subject of tumor immunology and methods of correcting the immune system’s reaction to the tumor microenvironment while impeding the survival and growth of tumor cells, with a focus on breast cancer. Induction of hypoxia-inducible genes in the microenvironment leads to lowering of its pH. This impedes the adaptive immune response and acts to recruit cells of the immune system, which suppress the immune response. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and their derivatives coordinate an anti-autoimmunity response and a healing response in concert with tumor-secreted cytokines, enzymes, and antigens. Together, they suppress a proper immune reaction to tumor cells and promote cellular reproduction (Fig. 1). In addition, the hypoxia-inducible response and components of the tumor microenvironment such as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) also create an ideal environment for tumor growth and metastasis via neoangiogenesis and increased motility. Broad-spectrum chemotherapy drugs are problematic as breast cancer cells develop resistance through selective loss of a novel target and downregulation of apoptotic factors. A better understanding of the tumor microenvironment offers new therapeutic opportunities to rescue the immune response, inhibit cancer cell growth pathways, and subvert the tumor microenvironment with little toxicity and side effects. PMID:26417204

  17. Current Practice of Therapeutic Mammaplasty: A Survey of Oncoplastic Breast Surgeons in England

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Marla, Sekhar; Nyanhongo, Donald; Kotecha, Sita; Basu, Narendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Therapeutic mammaplasty (TM) is a useful technique in the armamentarium of the oncoplastic breast surgeon (OBS). There is limited guidance on patient selection, technique, coding, and management of involved margins. The practices of OBS in England remain unknown. Methods. Questionnaires were sent to all OBS involved with the Training Interface Group. We assessed the number of TM cases performed per surgeon, criteria for patient selection, pedicle preference, contralateral symmetrisation, use of routine preoperative MRI, management of involved margins, and clinical coding. Results. We had an overall response rate of 43%. The most common skin resection technique utilised was wise pattern followed by vertical scar. Superior-medial pedicle was preferred by the majority of surgeons (62%) followed by inferior pedicle (34%). Twenty percent of surgeons would always proceed to a mastectomy following an involved margin, whereas the majority would offer reexcision based on several parameters. The main absolute contraindication to TM was tumour to breast ratio >50%. One in five surgeons would not perform TM in smokers and patients with multifocal disease. Discussion. There is a wide variation in the practice of TM amongst OBS. Further research and guidance would be useful to standardise practice, particularly management of involved margins and coding for optimal reimbursement. PMID:27110398

  18. PI3K mutations in breast cancer: prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Mukohara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K pathway is the most frequently enhanced oncogenic pathway in breast cancer. Among mechanisms of PI3K enhancement, PIK3CA mutations are most frequently (∼30%) observed, along with protein loss of PTEN. Since the first discovery of PIK3CA mutations in solid malignancies in 2004, numerous studies have revealed the prognostic and therapeutic implications of these mutations. Although many issues remain unconfirmed, some have been carved in stone by the level of consistency they have shown among studies: 1) PIK3CA mutations are most likely to be observed in ER-positive/HER2-negative tumors, and are associated with other good prognostic characters; 2) PIK3CA mutations can coexist with other PI3K-enhancing mechanisms, such as HER2 amplification and PTEN protein loss; 3) PIK3CA mutations are potentially a good prognostic marker; 4) PIK3CA may predict a poorer tumor response to trastuzumab-based therapies, but its impact on disease-free survival and overall survival is uncertain; and 5) based on reports of early clinical trials, PIK3CA mutations do not guarantee a dramatic response to PI3K inhibitors. Collectively, there is currently no sufficient evidence to recommend routine genotyping of PIK3CA in clinical practice. Given that PIK3CA-mutant breast cancer appears to have a distinct tumor biology, development of more individualized targeted therapies based on the PIK3CA genotype is awaited. PMID:26028978

  19. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-08-20

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  20. Hereditary breast cancer: an update on risk assessment and genetic testing in 2015.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Ashley R; Onstad, Michaela A

    2015-08-01

    The last 5 years have brought significant innovation and advancement in the genetics of breast cancer. This clinical opinion aims to summarize and update current approaches to the care of women at risk for a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. Implications of the BRCA mutation and several other hereditary syndromes will be discussed. Risk assessment and criteria for referral to cancer genetic professionals as well as high-risk screening and prophylactic options will be reviewed. Finally, the newly available genetic cancer panels and implications of mutations in some of these lesser known genes will be discussed. As the field of cancer genetics continues to evolve, the education of medical students, residents, and faculty will be paramount to identify appropriate candidates for genetic counseling and testing in conjunction with cancer genetic professionals. PMID:25747548

  1. Purification of the therapeutic antibody trastuzumab from genetically modified plants using safflower Protein A-oleosin oilbody technology.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michael D; Chen, Rongji; Yu, Deqiang; Mah, Kor-Zheng; Teat, John; Wang, Haifeng; Zaplachinski, Steve; Boothe, Joseph; Hall, J Christopher

    2012-12-01

    Production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies using genetically modified plants may provide low cost, high scalability and product safety; however, antibody purification from plants presents a challenge due to the large quantities of biomass that need to be processed. Protein A column chromatography is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for antibody purification, but its application is limited by cost, scalability and column fouling problems when purifying plant-derived antibodies. Protein A-oleosin oilbodies (Protein A-OB), expressed in transgenic safflower seeds, are relatively inexpensive to produce and provide a new approach for the capture of monoclonal antibodies from plants. When Protein A-OB is mixed with crude extracts from plants engineered to express therapeutic antibodies, the Protein A-OB captures the antibody in the oilbody phase while impurities remain in the aqueous phase. This is followed by repeated partitioning of oilbody phase against an aqueous phase via centrifugation to remove impurities before purified antibody is eluted from the oilbodies. We have developed this purification process to recover trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody used for therapy against specific breast-cancers that over express HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2), from transiently infected Nicotiana benthamiana. Protein A-OB overcomes the fouling problem associated with traditional Protein A chromatography, allowing for the development of an inexpensive, scalable and novel high-resolution method for the capture of antibodies based on simple mixing and phase separation. PMID:22382463

  2. TP53 genetic alterations in Arab breast cancer patients: Novel mutations, pattern and distribution

    PubMed Central

    AL-QASEM, ABEER J.; TOULIMAT, MOHAMED; ELDALI, ABDELMONEIM M.; TULBAH, ASMA; AL-YOUSEF, NUJOUD; AL-DAIHAN, SOOAD K.; AL-TASSAN, NADA; AL-TWEIGERI, TAHER; ABOUSSEKHRA, ABDELILAH

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health concern. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer varies significantly in ethnically and geographically distinct populations. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) breast cancer has shown an increase in incidence and is characterized by early onset and aggressiveness. The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is a crucial genetic factor that plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis. Furthermore, studies have shown a correlation between certain p53 mutations and response to therapy in breast cancer. In the present study, TP53 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of the gene (exons 4–9) from 119 breast cancer tissues. The prevalence of TP53 mutations in Arab breast cancer patients living in the KSA is among the highest in the world (40%). Notably, 73% of the patients whose tumors harbored p53 mutations were less than 50 years of age. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified 7 novel mutations and 16 mutations in breast cancer tissues. Notably, all the novel point mutations were found in exon 4, wherein 29% of the mutations were localized. Furthermore, an excess of G:C→A:T transitions (49%) at non-CpG sites was noted, suggesting exposure to particular environmental carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds. The results indicate that the TP53 gene plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis and the early onset of the disease among Arab female individuals. PMID:22866089

  3. TP53 genetic alterations in Arab breast cancer patients: Novel mutations, pattern and distribution.

    PubMed

    Al-Qasem, Abeer J; Toulimat, Mohamed; Eldali, Abdelmoneim M; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Yousef, Nujoud; Al-Daihan, Sooad K; Al-Tassan, Nada; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health concern. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer varies significantly in ethnically and geographically distinct populations. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) breast cancer has shown an increase in incidence and is characterized by early onset and aggressiveness. The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is a crucial genetic factor that plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis. Furthermore, studies have shown a correlation between certain p53 mutations and response to therapy in breast cancer. In the present study, TP53 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of the gene (exons 4-9) from 119 breast cancer tissues. The prevalence of TP53 mutations in Arab breast cancer patients living in the KSA is among the highest in the world (40%). Notably, 73% of the patients whose tumors harbored p53 mutations were less than 50 years of age. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified 7 novel mutations and 16 mutations in breast cancer tissues. Notably, all the novel point mutations were found in exon 4, wherein 29% of the mutations were localized. Furthermore, an excess of G:C→A:T transitions (49%) at non-CpG sites was noted, suggesting exposure to particular environmental carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds. The results indicate that the TP53 gene plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis and the early onset of the disease among Arab female individuals. PMID:22866089

  4. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Biomarkers For Breast Cancer Based On Genetic Instability | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    It is difficult to establish a prognosis for breast cancer because the clinical course and survival times of patients with the disease vary greatly.  The National Cancer Institute's Genetics Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize prognostic tests for breast cancer based on a 12-gene expression signature.

  6. Micro-RNAs as clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in breast cancer: Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, Gerasimos Socrates; Dalamaga, Maria

    2014-05-10

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent type of non skin cancer among women and a major leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Western countries. It is substantial to discover novel biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic or predictive usefulness as well as therapeutic value for BC. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) belong to a novel class of endogenous interfering RNAs that play a crucial role in post transcriptional gene silencing through mRNA targeting and, thus, are involved in many biological processes encompassing apoptosis, cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, DNA repair, immunity, metabolism, stress, aging, etc. MiRNAs exert their action mainly in a tumor suppressive or oncogenic manner. The specific aberrant expression patterns of miRNAs in BC that are detected with the use of high-throughput technologies reflect their key role in cancer initiation, progression, migration, invasion and metastasis. The detection of circulating extracellular miRNAs in plasma of BC patients may provide novel, non-invasive biomarkers in favor of BC diagnosis and prognosis and, at the same time, accumulating evidence has underscored the possible contribution of miRNAs as valuable biomarkers to predict response to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies on BC have revealed promising therapeutic approaches via miRNA delivery and miRNA inhibition. The purpose of this review is to explore the ontological role of miRNAs in BC etiopathogenesis as well as to highlight their potential, not only as non-invasive circulating biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic significance, but also as treatment response predictors and therapeutic targets aiding BC management. PMID:24829853

  7. Breast cancer risk in MEN1 - a cancer genetics perspective.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The tumour spectrum associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) has been known for many years. New data suggest that females with MEN1 may face an additional, hitherto unrecognized, risk of early-onset breast cancer. The menin protein is certainly known to have a role in regulating oestrogen receptor activity; but how robust are the data linking MEN1 to breast cancer? This article examines the published data from the viewpoint of a cancer geneticist and considers whether there really is a justifiable indication for enhanced breast surveillance in women with MEN1. PMID:25279812

  8. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  9. Ashkenazi Jews and Breast Cancer: The Consequences of Linking Ethnic Identity to Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt-Rauf, Sherry I.; Raveis, Victoria H.; Drummond, Nathan F.; Conte, Jill A.; Rothman, Sheila M.

    2006-01-01

    We explored the advantages and disadvantages of using ethnic categories in genetic research. With the discovery that certain breast cancer gene mutations appeared to be more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews, breast cancer researchers moved their focus from high-risk families to ethnicity. The concept of Ashkenazi Jews as genetically unique, a legacy of Tay–Sachs disease research and a particular reading of history, shaped this new approach even as methodological imprecision and new genetic and historical research challenged it. Our findings cast doubt on the accuracy and desirability of linking ethnic groups to genetic disease. Such linkages exaggerate genetic differences among ethnic groups and lead to unequal access to testing and therapy. PMID:17018815

  10. Ashkenazi Jews and breast cancer: the consequences of linking ethnic identity to genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Rauf, Sherry I; Raveis, Victoria H; Drummond, Nathan F; Conte, Jill A; Rothman, Sheila M

    2006-11-01

    We explored the advantages and disadvantages of using ethnic categories in genetic research. With the discovery that certain breast cancer gene mutations appeared to be more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews, breast cancer researchers moved their focus from high-risk families to ethnicity. The concept of Ashkenazi Jews as genetically unique, a legacy of Tay-Sachs disease research and a particular reading of history, shaped this new approach even as methodological imprecision and new genetic and historical research challenged it. Our findings cast doubt on the accuracy and desirability of linking ethnic groups to genetic disease. Such linkages exaggerate genetic differences among ethnic groups and lead to unequal access to testing and therapy. PMID:17018815

  11. Untangling the ATR-CHEK1 network for prognostication, prediction and therapeutic target validation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Middleton, Fiona K; Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Chen, Tao; Moseley, Paul M; Perry, Christina; Doherty, Rachel; Chan, Stephen; Green, Andrew R; Rakha, Emad; Ball, Graham; Ellis, Ian O; Curtin, Nicola J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-03-01

    ATR-CHEK1 signalling is critical for genomic stability. ATR-CHEK1 signalling may be deregulated in breast cancer and have prognostic, predictive and therapeutic significance. We investigated ATR, CHEK1 and phosphorylated CHEK1 (Ser345) protein (pCHEK1) levels in 1712 breast cancers. ATR and CHEK1 mRNA expression was evaluated in 1950 breast cancers. Pre-clinically, biological consequences of ATR gene knock down or ATR inhibition by the small molecule inhibitor (VE-821) were investigated in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and in non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). High ATR and high cytoplasmic pCHEK1 levels were significantly associated with higher tumour stage, higher mitotic index, pleomorphism and lymphovascular invasion. In univariate analyses, high ATR and high cytoplasmic pCHEK1 levels were associated with poor breast cancer specific survival (BCSS). In multivariate analysis, high ATR level remains an independent predictor of adverse outcome. At the mRNA level, high CHEK1 remains associated with aggressive phenotypes including lymph node positivity, high grade, Her-2 overexpression, triple negative, aggressive molecular phenotypes and adverse BCSS. Pre-clinically, CHEK1 phosphorylation at serine(345) following replication stress was impaired in ATR knock down and in VE-821 treated breast cancer cells. Doxycycline inducible knockdown of ATR suppressed growth, which was restored when ATR was re-expressed. Similarly, VE-821 treatment resulted in a dose dependent suppression of cancer cell growth and survival (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) but was less toxic in non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). We provide evidence that ATR and CHEK1 are promising biomarkers and rational drug targets for personalized therapy in breast cancer. PMID:25468710

  12. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Prediction of Breast Cancer Risk Based on Profiling With Common Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Brook, Mark N.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wildiers, Hans; Van Ongeval, Chantal; van Limbergen, Erik; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Kraft, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Benitez, Javier; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Takhirova, Zalina; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Christiansen, Hans; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Försti, Asta; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Marie Mulligan, Anna; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Carpenter, Jane; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Karina Dieffenbach, Aida; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Offit, Kenneth; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Dwek, Miriam; Swann, Ruth; Annie Perkins, Katherine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Rafiq, Sajjad; John, Esther M.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Slager, Susan; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Toland, Amanda E.; Yao, Song; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Rosario Alonso, M.; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. Methods: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. Results: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. Conclusions: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report. PMID:25855707

  14. Genome and transcriptome sequencing in prospective metastatic triple-negative breast cancer uncovers therapeutic vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Craig, David W; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Aldrich, Jessica; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy M; Wong, Shukmei; Dinh, Jennifer; Christoforides, Alexis; Blum, Joanne L; Aitelli, Cristi L; Osborne, Cynthia R; Izatt, Tyler; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Baker, Angela; Koeman, Julie; Barbacioru, Catalin; Sakarya, Onur; De La Vega, Francisco M; Siddiqui, Asim; Hoang, Linh; Billings, Paul R; Salhia, Bodour; Tolcher, Anthony W; Trent, Jeffrey M; Mousses, Spyro; Von Hoff, Daniel; Carpten, John D

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER-2. Thirty percent of patients recur after first-line treatment, and metastatic TNBC (mTNBC) has a poor prognosis with median survival of one year. Here, we present initial analyses of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing data from 14 prospective mTNBC. We have cataloged the collection of somatic genomic alterations in these advanced tumors, particularly those that may inform targeted therapies. Genes mutated in multiple tumors included TP53, LRP1B, HERC1, CDH5, RB1, and NF1. Notable genes involved in focal structural events were CTNNA1, PTEN, FBXW7, BRCA2, WT1, FGFR1, KRAS, HRAS, ARAF, BRAF, and PGCP. Homozygous deletion of CTNNA1 was detected in 2 of 6 African Americans. RNA sequencing revealed consistent overexpression of the FOXM1 gene when tumor gene expression was compared with nonmalignant breast samples. Using an outlier analysis of gene expression comparing one cancer with all the others, we detected expression patterns unique to each patient's tumor. Integrative DNA/RNA analysis provided evidence for deregulation of mutated genes, including the monoallelic expression of TP53 mutations. Finally, molecular alterations in several cancers supported targeted therapeutic intervention on clinical trials with known inhibitors, particularly for alterations in the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. In conclusion, whole genome and transcriptome profiling of mTNBC have provided insights into somatic events occurring in this difficult to treat cancer. These genomic data have guided patients to investigational treatment trials and provide hypotheses for future trials in this irremediable cancer. PMID:23171949

  15. Use of a genetically engineered mouse model as a preclinical tool for HER2 breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Creedon, Helen; Balderstone, Lucy A.; Muir, Morwenna; Balla, Jozef; Gomez-Cuadrado, Laura; Tracey, Natasha; Loane, Joseph; Klinowska, Teresa; Muller, William J.; Brunton, Valerie G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies presents a major clinical problem. Although preclinical studies have identified a number of possible mechanisms, clinical validation has been difficult. This is most likely to reflect the reliance on cell-line models that do not recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity seen in human tumours. Here, we show the utility of a genetically engineered mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer (MMTV-NIC) to define mechanisms of resistance to the pan-HER family inhibitor AZD8931. Genetic manipulation of MMTV-NIC mice demonstrated that loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) conferred de novo resistance to AZD8931, and a tumour fragment transplantation model was established to assess mechanisms of acquired resistance. Using this approach, 50% of tumours developed resistance to AZD8931. Analysis of the resistant tumours showed two distinct patterns of resistance: tumours in which reduced membranous HER2 expression was associated with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and resistant tumours that retained HER2 expression and an epithelial morphology. The plasticity of the EMT phenotype was demonstrated upon re-implantation of resistant tumours that then showed a mixed epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype. Further AZD8931 treatment resulted in the generation of secondary resistant tumours that again had either undergone EMT or retained their original epithelial morphology. The data provide a strong rationale for basing therapeutic decisions on the biology of the individual resistant tumour, which can be very different from that of the primary tumour and will be specific to individual patients. PMID:26721874

  16. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. PMID:26852151

  17. The influence of acculturation and breast cancer-specific distress on perceived barriers to genetic testing for breast cancer among women of African descent

    PubMed Central

    Sussner, Katarina M.; Thompson, Hayley S.; Jandorf, Lina; Edwards, Tiffany A.; Forman, Andrea; Brown, Karen; Kapil-Pair, Nidhi; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Schwartz, Marc D.; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Rising health disparities are increasingly evident in relation to use of genetic services (including genetic counseling and testing) for breast cancer risk, with women of African descent less likely to use genetic services compared with Whites. Meanwhile, little is known regarding potential within-group acculturation and psychological differences underlying perceived barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. Methods Hypothesized contributions of acculturation factors and breast cancer-specific distress to perceived barriers to genetic testing were examined with a statistical analysis of baseline data from 146 women of African descent (56% US born and 44% foreign born) meeting genetic breast cancer risk criteria and participating in a larger longitudinal study that included the opportunity for free genetic counseling and testing. Perceived barriers assessed included: (1) anticipation of negative emotional reactions, (2) stigma, (3) confidentiality concerns, (4) family-related worry, and (5) family-related guilt associated with genetic testing. Results In multivariate analyses, being foreign born was a significant predictor of anticipated negative emotional reactions about genetic testing (β= 0.26; SE=0.11; p = 0.01). Breast cancer-specific distress scores (avoidance symptoms) were positively related to anticipated negative emotional reactions (β = 0.02; SE= 0.005; p = <0.0001), confidentiality concerns (β = 0.02; SE = 0.01; p = 0.02), and family-related guilt (β = 0.02; SE=0.01; p = 0.0009) associated with genetic testing. Conclusions Results suggest an influence of acculturation and breast cancer-specific distress on perceived barriers to genetic testing among women of African descent. The potential utility of culturally tailored genetic counseling services taking into account such influences and addressing emotional and psychological concerns of women considering genetic testing for breast cancer should be investigated. PMID

  18. Genetic ancestry and risk of mortality among U.S. Latinas with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fejerman, Laura; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; John, Esther M.; Stern, Mariana C.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Ziv, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Multiple studies have reported that Latina women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer at more advanced stages and have poorer survival than non-Latina White women. However, Latinas are a heterogeneous group with individuals having different proportions of European, Indigenous American and African genetic ancestry. In this study we evaluated the association between genetic ancestry and survival after breast cancer diagnosis among 899 Latina women from the San Francisco Bay Area. Genetic ancestry was estimated from single nucleotide polymorphisms from an Affymetrix 6.0 array and we used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer-specific mortality (tests were two-sided). Women were followed for an average of 9 years during which 75 died from breast cancer. Our results showed that Individuals with higher Indigenous American ancestry had increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality [hazard ratio (HR): 1.57 per 25% increase in Indigenous American ancestry; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.29]. Adjustment for demographic factors, tumor characteristics, and some treatment information did not explain the observed association [HR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.12–2.74]. In an analysis in which ancestry was dichotomized, the hazard of mortality showed a two-fold increase when comparing women with <50% Indigenous American ancestry to women with ≥50% [HR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.10–3.24]. This was also reflected by Kaplan-Meier survival estimates (P for Log-Rank test of 0.003). Overall, results suggest that genetic factors and/or unmeasured differences in treatment or access to care should be further explored to understand and reduce ethnic disparities in breast cancer outcomes. PMID:24177181

  19. The genetics of Parkinson’s disease: progress and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The past 15 years has witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of the genetic basis for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Notably, while most mutations, such as those in SNCA, PINK1, PARK2, PARK7, PLA2G6, FBXO7, and ATP13A2, are a rare cause of disease, one particular mutation in LRRK2, has been found to be common in certain populations. There has been considerable progress in finding risk loci. To date approximately 16 such loci exist, notably some of these overlap with the genes known to contain disease-causing mutations. The identification of risk alleles has relied mostly on the application of revolutionary technologies; likewise second generation sequencing methods have facilitated the identification of new mutations in PD. These methods will continue to provide novel insights into PD. The utility of genetics in therapeutics relies primarily on leveraging findings to understand the pathogenesis of PD. Much of the investigation into the biology underlying PD has used these findings to define a pathway, or pathways, to pathogenesis, by trying to fit disparate genetic defects onto the same network. This work has had some success, particularly in the context of monogenic disease and is beginning to provide clues about potential therapeutic targets. Approaches toward therapies are also being provided more directly by genetics; notably via the reduction and clearance of α-synuclein and inhibition of Lrrk2 kinase activity. We believe this has been an exciting and productive time for PD genetics, and furthermore, that genetics will continue to drive the etiologic understanding and etiology based therapeutic approaches in this disease. PMID:23389780

  20. Genetic Polymorphisms of Metastasis Suppressor Gene NME1 and Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shimian; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Hui; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Ample evidence supports an important role of tumor metastasis suppressor genes in cancer metastatic processes. We evaluated the association of genetic polymorphisms of tumor metastasis suppressor gene NME1 with breast cancer prognosis in a follow-up study of patients with primary breast cancer and further investigated the functions of these polymorphisms. Experimental Design NME1 genotypes were analyzed in a cohort of 1134 breast cancer patients recruited as part of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study who were followed for a median of 7.1 years. In vitro biochemical analyses were carried out to examine the function of NME1 gene polymorphisms. Results Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the NME1 gene were found to be associated with breast cancer prognosis. Patients carrying the C allele in rs16949649 were associated with higher breast cancer-specific mortality (HR =1.4, 95% CI =1.1–1.9) as compared to those carrying the wild-type allele, and the association was more evident in patients with an early stage cancer (HR=1.7, 95% CI =1.2–2.5). SNP rs2302254 was also associated with breast cancer prognosis, and the association was statistically significant for the risk of breast cancer relapse, metastasis, and death (HR=1.3, 95% CI, 1.0–1.6). In vitro biochemical analyses showed that minor alleles in rs2302254 and rs3760468, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs16949646, altered nuclear proteins binding capacity and reduced NME1 promoter activity, supporting the results from an association study of these SNPs with breast cancer survival. Conclusion Promoter polymorphisms in the NME1 gene may alter its expression and influence breast cancer survival. PMID:18676749

  1. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and breast cancer risk is unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated 19 and 17 newly identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the ReproGen Consortium that have been associated with age at menarche and age at natural menopause, respectively, and assessed their associations with breast cancer risk in 6 population-based studies among up to 3,683 breast cancer cases and 34,174 controls in white women of European ancestry. In addition, we used these SNPs to calculate genetic risk scores (GRSs) based on their associations with each trait. Results After adjusting for age and potential population stratification, two age at menarche associated SNPs (rs1079866 and rs7821178) and one age at natural menopause associated SNP (rs2517388) were associated with breast cancer risk (p values, 0.003, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively). The odds ratios for breast cancer corresponding to per-risk-allele were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.24), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.15) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20), respectively, and were in the direction predicted by their associations with age at menarche or age at natural menopause. These associations did not appear to be attenuated by further controlling for self-reported age at menarche, age at natural menopause, or known breast cancer susceptibility loci. Although we did not observe a statistically significant association between any GRS for reproductive aging and breast cancer risk, the 4th and 5th highest quintiles of the younger age at menarche GRS had odds ratios of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.28) and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.27), respectively, compared to the lowest quintile. Conclusions Our study suggests that three genetic variants, independent of their

  2. RB-pathway disruption in breast cancer: differential association with disease subtypes, disease-specific prognosis and therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Ertel, Adam; Dean, Jeffry L; Rui, Hallgeir; Liu, Chengbao; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Knudsen, Karen E; Knudsen, Erik S

    2010-10-15

    In breast cancer, inactivation of the RB tumor suppressor gene is believed to occur via multiple mechanisms to facilitate tumorigenesis. However, the prognostic and predictive value of RB status in disease-specific clinical outcomes has remained uncertain. We investigated RB pathway deregulation in the context of both ER-positive and ER-negative disease using combined microarray datasets encompassing over 900 breast cancer patient samples. Disease-specific characteristics of RB pathway deregulation were investigated in this dataset by evaluating correlation among pathway genes as well as differential expression across patient tumor populations defined by ER status. Survival analysis among these breast cancer samples demonstrates that the RB-loss signature is associated with poor disease outcome within several independent cohorts. Within the ER-negative subpopulation, the RB-loss signature is associated with improved response to chemotherapy and longer relapse-free survival. Additionally, while individual genes in the RB target signature closely reproduce its prognostic value, they also serve to predict and monitor response to therapeutic compounds, such as the cytostatic agent PD-0332991. These results indicate that the RB-loss signature expression is associated with poor outcome in breast cancer, but predicts improved response to chemotherapy based on data in ER-negative populations. While the RB-loss signature, as a whole, demonstrates prognostic and predictive utility, a small subset of markers could be sufficient to stratify patients based on RB function and inform the selection of appropriate therapeutic regimens. PMID:20948315

  3. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    PubMed Central

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. Materials and Methods: To evaluate effectiveness of proposed feature selection method, we employed three different classifiers artificial neural network (ANN) and PS-classifier and genetic algorithm based classifier (GA-classifier) on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets include Wisconsin breast cancer dataset (WBC), Wisconsin diagnosis breast cancer (WDBC), and Wisconsin prognosis breast cancer (WPBC). Results: For WBC dataset, it is observed that feature selection improved the accuracy of all classifiers expect of ANN and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by PS-classifier. For WDBC and WPBC, results show feature selection improved accuracy of all three classifiers and the best accuracy with feature selection achieved by ANN. Also specificity and sensitivity improved after feature selection. Conclusion: The results show that feature selection can improve accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of classifiers. Result of this study is comparable with the other studies on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. PMID:27403253

  4. Epigenetic and genetic burden measures are associated with tumor characteristics in invasive breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Dylan E.; Johnson, Kevin C.; Skinner, Lucy; Koestler, Devin C.; Christensen, Brock C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development and progression of invasive breast cancer is characterized by alterations to the genome and epigenome. However, the relationship between breast tumor characteristics, disease subtypes, and patient outcomes with the cumulative burden of these molecular alterations are not well characterized. We determined the average departure of tumor DNA methylation from adjacent normal breast DNA methylation using Illumina 450K methylation data from 700 invasive breast tumors and 90 adjacent normal breast tissues in The Cancer Genome Atlas. From this we generated a novel summary measure of altered DNA methylation, the DNA methylation dysregulation index (MDI), and examined the relation of MDI with tumor characteristics and summary measures that quantify cumulative burden of genetic mutation and copy number alterations. Our analysis revealed that MDI was significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.017). Across invasive breast tumor subtypes we observed significant differences in genome-wide DNA MDIs (P = 4.9E–09) and in a fraction of the genome with copy number alterations (FGA) (P = 4.6E–03). Results from a linear regression adjusted for subject age, tumor stage, and estimated tumor purity indicated a positive significant association of MDI with both MCB and FGA (P = 0.036 and P < 2.2E–16). A recursively partitioned mixture model of all 3 somatic alteration burden measures resulted in classes of tumors whose epigenetic and genetic burden profile were associated with the PAM50 subtype and mutations in TP53, PIK3CA, and CDH1. Together, our work presents a novel framework for characterizing the epigenetic burden and adds to the understanding of the aggregate impact of epigenetic and genetic alterations in breast cancer. PMID:27070496

  5. The Search for an Explanation: Breast Cancer in the Context of Genetic Inheritance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheu, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This case study is an in-depth examination of how Erika (a pseudonym) interpreted and understood her genetic test results for breast cancer susceptibility. Her experience is presented in the form of a biography, which was built from key passages retrieved from the semi structured interview the author conducted at Erika's home. The interview data…

  6. Familial occurrence of unilateral giant breasts in Nigeria: a possible new genetic entity.

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, O A

    1984-01-01

    Four cases of unilateral giant breasts from two unrelated families are described. Three of the patients were managed surgically. It is speculated from a review of available published reports that this condition may be genetic with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Images PMID:6716410

  7. Familial occurrence of unilateral giant breasts in Nigeria: a possible new genetic entity.

    PubMed

    Badejo, O A

    1984-04-01

    Four cases of unilateral giant breasts from two unrelated families are described. Three of the patients were managed surgically. It is speculated from a review of available published reports that this condition may be genetic with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. PMID:6716410

  8. Genetic variation in genes involved in hormones, inflammation and energetic factors and breast cancer risk in an admixed population

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence rates are characterized by unique racial and ethnic differences. Native American ancestry has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. We explore the biological basis of disparities in breast cancer risk in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women by evaluating genetic variation in genes involved in inflammation, insulin and energy homeostasis in conjunction with genetic ancestry. Hispanic (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (1481 cases, 1586 controls) women enrolled in the 4-Corner’s Breast Cancer Study, the Mexico Breast Cancer Study and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study were included. Genetic admixture was determined from 104 ancestral informative markers that discriminate between European and Native American ancestry. Twenty-one genes in the CHIEF candidate pathway were evaluated. Higher Native American ancestry was associated with reduced risk of breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 0.95) but was limited to postmenopausal women (odds ratio = 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.52, 0.85). After adjusting for genetic ancestry and multiple comparisons, four genes were significantly associated with breast cancer risk, NFκB1, NFκB1A, PTEN and STK11. Within admixture strata, breast cancer risk among women with low Native American ancestry was associated with IkBKB, NFκB1, PTEN and RPS6KA2, whereas among women with high Native American ancestry, breast cancer risk was associated with IkBKB, mTOR, PDK2, PRKAA1, RPS6KA2 and TSC1. Higher Native American ancestry was associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Breast cancer risk differed by genetic ancestry along with genetic variation in genes involved in inflammation, insulin, and energy homeostasis. PMID:22562547

  9. Genetic polymorphisms associated with breast cancer in malaysian cohort.

    PubMed

    Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Munretnam, Khamsigan; Samsudin, Nurulhafizah; Lye, Say Hean; Hashim, Nikman Adli Nor; Ramzi, Nurul Hanis; Velapasamy, Sharmila; Wee, Ler Lian; Alex, Livy

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have discovered multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of common diseases. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the replication of previously published SNPs that showed statistical significance for breast cancer in the Malaysian population. In this case-control study, 80 subjects for each group were recruited from various hospitals in Malaysia. A total of 768 SNPs were genotyped and analyzed to distinguish risk and protective alleles. A total of three SNPs were found to be associated with increased risk of breast cancer while six SNPs showed protective effect. All nine were statistically significant SNPs (p ≤ 0.01), five SNPs from previous studies were successfully replicated in our study. Significant modifiable (diet) and non-modifiable (family history of breast cancer in first degree relative) risk factors were also observed. We identified nine SNPs from this study to be either conferring susceptibility or protection to breast cancer which may serve as potential markers in risk prediction. PMID:25883419

  10. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Naveen; Vohra, Shivani; Tu, Khin; Abdelmagid, Samir M.

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities. PMID:25530967

  11. Association of Genetic Ancestry with Breast Cancer in Ethnically Diverse Women from Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. Methods We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the “Breast Cancer Care in Chicago” study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. Results As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54–0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56–0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p = 0.02) and higher grade (p = 0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p = 0.03) in nH Blacks. Conclusion Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups

  12. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer - Effects on Disease Prognosis and Therapeutic Protocols - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stojanoski, Sinisa; Ristevska, Nevena; Pop-Gjorcheva, Daniela; Antevski, Borce; Petrushevska, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main prognostic factor in early staged breast cancer is the axillary lymph node metastatic affection. Sentinel lymph node biopsy, as a staging modality, significantly decreases surgical morbidity. The status of internal mammary lymph nodes gains an increased predictive role in grading breast carcinomas and modulation of postoperative therapeutic protocols. If positive, almost always are associated with worse disease outcome. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of internal mammary lymph node micrometastases has not been up to date precisely defined. AIM: To present a case of female patient clinically diagnosed as T1, N0, M0 (clinical TNM) ductal breast carcinoma with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. METHODS: Dual method of scintigraphic sentinel lymph node detection using 99mTc-SENTI-SCINT and blue dye injection, intraoperative gamma probe detection, radioguided surgery and intraoperative ex tempore biopsy were used. CASE REPORT: We present a case of clinically T1, N0, M0 ductal breast cancer with scintigraphic detection of internal mammary and axillary sentinel lymph nodes. Intraoperative ex tempore biopsy revealed micrometastases in the internal mammary node and no metastatic involvement of the axillary sentinel lymph node. CONCLUSION: Detection of internal mammary lymph node metastases improves N (nodal) grading of breast cancer by selecting a high risk subgroup of patients that require adjuvant hormone therapy, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy.

  13. Patients' attitudes about autonomy and confidentiality in genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Benkendorf, J L; Reutenauer, J E; Hughes, C A; Eads, N; Willison, J; Powers, M; Lerman, C

    1997-12-19

    The identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2, two breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, has brought many ethical and social issues to the forefront. This paper presents the results of a survey assessing the attitudes of 238 unaffected first-degree relatives of women with breast or ovarian cancer regarding the ethical issues of autonomy and confidentiality as they relate to BRCA1/2 testing. Baseline knowledge about BRCA1/2 and ethnic and psychosocial characteristics of our study population were examined to determine their association with women's attitudes. The majority of women (86-87%) felt that health care providers should not disclose the results of genetic tests for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility to insurance companies or employers without written consent; however, only 56-57% felt that written consent should be required for a spouse or immediate family to receive this information. Ninety-eight percent of the women surveyed agreed that genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer risk should be voluntary. Likewise, most women (95%) agreed that a person should be able to have genetic testing against a doctor's recommendation and 88% of the women surveyed agreed that parents should be able to consent to genetic susceptibility testing on behalf of their minor children. African American women were less concerned than Caucasian women about the protection of confidentiality in families, they were more likely to agree that an individual should still have access to testing when their physicians recommended against it, and they were more supportive of parents' rights to consent to genetic predisposition testing on behalf of their minor children. Women with coping styles characterized by higher optimism were more likely to favor access to genetic testing when a physician recommended against it, and to support parents' rights to consent to testing of their minor children. Therefore, the setting and manner in which genetic counseling and testing are delivered must be

  14. Prostaglandin E receptor EP4 is a therapeutic target in breast cancer cells with stem-like properties.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Namita; Ma, Xinrong; Kochel, Tyler; Goloubeva, Olga; Staats, Paul; Thompson, Keyata; Martin, Stuart; Reader, Jocelyn; Take, Yukinori; Collin, Peter; Fulton, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooxygenase pathway is strongly implicated in breast cancer progression but the role of this pathway in the biology of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells has not been defined. Recent attention has focused on targeting the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway downstream of the COX-2 enzyme by blocking the activities of individual prostaglandin E (EP) receptors. Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) is widely expressed in primary invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast and antagonizing this receptor with small molecule inhibitors or shRNA directed to EP4 inhibits metastatic potential in both syngeneic and xenograft models. Breast cancer stem/progenitor cells are defined as a subpopulation of cells that drive tumor growth, metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse. Mammosphere-forming breast cancer cells of human (MDA-MB-231, SKBR3) or murine (66.1, 410.4) origin of basal-type, Her-2 phenotype and/or with heightened metastatic capacity upregulate expression of both EP4 and COX-2 and are more tumorigenic compared to the bulk population. In contrast, luminal-type or non-metastatic counterparts (MCF7, 410, 67) do not increase COX-2 and EP4 expression in mammosphere culture. Treatment of mammosphere-forming cells with EP4 inhibitors (RQ-15986, AH23848, Frondoside A) or EP4 gene silencing, but not with a COX inhibitor (Indomethacin) reduces both mammosphere-forming capacity and the expression of phenotypic markers (CD44(hi)/CD24(low), aldehyde dehydrogenase) of breast cancer stem cells. Finally, an orally delivered EP4 antagonist (RQ-08) reduces the tumor-initiating capacity and markedly inhibits both the size of tumors arising from transplantation of mammosphere-forming cells and phenotypic markers of stem cells in vivo. These studies support the continued investigation of EP4 as a potential therapeutic target and provide new insight regarding the role of EP4 in supporting a breast cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating phenotype. PMID:24281828

  15. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering. PMID:26036278

  16. Common genetic variations in the LEP and LEPR genes, obesity and breast cancer incidence and survival

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Long, Chang-Min; Gaudet, Mia M.; Eng, Sybil M.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Santella, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a strong risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women and adverse prognostic indicator regardless of menopausal status. Leptin is an important regulator of adipose tissue mass and has been associated with tumor cell growth. Leptin exerts its effects through interaction with the leptin receptor (LEPR). We investigated whether genetic variations in the leptin (LEP) and LEPR genes are associated with risk of breast cancer, or once diagnosed, with survival. Methods The polymorphisms LEP G-2548A and LEPR Q223R were characterized in population-based study consisting of mostly European-American women. The study examined 1,065 women diagnosed with first, primary invasive breast cancer between 1996 and 1997. Controls were 1,108 women frequency matched to the cases by 5-year age group. Results A modest increase in risk of developing breast cancer was associated with the LEP -2548AA genotype when compared to the LEP -2548GG genotype (age-adjusted OR=1.30; 95% CI=1.01–1.66). This association was stronger among postmenopausal women who were obese (OR=1.86; 95% CI=0.95–3.64) although the interaction was of borderline statistical significance (P=0.07). We found no evidence of an association with polymorphisms of either LEP or LEPR in relation to all-cause or breast cancer-specific mortality among women with breast cancer (mean follow-up time=66.7 months). The effects of these genotypes on breast cancer risk and mortality did not vary significantly when stratified by menopausal status. Conclusions In summary, our results show that a common variant in LEP may be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer supporting the hypothesis that leptin is involved in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:19697123

  17. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  18. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Andrulis, Irene L; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A; Fasching, Peter A; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Martens, John W M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hopper, John L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M; Giles, Graham G; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2014-11-15

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  19. Glo1 genetic amplification as a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shirong; Liang, Xiaodong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Chen, Xufeng; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Ma, Shenglin

    2014-01-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) gene aberrations is associated with tumorigenesis and progression in numerous cancers. In this study, we explored the role of Glo1 genetic amplification and expression in Chinese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and Glo1 genetic amplification as potential therapeutic target for HCC. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and qRT-PCR to examine Glo1 genetic aberrations and Glo1 mRNA expression in paired tumor samples obtained from HCC patients. Glo1 genetic amplification was identified in a subset of HCC patient (6%, 3/50), and up-regulation of Glo1 expression was found in 48% (24/50) of tumor tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Statistic analysis showed that Glo1-upregulation significantly correlated with high serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Interfering Glo1 expression with shRNA knocking-down led to significant inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptosis in primarily cultured HCC cells carrying genetic amplified Glo1 gene, while no inhibitory effects on cell proliferation were observed in HCC cells with normal copies of Glo1 gene. Glo1 knockdown also inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in xenograft tumors established from primarily cultured HCC cells with Glo1 gene amplification. In addition, Glo1 knocking-down with shRNA interfering caused cellular accumulation of methylglyoxal, a Glo1 cytotoxic substrate. Our data suggested Glo1 pathway activation is required for cell proliferation and cell survival of HCC cells carrying Glo1 genetic amplification. Intervention of Glo1 activation could be a potential therapeutic option for patients with HCC carrying Glo1 gene amplification. PMID:24966916

  20. Genetics and pharmacology of longevity: the road to therapeutics for healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Kinghorn, Kerri J; Bjedov, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Aging can be defined as the progressive decline in tissue and organismal function and the ability to respond to stress that occurs in association with homeostatic failure and the accumulation of molecular damage. Aging is the biggest risk factor for human disease and results in a wide range of aging pathologies. Although we do not completely understand the underlying molecular basis that drives the aging process, we have gained exceptional insights into the plasticity of life span and healthspan from the use of model organisms such as the worm Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Single-gene mutations in key cellular pathways that regulate environmental sensing, and the response to stress, have been identified that prolong life span across evolution from yeast to mammals. These genetic manipulations also correlate with a delay in the onset of tissue and organismal dysfunction. While the molecular genetics of aging will remain a prosperous and attractive area of research in biogerontology, we are moving towards an era defined by the search for therapeutic drugs that promote healthy aging. Translational biogerontology will require incorporation of both therapeutic and pharmacological concepts. The use of model organisms will remain central to the quest for drug discovery, but as we uncover molecular processes regulated by repurposed drugs and polypharmacy, studies of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, drug-drug interactions, drug toxicity, and therapeutic index will slowly become more prevalent in aging research. As we move from genetics to pharmacology and therapeutics, studies will not only require demonstration of life span extension and an underlying molecular mechanism, but also the translational relevance for human health and disease prevention. PMID:26296933

  1. A multi-stage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Breyer, Joan P.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Parl, Fritz F.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging SNPs of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5′ - rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107 - 3′), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study (ORHet 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)), and a meta-analysis ORHet of 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10-4) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each ORHom was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor co-activator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:21610108

  2. A multistage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S P; Breyer, Joan P; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Parl, Fritz F; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5'-rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107-3'), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study [OR(Het): 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)], and a meta-analysis OR(Het) of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10(-4)) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each OR(Hom) was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor coactivator that interacts with estrogen receptor α to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:21610108

  3. MicroRNAs: New Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Therapy Prediction and Therapeutic Tools for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Gloria; Cava, Claudia; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in the initiation and progression of several human cancers, including breast cancer (BC), as strong evidence has been found that miRNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review presents the state of the art on the role of miRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of BC. Based on the results obtained in the last decade, some miRNAs are emerging as biomarkers of BC for diagnosis (i.e., miR-9, miR-10b, and miR-17-5p), prognosis (i.e., miR-148a and miR-335), and prediction of therapeutic outcomes (i.e., miR-30c, miR-187, and miR-339-5p) and have important roles in the control of BC hallmark functions such as invasion, metastasis, proliferation, resting death, apoptosis, and genomic instability. Other miRNAs are of interest as new, easily accessible, affordable, non-invasive tools for the personalized management of patients with BC because they are circulating in body fluids (e.g., miR-155 and miR-210). In particular, circulating multiple miRNA profiles are showing better diagnostic and prognostic performance as well as better sensitivity than individual miRNAs in BC. New miRNA-based drugs are also promising therapy for BC (e.g., miR-9, miR-21, miR34a, miR145, and miR150), and other miRNAs are showing a fundamental role in modulation of the response to other non-miRNA treatments, being able to increase their efficacy (e.g., miR-21, miR34a, miR195, miR200c, and miR203 in combination with chemotherapy). PMID:26199650

  4. Zinc as a possible preventive and therapeutic agent in pancreatic, prostate, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Han, Bo; Shaw, David Graeme; Nimni, Marcel

    2016-09-01

    Zinc is a vital nutrient for human health. Over 300 biological functions in the human body rely on zinc. Even though zinc is incredibly important for our physiology and pathology, our current understanding of zinc, as it relates to tumor cell biology, leaves much to be desired. As with other natural, nonpatentable, and inexpensive agents, zinc remains a subject of explorative research for scientific interest rather than being promoted for practical use. To date, more than 5000 studies with the keywords 'zinc' and 'cancer' have been indexed in the Web of Knowledge portal. Although the numbers of papers have increased 2.5-fold during the last decade, these vast research data have not generated a single recommendation for the incorporation of zinc use in cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we intend to analyze the current available research data and epidemiological and clinical evidence on the role of zinc in human cancer prevention and treatment. We focus on the cancers - prostate, breast, and pancreatic - for which the most basic and epidemiological studies with zinc have been carried out. The pancreas, and prostate and mammary glands are secretory tissues that have unusual zinc requirements; they tightly regulate zinc metabolism through integration of zinc import, sequestration, and export mechanisms. This suggests to us that zinc could play an important role in the physiology and pathology of these organs. The objective of this review was to stimulate more interest in the research field, focusing on the role of zinc as a possible preventive and therapeutic agent and the accelerated application of this inexpensive and easily accessible nutrient in clinical oncology. PMID:26317381

  5. Histamine H4 receptor: insights into a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide, and the leading cause of cancer death in women. Several studies underlined the critical role of histamine in breast cancer development and progression. This review addresses the latest evidence regarding the involvement of histamine and histamine receptors in breast cancer, focusing particularly in the histamine H4 receptor (H4R). Histamine concentration in breast cancer tissues was found to be higher than that in normal tissues of healthy controls by means of an increase in the activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme involved in histamine production. The expression of H4R in different experimental models and human biopsies, the associated biological responses, as well as the in vivo treatment of experimental tumors with H4R ligands is reviewed. Evidence demonstrates that the H4R exhibits a key role in histamine-mediated biological processes such as cell proliferation, senescence and apoptosis in breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the H4R and HDC genes and their association with breast cancer risk and malignancy reinforce the critical (patho)physiological role of H4R in breast cancer. In addition, H4R agonists display anti-tumor effects in vivo in a triple negative breast cancer model. The findings support the exploitation of the H4R as a molecular target for breast cancer drug development. PMID:25961682

  6. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Hsu, Brian E.; Tam, Christine E.; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors. PMID:25823815

  7. An objective biochemical assessment of therapeutic response in metastatic breast cancer: a study with external review of clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M. R.; Turkes, A.; Pearson, D.; Griffiths, K.; Blamey, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A series of tumour related markers have been examined in 179 patients receiving primary endocrine therapy for metastatic breast cancer. Significant correlations between therapeutic response (UICC criteria after 6 months of treatment) and appropriate alterations in serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen, ferritin, c-reactive protein, orosomucoid and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, have been observed when changes in these markers were examined only at high serum concentrations. By combining these five markers a 'therapeutic index' of response has been devised which can be employed at an early stage of treatment in more than 90% of patients, giving an overall sensitivity/specificity of 90%/78% for therapeutic response or disease stabilisation over a 6-month period. The design of an objective measurement of response, which is easy to perform, has the potential to replace the existing, largely subjective. UICC criteria for retrospective judgement of response, and may also be used to direct systemic endocrine therapy. PMID:2137007

  8. Use of genetic algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancers from image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Carey E., Jr.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Baker, Jay A.

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation we explore genetic algorithms as a technique to train the weights in a feed forward neural network designed to predict breast cancer based on mammographic findings and patient history. Mammograms were obtained from 206 patients who obtained breast biopsies. Mammographic findings were recorded by radiologists for each patient. In addition, the outcome of the biopsy was recorded. Of the 206 cases, 73 were malignant while 133 were benign at the time of biopsy. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed to adjust the weights of an artificial neural network (ANN) so that the ANN would output the outcome of the biopsy when the mammographic findings were given as inputs. The GA is a technique for function optimization that reflects biological genetic evolution. The ANN was a fully connected feed- forward network using a sigmoid activation with 11 inputs, one hidden layer with 10 nodes, and one output node (benign/malignant). The GA approach allows much flexibility in selecting the function to be optimized. In this work both mean-squared error (MSE) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area (Az) were explored as optimization criteria. The system was trained using a bootstrap sampling. Optimizing for the two criteria result in different solutions. The 'best' solution was obtained by minimizing a linear combination of MSE and (1-Az). ROC areas were 0.82 plus or minus 0.07, somewhat less than those obtained using backpropagation for ANN training: 0.90 plus or minus 0.05. This is the first description of a genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis. The novel advantage of this technique is the ability to optimize the system for maximizing ROC area rather than minimizing mean squared error. A new technique for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer has been explored. The flexibility of the GA approach allows optimization of cost functions that have relevance to breast cancer prediction.

  9. Genetics and Therapeutics in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis: the Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis; Patel, Ashish S.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting disease with significant phenotypic and genotypic variability. Though more common in adults, UC is being increasingly diagnosed in childhood. The subsequent lifelong course of disease results in challenges for the patient and physician. Currently, there is no medical cure for UC. Even though surgical removal of the colon can be curative, complications including infertility in females make colectomy an option often considered only when the disease presents with life-threatening complications or when medical management fails. One of the greatest challenges the clinician faces in the care of patients with UC is the inability to predict at diagnosis which patient is going to respond to a specific therapy or will eventually require surgery. This therapeutic conundrum frames the discussion to follow, specifically the concept of individualized or personalized treatment strategies based on genetic risk factors. As we move to therapeutics, we will elucidate traditional approaches and discuss known and novel agents. As we look to the future, we can expect increasing integrated approaches using several scientific disciplines to inform how genetic interactions shape and mold the pathogenesis and therapeutics of UC. PMID:26973787

  10. Interleukin-6 is a potential therapeutic target in interleukin-6 dependent, estrogen receptor-α-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casneuf, Tineke; Axel, Amy E; King, Peter; Alvarez, John D; Werbeck, Jillian L; Verhulst, Tinne; Verstraeten, Karin; Hall, Brett M; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-01-01

    engraftment with siltuximab, fulvestrant, or combination therapy. Siltuximab alone was able to blunt MCF-7 engraftment. Similarly, siltuximab alone induced regressions in 90% (9/10) of tumors, which were established in the presence which were established in the presence of hMSC expressing human IL-6 and estrogen. Conclusion Given the established role for IL-6 in ERα-positive breast cancer, these data demonstrate the potential for anti-IL-6 therapeutics in breast cancer. PMID:26893580

  11. Breast Cancer Genetic and Molecular Subtype Impacts Response to Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching Hui; Fabian, Carol; Hursting, Stephen; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated frequent omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid consumption with a lower risk for breast cancer; however, recent prospective studies have been less conclusive. Efforts in the preventive setting have focused on the use of n-3 fatty acids, and the pharmaceutical ethyl esters (EE) of these natural compounds, for high-risk patient populations. Limited understanding of specific mechanisms by which these agents function has hampered identification of the cancer subtype(s) that would gain the greatest therapeutic benefit. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of n-3 EEs in four distinct breast cancer subtypes and explored how they affect not only breast cancer cell survival but also modulate the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling pathways. Similar to the high variance in response observed in human studies, we found that the effectiveness of n-3 EEs depends on the molecular characteristics of the MCF-7, CAMA-1, MDA-MB-231, and SKBR3 breast cancer cell lines and is closely associated with the suppression of NF-κB. These data strongly suggest that the use of n-3 fatty acids and their pharmaceutical ether esters in the prevention and therapeutic setting should be guided by specific tumor characteristics. PMID:27367296

  12. Diagnostic and therapeutic path of breast cancer: effectiveness, appropriateness, and costs – results from the DOCMa study

    PubMed Central

    Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Bonifacino, Adriana; Neglia, Cosimo; Benvenuto, Marco; Sambati, Francesco Vincenzo; Giolli, Lorenzo; Giovagnoli, Alessandra; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective An increase in breast cancer incidence has been documented in Italy and in other countries, and some women decide by themselves to undergo diagnostic examinations outside the official screening campaigns. The aim of this paper was to analyze – in terms of effectiveness, appropriate access, and related costs – the path spontaneously followed by a sample of Italian women for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. Subjects and methods A total of 143 women who consecutively referred themselves to the breast cancer outpatient facilities at the Sant’Andrea University Hospital in Rome from May to June 2007 were enrolled in the study, gave their consent, and were screened according to their individual risk factors for breast cancer. The entire diagnostic and therapeutic path followed in the previous 2 years by each of them, either at Sant’Andrea or in other medical facilities, was reviewed and evaluated in terms of its operative efficiency and fair economic value. Results The subjects’ mean age was 47.5 years (standard deviation 13.6 years); 55% of the women were <50 years old (28% <40 years), and were thus not included in the official screening campaigns; 97 women (70%) were requesting a routine control; and 49% of them had already undergone four to seven examinations before the enrollment, although no major risk factor was present in 73.5%. After enrollment in the study, nine of the patients had surgical interventions performed on them at Sant’Andrea’s, identifying five invasive carcinomas and two ductal in situ carcinomas and two benign lesions. Operative efficiency and fair economic value were found to be optimal only in diagnostic/therapeutic paths followed at Sant’Andrea. Conclusion The diagnostic path at Sant’Andrea’s specialized center for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy is characterized by higher operative efficiency and more sustainable costs than at general hospitals, outpatient facilities run by local health authorities, or

  13. Genetic linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer: Results from 214 families

    SciTech Connect

    Easton, D.F.; Ford, D. ); Bishop, D.T.; Crockford, G.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative linkage study involving 214 breast cancer families, including 57 breast-ovarian cancer families; this represents almost all the known families with 17q linkage data. Six markers on 17q, spanning approximately 30 cM, were typed in the families. The aims of the study were to define more precisely the localization of the disease gene, the extent of genetic heterogeneity and the characteristics of linked families and to estimate the penetrance of the 17q gene. Under the assumption of no genetic heterogeneity, the strongest linkage evidence was obtained with D17S588. Multipoint linkage analysis allowing for genetic heterogeneity provided evidence that the predisposing gene lies between the markers D17S588 and D17S250, an interval whose genetic length is estimated to be 8.3 cM in males and 18.0 cM in females. This position was supported over other intervals by odds of 66:1. The location of the gene with respect to D17S579 could not be determined unequivocally. Under the genetic model used in the analysis, the best estimate of the proportion of linked breast-ovarian cancer families was 1.0 (lower LOD -- 1 limit 0.79). In contrast, there was significant evidence of genetic heterogeneity among the families without ovarian cancer, with an estimated 45% being linked. These results suggest that a gene(s) on chromosome 17q accounts for the majority of families in which both early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer occur but that other genes predisposing to breast cancer exist. By examining the fit of the linkage data to different penetrance functions, the cumulative risk associated with the 17q gene was estimated to be 59% by age 50 years and 82% by age 70 years. The corresponding estimates for the breast-ovary families were 67% and 76%, and those for the families without ovarian cancer were 49% and 90%; these penetrance functions did not differ significantly from one another. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A Multistage Genetic Association Study Identifies Breast Cancer Risk Loci at 10q25 and 16q24

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S.; Breyer, Joan P.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Parl, Fritz F.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. Methods We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Results Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR 1.13 [1.07–1.20], P = 5.6 × 10−5), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10–1.31], P = 3.5 × 10−5). Conclusions Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. Impact The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model. PMID:22806168

  15. The Role of Ovarian Sex Steroids in Metabolic Homeostasis, Obesity, and Postmenopausal Breast Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:25866757

  16. The role of ovarian sex steroids in metabolic homeostasis, obesity, and postmenopausal breast cancer: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, Viroj; Pateetin, Prangwan

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk of breast cancer and are likely to have a worse prognosis than nonobese postmenopausal women. The cessation of ovarian function after menopause results in withdrawal of ovarian sex steroid hormones, estrogen, and progesterone. Accumulating evidence suggests that the withdrawal of estrogen and progesterone causes homeostasis imbalances, including decreases in insulin sensitivity and leptin secretion and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism, resulting in a total reduction in energy expenditure. Together with a decrease in physical activity and consumption of a high fat diet, these factors significantly contribute to obesity in postmenopausal women. Obesity may contribute to breast cancer development through several mechanisms. Obesity causes localized inflammation, an increase in local estrogen production, and changes in cellular metabolism. In addition, obese women have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity, and an increase in insulin and other growth factor secretion. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the molecular actions of estrogen and progesterone and their contributions to cellular metabolism, obesity, inflammation, and postmenopausal breast cancer. We also discuss how modifications of estrogen and progesterone actions might be used as a therapeutic approach for obesity and postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:25866757

  17. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mauro AA; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce AJ; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk for breast cancer is conferred by a combination of multiple variants of small effect. To better understand how risk loci might combine, we examined whether risk-associated genes share regulatory mechanisms. We created a breast cancer gene regulatory network between transcription factors (TFs) and putative target genes (regulons) and asked whether specific regulons are enriched for genes associated with risk loci via eQTLs. We identified 36 overlapping regulons that were enriched and formed a distinct cluster within the network, suggesting shared biology. The risk-TFs driving these regulons are frequently mutated in cancer and lie in two opposing subgroups, which relate to ER+ luminal A/B and to ER− basal-like cancers and to different, luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation to reveal the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease settings. PMID:26618344

  18. Molecular, genetic and stem cell-mediated therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetta, Chiara; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease. It is the first genetic cause of infant mortality. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to the reduction of SMN protein. The most striking component is the loss of alpha motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis and eventually premature death. There is no current treatment other than supportive care, although the past decade has seen a striking advancement in understanding of both SMA genetics and molecular mechanisms. A variety of disease modifying interventions are rapidly bridging the translational gap from the laboratory to clinical trials. In this review, we would like to outline the most interesting therapeutic strategies that are currently developing, which are represented by molecular, gene and stem cell-mediated approaches for the treatment of SMA. PMID:24400925

  19. Scalable human ES culture for therapeutic use: propagation, differentiation, genetic modification and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Rao, M

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells unlike most adult stem cell populations can replicate indefinitely while preserving genetic, epigenetic, mitochondrial and functional profiles. ESCs are therefore an excellent candidate cell type for providing a bank of cells for allogenic therapy and for introducing targeted genetic modifications for therapeutic intervention. This ability of prolonged self-renewal of stem cells and the unique advantages that this offers for gene therapy, discovery efforts, cell replacement, personalized medicine and other more direct applications requires the resolution of several important manufacturing, gene targeting and regulatory issues. In this review, we assess some of the advance made in developing scalable culture systems, improvement in vector design and gene insertion technology and the changing regulatory landscape. PMID:18004405

  20. Searching for additional endocrine functions of the skeleton: genetic approaches and implications for therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianwen; Flaherty, Stephen; Karsenty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of whole organism physiology has greatly advanced in the past decades through mouse genetics. In particular, genetic studies have revealed that most organs interact with one another through hormones in order to maintain normal physiological functions and the homeostasis of the entire organism. Remarkably, through these studies many unexpected novel endocrine means to regulate physiological functions have been uncovered. The skeletal system is one example. In this article, we review a series of studies that over the years have identified bone as an endocrine organ. The mechanism of action, pathological relevance, and therapeutic implications of the functions of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin are discussed. In the last part of this review we discuss the possibility that additional endocrine functions of the skeleton may exist.

  1. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  2. Falling through the cracks. Women's experiences of ineligibility for genetic testing for risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bottorff, J. L.; Balneaves, L. G.; Buxton, J.; Ratner, P. A.; McCullum, M.; Chalmers, K.; Hack, T.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe experiences of women seeking information about their risk of hereditary breast cancer who fail to meet strict eligibility criteria for genetic counseling and testing. DESIGN: Qualitative descriptive study. SETTING: Hereditary cancer program in western Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Women who had received notification of their ineligibility for referral for hereditary breast cancer risk assessment (n = 20) and some of their referring physicians (n = 10). Of 28 attempted contacts, five women had moved, one declined the invitation to participate, and two could not be interviewed because of scheduling conflicts. Ten of 20 physicians declined the invitation to participate. METHOD: In-depth, open-ended telephone interviews were conducted. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient themes. MAIN FINDINGS: Three themes emerged. The first theme, "It's always on your mind," points to the profound concern about breast cancer that underlies women's experiences in seeking genetic testing. The second theme, "A test is a test," reflects women's beliefs that the test was relatively simple and similar to other medical tests in that it would provide a definitive answer. The third theme, "Falling through the cracks," captures the experience of ineligibility. Women reacted with a range of emotional responses and were left frustrated in their search for more specific information about their personal risk for breast cancer. Although women were encouraged to contact their physicians, few did. CONCLUSION: These findings point to the psychological consequences in women who seek genetic testing for risk of breast cancer when they are told they are ineligible and they are not given adequate information and support. PMID:10925759

  3. Evaluation of group genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Yolanda; Panabaker, Karen; McCullum, Mary; Portigal-Todd, Cheryl; Scott, Jenna; McGillivray, Barbara

    2009-02-01

    As demand for genetic counseling regarding hereditary cancer continues to grow, more efficient methods of providing this service must be explored. In this pilot study, group genetic counseling was offered to two different cohorts of women seeking genetic counseling for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Seven group sessions, designed to cover all aspects of an individual genetic counseling appointment, were conducted. Although patients were receptive to group genetic counseling, a significant proportion chose individual counseling when given the option. Advantages of group genetic counseling include shared experience and increased efficiency. Disadvantages include increased frustration at not being eligible for genetic testing, group influence on decision-making, privacy concerns, increased need for follow-up, and difficulty booking group appointments. Overall, the level of patient satisfaction with group genetic counseling was similar to that of individual counseling. The results of this pilot study suggest that further research is needed to determine whether group genetic counseling is an acceptable alternative to individual counseling. PMID:19127417

  4. Cathepsin D inhibitors as potential therapeutics for breast cancer treatment: Molecular docking and bioevaluation against triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Anantaraju, Hasitha Shilpa; Battu, Madhu Babu; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2016-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to discover small molecule inhibitors against Cathepsin D (CatD) (EC.3.4.23.5), a clinically proven prognostic marker for breast cancer, and to explore the mechanisms by which CatD could be a useful therapeutic target for triple-positive and triple-negative breast cancers (TPBC & TNBC). The crystal structure of CatD at 2.5 Å resolution (PDB: 1LYB), which was complexed with Pepstatin A, was selected for computer-aided molecular modeling. The methods used in our study were pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. Virtual screening was performed to identify small molecules from an in-house database and a large commercial chemical library. Cytotoxicity studies were performed on human normal cell line HEK293T and growth inhibition studies on breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-468. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis, in vitro enzyme assay, and cell cycle analysis ascertained the validity of the selected molecules. A set of 28 molecules was subjected to an in vitro fluorescence-based inhibitory activity assay, and among them six molecules exhibited [Formula: see text]50 % inhibition at [Formula: see text]. These molecules also exhibited good growth inhibition against TPBC and TNBC cancer types. Among them, molecules 1 and 17 showed single-digit micromolar [Formula: see text] values against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:26563150

  5. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  6. The contributions of breast density and common genetic variation to breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Celine M; Pankratz, V Shane; Scott, Christopher G; Haeberle, Lothar; Ziv, Elad; Jensen, Matthew R; Brandt, Kathleen R; Whaley, Dana H; Olson, Janet E; Heusinger, Katharina; Hack, Carolin C; Jud, Sebastian M; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Tice, Jeffrey A; Norman, Aaron D; Cunningham, Julie M; Purrington, Kristen S; Easton, Douglas F; Sellers, Thomas A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fasching, Peter A; Couch, Fergus J

    2015-05-01

    We evaluated whether a 76-locus polygenic risk score (PRS) and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density were independent risk factors within three studies (1643 case patients, 2397 control patients) using logistic regression models. We incorporated the PRS odds ratio (OR) into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk-prediction model while accounting for its attributable risk and compared five-year absolute risk predictions between models using area under the curve (AUC) statistics. All statistical tests were two-sided. BI-RADS density and PRS were independent risk factors across all three studies (P interaction = .23). Relative to those with scattered fibroglandular densities and average PRS (2(nd) quartile), women with extreme density and highest quartile PRS had 2.7-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74 to 4.12) increased risk, while those with low density and PRS had reduced risk (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.51). PRS added independent information (P < .001) to the BCSC model and improved discriminatory accuracy from AUC = 0.66 to AUC = 0.69. Although the BCSC-PRS model was well calibrated in case-control data, independent cohort data are needed to test calibration in the general population. PMID:25745020

  7. Genetic predisposition directs breast cancer phenotype by dictating progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Theresa A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Klebba, Ina; Jones, Ainsley D.; Sedic, Maja; Gilmore, Hannah; Tung, Nadine; Naber, Stephen P.; Schnitt, Stuart; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Women with inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene have increased risk of developing breast cancer, but also exhibit a predisposition for the development of aggressive basal-like breast tumors. We report here that breast epithelial cells derived from patients harboring deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (BRCA1mut/+) give rise to tumors with increased basal differentiation relative to cells from BRCA1+/+ patients. Molecular analysis of disease-free breast tissues from BRCA1mut/+ patients revealed defects in progenitor cell lineage commitment even before cancer incidence. Moreover, we discovered that the transcriptional repressor Slug is an important functional regulator of human breast progenitor cell lineage commitment and differentiation and that it is aberrantly expressed in BRCA1mut/+ tissues. Slug expression is necessary for increased basal-like phenotypes prior to and following neoplastic transformation. These findings demonstrate that the genetic background of patient populations, in addition to affecting incidence rates, significantly impacts progenitor cell fate commitment and, therefore, tumor phenotype. PMID:21295272

  8. Investigative and extrapolative role of microRNAs' genetic expression in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Shirazi, Bushra; Memon, Zahida

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are non-coding ribonucleic acids consisting of about 18-22 nucleotide bases. Expression of several miRs can be altered in breast carcinomas in comparison to healthy breast tissue, or between various subtypes of breast cancer. These are regulated as either oncogene or tumor suppressors, this shows that their expression is misrepresented in cancers. Some miRs are specifically associated with breast cancer and are affected by cancer-restricted signaling pathways e.g. downstream of estrogen receptor-α or HER2/neu. Connection of multiple miRs with breast cancer, and the fact that most of these post transcript structures may transform complex functional networks of mRNAs, identify them as potential investigative, extrapolative and predictive tumor markers, as well as possible targets for treatment. Investigative tools that are currently available are RNA-based molecular techniques. An additional advantage related to miRs in oncology is that they are remarkably stable and are notably detectable in serum and plasma. Literature search was performed by using database of PubMed, the keywords used were microRNA (52 searches) AND breast cancer (169 searches). PERN was used by database of Bahria University, this included literature and articles from international sources; 2 articles from Pakistan on this topic were consulted (one in international journal and one in a local journal). Of these, 49 articles were shortlisted which discussed relation of microRNA genetic expression in breast cancer. These articles were consulted for this review. PMID:27375730

  9. Investigative and extrapolative role of microRNAs’ genetic expression in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Shirazi, Bushra; Memon, Zahida

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are non-coding ribonucleic acids consisting of about 18-22 nucleotide bases. Expression of several miRs can be altered in breast carcinomas in comparison to healthy breast tissue, or between various subtypes of breast cancer. These are regulated as either oncogene or tumor suppressors, this shows that their expression is misrepresented in cancers. Some miRs are specifically associated with breast cancer and are affected by cancer-restricted signaling pathways e.g. downstream of estrogen receptor-α or HER2/neu. Connection of multiple miRs with breast cancer, and the fact that most of these post transcript structures may transform complex functional networks of mRNAs, identify them as potential investigative, extrapolative and predictive tumor markers, as well as possible targets for treatment. Investigative tools that are currently available are RNA-based molecular techniques. An additional advantage related to miRs in oncology is that they are remarkably stable and are notably detectable in serum and plasma. Literature search was performed by using database of PubMed, the keywords used were microRNA (52 searches) AND breast cancer (169 searches). PERN was used by database of Bahria University, this included literature and articles from international sources; 2 articles from Pakistan on this topic were consulted (one in international journal and one in a local journal). Of these, 49 articles were shortlisted which discussed relation of microRNA genetic expression in breast cancer. These articles were consulted for this review. PMID:27375730

  10. Triple negative breast cancer in Moroccan women: clinicopathological and therapeutic study at the National Institute of Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the lack of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) expression. This is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis despite the high rates of response to chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to determine the clinicopathological, therapeutic features and outcomes associated with this type of breast cancer. Methods This is a retrospective study of confirmed triple negative breast cancer females collected at the National institute of oncology of Rabat in Morocco, between January 2007 and December 2008. Epidemiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic and evolutive data were analyzed. OS and DFS rates were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results A total of one 152 patients with breast cancer, were identified as having triple-negative breast cancer (16,5%). The median age at diagnosis was 46 years. 130 patients (86%) had infiltrating ductal carcinoma and thirteen had medullar carcinoma (9%). 84 cases (55%) were grade III Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR). 48 % had positive lymph nodes, and 5 % had distant metastases at diagnosis. According TNM staging, 12 patients (8%) had stage I, 90 patients (60%) had stage II and the 43(28%) had stage III. 145 patients received surgery. 41 (28%) had conservative surgery and 104 (72%) received radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection. 14 patients with advanced tumors or inflammatory breast cancer have received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and four patients (28%) had complete pathologic response. From 131 patients how received adjuvant chemotherapy, 99 patients (75,5%) had Anthracycline based chemotherapy) and 27 patients (20,6%) had sequential Anthracycline and docetaxel,. Seven patients with metastatic disease received anthracycline-based regimen in the first line metastatic chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 46 months (range 6,1 -60 months). Overall survival at 5 years for all

  11. The knowledge value-chain of genetic counseling for breast cancer: an empirical assessment of prediction and communication processes.

    PubMed

    Amara, Nabil; Blouin-Bougie, Jolyane; Jbilou, Jalila; Halilem, Norrin; Simard, Jacques; Landry, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze the genetic counseling process for breast cancer with a theoretical knowledge transfer lens and to compare generalists, medical specialists, and genetic counselors with regards to their genetic counseling practices. This paper presents the genetic counseling process occurring within a chain of value-adding activities of four main stages describing health professionals' clinical practices: (1) evaluation, (2) investigation, (3) information, and (4) decision. It also presents the results of a cross-sectional study based on a Canadian medical doctors and genetic counselors survey (n = 176) realized between July 2012 and March 2013. The statistical exercise included descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results indicate that even though all types of health professionals are involved in the entire process of genetic counseling for breast cancer, genetic counselors are more involved in the evaluation of breast cancer risk, while medical doctors are more active in the decision toward breast cancer risk management strategies. The results secondly demonstrate the relevance and the key role of genetic counselors in the care provided to women at-risk of familial breast cancer. This paper presents an integrative framework to understand the current process of genetic counseling for breast cancer in Canada, and to shed light on how and where health professionals contribute to the process. It also offers a starting point for assessing clinical practices in genetic counseling in order to establish more clearly where and to what extent efforts should be undertaken to implement future genetic services. PMID:26334522

  12. Therapeutic Metformin/AMPK Activation Promotes the Angiogenic Phenotype in the ERα Negative MDA-MB-435 Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Kathryn N.; Vumbaca, Frank; Claffey, Kevin P.

    2008-01-01

    Metformin, a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, has been implicated as a potential anti-neoplastic agent for breast cancers as well as other cancers. Metformin is known to work in part through the activation of AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK). AMPK is a key regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, especially under stress conditions where biosynthetic pathways are blocked by the phosphorylation of downstream AMPK substrates. Stimulation of AMPK by metformin resulted in a significant repression of cell proliferation and active MAPK1/2 in both estrogen receptor α (ERα) negative (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435) and positive (MCF-7, T47D) human breast cancer cell lines. However, when ERα negative MDA-MB-435 cells were treated with metformin, they demonstrated increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in an AMPK dependent manner; while the ERα positive MCF-7 cells did not. Systemic therapy with metformin was tested for efficacy in an orthotopic model of ERα negative breast cancer performed in athymic nude mice. Surprisingly, metformin therapy significantly improved tumorigenic progression as compared to untreated controls. The metformin-treated group showed increased VEGF expression, intratumoral microvascular density and reduced necrosis. Metformin treatment was sufficient, however, to reduce systemic IGF-1 and the proliferation rate of tumor cells in vascularized regions. The data presented here suggests that, although metformin significantly represses breast cancer cell growth in vitro, the efficacy with respect to its therapeutic application for ERα negative breast cancer lesions in vivo may result in promotion of the angiogenic phenotype and increased tumorigenic progression. PMID:18256928

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Events of Breast and Ovarian Cancer Related to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Mckenna; Snyder, Nicole A.; Housman, Genevieve; Leary, Meghan; Lapinska, Karolina; Heerboth, Sarah; Willbanks, Amber; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer persists as the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer is also a significant source of morbidity and mortality, as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. This reflects the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. Though breast and ovarian cancer usually present as distinct clinical entities, the recent explosion of large-scale -omics research has uncovered many overlaps, particularly with respect to genetic and epigenetic alterations. We compared genetic, microenvironmental, stromal, and epigenetic changes common between breast and ovarian cancer cells, as well as the clinical relevance of these changes. Some of the most striking commonalities include genetic alterations of BRCA1 and 2, TP53, RB1, NF1, FAT3, MYC, PTEN, and PIK3CA; down regulation of miRNAs 9, 100, 125a, 125b, and 214; and epigenetic alterations such as H3K27me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H4K20me3, and H3K4me. These parallels suggest shared features of pathogenesis. Furthermore, preliminary evidence suggests a shared epigenetic mechanism of oncogenesis. These similarities, warrant further investigation in order to ultimately inform development of more effective chemotherapeutics, as well as strategies to circumvent drug resistance. PMID:27213343

  14. The Occurrence of Genetic Alterations during the Progression of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Chenglin; Huang, Tao; Zhong, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The interrelationship among genetic variations between the developing process of carcinoma and the order of occurrence has not been completely understood. Interpreting the mechanisms of copy number variation (CNV) is absolutely necessary for understanding the etiology of genetic disorders. Oncogenetic tree is a special phylogenetic tree inferential pictorial representation of oncogenesis. In our present study, we constructed oncogenetic tree to imitate the occurrence of genetic and cytogenetic alterations in human breast cancer. The oncogenetic tree model was built on CNV of ErbB2, AKT2, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and CCND1 genes in 963 cases of tumors with sequencing and CNA data of human breast cancer from TCGA. Results from the oncogenetic tree model indicate that ErbB2 copy number variation is the frequent early event of human breast cancer. The oncogenetic tree model based on the phylogenetic tree is a type of mathematical model that may eventually provide a better way to understand the process of oncogenesis. PMID:27190992

  15. Th17 Cell Pathway in Human Immunity: Lessons from Genetics and Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2015-12-15

    The T helper 17 (Th17) cell pathway has been linked by genome-wide association studies to multiple autoimmune diseases. Identification of the genetic causes of primary immunodeficiency diseases revealed that Th17 cells are also critical in host immunity to mucocutaneous candida infections and Staphylococcus aureus. Therapeutic interventions with inhibitors of the different components of the pathway such as interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-23, IL-17A, and IL-17RA have variably beneficial effects in psoriasis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, non-infectious uveitis, and multiple sclerosis. Thus, whereas Th17 cells are protective against Candida albicans and to a lesser degree Staphylococcus aureus, they are pathogenic in many autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare and contrast the effects of human genetic mutations of and therapeutic interventions targeted at Th17 cell molecules. We discuss that although there are similarities when Th17 cell pathway molecules are modulated, each molecule has unique non-Th17 cell features that lead to different functional outcomes. PMID:26682981

  16. Novel Mutations in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Breast: Possible Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; Ballard, Morgan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Schilling, Amy; O'Gara, Rebecca; Pukay, Marina; Neff, Tanaya L; West, Robert B; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2014-02-24

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast is a rare variant, accounting for only 2% to 5% of diagnosed breast cancers, and may have relatively aggressive behavior. Mutational profiling of invasive ductal breast cancers has yielded potential targets for directed cancer therapy, yet most studies have not included neuroendocrine carcinomas. In a tissue microarray screen, we found a 2.4% prevalence (9/372) of neuroendocrine breast carcinoma, including several with lobular morphology. We then screened primary or metastatic neuroendocrine breast carcinomas (excluding papillary and mucinous) for mutations in common cancer genes using polymerase chain reaction-mass spectroscopy (643 hotspot mutations across 53 genes), or semiconductor-based next-generation sequencing analysis (37 genes). Mutations were identified in 5 of 15 tumors, including 3 with PIK3CA exon 9 E542K mutations, 2 of which also harbored point mutations in FGFR family members (FGFR1 P126S, FGFR4 V550M). Single mutations were found in each of KDR (A1065T) and HRAS (G12A). PIK3CA mutations are common in other types of breast carcinoma. However, FGFR and RAS family mutations are exceedingly rare in the breast cancer literature. Likewise, activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KDR (VEGFR2) have been reported in angiosarcomas and non-small cell lung cancers; the KDR A1065T mutation is reported to be sensitive to VEGFR kinase inhibitors, and fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are in trials. Our findings demonstrate the utility of broad-based genotyping in the study of rare tumors such as neuroendocrine breast cancer. PMID:24569783

  17. Novel mutations in neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast: possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ang, Daphne; Ballard, Morgan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Schilling, Amy; O'Gara, Rebecca; Pukay, Marina; Neff, Tanaya L; West, Robert B; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2015-02-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast is a rare variant, accounting for only 2% to 5% of diagnosed breast cancers, and may have relatively aggressive behavior. Mutational profiling of invasive ductal breast cancers has yielded potential targets for directed cancer therapy, yet most studies have not included neuroendocrine carcinomas. In a tissue microarray screen, we found a 2.4% prevalence (9/372) of neuroendocrine breast carcinoma, including several with lobular morphology. We then screened primary or metastatic neuroendocrine breast carcinomas (excluding papillary and mucinous) for mutations in common cancer genes using polymerase chain reaction-mass spectroscopy (643 hotspot mutations across 53 genes), or semiconductor-based next-generation sequencing analysis (37 genes). Mutations were identified in 5 of 15 tumors, including 3 with PIK3CA exon 9 E542K mutations, 2 of which also harbored point mutations in FGFR family members (FGFR1 P126S, FGFR4 V550M). Single mutations were found in each of KDR (A1065T) and HRAS (G12A). PIK3CA mutations are common in other types of breast carcinoma. However, FGFR and RAS family mutations are exceedingly rare in the breast cancer literature. Likewise, activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KDR (VEGFR2) have been reported in angiosarcomas and non-small cell lung cancers; the KDR A1065T mutation is reported to be sensitive to VEGFR kinase inhibitors, and fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitors are in trials. Our findings demonstrate the utility of broad-based genotyping in the study of rare tumors such as neuroendocrine breast cancer. PMID:25679062

  18. Breast cancer stem-like cells: clinical implications and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    TUDORAN, OANA MIHAELA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, being also the leading cause of cancer death among female population, including in Romania. Resistance to therapy represents a major problem for cancer treatment. Current cancer treatments are both expensive and induce serious side effects; therefore ineffective therapies are both traumatic and pricy. Characterizing predictive markers that can identify high-risk patients could contribute to dedicated/personalized therapy to improve the life quality and expectancy of cancer patients. Moreover, there are some markers that govern specific tumor molecular features that can be targeted with specific therapies for those patients who are most likely to benefit. The identification of stem cells in both normal and malignant breast tissue have lead to the hypothesis that breast tumors arise from breast cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), and that these cells influence tumor’s response to therapy. CSCs have similar self-renewal properties to normal stem cells, however the balance between the signaling pathways is altered towards tumor formation In this review, we discuss the molecular aspects of breast CSCs and the controversies regarding their use in the diagnosis and treatment decision of breast cancer patients. PMID:27152067

  19. Common genetic determinants of breast-cancer risk in East Asian women: a collaborative study of 23 637 breast cancer cases and 25 579 controls

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Qiuyin; Sung, Hyuna; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Shi, Jiajun; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Long, Jirong; Dennis, Joe; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Li, Chun; Cai, Hui; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Dunning, Alison M.; Benitez, Javier; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Tessier, Daniel; Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Jong-Young; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Wenjin; Ji, Bu-Tian; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, In Nee; Wong, Tien Y.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lee, Soo Chin; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Hongbing; Chen, Kexin; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ren, Zefang; Haiman, Christopher A.; Sueta, Aiko; Kim, Mi Kyung; Khoo, Ui Soon; Iwasaki, Motoki; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Wen, Wanqing; Hall, Per; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Easton, Douglas F.; Kang, Daehee

    2013-01-01

    In a consortium including 23 637 breast cancer patients and 25 579 controls of East Asian ancestry, we investigated 70 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 67 independent breast cancer susceptibility loci recently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) conducted primarily in European-ancestry populations. SNPs in 31 loci showed an association with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in a direction consistent with that reported previously. Twenty-one of them remained statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons with the Bonferroni-corrected significance level of <0.0015. Eight of the 70 SNPs showed a significantly different association with breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor (ER) status at P < 0.05. With the exception of rs2046210 at 6q25.1, the seven other SNPs showed a stronger association with ER-positive than ER-negative cancer. This study replicated all five genetic risk variants initially identified in Asians and provided evidence for associations of breast cancer risk in the East Asian population with nearly half of the genetic risk variants initially reported in GWASs conducted in European descendants. Taken together, these common genetic risk variants explain ∼10% of excess familial risk of breast cancer in Asian populations. PMID:23535825

  20. Differentiation between genetic mutations of breast cancer by breath volatolomics

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qing-Ling; Pan, Yue-Yin; Kayal, Haneen; Khoury, Kayan; Liu, Hu; Davies, Michael P.A.; Haick, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Mapping molecular sub-types in breast cancer (BC) tumours is a rapidly evolving area due to growing interest in, for example, targeted therapy and screening high-risk populations for early diagnosis. We report a new concept for profiling BC molecular sub-types based on volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For this purpose, breath samples were collected from 276 female volunteers, including healthy, benign conditions, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and malignant lesions. Breath samples were analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and artificially intelligent nanoarray technology. Applying the non-parametric Wilcoxon/Kruskal-Wallis test, GC-MS analysis found 23 compounds that were significantly different (p < 0.05) in breath samples of BC patients with different molecular sub-types. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) of the nanoarray identified unique volatolomic signatures between cancer and non-cancer cases (83% accuracy in blind testing), and for the different molecular sub-types with accuracies ranging from 82 to 87%, sensitivities of 81 to 88% and specificities of 76 to 96% in leave-one-out cross-validation. These results demonstrate the presence of detectable breath VOC patterns for accurately profiling molecular sub-types in BC, either through specific compound identification by GC-MS or by volatolomic signatures obtained through statistical analysis of the artificially intelligent nanoarray responses. PMID:26540569

  1. New Strategies in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: The Evolving Genetic and Therapeutic Landscape.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami B; Vellore, Nadeem A; Deininger, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    The classical BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) include essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and myelofibrosis (MF). Although these clonal disorders share certain clinical and genetic features, MF in particular is distinct for its complex mutational landscape, severe disease phenotype, and poor prognosis. The genetic complexity inherent to MF has made this disease extremely challenging to treat. Pharmacologic JAK inhibition has proven to be a transformative therapy in MPNs, alleviating symptom burden and improving survival, but has been hampered by off-target toxicities and, as monotherapy, has shown limited effects on mutant allele burden. In this review, we discuss the genetic heterogeneity contributing to the pathogenesis of MPNs, focusing on novel driver and epigenetic mutations and how they relate to combination therapeutic strategies. We discuss results from ongoing studies of new JAK inhibitors and report on new drugs and drug combinations that have demonstrated success in early preclinical and clinical trials, including type II JAK inhibitors, antifibrotic agents, and telomerase inhibitors. PMID:26933174

  2. Recommendations for research priorities in breast cancer by the Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups Scientific Leadership Council: systemic therapy and therapeutic individualization.

    PubMed

    Sparano, Joseph A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gralow, Julie R; Perez, Edith A; Comis, Robert L

    2010-02-01

    Over 9,000 women with breast cancer are enrolled annually on clinical trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), accounting for about one-third of all patients enrolled on NCI-sponsored trials. Thousands are also enrolled on pharmaceutical-sponsored studies. Although breast cancer mortality rates have recently declined for the first time in part due to systemic therapeutic advances, coordinated efforts will be necessary to maintain this trend. The Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups convened the Scientific Leadership Council in breast cancer (BC), an expert panel, to identify priorities for future research and current trials with greatest practice-changing potential. Panelists formed a consensus on research priorities for chemoprevention, development and application of molecular markers for predicting therapeutic benefit and toxicity, intermediate markers predictive of therapeutic effect, pathogenesis-based therapeutic approaches, utilization of adaptive designs requiring fewer patients to achieve objectives, special and minority populations, and effects of BC and treatment on patients and families. Panelists identified 13 ongoing studies as High Priority and identified gaps in the current trial portfolio. We propose priorities for current and future clinical breast cancer research evaluating systemic therapies that may serve to improve the efficiency of clinical trials, identify individuals most likely to derive therapeutic benefit, and prioritize therapeutic strategies. PMID:19526354

  3. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer: how the latest results are improving therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hanfang; Rugo, Hope S.

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease, and approximately 25% of patients with HER2+ early breast cancer still relapse after adjuvant trastuzumab-based treatment. HER2 is a validated therapeutic target that remains relevant throughout the disease process. Recently, a number of novel HER2 targeted agents have become available, including lapatinib (a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor), pertuzumab (a new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, a novel antibody–drug conjugate), which provide additional treatment options for patients with HER2+ MBC. The latest clinical trials have demonstrated improved outcome with treatment including pertuzumab or T-DM1 compared with standard HER2 targeted therapy. Here we review the clinical development of approved and investigational targeted agents for the treatment of HER2+ MBC, summarize the latest results of important clinical trials supporting use of these agents in the treatment of HER2+ MBC, and discuss how these results impact therapeutic options in clinical practice. PMID:26557900

  4. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  5. Integrative network-based approach identifies key genetic elements in breast invasive carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is a genetically heterogeneous type of cancer that belongs to the most prevalent types with a high mortality rate. Treatment and prognosis of breast cancer would profit largely from a correct classification and identification of genetic key drivers and major determinants driving the tumorigenesis process. In the light of the availability of tumor genomic and epigenomic data from different sources and experiments, new integrative approaches are needed to boost the probability of identifying such genetic key drivers. We present here an integrative network-based approach that is able to associate regulatory network interactions with the development of breast carcinoma by integrating information from gene expression, DNA methylation, miRNA expression, and somatic mutation datasets. Results Our results showed strong association between regulatory elements from different data sources in terms of the mutual regulatory influence and genomic proximity. By analyzing different types of regulatory interactions, TF-gene, miRNA-mRNA, and proximity analysis of somatic variants, we identified 106 genes, 68 miRNAs, and 9 mutations that are candidate drivers of oncogenic processes in breast cancer. Moreover, we unraveled regulatory interactions among these key drivers and the other elements in the breast cancer network. Intriguingly, about one third of the identified driver genes are targeted by known anti-cancer drugs and the majority of the identified key miRNAs are implicated in cancerogenesis of multiple organs. Also, the identified driver mutations likely cause damaging effects on protein functions. The constructed gene network and the identified key drivers were compared to well-established network-based methods. Conclusion The integrated molecular analysis enabled by the presented network-based approach substantially expands our knowledge base of prospective genomic drivers of genes, miRNAs, and mutations. For a good part of the identified key drivers

  6. Genetic variation in multiple biologic pathways, flavonoid intake and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khankari, Nikhil K.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; McCullough, Lauren E.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Steck, Susan E.; Fink, Brian N.; Xu, Xinran; Ahn, Jiyoung; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Crew, Katherine D.; Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I.; Chen, Jia; Santella, Regina M.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported an inverse association between flavonoid intake and breast cancer incidence, which has been confirmed by others; but no studies have considered simultaneously potential interactions of flavonoids with multiple genetic polymorphisms involved in biologically-relevant pathways (oxidative stress, carcinogen metabolism, DNA repair, and one-carbon metabolism). Methods To estimate interaction effects between flavonoids and 13 polymorphisms in these four pathways on breast cancer risk, we used population-based data (N = 875 cases and 903 controls) and several statistical approaches, including conventional logistic regression and semi-Bayesian hierarchical modeling (incorporating prior information on the possible biological functions of genes), which also provides biologic pathway-specific effect estimates. Results Compared to the standard multivariate model, the results from the hierarchical model indicate that gene-by-flavonoid interaction estimates are attenuated, but more precise. In the hierarchical model, the average effect of the deleterious versus beneficial gene, controlling for average flavonoid intake in the DNA repair pathway, and adjusted for the three other biologically-relevant pathways (oxidative stress, carcinogen metabolism, and one-carbon metabolism), resulted in a 27% increase risk for breast cancer [Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.70, 2.29]. However, the CI was wide. Conclusions Based on results from the semi-Bayesian model, breast cancer risk may be influenced jointly by flavonoid intake and genes involved in DNA repair, but our findings require confirmation. PMID:24281852

  7. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  8. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    PubMed Central

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  9. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  10. Mucosal targeting of therapeutic molecules using genetically modified lactic acid bacteria: an update.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Aubry, Camille; Cortes-Perez, Naima G; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Langella, Philippe; Azevedo, Vasco; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Miyoshi, Anderson; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2013-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) represent a heterogeneous group of microorganisms naturally present in many foods and those have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vectors. Moreover, some specific strains of LAB exert beneficial properties (known as probiotic effect) on both human and animal health. Although probiotic effects are strain-specific traits, it is theoretically possible, using genetic engineering techniques, to design strains that can exert a variety of beneficial properties. During the two past decades, a large variety of therapeutic molecules has been successfully expressed in LAB, and although this field has been largely reviewed in recent years, approximately 20 new publications appear each year. Thus, the aim of this minireview is not to extensively assess the entire literature but to update progress made within the last 2 years regarding the use of the model LAB Lactococcus lactis and certain species of lactobacilli as live recombinant vectors for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. PMID:23600579

  11. Genetic background modulates outcome of therapeutic amyloid peptides in treatment of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Allison; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Winkler, Clayton; Saturday, Greg; Kurnellas, Michael; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Groveman, Bradley R; Steinman, Lawrence; Caughey, Byron

    2016-09-15

    Amyloid hexapeptide molecules are effective in the treatment of the murine model of neuroinflammation, known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Efficacy however differs between two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J (B6) and C57BL/10SnJ (B10). Amyloid hexapeptide treatments improved the clinical outcomes of B6, but not B10 mice, indicating that genetic background influences therapeutic efficacy. Moreover, although previous studies indicated that prion protein deficiency results in more severe EAE in B6 mice, we observed no such effect in B10 mice. In addition, we found that amyloid hexapeptide treatments of B10 and B6 mice elicited differential IL4 responses. Thus, the modulatory potential of prion protein and related treatments with other amyloid hexapeptides in EAE depends on mouse strain. PMID:27609274

  12. The PREX1/Rac signaling axis: Potential as a biomarker and therapeutic target in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Lloye M; Miller, Todd W

    2015-01-01

    PREX1 is a Rac guanine exchange factor that coordinates signaling inputs from G protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). PREX1 creates a positive feedback loop to drive RTK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and MEK/ERK signaling. High PREX1 levels predict sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors in breast cancer cells. PMID:27308485

  13. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases inhibitor, Zj6413, as a potential therapeutic agent against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Zhou, Jie; Jin, Jing; Xue, Nina; Chen, Ju; Xu, Bailing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) facilitate repairing of cancer cell DNA damage as a mean to promote cancer proliferation and metastasis. Inhibitors of PARPs which interfering DNA repair, in context of defects in other DNA repair mechanisms, can thus be potentially exploited to inhibit or even kill cancer cells. However, nondiscriminatory inhibition of PARPs, such as PARP2, may lead to undesired consequences. Here, we demonstrated the design and development of the Zj6413 as a potent and selective PARP1 catalytic inhibitor. It trapped PARP1/2 at damaged sites of DNA. As expected, the Zj6413 showed notable anti-tumor activity against breast cancer gene (BRCA) deficient triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). Zj6413 treated breast cancers (BCs) showed an elevated level of DNA damage evidenced by the accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and DNA damaged related proteins. Zj6413 also induced G2/M arrest and cell death in the MX-1, MDA-MB-453 BC cells, exerted chemo-sensitizing effect on BRCA proficient cancer cells and potentiated Temozolomide (TMZ)'s cytotoxicity in MX-1 xenograft tumors mice. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that a new PARP inhibitor strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of PARPs, trapped them on nicked DNA and damaged the cancer cells, eventually inhibiting the growth of breast tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26920250

  14. Glyceollins as novel targeted therapeutic for the treatment of metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of glyceollins on the suppression of tumorigenesis in triple negative breast carcinoma cell lines. We further explored the effects of glyceollins on microRNA and protein expression in MDA MB 231 cells. Triple negative (ER , PgR, and Her2/neu ...

  15. Using a GeneticFuzzy Algorithm as a Computer Aided Breast Cancer Diagnostic Tool.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Abir; Tchier, F; Rashidi, Mm

    2016-01-01

    Computeraided diagnosis of breast cancer is an important medical approach. In this research paper, we focus on combining two major methodologies, namely fuzzy base systems and the evolutionary genetic algorithms and on applying them to the Saudi Arabian breast cancer diagnosis database, to aid physicians in obtaining an earlycomputerized diagnosis and hence prevent the development of cancer through identification and removal or treatment of premalignant abnormalities; early detection can also improve survival and decrease mortality by detecting cancer at an early stage when treatment is more effective. Our hybrid algorithm, the geneticfuzzy algorithm, has produced optimized systems that attain high classification performance, with simple and readily interpreted rules and with a good degree of confidence. PMID:27510026

  16. Attitudes Toward Breast Cancer Genetic Testing in Five Special Population Groups

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Chalela, Patricia; Gallion, Kipling J.; Muñoz, Edgar; Holden, Alan E.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Smith, Selina A.; Wong-Kim, Evaon; Wyatt, Stephen W.; Suarez, Lucina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined interest in and attitudes toward genetic testing in 5 different population groups. Methods The survey included African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, and Appalachian women with varying familial histories of breast cancer. A total of 49 women were interviewed in person. Descriptive and nonparametric statistical techniques were used to assess ethnic group differences. Results Overall, interest in testing was high. All groups endorsed more benefits than risks. There were group differences regarding endorsement of specific benefits and risks: testing to “follow doctor recommendations” (p=0.017), “concern for effects on family” (p=0.044), “distrust of modern medicine” (p=0.036), “cost” (p=0.025), and “concerns about communication of results to others” (p=0.032). There was a significant inverse relationship between interest and genetic testing cost (p<0.050), with the exception of Latinas, who showed the highest level of interest regardless of increasing cost. Conclusion Cost may be an important barrier to obtaining genetic testing services, and participants would benefit by genetic counseling that incorporates the unique cultural values and beliefs of each group to create an individualized, culturally competent program. Further research about attitudes toward genetic testing is needed among Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Appalachians for whom data are severely lacking. Future study of the different Latina perceptions toward genetic testing are encouraged. PMID:26855846

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a genetic test for breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Folse, Henry J; Green, Linda E; Kress, Andrea; Allman, Richard; Dinh, Tuan A

    2013-12-01

    Genetic testing of seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (7SNP) can improve estimates of risk of breast cancer relative to the Gail risk test alone, for the purpose of recommending MRI screening for women at high risk. A simulation of breast cancer and health care processes was used to conduct a virtual trial comparing the use of the 7SNP test with the Gail risk test to categorize patients by risk. Average-risk patients received annual mammogram, whereas high-risk patients received annual MRI. Cancer incidence was based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data and validated to Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort data. Risk factor values were drawn from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-4) and Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial data. Mammogram characteristics were derived from Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data. The test was most cost-effective when given to patients at an intermediate lifetime risk of breast cancer. For patients with a risk of 16% to 28%, it resulted in a 1.91% reduction in cancer deaths, saving 0.005 quality-adjusted life years per person at a cost of $163,264 per QALY. These results were sensitive to the age at which the test is given, the discount rate, and the costs of the genetic test and MRI. The cost effectiveness of using the 7SNP test for patients with intermediate Gail risk is similar to that of other recommended strategies, including annual MRI for patients with a lifetime risk greater than 20% or BRCA1/2 mutations. PMID:24309564

  18. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  19. Risk assessment of multistate progression of breast tumor with state-dependent genetic and environmental covariates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Yen, Ming-Fang; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-02-01

    Few studies have focused on the different roles risk factors play in the multistate temporal natural course of breast cancer. We proposed a three-state Markov regression model to predict the risk from free of breast cancer (FBC) to the preclinical screen-detectable phase (PCDP) and from the PCDP to the clinical phase (CP). We searched the initiators and promoters affecting onset and subsequent progression of breast tumor to build up a three-state temporal natural history model with state-dependent genetic and environmental covariates. This risk assessment model was applied to a 1 million Taiwanese women cohort. The proposed model was verified by external validation with another independent data set. We identified three kinds of initiators, including the BRCA gene, seven single nucleotides polymorphism, and breast density. ER, Ki-67, and HER-2 were found as promoters. Body mass index and age at first pregnancy both played a role. Among women carrying the BRCA gene, the 10-year predicted risk for the transition from FBC to CP was 25.83%, 20.31%, and 13.84% for the high-, intermediate-, and low-risk group, respectively. The corresponding figures were 1.55%, 1.22%, and 0.76% among noncarriers. The mean sojourn time of staying at the PCDP ranged from 0.82 years for the highest risk group to 6.21 years for the lowest group. The lack of statistical significance for external validation (x(4)2=5.30,p=0.26) revealed the adequacy of our proposed model. The three-state model with state-dependent covariates of initiators and promoters was proposed for achieving individually tailored screening and also for personalized clinical surveillance of early breast cancer. PMID:24111840

  20. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A.; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J.; Sittampalam, Sitta G.; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    “The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach” was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2–4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. PMID:25900621

  1. The third international meeting on genetic disorders in the RAS/MAPK pathway: towards a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D; Gripp, Karen W; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo; MacRae, Calum A; Messiaen, Ludwine; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Neel, Benjamin; Plotkin, Scott; Rauen, Katherine A; Roberts, Amy; Silva, Alcino J; Sittampalam, Sitta G; Zhang, Chao; Schoyer, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    "The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach" was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2-4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regarding their hopes and expectations for therapeutic advances. In keeping with the theme on therapeutic development, the sessions followed a progression from description of the phenotype and definition of therapeutic endpoints, to definition of genomic changes, to identification of therapeutic targets in the RAS/MAPK pathway, to preclinical drug development and testing, to clinical trials. These proceedings will review the major points of discussion. PMID:25900621

  2. HER2 Expression Beyond Breast Cancer: Therapeutic Implications for Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    HER2 or ErbB2 is a member of the epidermal growth factor family and is overexpressed in subsets of breast, ovarian, gastric, colorectal, pancreatic and endometrial cancers. HER2 regulates signaling through several pathways (Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase-B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways) associated with cell survival and proliferation. HER2 overexpressed and/or gene amplified tumors are generally regarded as biologically aggressive neoplasms. In breast, cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer, there have been several studies linking the amplification of the c-erbB2 gene with chemo-resistance and overall poor survival. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 holds promise for patients harboring these aggressive neoplasms. Trastuzumab combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents or conjugated with radioactive isotopes is currently being investigated in clinical trials of several tumor types. PMID:23529353

  3. Clinical Response of Metastatic Breast Cancer to Multi-targeted Therapeutic Approach: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Meiners, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the ongoing (partial) remission of a female patient (41 years old) from estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor (PR)-negative metastatic breast cancer in response to a combination treatment directed towards the revitalization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (oxidative phosphorylation), the suppression of NF-kappaB as a factor triggering the inflammatory response, and chemotherapy with capecitabine. The reduction of tumor mass was evidenced by a continuing decline of CA15-3 and CEA tumor marker serum levels and 18FDG-PET-CT plus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It is concluded that such combination treatment might be a useful option for treating already formed metastases and for providing protection against the formation of metastases in ER positive breast cancer. The findings need to be corroborated by clinical trials. Whether similar results can be expected for other malignant tumor phenotypes relying on glycolysis as the main energy source remains to be elucidated. PMID:24212668

  4. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities. PMID:27446389

  5. Therapeutic options for HER-2 positive breast cancer: Perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo Jr; Dìaz Canton, Enrique; de la Vega, Màximo; Greco, Martin; Recondo, Gonzalo Sr; Valsecchi, Matias E

    2014-01-01

    During the last 15 years we have witnessed an unprecedented expansion in the drugs developed to target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab, pertuzumab, ado-trastuzumab emtansine and lapatinib are currently food and drug administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of breast cancer patients with HER-2 over-expressed. However, given the amount of information gathered from years of uninterrupted clinical research, it is essential to have periodic updates that succinctly recapitulate what we have learnt over these last years and help us to apply that information in our daily practice. This review will pursue that objective. We will summarize the most relevant and updated information related to the state of the art management of HER-2 positive breast cancer in all the clinical scenarios including the adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic settings. But we will also critically appraise that literature in order to highlight some key clinical concepts that should not be overlooked. Lastly, this review will also point out some of the most promising strategies that are currently being tested and may soon become available. PMID:25114858

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Integrin αvβ6 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kate M.; Thomas, Gareth J.; Duffy, Stephen W.; Warwick, Jane; Gabe, Rhian; Chou, Patrick; Ellis, Ian O.; Green, Andrew R.; Haider, Syed; Brouilette, Kellie; Saha, Antonio; Vallath, Sabari; Bowen, Rebecca; Chelala, Claude; Eccles, Diana; Tapper, William J.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Quinlan, Phillip; Jordan, Lee; Gillett, Cheryl; Brentnall, Adam; Violette, Shelia; Weinreb, Paul H.; Kendrew, Jane; Barry, Simon T.; Hart, Ian R.; Jones, J. Louise; Marshall, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrin αvβ6 promotes migration, invasion, and survival of cancer cells; however, the relevance and role of αvβ6 has yet to be elucidated in breast cancer. Methods Protein expression of integrin subunit beta6 (β6) was measured in breast cancers by immunohistochemistry (n > 2000) and ITGB6 mRNA expression measured in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium dataset. Overall survival was assessed using Kaplan Meier curves, and bioinformatics statistical analyses were performed (Cox proportional hazards model, Wald test, and Chi-square test of association). Using antibody (264RAD) blockade and siRNA knockdown of β6 in breast cell lines, the role of αvβ6 in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) biology (expression, proliferation, invasion, growth in vivo) was assessed by flow cytometry, MTT, Transwell invasion, proximity ligation assay, and xenografts (n ≥ 3), respectively. A student’s t-test was used for two variables; three-plus variables used one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni’s Multiple Comparison Test. Xenograft growth was analyzed using linear mixed model analysis, followed by Wald testing and survival, analyzed using the Log-Rank test. All statistical tests were two sided. Results High expression of either the mRNA or protein for the integrin subunit β6 was associated with very poor survival (HR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.15, P = .002) and increased metastases to distant sites. Co-expression of β6 and HER2 was associated with worse prognosis (HR = 1.97, 95% CI = 1.16 to 3.35, P = .01). Monotherapy with 264RAD or trastuzumab slowed growth of MCF-7/HER2-18 and BT-474 xenografts similarly (P < .001), but combining 264RAD with trastuzumab effectively stopped tumor growth, even in trastuzumab-resistant MCF-7/HER2-18 xenografts. Conclusions Targeting αvβ6 with 264RAD alone or in combination with trastuzumab may provide a novel therapy for treating high-risk and trastuzumab-resistant breast

  7. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  8. Dose-Dense Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Shortening the Time Interval for a Better Therapeutic Index.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Despite the advancement of targeted therapies in metastatic breast cancer, chemotherapy is still of pivotal importance. The concept of dose density is known to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy. In metastatic disease, preservation of the quality of life is equally important. Because of this, weekly regimens are a cornerstone in metastatic disease. Taxanes like paclitaxel or nab-paclitaxel as well as antracyclines are often used in palliative treatment. Further advances to increase dose density have led to the concept of daily metronomic schedules with oral chemotherapeutic drugs like cyclophosphamide, capecitabine, or vinorelbine. Metronomic chemotherapy affects tumor angiogenesis and also weakens immunosuppressive regulatory T cells, promoting better control of tumor progression. Weekly or daily dose-dense regimens are a reasonable compromise between efficacy and toxicity to improve the therapeutic index. This is most important for the treatment of chronic disease where palliation and preservation of quality of life are vital. PMID:27051392

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey: recommendations for ex situ conservation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C G; Gaiotto, F A; Costa, M A; Martinez, R A

    2011-01-01

    The yellow-breasted capuchin monkey, Cebus xanthosternos, is one of the most endangered species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In situ conservation for this species is problematic due to habitat destruction; therefore, captive conservation has been considered as an alternative strategy. A Studbook for C. xanthosternos has been kept for more than 20 years; however, no genetic data has been collected. Our aim was to provide a preliminary assessment of the genetic variability of C. xanthosternos in captivity in Brazil and compare it with data from the wild. Microsatellite and mtDNA sequencing were carried out in 40 samples from five Brazilian institutions registered in the international Studbook and compared with 8 samples collected in a wild population from REBIO-Una/BA. DNA for analysis was extracted from hair, feces and blood. Our results showed that two of the five captive groups assessed had a genetic variability comparable to wild animals. However, the other three groups apparently require urgent management to improve its genetic variability. Considering that inbreeding effects are more pronounced in captivity due to lack of gene flow, our data indicate a need to increase population size by introducing newly rescued individuals into these captive groups. Our results are the first attempt to provide genetic information for captive C. xanthosternos in Brazil. PMID:21823097

  10. Induction of Autophagy Is an Early Response to Gefitinib and a Potential Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dragowska, Wieslawa H.; Weppler, Sherry A.; Wang, Jun Chih; Wong, Ling Yan; Kapanen, Anita I.; Rawji, Jenna S.; Warburton, Corinna; Qadir, Mohammed A.; Donohue, Elizabeth; Roberge, Michel; Gorski, Sharon M.; Gelmon, Karen A.; Bally, Marcel B.

    2013-01-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa®, ZD1839) is a small molecule inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. We report on an early cellular response to gefitinib that involves induction of functional autophagic flux in phenotypically diverse breast cancer cells that were sensitive (BT474 and SKBR3) or insensitive (MCF7-GFPLC3 and JIMT-1) to gefitinib. Our data show that elevation of autophagy in gefitinib-treated breast cancer cells correlated with downregulation of AKT and ERK1/2 signaling early in the course of treatment. Inhibition of autophagosome formation by BECLIN-1 or ATG7 siRNA in combination with gefitinib reduced the abundance of autophagic organelles and sensitized SKBR3 but not MCF7-GFPLC3 cells to cell death. However, inhibition of the late stage of gefitinib-induced autophagy with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) or bafilomycin A1 significantly increased (p<0.05) cell death in gefitinib-sensitive SKBR3 and BT474 cells, as well as in gefitinib-insensitive JIMT-1 and MCF7-GFPLC3 cells, relative to the effects observed with the respective single agents. Treatment with the combination of gefitinib and HCQ was more effective (p<0.05) in delaying tumor growth than either monotherapy (p>0.05), when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Our results also show that elevated autophagosome content following short-term treatment with gefitinib is a reversible response that ceases upon removal of the drug. In aggregate, these data demonstrate that elevated autophagic flux is an early response to gefitinib and that targeting EGFR and autophagy should be considered when developing new therapeutic strategies for EGFR expressing breast cancers. PMID:24146879

  11. Galectin signatuares contribute to the heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide new prognostic information and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Labrie, Marilyne; Vladoiu, Maria Claudia; Yousef, Einas M; Gaboury, Louis; St-Pierre, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Because of their ability to induce local immunosuppression and to confer cancer cells with resistance to apoptosis, members of the galectin family are emerging as a new class of actionable targets in cancer. Unfortunately, we have yet to obtain a clear picture of the galectin signatures in cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study was to provide the first detailed analysis of the galectin signature in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Expression signatures of galectins were obtained at the mRNA and protein levels. A particular attention was paid to stromal versus epithelial staining and to subcellular compartmentalization. Analysis of the stromal signature showed that gal-1, -3, -9-positive stroma were preferentially found in triple-negative (TN) and HER2 subtypes. In cancer cells, gal-1, −3, -8, and -9 showed a dual expression pattern, being found either in the cytosol or in the cytosol and the nucleus. TN patients with gal-8-positive nuclei had significantly better disease-free survival (DFS), distant-disease-free survival (DDFS), and overall survival (OS). In contrast, high expression of nuclear gal-1 correlated with poor DDFS and OS. TNBC patients who were positive for both nuclear gal-1 and gal-8 had 5-year DFS and DDFS of 100%, suggesting a dominance of the gal-8 phenotype. Overall, the results indicate that specific galectin expression signatures contribute to the phenotypic heterogeneity of aggressive subtypes of breast cancer. Our data also suggest that galectins have clinical utility as indicators of disease progression and therapeutic targets in aggressive molecular subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:26933916

  12. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size.

    PubMed

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R; Flynn, John R; Jellison, Evan R; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model. PMID:26113869

  13. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size

    PubMed Central

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R.; Flynn, John R.; Jellison, Evan R.; Kuhn, Liisa T.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model. PMID:26113869

  14. Reverse genetics technology for Rift Valley fever virus: current and future applications for the development of therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bouloy, Michele; Flick, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    The advent of reverse genetics technology has revolutionized the study of RNA viruses, making it possible to manipulate their genomes and evaluate the effects of these changes on their biology and pathogenesis. The fundamental insights gleaned from reverse genetics-based studies over the last several years provide a new momentum for the development of designed therapies for the control and prevention of these viral pathogens. This review summarizes the successes and stumbling blocks in the development of reverse genetics technologies for Rift Valley fever virus and their application to the further dissection of its pathogenesis and the design of new therapeutics and safe and effective vaccines. PMID:19682499

  15. Platelet–Lymphocyte Ratio as a Useful Predictor of the Therapeutic Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Yuka; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Noda, Satoru; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The peripheral blood platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has been proposed as an indicator for evaluating systemic inflammatory responses in cancer-bearing patients. While some reports suggest a correlation between PLR and prognosis, few studies have examined the relationship between PLR and sensitivity to chemotherapy. We conducted a study on whether PLR could serve as a predictor of the therapeutic effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Methods PLR was evaluated in 177 breast cancer patients treated with the NAC 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide, followed by weekly paclitaxel and subsequent curative surgery. The correlation between PLR and prognosis, and between PLR and the efficacy of NAC, were evaluated retrospectively. Results The low PLR group had significantly more patients > 56 years old (p = 0.001) and postmenopausal women (p = 0.001) than the high PLR group. The low PLR group also had a higher pathologic complete response (pCR) rate (p = 0.019). On examining the correlation with prognosis, the low-PLR group was found to have significantly longer disease-free survival (p = 0.004) and overall survival (p = 0.032) than the high PLR group. Multivariate analysis also revealed that lymph node metastasis (p = 0.043, hazard ratio = 4.40) and a high PLR (p = 0.005, hazard ratio = 2.84) were independent, unfavorable prognostic factors. Conclusions For patients with breast cancer treated with NAC, a low PLR indicated high chemotherapy sensitivity, suggesting that PLR could serve as a predictive marker of the therapeutic effect of NAC. PMID:27472762

  16. Genetic testing and familial implications in breast-ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Vries, Jakob; Mourits, Marian J; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-08-01

    DNA-testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become incorporated in the diagnostic procedure of patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer. Since 1994 an immense amount of information has been gathered on mutation spectra, mutation risk assessment, cancer risks for mutation carriers, factors that modify these risks, unclassified DNA variants, surveillance strategies and preventive options. For the patient and family the main determinator still is whether a mutation is found or not. When a pathogenic mutation is detected in an index case, relatives can opt for pre-symptomatic DNA testing. However in the vast majority no mutation, or only unclear mutations are detectable yet. This means that a hereditary cause cannot be excluded, but pre-symptomatic DNA-testing is still unavailable for relatives. Surveillance for both index cases and relatives is based of the family history of cancer. Next generation genetic testing may help to elucidate genetic causes in these families. PMID:24894332

  17. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited breast cancer: first clinical application and live birth in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramón Y Cajal, Teresa; Polo, Ana; Martínez, Olga; Giménez, Carles; Arjona, César; Llort, Gemma; Bassas, Lluís; Viscasillas, Pere; Calaf, Joaquin

    2012-06-01

    Carriers of a mutation in BRCA1/2 genes confront a high lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer and fifty percent probability of passing the mutation to their offspring. Current options for risk management influence childbearing decisions. The indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have now been expanded to include predisposition for single-gene, late-onset cancer but few cases have been reported to date despite the favorable opinion among professionals and carriers. A 28-year-old BRCA1 mutation carrier (5273G>A in exon 19) with a strong maternal history of breast cancer and 2 years of infertility decided to pursue PGD to have a healthy descendent after an accurate assessment of her reproductive options. The procedure was approved by the national regulation authority and a PGD cycle was initiated. Four out of 6 embryos harbored the mutation. The two unaffected embryos were implanted in the uterus. A singleton pregnancy was achieved and a male baby was delivered at term. Consented umbilical cord blood testing confirmed the accuracy of the technique. Individualized PGD for inherited breast predisposition is feasible in the context of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:22179695

  18. Aromatase inhibitor-induced modulation of breast density: clinical and genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Henry, N L; Chan, H-P; Dantzer, J; Goswami, C P; Li, L; Skaar, T C; Rae, J M; Desta, Z; Khouri, N; Pinsky, R; Oesterreich, S; Zhou, C; Hadjiiski, L; Philips, S; Robarge, J; Nguyen, A T; Storniolo, A M; Flockhart, D A; Hayes, D F; Helvie, M A; Stearns, V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Change in breast density may predict outcome of women receiving adjuvant hormone therapy for breast cancer. We performed a prospective clinical trial to evaluate the impact of inherited variants in genes involved in oestrogen metabolism and signalling on change in mammographic percent density (MPD) with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Methods: Postmenopausal women with breast cancer who were initiating adjuvant AI therapy were enrolled onto a multicentre, randomised clinical trial of exemestane vs letrozole, designed to identify associations between AI-induced change in MPD and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes. Subjects underwent unilateral craniocaudal mammography before and following 24 months of treatment. Results: Of the 503 enrolled subjects, 259 had both paired mammograms at baseline and following 24 months of treatment and evaluable DNA. We observed a statistically significant decrease in mean MPD from 17.1 to 15.1% (P<0.001), more pronounced in women with baseline MPD ⩾20%. No AI-specific difference in change in MPD was identified. No significant associations between change in MPD and inherited genetic variants were observed. Conclusion: Subjects with higher baseline MPD had a greater average decrease in MPD with AI therapy. There does not appear to be a substantial effect of inherited variants in biologically selected candidate genes. PMID:24084768

  19. In vivo evaluation of an EIAV vector for the systemic genetic delivery of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, A; Myers, K A; Ferris, N; Mitrophanous, K A; Carroll, M W

    2005-06-01

    Lentiviral-based vectors hold great promise as gene delivery vehicles for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. We have previously reported the development of a nonprimate lentiviral vector system based on the equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV), which is able to efficiently transduce dividing and nondividing cells both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report on the application of EIAV vectors for the systemic delivery of an antibody fusion protein designed for the treatment of cancer. The therapeutic potential of a single chain antibody against the tumour-associated antigen, 5T4, fused to immune enhancer moieties has been demonstrated in vitro and here we evaluate the genetic delivery of a 5T4 scFv fused to B7.1 (scFvB7) using an EIAV vector. The kinetics and concentration of protein produced following both intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration was determined in immune competent adult mice. In addition, the immune response to the EIAV vector and the transgene were determined. Here, we show that a single injection of EIAV expressing scFv-B7 can give rise to concentrations of protein in the range of 1-5 microg/ml that persist in the sera for more than 50 days. After a second injection, concentrations of scFv-B7.1 rose as high as 20 microg/ml and levels greater than 2 microg/ml were present in the sera of all mice injected i.v. after 210 days despite the detection of antibodies against both the transgene and viral envelope for the duration of this study. These results demonstrate the potential of EIAV as a gene therapy vector for long-term production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. PMID:15772687

  20. Oncogenic role and therapeutic target of leptin signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Wang, Guangdi; Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant correlations between obesity and incidence of various cancers have been reported. Obesity, considered a mild inflammatory process, is characterized by a high level of secretion of several cytokines from adipose tissue. These molecules have disparate effects, which could be relevant to cancer development. Among the inflammatory molecules, leptin, mainly produced by adipose tissue and overexpressed with its receptor (Ob-R) in cancer cells is the most studied adipokine. Mutations of leptin or Ob-R genes associated with obesity or cancer are rarely found. However, leptin is an anti-apoptotic molecule in many cell types, and its central roles in obesity-related cancers are based on its pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic actions. Notably, these leptin actions are commonly reinforced through entangled crosstalk with multiple oncogenes, cytokines and growth factors. Leptin-induced signals comprise several pathways commonly triggered by many cytokines (i.e, canonical: JAK2/STAT; MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI-3K/AKT1 and, non-canonical signaling pathways: PKC, JNK and p38 MAP kinase). Each of these leptin-induced signals is essential to its biological effects on food intake, energy balance, adiposity, immune and endocrine systems, as well as oncogenesis. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role of leptin in breast cancer. Additionally, leptin pro-angiogenic molecular mechanisms and its potential role in breast cancer stem cells will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding-affinity and activation of leptin/Ob-R complex makes it a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer, particularly in obesity contexts. PMID:22289780

  1. Vitamin-D associated genetic variation and risk of breast cancer in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Mondul, Alison M.; Shui, Irene M.; Yu, Kai; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Joshi, Amit D.; Agudo, Antonio; Berg, Christine D.; Black, Amanda; Buring, Julie E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher; Hankinson, Susan E.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kühn, Tilman; Kvaskoff, Marina; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Overvad, Kim; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M; Stram, Daniel O.; Sund, Malin; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter; Kraft, Peter; Ziegler, Regina G.; Albanes, Demetrius

    2015-01-01

    Background Two recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified SNPs related to circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration in or near four genes. To examine the hypothesized inverse relationship between vitamin D status and breast cancer, we studied the associations between SNPs in these genes and breast cancer risk in a large pooled study of 9,456 cases and 10,816 controls from six cohorts. Methods SNP markers localized to each of four genes (GC, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, and DHCR7) previously associated with 25(OH)D were genotyped and examined both individually and as a 4-SNP polygenic score. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between the genetic variants and risk of breast cancer. Results We found no association between any of the four SNPs or their polygenic score and breast cancer risk. Conclusions Our findings do not support an association between vitamin D status, as reflected by 25(OH)D-related genotypes, and breast cancer risk. Impact These findings may contribute to future meta-analyses and scientific review articles, and provide new data about the association between vitamin D-related genes and breast cancer. PMID:25542828

  2. Identification of novel therapeutic target genes in acquired lapatinib-resistant breast cancer by integrative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Hwang, Sun Goo; Kim, Jin Ki; Park, Tae Hwan; Kim, Young Rae; Myeong, Ho Sung; Choi, Jong Duck; Kwon, Kang; Jang, Cheol Seong; Ro, Young Tae; Noh, Yun Hee; Kim, Sung Young

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib is a highly problematic clinical barrier that has to be overcome for a successful cancer treatment. Despite efforts to determine the mechanisms underlying acquired lapatinib resistance (ALR), no definitive genetic factors have been reported to be solely responsible for the acquired resistance in breast cancer. Therefore, we performed a cross-platform meta-analysis of three publically available microarray datasets related to breast cancer with ALR, using the R-based RankProd package. From the meta-analysis, we were able to identify a total of 990 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 406 upregulated, 584 downregulated) that are potentially associated with ALR. Gene ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that "response to organic substance" and "p53 signaling pathway" may be largely involved in ALR process. Of these, many of the top 50 upregulated and downregulated DEGs were found in oncogenesis of various tumors and cancers. For the top 50 DEGs, we constructed the gene coexpression and protein-protein interaction networks from a huge database of well-known molecular interactions. By integrative analysis of two systemic networks, we condensed the total number of DEGs to six common genes (LGALS1, PRSS23, PTRF, FHL2, TOB1, and SOCS2). Furthermore, these genes were confirmed in functional module eigens obtained from the weighted gene correlation network analysis of total DEGs in the microarray datasets ("GSE16179" and "GSE52707"). Our integrative meta-analysis could provide a comprehensive perspective into complex mechanisms underlying ALR in breast cancer and a theoretical support for further chemotherapeutic studies. PMID:26361955

  3. Association of Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Variants with Breast Cancer Survival among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the genetic susceptibility of T2D was associated with overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) outcomes for breast cancer (BC). Methods Included in the study were 6346 BC patients who participated in three population-based epidemiological studies of BC and were genotyped with either GWAS or Exome-chip. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) for diabetes using risk variants identified from the GWAS catalog (http://genome.gov/gwastudies) that were associated with T2D risk at a minimum significance level of P ≤ 5.0E-8 among Asian population and evaluated its associations with BC outcomes with Cox proportional hazards models. Results During a median follow-up of 8.08 years (range, 0.01–16.95 years), 1208 deaths were documented in 6346 BC patients. Overall, the diabetes GRS was not associated with OS and DFS. Analyses stratified by estrogen receptor status (ER) showed that the diabetes GRS was inversely associated with OS among women with ER- but not in women with ER+ breast cancer; the multivariable adjusted HR was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.05–1.82) when comparing the highest to the lowest GRS quartiles. The association of diabetes GRS with OS varied by diabetes status (P for interaction <0.01). In women with history of diabetes, higher diabetes GRS was significantly associated with worse OS, with HR of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.28–3.88) for the highest vs. lowest quartile, particularly among women with an ER- breast cancer, with corresponding HR being 4.59 (95% CI: 1.04–20.28). No significant association between the diabetes GRS and OS was observed across different BMI and PR groups. Conclusions Our study suggested that genetic susceptibility of T2D was positively associated with total mortality among women with ER- breast cancer, particularly among subjects with a history of diabetes. Additional studies are warranted to verify the associations and elucidate the underlying biological mechanism. PMID:25679392

  4. Limited family structure and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype as predictors of BRCA mutations in a genetic counseling cohort of early-onset sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Manzano, Arancha; Blanco, Ignacio; Vega, Ana; Custodio, Ana; Teulé, Alex; Fachal, Laura; Martínez, Beatriz; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Chirivella, Isabel; Garcés, Vicente; Garre, Pilar; Romero, Atocha; Caldés, Trinidad; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset diagnosis is an eligibility criterion for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) testing in sporadic breast cancer patients. Limited family structure has been proposed as a predictor of BRCA mutation status in this group of patients. An overwhelming amount of data supports a strong association between BRCA1 mutations and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we analyze the feasibility of using limited family structure and TNBC as predictors of BRCA mutation status in early-onset breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. We have conducted the study in a cohort of sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients (N = 341) previously selected for BRCA genetic testing in Academic Hereditary Cancer Clinics from Spain. A retrospective review of medical records available at the time of risk assessment allowed us classifying patients according to family structure and TNBC. In addition, BRCAPRO score was calculated for all patients. Association between categorical variables was investigated using the Fisher's exact test. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Limited family structure (OR 3.61, p = 0.013) and TNBC (OR 3.14, p = 0.013) were independent predictors of BRCA mutation status. Mutation prevalence in the subgroup of patients with at least one positive predictor was 14%, whereas it dropped to 3% in non-TNBCs with adequate family history (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.38-23.89, p = 0.006). BRCAPRO correctly discerned between limited and adequate family structures. Limited family structure and TNBC are feasible predictors of BRCA mutation status in sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. The low prevalence of mutations observed in non-TNBCs with adequate family structure suggests that this subgroup of patients might be excluded from genetic testing. PMID:25342642

  5. Polygenic model of DNA repair genetic polymorphisms in human breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha R; Levine, Edward A; Freimanis, Rita I; Akman, Steven A; Allen, Glenn O; Hoang, Kimberly N; Liu-Mares, Wen; Hu, Jennifer J

    2008-11-01

    Genetic variations in DNA repair may impact repair functions, DNA damage and breast cancer risk. Using data/samples collected from the first 752 Caucasians and 141 African-Americans in an ongoing case-control study, we examined the association between breast cancer risk and 18 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in four DNA repair pathways-(i) base excision repair: ADPRT V762A, APE1 D148E, XRCC1 R194W/R280H/R399Q and POLD1 R119H; (ii) nucleotide excision repair: ERCC2 D312N/K751Q, ERCC4 R415Q, ERCC5 D1104H and XPC A499V/K939Q; (iii) mismatch repair: MLH1 I219V, MSH3 R940Q/T1036A and MSH6 G39E and (iv) double-strand break repair: NBS1 E185Q and XRCC3 T241M. In Caucasians, breast cancer risk was significantly associated with ADPRT 762VV [odds ratio (OR) = 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03, 2.03], APE1 148DD (OR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.03, 2.00), MLH1 219II/IV (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.11, 3.16) and ERCC4 415QQ (OR = 8.64; 95% CI = 1.04, 72.02) genotypes. With a limited sample size, we did not observe any significant association in African-Americans. However, there were significant trends in breast cancer risk with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for ADPRT 762VV, APE1 148DD, ERCC4 415RQ/QQ and MLH1 219II/IV (P(trend) < 0.001) in Caucasians and ADPRT 762VA, ERCC2 751KQ/QQ and NBS1 185EQ/QQ in African-Americans (P(trend) = 0.006), respectively. Our results suggest that combined nsSNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways may contribute to breast cancer risk and larger studies are warranted to further evaluate polygenic models of DNA repair in breast cancer risk. PMID:18701435

  6. Genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Liu, Song; Hu, Qiang; Yao, Song; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Bandera, Elisa V; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen; Troester, Melissa A; Haiman, Christopher A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis. However, there has been no large-scale investigation of genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk. We examined 28847 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 61 mTOR pathway genes in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk consortium of 3663 cases [1983 estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and 1098 ER-negative (ER-)] and 4687 controls. Gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) test for 10773 SNPs that were not highly correlated (r (2) < 0.8), and SNP-level analyses were conducted with logistic regression. Among genes that were prioritized (nominal P < 0.05, ARTP tests), associations were observed for intronic SNPs TSC2 rs181088346 [odds ratio (OR) of each copy of variant allele = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.88 for all breast cancer] and BRAF rs114729114 (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24-1.91 for all breast cancer and OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.50-2.76 for ER- tumors). For ER- tumors, intronic SNPs PGF rs11542848 (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.15-1.66) and rs61759375 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.14-1.57) and MAPK3 rs78564187 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.11-1.43) were associated with increased risk. These SNPs were significant at a gene-wide level (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05). The variant allele of RPS6KB2 rs35363135, a synonymous coding SNP, was more likely to be observed in ER- than ER+ tumors (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05-1.31, gene-wide Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.06). In conclusion, specific mTOR pathway genes are potentially important to breast cancer risk and to the ER negativity in African American women. PMID:26577839

  7. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genes and breast cancer risk in Caucasians and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Dorgan, Joanne F; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Elevated circulating levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are associated with increased breast cancer risk in prospective studies. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis genes may contribute to these circulating hormone levels, and consequently to breast cancer risk. No previous studies have examined the effects of genetic variants in HPA axis genes on breast cancer risk. We evaluated the associations of 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five HPA axis genes (NR3C1, NR3C2, CRH, CRHR1, and CRHBP) with the risk of breast cancer in the Women’s Insights and Shared Experiences (WISE) Study of Caucasians (346 cases and 442 controls), as well as African Americans (149 cases and 246 controls). Of the 49 SNPs evaluated, one showed a nominal significant association (P for trend < 0.05) with breast cancer risk among Caucasians, and another two among African Americans. The age-adjusted additive odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) of the SNP rs11747190[A] in the CRHBP gene for the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women was 1.45 (1.09-1.94). The age-adjusted additive ORs (95% CIs) of two SNPs (CRHBP rs1700688[T] and CRHR1 rs17689471[C]) for the risk of breast cancer among African American women were 1.84 (1.13-2.98) and 2.48 (1.20-5.13), respectively. However, these SNPs did not show significant associations after correction for multiple testing. Our findings do not provide strong supportive evidence for the contribution of genetic variants in these HPA axis genes to the risk of developing breast cancer in either Caucasians or African Americans. PMID:26417403

  8. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genes and breast cancer risk in Caucasians and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Nan, Hongmei; Dorgan, Joanne F; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Elevated circulating levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are associated with increased breast cancer risk in prospective studies. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis genes may contribute to these circulating hormone levels, and consequently to breast cancer risk. No previous studies have examined the effects of genetic variants in HPA axis genes on breast cancer risk. We evaluated the associations of 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five HPA axis genes (NR3C1, NR3C2, CRH, CRHR1, and CRHBP) with the risk of breast cancer in the Women's Insights and Shared Experiences (WISE) Study of Caucasians (346 cases and 442 controls), as well as African Americans (149 cases and 246 controls). Of the 49 SNPs evaluated, one showed a nominal significant association (P for trend < 0.05) with breast cancer risk among Caucasians, and another two among African Americans. The age-adjusted additive odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) of the SNP rs11747190[A] in the CRHBP gene for the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women was 1.45 (1.09-1.94). The age-adjusted additive ORs (95% CIs) of two SNPs (CRHBP rs1700688[T] and CRHR1 rs17689471[C]) for the risk of breast cancer among African American women were 1.84 (1.13-2.98) and 2.48 (1.20-5.13), respectively. However, these SNPs did not show significant associations after correction for multiple testing. Our findings do not provide strong supportive evidence for the contribution of genetic variants in these HPA axis genes to the risk of developing breast cancer in either Caucasians or African Americans. PMID:26417403

  9. Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Activity of Dietary Blueberry against Estrogen-Mediated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Berries are gaining increasing importance lately for their chemopreventive and therapeutic potential against several cancers. In earlier studies, a blueberry-supplemented diet has shown protection against 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. This study tested both preventive and therapeutic activities of diet supplemented with whole blueberry powder (50:50 blend of Tifblue and Rubel). Animals received 5% blueberry diet, either 2 weeks prior to or 12 weeks after E2 treatment in preventive and therapeutic groups, respectively. Both interventions delayed the tumor latency for palpable mammary tumors by 28 and 37 days, respectively. Tumor volume and multiplicity were also reduced significantly in both modes. The effect on mammary tumorigenesis was largely due to down-regulation of CYP 1A1 and ER-α gene expression and also favorable modulation of microRNA (miR-18a and miR-34c) levels. These data suggest that the blueberry blend tested is effective in inhibiting E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in both preventive and therapeutic modes. PMID:24245576

  10. Bcl-xL mediates therapeutic resistance of a mesenchymal breast cancer cell subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Keitel, Ulrike; Scheel, Andreas; Thomale, Jürgen; Halpape, Rovena; Kaulfuß, Silke; Scheel, Christina; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype (EMT) confers increased invasiveness and clonogenic potential to tumor cells. We used a breast epithelium-derived cell culture model to evaluate the impact of EMT on the cellular sensitivity towards chemotherapeutics and apoptotic stimuli. Cells that had passed through an EMT acquired resistance towards chemotherapeutics and death ligands. Mechanistically, we found that the levels of the apoptosis inhibitor Bcl-xL were strongly enhanced in mesenchymal versus epithelial cells, whereas the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Puma were diminished. Clinical samples from breast cancer showed enhanced Bcl-xL staining in cells that had dispersed into the desmoplastic stroma, as compared to cells that were part of large tumor cell aggregates, suggesting increased Bcl-xL expression when cells invade the stroma. Bcl-xL was necessary for apoptotic resistance in mesenchymal cells, and its expression was sufficient to confer such resistance to epithelial cells. To antagonize Bcl-xL, BH3-mimetics were used. They successfully interfered with the proliferation and survival of mesenchymal cells, and also inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors raised from the mesenchymal subpopulation. We conclude that enhanced Bcl-xL levels confer resistance to cells upon EMT, and that Bcl-xL represents a promising target for therapy directed against invasive cancer cells. PMID:25473892