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Sample records for breath measured blood

  1. Comparison of spectroscopically measured tissue alcohol concentration to blood and breath alcohol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Trent D.; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.

    2009-09-01

    Alcohol testing is an expanding area of interest due to the impacts of alcohol abuse that extend well beyond drunk driving. However, existing approaches such as blood and urine assays are hampered in some testing environments by biohazard risks. A noninvasive, in vivo spectroscopic technique offers a promising alternative, as no body fluids are required. The purpose of this work is to report the results of a 36-subject clinical study designed to characterize tissue alcohol measured using near-infrared spectroscopy relative to venous blood, capillary blood, and breath alcohol. Comparison of blood and breath alcohol concentrations demonstrated significant differences in alcohol concentration [root mean square of 9.0 to 13.5 mg/dL] that were attributable to both assay accuracy and precision as well as alcohol pharmacokinetics. A first-order kinetic model was used to estimate the contribution of alcohol pharmacokinetics to the differences in concentration observed between the blood, breath, and tissue assays. All pair-wise combinations of alcohol assays were investigated, and the fraction of the alcohol concentration variance explained by pharmacokinetics ranged from 41.0% to 83.5%. Accounting for pharmacokinetic concentration differences, the accuracy and precision of the spectroscopic tissue assay were found to be comparable to those of the blood and breath assays.

  2. Laser speckle contrast imaging of blood flow from anesthetized mice: correcting drifts in measurements due to breathing movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Ribeiro, Márcio A. C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2015-06-01

    Background: Laser speckle contrast imaging allows non-invasive assessment of cutaneous blood flow. Although the technique is attractive to measure a quantity related to the skin blood flow (SBF) in anesthetized animal models, movements from breathing can mask the SBF signal. As a consequence, the measurement is overestimated because a variable amount of a DC component due to the breathing movements is added to the SBF signal. Objective: To evaluate a method for estimating the background level of the SBF signal, rejecting artefacts from breathing. Methods: A baseline correction method used for accurate DNA sequencing was evaluated, based on estimating the background level of a signal in small temporal sliding-windows. The method was applied to evaluate a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. SBF signals from hindlimbs of anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (n=13) were registered. The mean SBF (Fi and Fc from ischemic and control hindlimbs) were computed from the registers and from the corresponding estimated background levels (Fib and Fcb from ischemic and control hindlimbs). Results: The mean values of the percentages (a measure of ischemia) MI = (Fi/Fc).100 and MIb = (Fib/Fcb).100 were computed to be 30+/-4% and 23+/-3% respectively (mean +/- SE). Evidences of statistical differences between both, ischemic and control hindlimbs, were obtained (p<0.05, paired student-t). The mean error [(MI-MIb)/MIb].100 obtained was 45+/-14% (mean+/-SE). Conclusion: The recovery of a corrupted SBF signal by breathing artefacts is feasible, allowing more accurate measurements.

  3. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  4. Interactions between breathing rate and low-frequency fluctuations in blood pressure and cardiac intervals.

    PubMed

    Horsman, H M; Peebles, K C; Tzeng, Y C

    2015-10-01

    Evidence derived from spontaneous measures of cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) suggests that slow breathing at 6 breaths/min augments BRS. However, increases in BRS associated with slow breathing may simply reflect the frequency-dependent nature of the baroreflex rather than the modulation of baroreflex function by changes in breathing rate per se. To test this hypothesis we employed a crossover study design (n = 14) wherein breathing rate and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) oscillation induced via the application of oscillating lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) were independently varied at fixed frequencies. Breathing rate was controlled at 6 or 10 breaths/min with the aid of a metronome, and SAP oscillations were driven at 0.06 Hz and 0.1 Hz using OLBNP. The magnitudes of SAP and R-R interval (cardiac period) oscillations were quantified using power spectral analysis, and the transfer function gain between SAP and R-R interval was used to estimate BRS. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the main effects and interactions between breathing rate and OLBNP frequency. There was no statistical interaction between breathing and OLBNP frequency (P = 0.59), indicating that the effect of breathing rate on BRS did not differ according to OLBNP frequency (and vice versa). Additionally, there was no main effect for breathing rate (P = 0.28). However, we observed a significant main effect for OLBNP frequency (P = 0.01) consistent with the frequency-dependent nature of baroreflex. These findings suggest that increases in spectral indices of BRS reflect the frequency dependence of the baroreflex and are not due to slow breathing per se. PMID:26205543

  5. Blood and breath levels of selected volatile organic compounds in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    King, Julian; Klieber, Martin; Unterkofler, Karl; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Baumann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) was used to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the blood and breath of healthy individuals. Blood and breath volatiles were preconcentrated using headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and needle trap devices (NTDs), respectively. The study involved a group of 28 healthy test subjects and resulted in the quantification of a total of 74 compounds in both types of samples. The concentrations of the species under study varied between 0.01 and 6700 nmol L−1 in blood and between 0.02 and 2500 ppb in exhaled air. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.01 to 270 nmol L−1 for blood compounds and from 0.01 to 0.7 ppb for breath species. Relative standard deviations for both measurement regimes varied from 1.5 to 14%. The predominant chemical classes among the compounds quantified were hydrocarbons (24), ketones (10), terpenes (8), heterocyclic compounds (7) and aromatic compounds (7). Twelve analytes were found to be highly present in both blood and exhaled air (with incidence rates higher than 80%) and for 32 species significant differences (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) between room air and exhaled breath were observed. By comparing blood, room air and breath levels in parallel, a tentative classification of volatiles into endogenous and exogenous compounds can be achieved. PMID:23435188

  6. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  7. Longitudinal study (32 years) of exercise tolerance, breathing response, blood pressure, and blood lipids in young men.

    PubMed

    Gillum, R F; Taylor, H L; Anderson, J; Blackburn, H

    1981-01-01

    Changes in exercise tolerance, blood lipids, and blood pressure from youth to middle age was studied in 106 subjects followed 32 years. In addition, the responses to cold pressor and CO2 stress were studied as correlates of future lipids and blood pressure. Treadmill exercise test, cold pressor test, response to breathing a mixture of 6% CO2, and 21% O2, for 5 minutes, blood pressure, and lipid measurements were performed in 1947 when subjects were 20 +/- 2 years old. Exercise, blood pressure and lipid tests were repeated in 1979. Tracking of blood pressure and pulse response to exercise over the period was demonstrated. Baseline exercise response correlated with future blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and high density lipoproteins. Change in exercise pulse rate over the period correlated with change in cholesterol. Cold pressor systolic blood pressure response correlated with future systolic blood pressure and triglycerides. Pulse and blood pressure response to CO2 breathing correlated with cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein 32 years later. These correlations were independent of baseline values of the variables and body mass index. Individuals who were judged "fit" (exercise pulse rise less than median) at both baseline and follow-up had the best cardiovascular risk profile (blood pressure and lipids). Blood pressure and pulse response to exercise tracked between ages 20 and 50. Exercise, cold pressor, and CO2 responses in youth correlated with blood lipid levels in middle age. PMID:6810858

  8. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  9. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  10. Increased Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Children with Mild Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine M.; Hogan, Alexandra M.; Onugha, Nwanneka; Harrison, Dawn; Cooper, Sara; McGrigor, Victoria J.; Datta, Avijit; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2007-01-01

    polysomnography. Weight, height, and head circumference were measured in all of the children. BMI and occipitofrontal circumference z scores were computed. Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained. Both sleep-disordered breathing children and the age- and BMI-similar controls were assessed using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), Neuropsychological Test Battery for Children (NEPSY) visual attention and visuomotor integration, and IQ assessment (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Version III). Transcranial Doppler was performed using a TL2-64b 2-MHz pulsed Doppler device between 2 PM and 7 PM in all of the patients and the majority of controls while awake. Time-averaged mean of the maximal cerebral blood flow velocities was measured in the left and right middle cerebral artery and the higher used for analysis. Results Twenty-one snoring children had an apnea/hypopnea index <5, consistent with mild sleep-disordered breathing below the conventional threshold for surgical intervention. Compared with 17 nonsnoring controls, these children had significantly raised middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities. There was no correlation between cerebral blood flow velocities and BMI or systolic or diastolic blood pressure indices. Exploratory analyses did not reveal any significant associations with apnea/hypopnea index, apnea index, hypopnea index, mean pulse oxygen saturation, lowest pulse oxygen saturation, accumulated time at pulse oxygen saturation <90%, or respiratory arousals when examined in separate bivariate correlations or in aggregate when entered simultaneously. Similarly, there was no significant association between cerebral blood flow velocities and parental estimation of child’s exposure to sleep-disordered breathing. However, it is important to note that whereas the sleep-disordered breathing group did not exhibit significant hypoxia at the time of study, it was unclear to what extent this may have been a

  11. Underwater study of arterial blood pressure in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Arne; L'abbate, Antonio; Passera, Mirko; Garbella, Erika; Benassi, Antonio; Bedini, Remo

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge regarding arterial blood pressure (ABP) values during breath-hold diving is scanty. It derives from a few reports of measurements performed at the water's surface, showing slight or no increase in ABP, and from a single study of two simulated deep breath-hold dives in a hyperbaric chamber. Simulated dives showed an increase in ABP to values considered life threatening by standard clinical criteria. For the first time, using a novel noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer, we successfully measured ABP in 10 healthy elite breath-hold divers at a depth of 10 m of freshwater (mfw). ABP was measured in dry conditions, at the surface (head-out immersion), and twice at a depth of 10 mfw. Underwater measurements of ABP were obtained in all subjects. Each measurement lasted 50-60 s and was accomplished without any complications or diver discomfort. In the 10 subjects as a whole, mean ABP values were 124/93 mmHg at the surface and 123/94 mmHg at a depth of 10 mfw. No significant statistical differences were found when blood pressure measurements at the water surface were compared with breath-hold diving conditions at a depth of 10 mfw. No systolic blood pressure values >140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure values >115 mmHg were recorded. In conclusion, direct measurements of ABP during apnea diving showed no or only mild increases in ABP. However, our results cannot be extended over environmental conditions different from those of the present study. PMID:19696356

  12. Spleen volume and blood flow response to repeated breath-hold apneas.

    PubMed

    Baković, Darija; Valic, Zoran; Eterović, Davor; Vukovic, Ivica; Obad, Ante; Marinović-Terzić, Ivana; Dujić, Zeljko

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was 1) to answer whether the reduction in spleen size in breath-hold apnea is an active contraction or a passive collapse secondary to reduced splenic arterial blood flow and 2) to monitor the spleen response to repeated breath-hold apneas. Ten trained apnea divers and 10 intact and 7 splenectomized untrained persons repeated five maximal apneas (A1-A5) with face immersion in cold water, with 2 min interposed between successive attempts. Ultrasonic monitoring of the spleen and noninvasive cardiopulmonary measurements were performed before, between apneas, and at times 0, 10, 20, 40, and 60 min after the last apnea. Blood flows in splenic artery and splenic vein were not significantly affected by breath-hold apnea. The duration of apneas peaked after A3 (143, 127, and 74 s in apnea divers, intact, and splenectomized persons, respectively). A rapid decrease in spleen volume ( approximately 20% in both apnea divers and intact persons) was mainly completed throughout the first apnea. The spleen did not recover in size between apneas and only partly recovered 60 min after A5. The well-known physiological responses to apnea diving, i.e., bradycardia and increased blood pressure, were observed in A1 and remained unchanged throughout the following apneas. These results show rapid, probably active contraction of the spleen in response to breath-hold apnea in humans. Rapid spleen contraction and its slow recovery may contribute to prolongation of successive, briefly repeated apnea attempts. PMID:12819225

  13. An analysis of estimation of pulmonary blood flow by the single-breath method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The single-breath method represents a simple noninvasive technique for the assessment of capillary blood flow across the lung. However, this method has not gained widespread acceptance, because its accuracy is still being questioned. A rigorous procedure is described for estimating pulmonary blood flow (PBF) using data obtained with the aid of the single-breath method. Attention is given to the minimization of data-processing errors in the presence of measurement errors and to questions regarding a correction for possible loss of CO2 in the lung tissue. It is pointed out that the estimations are based on the exact solution of the underlying differential equations which describe the dynamics of gas exchange in the lung. The reported study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining highly reliable estimates of PBF from expiratory data in the presence of random measurement errors.

  14. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing ('clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23 to 37 mm Hg (30 ± 7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54 ± 24% versus 34 ± 26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6 ± 28% and 83.4 ± 38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  15. Response of choroidal blood flow to carbogen breathing in smokers and non-smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wimpissinger, B; Resch, H; Berisha, F; Weigert, G; Schmetterer, L; Polak, K

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a potential difference in ocular vascular reactivity during carbogen breathing in optic nerve head, choroid, and retina between healthy smokers and non-smokers. Methods: 25 (13 smokers and 12 non-smokers) healthy male volunteers participated in this observer masked, two cohort study. During inhalation of carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) over 10 minutes measurements were taken using laser Doppler flowmetry to assess submacular choroidal and optic nerve head blood flow, laser interferometry to assess fundus pulsation amplitudes, and retinal vessel analyser (RVA) to assess retinal vessel diameters. Results: At baseline choroidal blood flow was higher (p = 0.018, ANOVA) in smokers than in non-smokers. During administration of carbogen the response in choroidal blood flow was significantly different between the two groups: there was an increase in non-smokers after carbogen breathing (p = 0.048) compared with relatively stable blood flow in smokers (p = 0.049 between groups, ANOVA). A similar response pattern was seen for fundus pulsation amplitude, which increased notably after carbogen breathing in non-smokers but not in smokers (p<0.001 between groups, ANOVA). Optic nerve head blood flow and retinal vessel diameters were reduced in both groups to a comparable degree during carbogen breathing. Conclusion: The study indicated abnormal choroidal vascular reactivity in chronic smokers. These early haemodynamic changes may be related to the increased risk to smokers of developing ocular vascular diseases. The specific mechanisms underlying abnormal choroidal vascular reactivity in chronic smokers remain to be characterised. PMID:15148211

  16. Monitoring of rapid blood pH variations by CO detection in breath with tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Andrian I.; Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Diachenko, Alexander I.; Gurfinkel, Youri I.

    1997-06-01

    Detection of endogenous carbon monoxide content in breath with tunable diode lasers (TDL) was proposed for noninvasive monitoring of rapid blood pH variation. Applied approach is based on high sensitivity of the haemoglobin and myoglobin affinity for CO to blood pH value and an ability to detect rapidly small variations of CO content in expired air. Breath CO absorption in 4.7 micrometers spectral region was carefully measured using PbSSe tunable diode laser that can provide 1 ppb CO concentration sensitivity and 10 s time constant. Applied TDL gas analyzer was used to monitor expired air of studied persons in physiological tests including hyperventilation and physical load. Simultaneous blood tests were conducted to demonstrate correlation between blood and breath chemical parameters.

  17. Measurement of nitric oxide in human exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, S.M.; Spicer, C.W.; Ollison, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    This project was initiated to confirm the reliability of nitric oxide (NO) measurement in the breath matrix, using two different analytical techniques - ozone and luminol chemiluminescence - and to corroborate literature reports of elevated breath NO values. To measure peak oral and nasal NO levels, subjects performed slow vital capacity and breath holding maneuvers directly into the monitors through the mouth and the nose, respectively. Additional measurements were made using normal breathing techniques. Initial interferent tests indicate that measured NO signals are real and are not confounded by measurement artifacts. Similar results were obtained using the two independent analytical methods in dry or humid air. The NO signal was unaffected by maximum concentrations of potential breath interferents, such as sulfur compounds and alkenes. The measured breath NO concentrations were greater than typical room air levels and differed significantly with the breathing technique used. During these tests room air averaged 4-5 ppb NO. Peak oral NO levels were 4.3 {+-} 1.5 ppb during a slow vital capacity maneuver and 8.0 {+-} 5.0 ppb during a breath holding maneuver. By contrast, higher peak nasal NO levels were measured for both slow vital capacity (17.8 {+-} 7.8 ppb) and breath holding maneuvers (45.4 {+-} 29.5 ppb).

  18. The acute effect of mouth only breathing on time to completion, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, blood lactate, and ventilatory measures during a high-intensity shuttle run sequence.

    PubMed

    Meir, Rudi; Zhao, Guang-Gao; Zhou, Shi; Beavers, Rosalind; Davie, Allan

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of restricting nasal breathing during a series of 20-m shuttle runs. Ten male participants (mean age = 21.7 ± 2.4 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.62 m, mass = 79.2 ± 10.4 kg, sum of 4 skinfolds = 54.5 ± 7.8 mm) were required to either (a) dive on the ground and complete a rolling sequence (condition = GRD) or (b) complete the shuttles while staying on their feet and tagging the line with 1 foot, at the end of each 20-m segment (condition = STD). The shuttle runs were completed with and without a nose clip (no clip = nc; with a clip = clip) under 4 different trial conditions in a randomized order (GRDnc; GRDclip; STDnc; and STDclip), requiring the participants to return on 4 separate occasions separated by 5-7 days. Heart rate was recorded throughout each trial, and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured at the completion of each shuttle sequence. Pretrial and posttrial lactate and respiratory function measures were also recorded. The general linear model with repeated measures analysis indicated that there was a significant effect for Roll (GRD > STD) (p ≤ 0.05) but not for Clip (p > 0.05) on total time to completion in the trials. There was no significant interaction of the conditions (Roll × Clip) for RPE (p > 0.05). Similarly, there was no significant effect for blood lactate measured 3 minutes post the last shuttle for Roll (p > 0.05) and Clip (p > 0.05). There was a significant main effect on the HR across all 6 time points (i.e., pre, intervals 1-4 and 10 minutes post) (p ≤ 0.05) and for Roll (GRD > STD) (p ≤ 0.05), but not for Clip (p > 0.05). No significant effect of Roll or Clip was found for any of the recorded ventilation measures (p > 0.05). On the basis of these findings, the use of restricted nasal breathing, while performing a high-intensity shuttle sequence as a method of increasing the acute training effect on athletes, is questionable, so strength and conditioning coaches should carefully consider

  19. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability during Yoga-Based Alternate Nostril Breathing Practice and Breath Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Shirley; Sharma, Sachin Kumar; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown a reduction in blood pressure (BP) immediately after the practice of alternate nostril yoga breathing (ANYB) in normal healthy male volunteers and in hypertensive patients of both sexes. The BP during ANYB has not been recorded. Material/Methods Participants were 26 male volunteers (group mean age ±SD, 23.8±3.5 years). We assessed (1) heart rate variability, (2) non-invasive arterial BP, and (3) respiration rate, during (a) ANYB and (b) breath awareness (BAW) sessions. Each session was 25 minutes. We performed assessments at 3 time points: Pre (5 minutes), during (15 minutes; for ANYB or BAW) and Post (5 minutes). A naïve-to-yoga control group (n=15 males, mean age ±SD 26.1±4.0 years) were assessed while seated quietly for 25 minutes. Results During ANYB there was a significant decrease (repeated measures ANOVA) in systolic BP and respiration rate; while RMSSD (the square root of the mean of the sum of squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals) and NN50 (the number of interval differences of successive normal to normal intervals greater than 50 ms) significantly increased. During BAW respiration rate decreased. In contrast, respiration rate increased during the control state. ANYB and BAW were significantly different (2-factor ANOVA) in RMSSD and respiration rate. BAW and control were different with respect to respiration rate. Conclusions The results suggest that vagal activity increased during and after ANYB, which could have contributed to the decrease in BP and changes in the HRV. PMID:25408140

  20. MEASUREMENT METHOD FOR VOLATILE METABOLIC BIOMARKERS IN EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing biomarker methodology to interpret spot biological measurements and their linkage to previous environmental pollutants exposures for individuals. This work explores the use of a promising biological media, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), which contains trapped...

  1. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  2. Blood and breath profiles of volatile organic compounds in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath shows great potential as a non-invasive method for assessing hemodialysis efficiency. In this work we aim at identifying and quantifying of a wide range of VOCs characterizing uremic breath and blood, with a particular focus on species responding to the dialysis treatment. Methods Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection coupled with solid-phase microextraction as pre-concentration method. Results A total of 60 VOCs were reliably identified and quantified in blood and breath of CKD patients. Excluding contaminants, six compounds (isoprene, dimethyl sulfide, methyl propyl sulfide, allyl methyl sulfide, thiophene and benzene) changed their blood and breath levels during the hemodialysis treatment. Conclusions Uremic breath and blood patterns were found to be notably affected by the contaminants from the extracorporeal circuits and hospital room air. Consequently, patient exposure to a wide spectrum of volatile species (hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones, aromatics, heterocyclic compounds) is expected during hemodialysis. Whereas highly volatile pollutants were relatively quickly removed from blood by exhalation, more soluble ones were retained and contributed to the uremic syndrome. At least two of the species observed (cyclohexanone and 2-propenal) are uremic toxins. Perhaps other volatile substances reported within this study may be toxic and have negative impact on human body functions. Further studies are required to investigate if VOCs responding to HD treatment could be used as markers for monitoring hemodialysis efficiency. PMID:24607025

  3. Multi-window PIV measurements around a breathing manikin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, David

    2005-11-01

    The presented work includes multi-scale measurements via a stereo article Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to view a pair of two-component windows of dissimilar scale using a varied focal length. These measurements are taken in the breathing zone of an isothermal breathing manikin (from mouth) in an environmental chamber of average office cubicle dimensions without ventilation and are analogous to an oscillatory jet. From these phase-averaged measurements, we can extract information concerning length scales, turbulence quantities and low dimensional information in order to both determine correlation between data at different length scales as well as continuing research in exposure assessment for the indoor environment. In this talk we will present these turbulence quantities and interpret their influence on the breathing zone. While the largest scale is that of the room itself, we find that the relevant spatial scales associated with the breathing zone are much lower in magnitude. In future experiments, we will expand the multi window PIV technique to include PIV window configured to obtain scales of order the cubicle simultaneously with those of the breathing zone. This will aid in our understanding of the combined impact of these multiple scales on occupant exposure in the indoor environment.

  4. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Aalami, Mahboobeh; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; ModarresGharavi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are the main cause of maternal and fetal mortality; however, they have no definite effective treatment. The researchers aimed to study the effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure (BP) during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This three-group clinical trial was conducted in Mashhad health centers and governmental hospitals. Sixty pregnant (after 20 weeks of gestational age) women with systolic BP ≥ 135 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg were assigned to three groups. Progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control exercises were administered to the two experimental groups once a week in person and in the rest of the days by instructions given on a CD for 4 weeks. BP was checked before and after the interventions. BP was measured before and after 15 min subjects' waiting without any especial intervention in the control group. Results: After 4 weeks of intervention, the systolic (by a mean of 131.3 to 117.2, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 131.05 to 120.5, P = 0.004, respectively) and diastolic (by a mean of 79.2 to 72.3, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 80.1 to 76.5, P = 0.047, respectively) BPs were significantly decreased in progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control groups, but they were not statistically significant in the control group. Conclusions: The interventions were effective on decreasing systolic and diastolic BP to normal range after 4 weeks in both the groups. The effects of both the interventions were more obvious on systolic BP compared to diastolic BP. PMID:27186213

  5. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  6. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3-5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%-12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application. PMID

  7. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3–5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%–12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application. PMID

  8. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  9. Simultaneous Measurement of Breathing and Heartbeat using Airborne Ultrasound in a Standing Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, Kotaro; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    We have been studied about non-contact measurement of respiration and heart rates. In previous papers, the measurement system of small velocity using the M-sequence-modulated signal and phase difference of reflected signals from the target has been proposed. In this paper, we describe measurement of breathing and heartbeat in a standing position using the proposed method. Body-surface velocities by breathing and heartbeat could be observed respectively when the volunteer was breathing and holding the breath. In addition, measured velocity of breathing volunteer includes the component by heartbeat. It is considered that it has possibility to measure breathing and heartbeat concurrently.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 decreases fetal breathing movements, but not pulmonary blood flow, in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1995-04-01

    Fetal breathing movements are vital for normal fetal lung growth. Inhibition of these fetal breathing movements is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. Pulmonary hypoplasia also occurs subsequent to alterations in other factors, such as a significant decrease in pulmonary blood flow. The prostaglandin system is known to have profound effects on both fetal breathing movements and on the pulmonary vascular system. We studied six late-gestation chronically instrumented fetal sheep by using an electromagnetic flow transducer around the left pulmonary artery to determine whether a decrease in fetal breathing movements, subsequent to a continuous infusion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), is associated with a decrease in pulmonary blood flow. A continuous PGE2 infusion of 0.88 +/- 0.11 microgram.kg-1.min-1 over 120 min led to a significant decrease in fetal breathing movements (control 40.5 +/- 3.6%, infusion 3.3 +/- 1.6%; P < 0.001). In contrast, the PGE2 infusion had no effect on mean left pulmonary artery blood flow (control 27.7 +/- 9.3 ml.min-1.kg-1, infusion 23.8 +/- 7.0 ml.min-1.kg-1. The PGE2 infusion demonstrated central effects in the percentage of time the fetus was in high-voltage electrocortical activity (control 41.9 +/- 2.5%, infusion 56.5 +/- 5.4%; P < 0.05) and in the amount of time spent in low-voltage electrocortical activity without fetal breathing movements (control 17.5 +/- 2.7%, infusion 40.2 +/- 4.8%; P < 0.05). A significant decrease in the fetal heart rate during the infusion was seen with no effect on either the systemic or pulmonary blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7615458

  11. Fuzzy blood pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuce, Antonino; Di Guardo, Mario; Sicurella, Gaetano

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, an intelligent system for blood pressure measurement is posed together with a possible implementation using an eight bit fuzzy processor. The system can automatically determine the ideal cuff inflation level eliminating the discomfort and misreading caused by incorrect cuff inflation. Using statistics distribution of the systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in the inflation phase, a fuzzy rule system determine the pressure levels at which checking the presence of heart beat in order to exceed the systolic pressure with the minimum gap. The heart beats, characterized through pressure variations, are recognized by a fuzzy classifier.

  12. Lung function measurement with multiple-breath-helium washout system.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Suddards, M E; Mellor, C J; Owers-Bradley, J R

    2013-04-01

    Multiple-breath-washout (MBW) measurements are regarded as a sensitive technique which can reflect the ventilation inhomogeneity of respiratory airways. Typically nitrogen is used as the tracer gas and is washed out by pure oxygen in multiple-breath-nitrogen washout (MBNW) tests. In this study, instead of using nitrogen, (4)He is used as the tracer gas with smaller gas density which may be able to reach deeper into our lungs in a given time and the helium washout results may be more sensitive to the ventilation inhomogeneity in small airways. A multiple-breath-helium-washout (MBHW) system developed for the lung function study is also presented. Quartz tuning forks with a resonance frequency of 32,768Hz have been used for detecting the change of the respiratory gas density. The resonance frequency of the quartz tuning fork decreases linearly with increasing density of the surrounding gas. Knowing the CO2 concentration from the infrared carbon dioxide detector, the helium concentration can be determined. Results from 14 volunteers (3 mild asthmatics, 4 tobacco smokers, 1 with asthma history, 1 with COPD history, 5 normal) have shown that mild asthmatics have higher ventilation inhomogeneity in either conducting or acinar airways (or both). A feature has been found in washout curve of single breaths from 4 tobacco smokers with different length of smoking history which may indicate the early stage of respiratory ventilation inhomogeneity in acinar airways. PMID:22835436

  13. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  14. How Ecosystems Breathe: Measuring Respiration of Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTammany, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Curriculum for general ecology labs often uses in-lab exercises and computer simulations to demonstrate ecological principles rather than experimental field projects. In addition, ecosystem processes can be difficult to incorporate into general ecology labs because the techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex field designs. As an alternative to in-lab projects, I have integrated field measurement of soil respiration into my general ecology lab to teach students aspects of experimental design (sampling, replication, error, etc.) and to demonstrate how organism-level processes operate beyond single organisms in nature and are influenced by environmental conditions. In a program laden with biomedical interests, analogies between organisms and ecosystems are quite appealing to students. Students in my general ecology course complete a 2-week field project in which they measure soil respiration inside a dark microcosm chamber. We use 10% KOH to trap evolved CO2 and titrate unreacted KOH in lab using 1N HCl. The protocol is simple, only requires some chemicals, and can be used in many different habitats (including flower beds on campus) quite easily. Potential experiments could involve varying environmental conditions, such as soil moisture, nutrient availability, gaseous environment, carbon supply, or temperature, to affect soil respiration rate.

  15. Measurement of Ethanol in Gaseous Breath Using a Miniature Gas Chromatograph

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Timothy E.; Booth, Matthew M.; Prather, Robert A.; Nixon, Sara J.; Boissoneault, Jeff; Melker, Richard J.; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Wohltjen, Hank; Dennis, Donn M.

    2011-01-01

    We designed and built a novel, miniature gas chromatograph (mGC) to use exhaled breath to estimate blood ethanol concentrations that may offer GC quality sensitivity and specificity, but with portability, reduced size, and decreased cost. We hypothesized that the mGC would accurately estimate the serum ethanol concentration using exhaled breath. Human subjects (n = 8) were dosed with ethanol employing the Widmark criteria, targeting a blood concentration of 0.08 g/dL. Serum and breath samples were collected concurrently over an hour. Ethanol concentrations in serum were measured using a CLIA-approved laboratory. Ethanol concentrations in conventional breath were assayed using a calibrated mGC or Intoxilyzer 400PA. Data were analyzed using Bland-Altman analysis using serum concentrations as a “gold standard”. For the mGC, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 1.013x − 0.009 (r = 0.91), −0.008 g/dL, and −0.031 to 0.016 g/dL, respectively, for 30 specimens. For the Intoxilyzer 400PA, the regression line (correlation coefficient), bias, and 95% limits of agreement were y = 0.599x + 0.008 (r = 0.86), −0.024 g/dL, and −0.049 to 0.002 g/dL, respectively, for 71 specimens with a large magnitude effect. We concluded that the mGC, using exhaled breath, performed well to estimate the serum ethanol concentrations. PMID:21439148

  16. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  17. Blood (Breath) Alcohol Concentration Rates of College Football Fans on Game Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Tavis; Braun, Robert; Reindl, Diana M.; Whewell, Aubrey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Blood (breath) Alcohol Concentration (BrAC) rates of college football fans on game day. Researchers employed a time-series study design, collecting data at home football games at a large university in the Midwest. Participants included 536 individuals (64.4% male) ages 18-83 (M = 28.44, SD = 12.32).…

  18. [An Examination of Variable Image Positions in the Aortic Valve Blood Flow Using Phase Contrast MRI: Effect of Breath-holding Methods in Healthy Volunteers].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kenichi; Morimoto, Noriyoshi; Fukushima, Sachi

    2015-12-01

    Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is a useful tool for evaluating valvular pathology. In addition, PC-MRI can provide a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in an arbitrary cross section. However, the blood flow measurement with breath-hold or free breath PC-MRI may be different from each other because of intrathoracic pressure changing and variable image position. The aim of this study was to find both the optimal breath-hold technique and the image position. Quantitative flow images were acquired in four planes (ascending aorta: Ao, sino-tubular junction: STJ, valsalva sinus: valsalva, left ventricular outflow tract: LVOT), in healthy subjects (n=10). The study protocol was divided into two parts: (1) stroke volume (SV) measured in each slice positions by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method during normal breathing and (2) SV measured at each breath-hold techniques in the Ao, STJ, valsalva, and LVOT. As a result, (1) SV of the respective measurement positions were not significant by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method and (2) LVOT SV was significantly lower than Ao, STJ, and valsalva. PMID:26685835

  19. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis on breathing movements and pulmonary blood flow in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1995-02-01

    During transition from fetal to extrauterine life, respiration increases in incidence and magnitude as pulmonary blood flow dramatically increases. To determine whether alterations in pulmonary blood flow in utero are directly related to alterations in fetal breathing movements (FBM), we studied six chronically instrumented fetal sheep late in gestation to assess the effects of continuous FBM caused by a 4-h infusion of meclofenamate, a prostaglandin synthase inhibitor, on mean pulmonary blood flow to the fetus. We found a striking increase in FBM from 46 +/- 15% (SD) of the time during control to > 85% of the time by 1 h (P < 0.001), with the fetuses exhibiting continuous FBM by the last 1 h of infusion. The mean pulmonary blood flow also increased significantly during the first 90 min of the infusion as the incidences of FBM were increasing (26 +/- 14 and 56 +/- 23 ml.min-1.kg-1 for control and infusion, respectively; P < 0.01). Despite the simultaneous initial increase in FBM and mean pulmonary blood flow, the increase in left pulmonary artery blood flow was not sustained and decreased back to baseline by 2 h, even though the incidence of FBM continued to increase at this time. During the infusion, the mean pulmonary blood flow was not different between the presence or absence of FBM. There were no changes in fetal heart rate or pulmonary or systemic blood pressures during the infusion nor in arterial pH or blood gas tensions. We conclude that this increase in mean pulmonary blood flow in utero was not solely related to the increase in breathing movements. PMID:7759422

  20. Noninvasive Measurement of Plasma Triglycerides and Free Fatty Acids from Exhaled Breath

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Timothy Do Chau; Oliver, Stacy R; Flores, Rebecca L; Ngo, Jerry; Meinardi, Simone; Carlson, Matthew K; Midyett, Jason; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R; Galassetti, Pietro Renato

    2012-01-01

    Background Although altered metabolism has long been known to affect human breath, generating clinically usable metabolic tests from exhaled compounds has proven challenging. If developed, a breath-based lipid test would greatly simplify management of diabetes and serious pathological conditions (e.g., obesity, familial hyperlipidemia, and coronary artery disease), in which systemic lipid levels are a critical risk factor for onset and development of future cardiovascular events. Methods We, therefore, induced controlled fluctuations of plasma lipids (insulin-induced lipid suppression or intravenous infusion of Intralipid) during 4-h in vivo experiments on 23 healthy volunteers (12 males/11 females, 28.0 ± 0.3 years) to find correlations between exhaled volatile organic compounds and plasma lipids. In each subject, plasma triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations were both directly measured and calculated via individualized prediction equations based on the multiple linear regression analysis of a cluster of 4 gases. In the lipid infusion protocol, we also generated common prediction equations using a maximum of 10 gases. Results This analysis yielded strong correlations between measured and predicted values during both lipid suppression (r = 0.97 for TG; r = 0.90 for FFA) and lipid infusion (r = 0.97 for TG; r = 0.94 for FFA) studies. In our most accurate common prediction model, measured and predicted TG and FFA values also displayed very strong statistical agreement (r = 0.86 and r = 0.81, respectively). Conclusions Our results demonstrate the feasibility of measuring plasma lipids through breath analysis. Optimization of this technology may ultimately lead to the development of portable breath analyzers for plasma lipids, replacing blood-based bioassays. PMID:22401327

  1. Changes in the blood parameters of an air-breathing fish during different respiratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R; Thakur, R N; Yadav, A N

    1976-01-01

    Some of the blood parameters recorded in an air-breathing eel, Amphipnous cuchia under normal respiratory condition during non-breeding period (September-April) are haemoglobin (Hb) concentration 19.26%, haematocrit value 56.16%, RBC number 1.71 million/mm3, RBC size 18.86 X 9.70 mum, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) 113.4 ng, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) 34.2%, blood sugar 77 mg% and ascorbic acid 0.435 mg%. The higher concentration of haemoglobin (19.26%) appears to be related to its obligatory air breathing habit and habitat in a water of low oxygen content. Though a definite trend of increase in the haemoglobin and haematocrit concentration with an increase in the body weight of the fish was lacking, variations were clearly marked related to intrinsic activity of the fish connected with different respiratory conditions. Asphyxiation in a submerged but continuous flow of water (liter/h) for 5 1/2 h resulted in an increase in the above-mentioned parameters to an appreciable extent. These increases were 0.23 million/mm3 in the number of erythrocytes, 6.16% in haemoglobin concentration, 10% in haematocrit value, 20% in blood sugar and 35% in ascorbic acid content. The mean corpuscular haemoglobin showed a decline of 6.2%. Exclusive aerial breathing for 5 1/2 h also caused 7.4% increase in haemoglobin concentration, 9.4% in haematocrit value, 0.14 million/mm3 in RBC number, 20% in blood sugar level, 9% in ascorbic acid content but almost no change in mean corpuscular haemoglobin. The average surface area for diffusion of gases appeared to have reduced by 6.8 mum2 per RBC. PMID:61915

  2. The effect of fetal breathing movements on pulmonary blood flow in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Kitterman, J A

    1994-04-01

    In the fetus, normal lung growth requires both fetal breathing movements (FBM) and adequate pulmonary blood flow. We postulated that FBM intermittently increase pulmonary blood flow and may stimulate lung growth through that effect. To test the hypothesis that normal intermittent FBM cause associated intermittent increases in pulmonary blood flow, we studied eight chronically instrumented fetal sheep (gestational ages 125-143 d) on 34 occasions (total study time = 65.7 h). Each fetus had a cuff electromagnetic flow transducer around the left pulmonary artery, electrocortical electrodes, and catheters in the trachea, main pulmonary artery, carotid artery, and amniotic cavity. Mean blood flow though the left pulmonary artery averaged 59 +/- 8 mL/min (mean +/- SEM; per kg: 25 +/- 4 mL/kg/min) and was similar in both the presence (61 +/- 9 mL/min) and absence (57 +/- 7 mL/min) of FBM and during both high and low voltage electrocortical activity. In contrast, in utero phasic pulmonary blood flow varied with FBM, increasing during the inspiratory phase and decreasing during the expiratory phase. Both pulmonary and systemic vascular pressures showed changes in the opposite directions. Arterial pH and blood gas tensions were normal and did not change with FBM or electrocortical activity. We conclude that FBM do not increase mean blood flow through the left pulmonary artery; thus, it is unlikely that FBM stimulate lung growth through changes in pulmonary blood flow. PMID:8047386

  3. Reliability and Determinants of Self-Evaluation of Breathing Questionnaire (SEBQ) Score: A Symptoms-Based Measure of Dysfunctional Breathing.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A J; Bacon, C J; Moran, R W

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunctional breathing is characterised by an abnormal breathing pattern leading to respiratory symptoms. The 25-item Self Evaluation of Breathing Questionnaire (SEBQ) has been developed to measure breathing-related symptoms and their severity but lacks thorough evaluation. To determine reproducibility, internal consistency and predictors of SEBQ score, 180 participants completed an online SEBQ with additional demographic and lifestyle questions. Two weeks later, 155 of those repeated SEBQ. Test-retest correlation of the SEBQ was high [intraclass correlation coefficient (3, 1) = 0.89; 95 % CI 0.85-0.92]. There was no difference in SEBQ score between test and retest (15.1 (11.6) [mean (SD)] versus 14.7 (12.4); P = 0.4) and the score showed a typical error (standard error of measurement) of 4.0. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α = 0.93), and a single factor structure for items was shown. Smoking status, reported respiratory disease, recent respiratory illness and female gender were positively-associated predictors of SEBQ score, and together explained 25.6 % of score variance (P ≤ 0.001). The SEBQ has high test-retest reproducibility and its score may be predicted by current smoking, chronic respiratory disease, recent respiratory illness and female gender, thus may be a useful clinical screening tool for dysfunctional breathing. PMID:26400252

  4. Influence of breathing frequency on the pattern of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and blood pressure: old questions revisited.

    PubMed

    Sin, P Y W; Galletly, D C; Tzeng, Y C

    2010-05-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is classically described as a vagally mediated increase and decrease in heart rate concurrent with inspiration and expiration, respectively. However, although breathing frequency is known to alter this temporal relationship, the precise nature of this phase dependency and its relationship to blood pressure remains unclear. In 16 subjects we systematically examined the temporal relationships between respiration, RSA, and blood pressure by graphically portraying cardiac interval (R-R) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) variations as a function of the respiratory cycle (pattern analysis), during incremental stepwise paced breathing. The principal findings were 1) the time interval between R-R maximum and expiration onset remained the same ( approximately 2.5-3.0 s) irrespective of breathing frequency (P = 0.10), whereas R-R minimum progressively shifted from expiratory onset into midinspiration with slower breathing (P < 0.0001); 2) there is a clear qualitative distinction between pre- versus postinspiratory cardiac acceleration during slow (0.10 Hz) but not fast (0.20 Hz) breathing; 3) the time interval from inspiration onset to SBP minimum (P = 0.16) and from expiration onset to SBP maximum (P = 0.26) remained unchanged across breathing frequencies; 4) SBP maximum and R-R maximum maintained an unchanged temporal alignment of approximately 1.1 s irrespective of breathing frequency (P = 0.84), whereas the alignment between SBP minimum and R-R minimum was inconstant (P > 0.0001); and 5) beta(1)-adrenergic blockade did not influence the respiration-RSA relationships or distinct RSA patterns observed during slow breathing, suggesting that temporal dependencies associated with alterations in breathing frequency are unrelated to cardiac sympathetic modulation. Collectively, these results illustrate nonlinear respiration-RSA-blood pressure relationships that may yield new insights to the fundamental mechanism of RSA in humans. PMID:20228262

  5. Noninvasive measurement of plasma glucose from exhaled breath in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Stacy R.; Ngo, Jerry; Flores, Rebecca; Midyett, Jason; Meinardi, Simone; Carlson, Matthew K.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Donald R.; Galassetti, Pietro R.

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of diabetes mellitus, affecting tens of millions of patients, requires frequent assessment of plasma glucose. Patient compliance for sufficient testing is often reduced by the unpleasantness of current methodologies, which require blood samples and often cause pain and skin callusing. We propose that the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath can be used as a novel, alternative, noninvasive means to monitor glycemia in these patients. Seventeen healthy (9 females and 8 males, 28.0 ± 1.0 yr) and eight type 1 diabetic (T1DM) volunteers (5 females and 3 males, 25.8 ± 1.7 yr) were enrolled in a 240-min triphasic intravenous dextrose infusion protocol (baseline, hyperglycemia, euglycemia-hyperinsulinemia). In T1DM patients, insulin was also administered (using differing protocols on 2 repeated visits to separate the effects of insulinemia on breath composition). Exhaled breath and room air samples were collected at 12 time points, and concentrations of ∼100 VOCs were determined by gas chromatography and matched with direct plasma glucose measurements. Standard least squares regression was used on several subsets of exhaled gases to generate multilinear models to predict plasma glucose for each subject. Plasma glucose estimates based on two groups of four gases each (cluster A: acetone, methyl nitrate, ethanol, and ethyl benzene; cluster B: 2-pentyl nitrate, propane, methanol, and acetone) displayed very strong correlations with glucose concentrations (0.883 and 0.869 for clusters A and B, respectively) across nearly 300 measurements. Our study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately predict glycemia through exhaled breath analysis over a broad range of clinically relevant concentrations in both healthy and T1DM subjects. PMID:21467303

  6. Perspective use of direct human blood as an energy source in air-breathing hybrid microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dector, A.; Escalona-Villalpando, R. A.; Dector, D.; Vallejo-Becerra, V.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a flexible and light air-breathing hybrid microfluidic fuel cell (HμFC) operated under biological conditions. A mixture of glucose oxidase, glutaraldehyde, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and vulcan carbon (GOx/VC-MWCNT-GA) was used as the bioanode. Meanwhile, integrating an air-exposed electrode (Pt/C) as the cathode enabled direct oxygen delivery from air. The microfluidic fuel cell performance was evaluated using glucose obtained from three different sources as the fuel: 5 mM glucose in phosphate buffer, human serum and human blood. For the last fuel, an open circuit voltage and maximum power density of 0.52 V and 0.20 mW cm-2 (at 0.38 V) were obtained respectively; meanwhile the maximum current density was 1.1 mA cm-2. Furthermore, the stability of the device was measured in terms of recovery after several polarization curves, showing excellent results. Although this air-breathing HμFC requires technological improvements before being tested in a biomedical device, it represents the best performance to date for a microfluidic fuel cell using human blood as glucose source.

  7. Ethylene and ammonia traces measurements from the patients' breath with renal failure via LPAS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dutu, D. C. A.; Cernat, R.; Matei, C.; Bratu, A. M.; Banita, S.; Dumitras, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    The application of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) for fast and precise measurements of breath biomarkers has opened up new promises for monitoring and diagnostics in recent years, especially because breath test is a non-invasive method, safe, rapid and acceptable to patients. Our study involved assessment of breath ethylene and breath ammonia levels in patients with renal failure receiving haemodialysis (HD) treatment. Breath samples from healthy subjects and from patients with renal failure were collected using chemically inert aluminized bags and were subsequently analyzed using the LPAS technique. We have found out that the composition of exhaled breath in patients with renal failure contains not only ethylene, but also ammonia and gives valuable information for determining efficacy and endpoint of HD. Analysis of ethylene and ammonia traces from the human breath may provide insight into severity of oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and may ensure optimal therapy and prevention of pathology at patients on continuous HD.

  8. Optical measures of changes in cerebral vascular tone during voluntary breath holding and a Sternberg memory task.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chin Hong; Low, Kathy A; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Zimmerman, Benjamin; Fletcher, Mark A; Maclin, Edward L; Chiarelli, Antonio M; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2016-07-01

    The human cerebral vasculature responds to changes in blood pressure and demands for oxygenation via cerebral autoregulation. Changes in cerebrovascular tone (vasoconstriction and vasodilation) also mediate the changes in blood flow measured by the BOLD fMRI signal. This cerebrovascular reactivity is known to vary with age. In two experiments, we demonstrate that cerebral pulse parameters measured using optical imaging can quantify changes in cerebral vascular tone, both globally and locally. In experiment 1, 51 older adults (age range=55-87) performed a voluntary breath-holding task while cerebral pulse amplitude measures were taken. We found significant pulse amplitude variations across breath-holding periods, indicating vasodilation during, and vasoconstriction after breath holding. The breath-holding index (BHI), a measure of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was derived and found to correlate with age. BHI was also correlated with performance in the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination, even after controlling for age and education. In experiment 2, the same participants performed a Sternberg task, and changes in regional pulse amplitude between high (set-size 6) and low (set-size 2) task loads were compared. Only task-related areas in the fronto-parietal network (FPN) showed significant reduction in pulse amplitude, indicating vasodilation. Non-task-related areas such as the somatosensory and auditory cortices did not show such reductions. Taken together, these experiments suggest that optical pulse parameters can index changes in brain vascular tone both globally and locally, using both physiological and cognitive load manipulations. PMID:27235126

  9. Acoustic plethysmography measures breathing in unrestrained neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, J Andrew; Li, Aihua; Nattie, Eugene E

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of breathing volumes in neonatal mice is of growing importance in order to characterize the influence of development and genetic modifications on respiratory control to evaluate hypotheses concerned with human infant deficits that may affect sudden infant death syndrome, for example. Current techniques require undesirable physical constraints or incur possible artifacts specific to very small animals. We have examined the utility of a recently proposed approach using an acoustic resonance procedure that does not require undue physical constraint beyond placement in the acoustic plethysmograph. We show here that this approach can be applied to baby mice 5 days after birth and that it can be accurately calibrated. In addition, this approach should be useful to study unrestrained neonatal mice under conditions where body temperature approaches environmental temperature and barometric plethysmography cannot be used. PMID:17962574

  10. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d(-1) of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  11. A Modified Carbon Monoxide Breath Test for Measuring Erythrocyte Lifespan in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Jian; Zhang, Hou-De; Ji, Yong-Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Huang, Jia-Liang; Du, Li-Tao; Cao, Ping; Zang, De-Yue; Du, Ji-Hui; Li, Rong; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study was to develop a CO breath test for RBC lifespan estimation of small animals. The ribavirin induced hemolysis rabbit models were placed individually in a closed rebreath cage and air samples were collected for measurement of CO concentration. RBC lifespan was calculated from accumulated CO, blood volume, and hemoglobin concentration data. RBC lifespan was determined in the same animals with the standard biotin-labeling method. RBC lifespan data obtained by the CO breath test method for control (CON, 49.0 ± 5.9 d) rabbits, rabbits given 10 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB10, 31.0 ± 4.0 d), and rabbits given 20 mg/kg·d−1 of ribavirin (RIB20, 25.0 ± 2.9 d) were statistically similar (all p > 0.05) to and linearly correlated (r = 0.96, p < 0.01) with the RBC lifespan data obtained for the same rabbits by the standard biotin-labeling method (CON, 51.0 ± 2.7 d; RIB10, 33.0 ± 1.3 d; and RIB20, 27.0 ± 0.8 d). The CO breath test method takes less than 3 h to complete, whereas the standard method requires at least several weeks. In conclusion, the CO breath test method provides a simple and rapid means of estimating RBC lifespan and is feasible for use with small animal models. PMID:27294128

  12. Heart rate and blood pressure time courses during prolonged dry apnoea in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Tironi, Adelaide; Gheza, Alberto; Butti, Ferdinando; Moia, Christian; Ferretti, Guido

    2008-09-01

    To define the dynamics of cardiovascular adjustments to apnoea, beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) were recorded during prolonged breath-holding in air in 20 divers. Apnoea had a mean duration of 210 +/- 70 s. In all subjects, HR attained a value 14 beats min(-1) lower than control within the initial 30 s (phase I). HR did not change for the following 2-2.5 min (phase II). Then, nine subjects interrupted the apnoea (group A), whereas 11 subjects (group B) could prolong the breath-holding for about 100 s, during which HR continuously decreased (phase III). In both groups, mean blood pressure was 8 mmHg above control at the end of phase I; it then further increased by additional 12 mmHg at the end of the apnoea. In both groups, SaO(2) did not change in the initial 100-140 s of apnoea; then, it decreased to 95% at the end of phase II. In group B, SaO(2) further diminished to 84% at the end of phase III. A typical pattern of cardiovascular readjustments was identified during dry apnoea. This pattern was not compatible with a role for baroreflexes in phase I and phase II. Further readjustment in group B may imply a role for both baroreflexes and chemoreflexes. Hypothesis has been made that the end of phase II corresponds to physiological breakpoint. PMID:18496707

  13. What Controls Your Breathing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  14. Rapid shallow breathing

    MedlinePlus

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  15. 77 FR 35747 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ...) published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2010 (75 FR 11624) for instruments that conform to the Model Specifications for Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices dated, September 17, 1993 (58 FR 48705). DATES... Alcohol (38 FR 30459). A Qualified Products List of Evidential Breath Measurement Devices comprised...

  16. 75 FR 11624 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Register on December 17, 2007 (72 FR 71480) for instruments that conform to the Model Specifications for Evidential Breath Alcohol Measurement Devices (58 FR 48705). DATES: Effective Date: March 11, 2010. FOR... Administration (NHTSA) published the Standards for Devices to Measure Breath Alcohol (38 FR 30459). A...

  17. Comparison of cerebral vascular reactivity measures obtained using breath-holding and CO2 inhalation.

    PubMed

    Tancredi, Felipe B; Hoge, Richard D

    2013-07-01

    Stimulation of cerebral vasculature using hypercapnia has been widely used to study cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR), which can be expressed as the quantitative change in cerebral blood flow (CBF) per mm Hg change in end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2). We investigate whether different respiratory manipulations, with arterial spin labeling used to measure CBF, lead to consistent measures of CVR. The approaches included: (1) an automated system delivering variable concentrations of inspired CO2 for prospective targeting of PETCO2, (2) administration of a fixed concentration of CO2 leading to subject-dependent changes in PETCO2, (3) a breath-hold (BH) paradigm with physiologic modeling of CO2 accumulation, and (4) a maneuver combining breath-hold and hyperventilation. When CVR was expressed as the percent change in CBF per mm Hg change in PETCO2, methods 1 to 3 gave consistent results. The CVR values using method 4 were significantly lower. When CVR was expressed in terms of the absolute change in CBF (mL/100 g per minute per mm Hg), greater discrepancies became apparent: methods 2 and 3 gave lower absolute CVR values compared with method 1, and the value obtained with method 4 was dramatically lower. Our findings indicate that care must be taken to ensure that CVR is measured over the linear range of the CBF-CO2 dose-response curve, avoiding hypocapnic conditions. PMID:23571282

  18. Stable isotopes in breath, blood, feces and feathers can indicate intra-individual changes in the diet of migratory songbirds.

    PubMed

    Podlesak, David W; McWilliams, Scott R; Hatch, Kent A

    2005-02-01

    We used stable isotopes of C in breath, blood, feces and feathers to identify intra-individual changes in diet and the timescale of diet changes in free-living songbirds at a stopover site. Because accurate interpretation of differences between the delta13C of breath, plasma, and red blood cells (RBCs) relative to diet requires knowing the turnover rate of C within them, we determined the rate of change of C in breath, plasma and RBCs for yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata). Half-lives of C in breath, plasma, and RBCs were 4.4+/-2.1 h, 24.8+/-12.3 h and 10.9+/-3.2 days, respectively, for yellow-rumped warblers. delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs and feces from wild-caught golden-crowned kinglets (Regulus satrapa), ruby-crowned kinglets (R. calendula) and gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis) indicated that they had maintained an isotopically consistent diet for an extended period of time. However, delta13C of breath and plasma indicated that white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) had recently expanded their diet to include a C4 dietary component. Likewise, delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs and feces indicated that some wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers had consumed foods with a more enriched protein signature prior to their arrival on Block Island, and since arrival, they had consumed mostly northern bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica). Therefore, comparisons of the delta13C of breath, plasma, RBCs, feces and feathers from individual songbirds can indicate changes in diet and provide an estimate of the timescale of the diet change. PMID:15586297

  19. Individual breathing reactions measured in hemoglobin by hydrogen exchange methods

    SciTech Connect

    Englander, S.W.; Calhoun, D.B.; Englander, J.J.; Kallenbach, N.R.; Liem, R.K.H.; Malin, E.L.; Mandal, C.; Rogero, J.R.

    1980-10-01

    Protein hydrogen exchange is generally believed to register some aspect of internal protein dynamics, but the kind of motion at work is not clear. Experiments are being done to identify the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange and to distinguish between local unfolding and accessibility-penetration mechanisms. Results with small molecules, polynucleotides, and proteins demonstrate that solvent accessibility is by no means sufficient for fast exchange. H-exchange slowing is quite generally connected with intramolecular H-bonding, and the exchange process depends pivotally on transient H-bond cleavage. At least in ..cap alpha..-helical structures, the cooperative aspect of H-bond cleavage mut be expressed in local unfolding reactions. Results obtained by use of a difference hydrogen exchange method appear to provide a direct measurement of transient, cooperative, local unfolding reactions in hemoglobin. The reality of these supposed coherent breathing units is being tested by using the difference H-exchange approach to tritium label the units one at a time and then attempting to locate the tritium by fragmenting the protein, separating the fragments, and testing them for label. Early results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  20. Evaluation of Candidate Measures for Home-Based Screening of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Taiwanese Bus Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Hua; Huang, Ren-Jing; Lai, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Shen-Wen; Chung, Ai-Hui; Kuo, Teng-Yao; Chang, Ching-Haur; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleepiness-at-the-wheel has been identified as a major cause of highway accidents. The aim of our study is identifying the candidate measures for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing in Taiwanese bus drivers, instead of polysomnography. Methods: Overnight polysomnography accompanied with simultaneous measurements of alternative screening devices (pulse oximetry, ApneaLink, and Actigraphy), heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and questionnaires were completed by 151 eligible participants who were long-haul bus drivers with a duty period of more than 12 h a day and duty shifting. Results: 63.6% of professional bus drivers were diagnosed as having sleep disordered breathing and had a higher body mass index, neck circumference, systolic blood pressure, arousal index and desaturation index than those professional bus drivers without evidence of sleep disordered breathing. Simple home-based candidate measures: (1) Pulse oximetry, oxygen-desaturation indices by ≥3% and 4% (r = 0.87∼0.92); (2) Pulse oximetry, pulse-rising indices by ≥7% and 8% from a baseline (r = 0.61∼0.89); and (3) ApneaLink airflow detection, apnea-hypopnea indices (r = 0.70∼0.70), based on recording-time or Actigraphy-corrected total sleep time were all significantly correlated with, and had high agreement with, corresponding polysomnographic apnea-hypopnea indices [(1) 94.5%∼96.6%, (2) 93.8%∼97.2%, (3) 91.1%∼91.3%, respectively]. Conversely, no validities of SDB screening were found in the multi-variables apnea prediction questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, night-sleep heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and anthropometric variables. Conclusions: The indices of pulse oximetry and apnea flow detection are eligible criteria for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing, specifically for professional drivers. PMID:24803198

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  2. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  3. Metabolic analyzer. [for measuring metabolic rate and breathing dynamics of human beings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Perry, C. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of metabolic rate and breathing dynamics in which inhaled and exhaled breath are sensed by sealed, piston-displacement type spirometers. These spirometers electrically measure the volume of inhaled and exhaled breath. A mass spectrometer analyzes simultaneously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water vapor. Computation circuits are responsive to the outputs of the spirometers, mass spectrometer, temperature, pressure and timing signals and compute oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute volume and respiratory exchange ratio. A selective indicator provides for read-out of these data at predetermined cyclic intervals.

  4. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and 24-Hour Blood Pressure Pattern Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    White, William B.; Kutner, Michael; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Bliwise, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Background To examine the association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and 24-hour blood pressure (BP) pattern among community-dwelling older adults. Methods A convenience sample of 70 community-dwelling older adults, recruited from senior housing, community centers, and learning centers, were admitted to General Clinical Research Center, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Ga. Information regarding demographic and clinical history was obtained using questionnaires. Twenty-four–hour BP monitoring in supine position was performed using Spacelabs model 20207. Breathing during sleep was monitored with the use of a modified sleep recording system (Embletta, PDS), which monitors nasal and oral airflow, chest and abdominal movements, and pulse oximetry. Night time–daytime (night-day) BP ratio (average night-time BP divided by daytime BP) was calculated both for systolic and diastolic BPs. Results Sixty-nine participants, mean age 74.9 ± 6.4 years (41 [57%] women), completed the study. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 13 ± 13 per hour of sleep, and 20 participants (29%) had AHI ≥15 per hour of sleep, indicating moderate to severe SDB. Moderate to severe SDB (AHI ≥15 per hour of sleep) was significantly associated with nocturnal hypertension, whereas there was no statistically significant difference in wake-time BP between those with and without moderate to severe SDB. Stepwise multiple regressions showed that AHI independently predicted increased night-day systolic and night-day diastolic BP ratio, even after controlling for nocturia frequency. Conclusions The results indicate increased BP load associated with increased AHI in this group of older adults. This increased BP load may contribute to increased hypertension-related morbidity and disease burden. PMID:19196901

  5. [*C]octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying rate of solids.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Rutgeerts, P J; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B; Vantrappen, G

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a breath test to measure solid gastric emptying using a standardized scrambled egg test meal (250 kcal) labeled with [14C]octanoic acid or [13C]octanoic acid. In vitro incubation studies showed that octanoic acid is a reliable marker of the solid phase. The breath test was validated in 36 subjects by simultaneous radioscintigraphic and breath test measurements. Nine healthy volunteers were studied after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin and peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline, respectively. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying, while propantheline significantly reduced gastric emptying rates. We conclude that the [*C]octanoic breath test is a promising and reliable test for measuring the gastric emptying rate of solids. PMID:7995200

  6. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  7. CONTROLLED METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) EXPOSURE TO HUMANS THROUGH DERMAL, INGESTION, AND INHALATION ROUTES AND THE RESULTANT BIOMARKER TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL (TBA) AS MEASURED IN EXHALED BREATH AND VENOUS BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. In September 1997 during SCOS97 a series of 3-h canister samples of ambient air were collected at the Azusa air monitoring station during morning and afternoon periods. ...

  8. Measurement of low breath-alcohol concentrations: laboratory studies and field experience.

    PubMed

    Dubowski, K M; Essary, N A

    1999-10-01

    Recent federal rules and traffic law changes impose breath-alcohol thresholds of 0.02 and 0.04 g/210 L upon some classes of motor vehicle operators, such as juveniles and commercial vehicle operators. In federally regulated alcohol testing in the workplace, removal of covered workers from safety-sensitive duties, and other adverse actions, also occur at breath-alcohol concentrations (BrACs) of 0.02 and 0.04 g/210 L. We therefore studied performance of vapor-alcohol and breath-alcohol measurement at low alcohol concentrations in the laboratory and in the field, with current-generation evidential analyzers. We report here chiefly our field experience with evidential breath-alcohol testing of drinking drivers on paired breath samples using 62 Intoxilyzer 5000-D analyzers, for BrACs of 0-0.059 g/210 L. The data from 62 law enforcement breath-alcohol testing sites were collected and pooled, with BrACs recorded to three decimal places, and otherwise carried out under the standard Oklahoma evidential breath-alcohol testing protocol. For 2105 pooled simulator control tests at 0.06-0.13 g/210 L the mean +/- SD of the differences between target and result were -0.001 +/- 0.0035 g/210 L and 0.003 +/- 0.0023 g/210 L for signed and absolute differences, respectively (spans -0.016-0.010, 0.000-0.016). For 2078 paired duplicate breath-alcohol measurements with the Intoxilyzer 5000-D, the mean +/- SD difference (BrAC1-BrAC2) were 0.002 +/- 0.0026 (span 0-0.020 g/210 L). Variability of breath-alcohol measurements was related inversely to the alcohol concentration. Ninety-nine percent prediction limits for paired BrAC measurements correspond to a 0.020 g/210 L maximum absolute difference, meeting the NSC/CAOD recommendation that paired breath-alcohol analysis results within 0.02 g/210 L shall be deemed to be in acceptable agreement. We conclude that the field system for breath-alcohol analysis studied by us can and does perform reliably and accurately at low BrACs. PMID:10517542

  9. Laser 3-D measuring system and real-time visual feedback for teaching and correcting breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povšič, Klemen; Fležar, Matjaž; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel method for real-time 3-D body-shape measurement during breathing based on the laser multiple-line triangulation principle. The laser projector illuminates the measured surface with a pattern of 33 equally inclined light planes. Simultaneously, the camera records the distorted light pattern from a different viewpoint. The acquired images are transferred to a personal computer, where the 3-D surface reconstruction, shape analysis, and display are performed in real time. The measured surface displacements are displayed with a color palette, which enables visual feedback to the patient while breathing is being taught. The measuring range is approximately 400×600×500 mm in width, height, and depth, respectively, and the accuracy of the calibrated apparatus is +/-0.7 mm. The system was evaluated by means of its capability to distinguish between different breathing patterns. The accuracy of the measured volumes of chest-wall deformation during breathing was verified using standard methods of volume measurements. The results show that the presented 3-D measuring system with visual feedback has great potential as a diagnostic and training assistance tool when monitoring and evaluating the breathing pattern, because it offers a simple and effective method of graphical communication with the patient.

  10. Elimination kinetics of volatile organics in humans using breath measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Wallace, L.A.; Gordon, S.M. )

    1992-07-01

    During the past decade significant strides have been made toward understanding the sources and factors which lead to volatile organic chemical (VOC) exposure in the general population. Less is known, however, about the impact of low-level environmental exposure on human health. Investigations are underway in a number of laboratories in an effort to determine the uptake, distribution, metabolism, and elimination kinetics for VOCs in humans. We examined the elimination kinetics for the third phase for ten VOCs--1,1,-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, m,p-xylenes, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and limonene--in human subjects. Subjects were exposed to a variety of common consumer products and breath samples were collected post-exposure while the subjects spent up to 10 hr in a clean air environment. VOCs from breath samples were collected into canisters or onto Tenax GC cartridges and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Exponential modeling of the decay data was performed to obtain kinetic parameters. The half-lives for trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were approximately 5 to 8 hr for the four subjects. In general, the magnitude and range of variability was larger for toluene, limonene, and p-dichlorobenzene than for the other VOCs; the elimination rate spanning a few hours to a day or two. Thus, VOCs exhibit relatively short residence times in the body relative to other halo-carbons, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins.

  11. Dirhythmic breathing.

    PubMed

    Flemister, G; Goldberg, N B; Sharp, J T

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with severe chronic obstructive lung disease and recent respiratory failure are described in whom two distinct simultaneous respiratory rhythms were identified, one at 8 to 13 breaths per minute and the other at 39 to 65 per minute. Magnetometer measurements of thoracoabdominal motion together with simultaneous electromyograms of multiple inspiratory muscles suggested that both rhythms were the result of coordinated action of several inspiratory muscles. We suggest that this phenomenon, which we have called dirhythmic breathing, results from the conflicting influence upon respiratory centers and motoneurons of two or more stimuli, some favoring rapid shallow breaths and others slow deep breaths. PMID:7449504

  12. Application of Novel Method to Measure Endogenous VOCs in Exhaled Breath Condensate Before and After Exposure to Diesel Exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polar volatile organic compounds (PVOCs) such as aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols are byproducts of normal human metabolism and are present in exhaled breath and blood. Environmental exposures, individual activities, and disease states can perturb normal metabolic processes and ...

  13. [Peculiarities of respiration mechanics in spontaneously breathing newborn infants. 1. Principles of the measurement technics].

    PubMed

    Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    1983-01-01

    Disturbances of breathing mechanics may involve disturbances of ventilation as one cause of hypoxaemia. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of breathing mechanics has several diagnostical and therapeutical advantages, but their application in newborns, under conditions of spontaneous ventilation, is rendered more difficult by the missing co-operation of the newborns and by the missing of suitable measurement devices for a bedside measurement. The determination of parameters of breathing mechanics is based on the measurement of breathing flow rate (V), tidal volume (VT) and esophageal pressure (Pe). Bodyplethysmographs, face masks and nasal prongs can be used for the measurement of V and VT, however, face masks have the most methodological and technical advantages for the bedside application, moreover, they guarantee a very low injury of newborns. Until now the fluid-filled open catheter is used most frequently for the measurement of esophageal pressure, however, it will be replaced in future by the microtip pressure transducer (Tip-catheter), which offers fundamental advantages. In addition to these technical problems the complete clinical application of breathing mechanical investigations is rendered more difficult, because the standardization of the investigative conditions, the parameters and the proposals on evaluation techniques are absent until now. PMID:6670321

  14. A mind you can count on: validating breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Daniel B.; Stoll, Eli L.; Kindy, Sonam D.; Merry, Hillary L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness practice of present moment awareness promises many benefits, but has eluded rigorous behavioral measurement. To date, research has relied on self-reported mindfulness or heterogeneous mindfulness trainings to infer skillful mindfulness practice and its effects. In four independent studies with over 400 total participants, we present the first construct validation of a behavioral measure of mindfulness, breath counting. We found it was reliable, correlated with self-reported mindfulness, differentiated long-term meditators from age-matched controls, and was distinct from sustained attention and working memory measures. In addition, we employed breath counting to test the nomological network of mindfulness. As theorized, we found skill in breath counting associated with more meta-awareness, less mind wandering, better mood, and greater non-attachment (i.e., less attentional capture by distractors formerly paired with reward). We also found in a randomized online training study that 4 weeks of breath counting training improved mindfulness and decreased mind wandering relative to working memory training and no training controls. Together, these findings provide the first evidence for breath counting as a behavioral measure of mindfulness. PMID:25386148

  15. Measurement of Whole-Body CO2 Production in Birds Using Real-Time Laser-Derived Measurements of Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and Oxygen (δ(18)O) Isotope Concentrations in Water Vapor from Breath.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G W; Guglielmo, C G; Hobson, K A

    2015-01-01

    The doubly labeled water (DLW) method is commonly used to measure energy expenditure in free-living wildlife and humans. However, DLW studies involving animals typically require three blood samples, which can affect behavior and well-being. Moreover, measurement of H (δ(2)H) and O (δ(18)O) isotope concentrations in H2O derived from blood using conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry is technically demanding, time-consuming, and often expensive. A novel technique that would avoid these constraints is the real-time measurement of δ(2)H and δ(18)O in the H2O vapor of exhaled breath using cavity ring-down (CRD) spectrometry, provided that δ(2)H and δ(18)O from body H2O and breath were well correlated. Here, we conducted a validation study with CRD spectrometry involving five zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), five brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), and five European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), where we compared δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and rCO2 (rate of CO2 production) estimates from breath with those from blood. Isotope concentrations from blood were validated by comparing dilution-space estimates with measurements of total body water (TBW) obtained from quantitative magnetic resonance. Isotope dilution-space estimates from δ(2)H and δ(18)O values in the blood were similar to and strongly correlated with TBW measurements (R(2) = 0.99). The (2)H and (18)O (ppm) in breath and blood were also highly correlated (R(2) = 0.99 and 0.98, respectively); however, isotope concentrations in breath were always less enriched than those in blood and slightly higher than expected, given assumed fractionation values between blood and breath. Overall, rCO2 measurements from breath were strongly correlated with those from the blood (R(2) = 0.90). We suggest that this technique will find wide application in studies of animal and human energetics in the field and laboratory. We also provide suggestions for ways this technique could be further improved. PMID:26658408

  16. Environmental and occupational exposure to benzene by analysis of breath and blood.

    PubMed

    Perbellini, L; Faccini, G B; Pasini, F; Cazzoli, F; Pistoia, S; Rosellini, R; Valsecchi, M; Brugnone, F

    1988-05-01

    Benzene exposure of chemical workers was studied, during the entire workshift, by continuous monitoring of workplace benzene concentration, and 16 hours after the end of the workshift by the measurement of alveolar and blood benzene concentrations and excretion of urinary phenol. Exposure of hospital staff was studied by measuring benzene concentrations in the alveolar and blood samples collected during the hospital workshift. Instantaneous environmental air samples were also collected, at the moment of the biological sampling, for all the subjects tested. A group of 34 chemical workers showed an eight hour exposure to benzene, as a geometric mean, of 1.12 micrograms/l which corresponded, 16 hours after the end of the workshift, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 70 ng/l in the alveolar air and 597 ng/l in the blood. Another group of 27 chemical workers (group A) turned out to be exposed to an indeterminable eight hour exposure to benzene that corresponded, the morning after, to a geometric mean benzene concentration of 28 ng/l in the alveolar air and 256 ng/l in the blood. The group of hospital staff (group B) had a benzene concentration of 14 ng/l in the alveolar air and 269 ng/l in the blood. Instantaneous environmental samples showed that in the infirmaries the geometric mean benzene concentration was 58 ng/l during the examination of the 34 chemical workers, 36 ng/l during the examination of the 27 chemical workers (group A), and 5 ng/l during the examination of the 19 subjects of the hospital staff (group B). Statistical analysis showed that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations in the 34 workers exposed to 1.12 microgram/l of benzene differed significantly from those in groups A and B. It was found, moreover, that the alveolar and blood benzene concentrations were higher in the smokers in groups A and B but not in the smokers in the group of 34 chemical workers. The slope of the linear correlation between the alveolar and the instantaneous

  17. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  18. Diaphragm breathing movement measurement using ultrasound and radiographic imaging: a concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Jae J; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    Recent ultrasound imaging evidence asserts that the diaphragm is an important multifunctional muscle to control breathing as well as stabilize the core and posture in humans. However, the validity and accuracy of ultrasound for the measurement of dynamic diaphragm movements during breathing and functional core activities have not been determined. The specific aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of ultrasound imaging measurements of diaphragm movements by concurrently comparing these measurements to the gold standard of radiographic imaging measurements. A total of 14 asymptomatic adults (9 males, 5 females; mean age =28.4 ± 3.0 years) were recruited to participate in the study. Ultrasound and radiographic images were used concurrently to determine diaphragm movement (inspiration, expiration, and excursion) during tidal breathing. Pearson correlation analysis showed strong correlations, ranging from r=0.78 to r=0.83, between ultrasound and radiographic imaging measurements of the diaphragm during inhalation, exhalation, and excursion. These findings suggest that ultrasound imaging measurement is useful to accurately evaluate diaphragm movements during tidal breathing. Clinically, ultrasound imaging measurements can be used to diagnose and treat diaphragm movement impairments in individuals with neuromuscular disorders including spinal cord injuries, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:24211983

  19. MEASUREMENT OF THE BIOTRANSFER AND TIME CONSTANT OF RADON FROM INGESTED WATER BY HUMAN BREATH ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty-one tests were performed on 38 volunteers to measure elimination rates of 222Rn in expired breath. articipants ranged from ages 9 to 85 y, with 16 males and 22 females. he levels of physical activity of the subjects ranged from very inactive to marathon level. alibration of...

  20. How many digits should be reported in forensic breath alcohol measurements?

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Rod G

    2015-06-01

    Uncertainty is an inherent property of all measurements. The magnitude of this uncertainty will determine the number of meaningful digits that should be reported in a measurement result. Several statistical arguments are considered providing evidence that three digit truncated results are more appropriate than two since the first significant digit of the combined uncertainty (standard deviation) in breath alcohol measurement is found in the third decimal place. Probably, the most compelling reason for reporting three digits is the significant reduction in combined uncertainty compared with the use of two digits. For a breath alcohol concentration of 0.089 g/210 L, the combined uncertainty for two digit results is ∼0.0042 g/210 L, compared with 0.0031 g/210 L for three digit results. The historical practice of reporting two digit truncated results in forensic breath alcohol analysis has been largely based on the use of analog scale instruments with 0.01 g/210 L scale resolution. With today's modern digital instrumentation, this practice should be reconsidered. While the focus of this paper is on breath alcohol analysis, the general principles will apply to any quantitative analytical measurement. PMID:25829470

  1. The association of annual air pollution exposure with blood pressure among patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Te; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Wu, Dean; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2016-02-01

    While sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), high blood pressure (BP) and air pollution exposure have separately been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality, the association linking air pollution exposure to BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing is still unclear. We collected 3762 participants' data from the Taipei Medical University Hospital's Sleep Center and air pollution data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Associations of 1-year mean criteria air pollutants [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3)] with systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were investigated by generalized additive models. After controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), temperature and relative humidity, we observed that increases in air pollution levels were associated with decreased SBP and increased DBP. We also found that patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥30 showed a stronger BP response to increased levels of air pollution exposure than those with AHI<30. Stronger effects of air pollution exposure on BP were found in overweight participants than in participants with normal BMI. We concluded that annual exposure to air pollution was associated with change of BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing. The association between annual air pollution exposure and BP could be modified by AHI and BMI. PMID:26580727

  2. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  3. Modelling acute renal failure using blood and breath biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Moorhead, Katherine T; Hill, Jonathan V; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Scotter, Jennifer M; Storer, Malina K; Endre, Zoltan H

    2011-02-01

    This paper compares three methods for estimating renal function, as tested in rats. Acute renal failure (ARF) was induced via a 60-min bilateral renal artery clamp in 8 Sprague-Dawley rats and renal function was monitored for 1 week post-surgery. A two-compartment model was developed for estimating glomerular filtration via a bolus injection of a radio-labelled inulin tracer, and was compared with an estimated creatinine clearance method, modified using the Cockcroft-Gault equation for rats. These two methods were compared with selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) monitoring of breath analytes. Determination of renal function via SIFT-MS is desirable since results are available non-invasively and in real time. Relative decreases in renal function show very good correlation between all 3 methods (R²=0.84, 0.91 and 0.72 for breath-inulin, inulin-creatinine, and breath-creatinine correlations, respectively), and indicate good promise for fast, non-invasive determination of renal function via breath testing. PMID:20728235

  4. Reassessment of chemical control of breathing in undisturbed bullfrogs, Lithobates catesbeianus, using measurements of pulmonary ventilation.

    PubMed

    Santin, Joseph M; Hartzler, Lynn K

    2016-04-01

    Despite the importance of bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) as models in respiratory control, chemical control of breathing in conscious bullfrogs has never been assessed with methods that measure the tidal volume (VT). This has precluded the calculation of important respiratory variables like minute ventilation (V.E) and air convection requirement. To address this, we adapted airflow pneumotachography for use in bullfrogs and reassessed chemical control of breathing. We show that V.E measured with pneumotachography produces breathing pattern and metabolism values consistent with anurans. Second, we confirm that bullfrogs have small ventilatory responses to hypercarbia that include increases in tidal volume and a post-hypercarbic hyperpnea. We observed that the magnitude of the post-hypercarbic hyperpnea does not depend on ventilatory responses during hypercarbia. Finally, we showed that increases in breathing frequency and VT during hypoxia are differentially regulated with time. These findings comprise the first complete assessment of hypercarbic and hypoxic V.E responses in intact bullfrogs and emphasize the importance of measuring VT. PMID:26478178

  5. Accuracy of the blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbia, F; Del Colle, S; Testa, E; Naso, D; Veglio, F

    2006-08-01

    Blood pressure measurement is the cornerstone for the diagnosis, the treatment and the research on arterial hypertension, and all of the decisions about one of these single aspects may be dramatically influenced by the accuracy of the measurement. Over the past 20 years or so, the accuracy of the conventional Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff technique of blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with automated devices. In the same period, recognition of the phenomenon of white coat hypertension, whereby some individuals with an apparent increase in blood pressure have normal, or reduced, blood pressures when measurement is repeated away from the medical environment, has focused attention on methods of measurement that provide profiles of blood pressure behavior rather than relying on isolated measurements under circumstances that may in themselves influence the level of blood pressure recorded. These methodologies have included repeated measurements of blood pressure using the traditional technique, self-measurement of blood pressure in the home or work place, and ambulatory blood pressure measurement using innovative automated devices. The purpose of this review to serve as a source of practical information about the commonly used methods for blood pressure measurement: the traditional Riva-Rocci method and the automated methods. PMID:17016412

  6. Additional Value of CH₄ Measurement in a Combined (13)C/H₂ Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-09-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H₂) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined (13)C/H₂ lactose breath test that measures breath (13)CO₂ as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H₂ and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 (13)C/H₂ lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH₄ in addition to H₂ and (13)CO₂. Based on the (13)C/H₂ breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH₄ further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H₂-excretion were found to excrete CH₄. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH₄-concentrations has an added value to the (13)C/H₂ breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  7. H2S concentrations in the arterial blood during H2S administration in relation to its toxicity and effects on breathing

    PubMed Central

    Klingerman, Candice M.; Trushin, Neil; Prokopczyk, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to establish in spontaneously breathing urethane-anesthetized rats, the relationship between the concentrations of H2S transported in the blood and the corresponding clinical manifestations, i.e., breathing stimulation and inhibition, during and following infusion of NaHS at increasing rates. The gaseous concentration of H2S (CgH2S, one-third of the total soluble form) was computed from the continuous determination of H2S partial pressure in the alveolar gas, while H2S, both dissolved and combined to hemoglobin, was measured at specific time points by sulfide complexation with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S). We found that using a potent reducing agent in vitro, H2S added to the whole blood had little interaction with the plasma proteins, as sulfide appeared to be primarily combined and then oxidized by hemoglobin. In vivo, H2S was undetectable in the blood in its soluble form in baseline conditions, while CMBBH2S averaged 0.7 ± 0.5 μM. During NaHS infusion, H2S was primarily present in nonsoluble form in the arterial blood: CMBBH2S was about 50 times higher than CgH2S at the lowest levels of exposure and 5 or 6 times at the levels wherein fatal apnea occurred. CgH2S averaged only 1.1 ± 0.7 μM when breathing increased, corresponding to a CMBBH2S of 11.1 ± 5.4 μM. Apnea occurred at CgH2S above 5.1 μM and CMBBH2S above 25.4 μM. At the cessation of exposure, CMBBH2S remained elevated, at about 3 times above baseline for at least 15 min. These data provide a frame of reference for studying the putative effects of endogenous H2S and for testing antidotes against its deadly effects. PMID:23904109

  8. The impact of breathing on HRV measurements: implications for the longitudinal follow-up of athletes.

    PubMed

    Saboul, Damien; Pialoux, Vincent; Hautier, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to compare daily variations of heart rate variability (HRV) parameters between controlled breathing (CB) and spontaneous breathing (SB) sessions during a longitudinal follow-up of athletes. HRV measurements were performed daily on 10 healthy male runners for 21 consecutive days. The signals were recorded during two successive randomised 5-minutes sessions. One session was performed in CB and the other in SB. The results showed significant differences between the two respiration methods in the temporal, nonlinear and frequency domains. However, significant correlations were observed between CB and SB (higher than 0.70 for RMSSD and SD1), demonstrating that during a longitudinal follow-up, these markers provide the same HRV variations regardless of breathing pattern. By contrast, independent day-to-day variations were observed with HF and LF/HF frequency markers, indicating no significant relationship between SB and CB data over time. Therefore, we consider that SB and CB may be used for HRV longitudinal follow-ups only for temporal and nonlinear markers. Indeed, the same daily increases and decreases were observed whatever the breathing method employed. Conversely, frequency markers did not provide the same variations between SB and CB and we propose that these indicators are not reliable enough to be used for day-to-day HRV monitoring. PMID:24050471

  9. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  10. Blood Pressure Measurements Taken by Patients are Similar to Home and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Pierin, Angela M. G.; Ignez, Edna C.; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Barbato, Alfonso Júlio Guedes; Mion, Décio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare blood pressure measurements taken at home by physicians, nurses, and patients with office blood pressure measurement , ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure measurement. METHODS A total of 44 patients seen by a home care program were studied. Protocol 1 a) blood pressure was measured by the patient, a physician and a nurse during a regular home visit (Home1); b) home blood pressure measurement was measured for 4 days (HBPM1); c) office blood pressure measurement was measured by a physician, a nurse, and the patient; and by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Protocol 2 blood pressure was measured by the patient, a physician, and a nurse during a special home visit in the presence of a physician and a nurse only (Home2); and b) home blood pressure measurement was taken for the second time (HBPM2). Echocardiography, guided by a two-dimensional echocardiograph, was performed. RESULTS Protocol 1: a) office blood pressure measurement and Home1 were significantly higher than ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, except for systolic and diastolic office blood pressure measurement taken by the patient or a family member, systolic blood pressure taken by a nurse, and diastolic blood pressure taken by a physician. b) ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and HBPM1 were similar. Protocol 2: a) HBPM2 and Home2 were similar. b) Home2 was significantly lower than Home1, except for diastolic blood pressure taken by a nurse or the patient. There were significant relationships between: a) diastolic blood pressure measured by the patient and the thickness of the interventricular septum, posterior wall, and left ventricular mass; and b) ambulatory and HBPM2 diastolic and systolic blood pressure taken by a physician (home2) and left ventricular mass. Therefore, the data indicate that home blood pressure measurement and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring had good prognostic values relative to “office measurement.” CONCLUSION

  11. Breath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Stefan; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena; Smets, Elyn; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance. PMID:23908639

  12. Normal breathing pattern and arterial blood gases in awake and sleeping goats after near total destruction of the presumed pre-Bötzinger complex and the surrounding region

    PubMed Central

    Krause, K. L.; Forster, H. V.; Kiner, T.; Davis, S. E.; Bonis, J. M.; Qian, B.; Pan, L. G.

    2009-01-01

    Abrupt neurotoxic destruction of >70% of the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötzC) in awake goats results in respiratory and cardiac failure (Wenninger JM, Pan LG, Klum L, Leekley T, Bastastic J, Hodges MR, Feroah TR, Davis S, Forster HV. J Appl Physiol 97: 1629–1636, 2004). However, in reduced preparations, rhythmic respiratory activity has been found in other areas of the brain stem (Huang Q, St. John WM. J Appl Physiol 64: 1405–1411, 1988; Janczewski WA, Feldman JL. J Physiol 570: 407–420, 2006; Lieske SP, Thoby-Brisson M, Telgkamo P, Ramierz JM. Nature Neurosci 3: 600–607, 2000; St. John WM, Bledsoe TA. J Appl Physiol 59: 684–690, 1985); thus we hypothesized that, when the preBötzC is destroyed incrementally over weeks, time-dependent plasticity within the respiratory network will result in a respiratory rhythm capable of maintaining normal blood gases. Microtubules were bilaterally implanted into the presumed preBötzC of seven goats. After recovery from surgery, studies were completed to establish baseline values for respiratory parameters. At weekly intervals, increasing volumes (in order 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 μl) of ibotenic acid (IA; 50 mM) were then injected into the preBötzC. All IA injections resulted in an acute tachypnea and dysrhythmia featuring augmented breaths, apneas, and increased breath-to-breath variation in breathing. In studies at night, apneas were nearly all central and occurred in the awake state. Breath-to-breath variation in breathing was greater (P < 0.05) during wakefulness than during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, one week after the final IA injection, the breathing pattern, breath-to-breath variation, and arterial blood gases and pH were unchanged from baseline, but there was a 20% decrease in respiratory frequency (f) and CO2 sensitivity (P < 0.05), as well as a 40% decrease in the ventilatory response to hypoxia (P < 0.001). In subsequent histological analysis of the presumed preBötzC region of lesioned goats, it

  13. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  14. Free-Breathing 3D Whole Heart Black Blood Imaging with Motion Sensitized Driven Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hu, Peng; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and robustness of motion sensitized driven equilibrium (MSDE) for blood suppression in volumetric 3D whole heart cardiac MR. Materials and Methods To investigate the efficacy of MSDE on blood suppression and myocardial SNR loss on different imaging sequences. 7 healthy adult subjects were imaged using 3D ECG-triggered MSDE-prep T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), and spoiled gradient echo (GRE), after optimization of MSDE parameters in a pilot study of 5 subjects. Imaging artifacts, myocardial and blood SNR were assessed. Subsequently, the feasibility of isotropic spatial resolution MSDE-prep black-blood was assessed in 6 subjects. Finally, 15 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease were recruited to be imaged using conventional multi-slice 2D DIR TSE imaging sequence and 3D MSDE-prep spoiled GRE. Results The MSDE-prep yields significant blood suppression (75-92%), enabling a volumetric 3D black-blood assessment of the whole heart with significantly improved visualization of the chamber walls. The MSDE-prep also allowed successful acquisition of black-blood images with isotropic spatial resolution. In the patient study, 3D black-blood MSDE-prep and DIR resulted in similar blood suppression in LV and RV walls but the MSDE prep had superior myocardial signal and wall sharpness. Conclusion MSDE-prep allows volumetric black-blood imaging of the heart. PMID:22517477

  15. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... deep breath, which usually results in retention of carbon dioxide and not enough oxygen in blood (obesity hypoventilation ... for anemia), and oximetry or blood oxygen or carbon dioxide levels. Your doctor also may obtain a chest ...

  16. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  17. Measurement of fat digestion in early life using a stable isotope breath test.

    PubMed Central

    McClean, P; Harding, M; Coward, W A; Green, M R; Weaver, L T

    1993-01-01

    13C breath tests are a safe, non-invasive way of assessing nutrient digestion and absorption that can be used repeatedly in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to assess their value for measuring fat digestion in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, and healthy controls whose pancreatic exocrine function is immature, and to monitor pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Six infants with cystic fibrosis (aged 10-18 months) and nine healthy controls (aged 6-19 months) were studied. After an overnight fast each child ingested 7.5 mg/kg 13C trioctanoin (99 atom % excess) followed by a known volume of milk. Breath samples were collected before and at 30 minute intervals thereafter for five hours. The 13C enrichment of expired carbon dioxide was measured by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The mean (SD) percentage dose recovery of 13C was 13.5 (5.3) for the cystic fibrosis group and 24.2 (6.7) for the healthy controls. When those with cystic fibrosis were studied after supplementary pancreatic enzymes, the mean percentage dose recovery rose to 17.1 (6.9). Total intraluminal lipolysis was diminished by 44% in young children with cystic fibrosis. Pancreatic enzyme supplements improved digestion by 27%. The 13C trioctanoin breath test was effective in detecting fat maldigestion and can be used to measure the benefits of enzyme supplements in early life. PMID:8215547

  18. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  19. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  20. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  1. Blood alcohol measurements in the emergency department: who needs them?

    PubMed Central

    Simel, D L; Feussner, J R

    1988-01-01

    We surveyed North Carolina emergency physicians to determine current medical practices regarding the use of blood alcohol concentrations using a hypothetical scenario. Most physicians (88 per cent) would not have obtained blood alcohol concentrations in a patient who had alcohol on his breath but was coherent and cooperative. For marginally impaired patients, more liberal use of blood alcohol concentrations and explicit instructions to avoid driving while impaired might improve patient care and promote highway safety. PMID:3177726

  2. Measuring tidal breathing parameters using a volumetric vest in neonates with and without lung disease.

    PubMed

    Olden, C; Symes, E; Seddon, P

    2010-11-01

    Lung function measurement is difficult in unsedated infants; tidal breathing parameters are a useful non-invasive surrogate, but even these measurements cause disturbance from applying a facemask. We investigated a novel volumetric vest system (FloRight), which measures volume changes of the respiratory system from changes in the magnetic fields induced by current-carrying coils around the entire chest and abdomen. Using a facemask and ultrasonic flowmeter as comparator, we assessed the validity and repeatability of tidal breathing parameters measured by FloRight in 10 healthy newborn infants during natural sleep. We also assessed the effect of a facemask on tidal volume and tidal expiratory flow parameters. To assess the ability of the FloRight system to detect disease, we compared the healthy infants with 11 infants suffering from bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Tidal parameters with the FloRight vest corresponded closely with facemask measurements. Mean difference, mask minus vest, for tidal volume was 0.096 ml (P < 0.05), with limits of agreement +4.5 to -4.3 ml. Coefficient of repeatability was similar for mask and vest measurements. Tidal volume measured by FloRight with mask in place (20.6 ml) was significantly higher than without mask (16.1 ml), but tidal expiratory flow parameters were not altered. FloRight measurements of tidal parameters were markedly different between the two groups of infants, with tidal volume per Kg significantly higher and tidal expiratory flow parameters significantly lower. Our findings suggest that the FloRight system is able to measure tidal breathing parameters accurately, in healthy newborn infants, without prior calibration on the infant. It appears to have at least sufficient sensitivity to detect severe respiratory disease. PMID:20872815

  3. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  4. A medical cloud-based platform for respiration rate measurement and hierarchical classification of breath disorders.

    PubMed

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel

  5. A Medical Cloud-Based Platform for Respiration Rate Measurement and Hierarchical Classification of Breath Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel

  6. Influence of breathing pattern and lung inflation on impulse oscillometry measurements in horses.

    PubMed

    Van Erck, E; Votion, D; Kirschvink, N; Genicot, B; Lindsey, J; Art, T; Lekeux, P

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to determine if changes in ventilation patterns could influence the outcome of respiratory function measurements performed with our impulse oscillometry system (IOS) in horses. In a first study, IOS tests were performed in vitro on six isolated equine lungs. Lung inflation levels were controlled by modifying depressurisation inside an artificial thorax and different ventilation patterns were imposed. In a second in vivo study, transient variations in breathing pattern were evaluated both with the IOS and a current reference technique (CRT) in five healthy mature horses after an intravenous (i.v.) injection of lobeline hydrochloride. In both studies, respiratory rate (RR, range: 7-42 breaths/min.) and tidal volume (V(T), range: 0.4-25 L) had minor or no influence on IOS parameters. The influence of lung inflation, most marked for resistance at 5 Hz (R(5 Hz)), was limited for the considered physiological range. In vivo, statistical models indicated that maximal changes in pleural pressure (Max Delta Ppl) and peak flows were the main determinants of the variability of the resistance (R(rs)) and the reactance (X(rs)) of the respiratory system. The fourfold increase in baseline Max Delta Ppl and peak flows obtained during hyperpnoea caused a significant increase in R(rs) at 5 and 10 Hz and a decrease in X(rs) at all frequencies. We conclude that IOS parameters are not influenced by tachypnoea, but will reflect alterations in respiratory mechanics caused by hyperpnoeic breathing. PMID:15501143

  7. In vivo retinal blood flow measurement by Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Tan, Ou; Huang, David

    2008-02-01

    The measurement of ocular blood flow is important in studying the pathophysiology and treatment of several leading causes of blindness. We present a method for in vivo human retinal flow measurement using Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. A double circular scanning pattern was used to scan the blood vessels around the optic nerve head 8 times over 2 seconds. The venous flow totaled 36.13 μl/min in the right eye of a volunteer. The flow difference was observed before and after breath holding. The fast flow measurement method did not require any assumption on the flow profile over time or space.

  8. Technical and practical issues for tidal breathing measurements of nasal nitric oxide in children.

    PubMed

    Beydon, Nicole; Chambellan, Arnaud; Alberti, Corinne; de Blic, Jacques; Clément, Annick; Escudier, Estelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel

    2015-12-01

    To promote early screening of patients with suspected Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurements during tidal breathing (TB) have been developed for children unable to ensure velum closure (VC) during breath hold or expiration against resistance. To investigate technical and practical issues related to TB-nNO methods in children referred for suspected or asserted PCD, we recorded, in a prospective multicenter study, TB-nNO (calculated as the mean of 5 peaks, 10 or 30 sec during tidal breathing) and VC-nNO when available. We studied 142 children (PCD diagnosis asserted in 47, excluded in 39). Nasal NO values were significantly different according to methods, VC-nNO being higher than TB-nNO (TB-nNO 5 peaks higher than mean of 10 or 30 sec). Specificity (90-94%) and sensitivity (86-97%) were similar between TB-nNO and VC-nNO methods. Age was more correlated with VC-nNO than with TB-nNO. TB-nNO could differ between the two nostrils by more than 10% (or 10 ppb when nNO absolute value lower 100 ppb) in 32-43% of the tested children, according to the different tidal breathing values, and was reproducible in the long term but influenced by ambient NO. Despite TB-nNO values being lower than VC-nNO, TB-nNO was found to be as discriminant for PCD, and probably more discriminant in children less than 8 years old, as the VC method. These results were obtained using the chemiluminescence technique which allows an easier assessment of relevant factors such as nasal permeability and ambient NO than the electrochemical technique. PMID:25731630

  9. Measurement and interpretation of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed

    Syabbalo, N

    1997-01-01

    Arterial blood gases and pH are routinely being measured in clinical practice, both to provide diagnosis and to guide therapy in critically ill patients. Oximetry is clinically useful in establishing the presence of hypoxaemia in patients with respiratory diseases. Oximetry is also a simple and reliable method for monitoring patients undergoing anaesthesia, sleep studies and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The search continues for new innovative techniques for continuous transcutaneous and intra-arterial blood gas monitoring. This is essential in the management of critically ill patients because blood analysers provide only intermittent monitoring of arterial blood gases. PMID:9293061

  10. Transcutaneous measurement of volume blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, R. E.; Mcleod, F. D.; Miller, C. W.; Histand, M. B.; Wells, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Blood flow velocity measurements, using Doppler velocimeter, are described. The ability to measure blood velocity using ultrasound is derived from the Doppler effect; the change in frequency which occurs when sound is reflected or transmitted from a moving target. When ultrasound of the appropriate frequency is transmitted through a moving blood stream, the blood cells act as point scatterers of ultrasonic energy. If this scattered ultrasonic energy is detected, it is found to be shifted in frequency according to the velocity of the blood cells, nu, the frequency of the incident sound, f sub o, the speed of sound in the medium, c, and the angle between the sound beam and the velocity vector, o. The relation describing this effect is known as the Doppler equation. Delta f = 2 f sub o x nu x cos alpha/c. The theoretical and experimental methods are evaluated.

  11. Breath tests and airway gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Measuring soluble gas in the exhaled breath is a non-invasive technique used to estimate levels of respiratory, solvent, and metabolic gases. The interpretation of these measurements is based on the assumption that the measured gases exchange in the alveoli. While the respiratory gases have a low blood-solubility and exchange in the alveoli, high blood-soluble gases exchange in the airways. The effect of airway gas exchange on the interpretation of these exhaled breath measurements can be significant. We describe airway gas exchange in relation to exhaled measurements of soluble gases that exchange in the alveoli. The mechanisms of airway gas exchange are reviewed and criteria for determining if a gas exchanges in the airways are provided. The effects of diffusion, perfusion, temperature and breathing maneuver on airway gas exchange and on measurement of exhaled soluble gas are discussed. A method for estimating the impact of airway gas exchange on exhaled breath measurements is presented. We recommend that investigators should carefully control the inspired air conditions and type of exhalation maneuver used in a breath test. Additionally, care should be taken when interpreting breath tests from subjects with pulmonary disease. PMID:16413216

  12. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices. PMID:24788372

  14. Measurement of Olfactory Characteristics for Two Kinds of Scent in a Single Breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Kaori; Sato, Junta; Bannai, Yuichi; Okada, Kenichi

    This study describes a presentation technique of scent designed for users to recognize multiple scents during a very short time period. We measured the olfactory characteristics of subjects when two kinds of scents were presented in a single breath. We defined and measured the minimum ejection interval in which subjects could discriminate the two individually emitted pulses of scent, which we term “separable detection threshold”, and the minimum ejection interval in which they could specify both kinds of scents, “separable recognition threshold”. Further, “response time” and “duration of scent perception” were measured. As a result, we found the duration of scent perception and the separable recognition threshold were positively correlated. Knowledge of this olfactory characteristic brings us closer to being able to provide a greater sense of realism in multimedia environments, by describing more than one object by scent at the same time as the objects are seen on screen.

  15. Measurement of Human Blood and Plasma Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Szalkay, H. G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Report reviews techniques for measuring blood-plasma volume in humans. Common technique of using radioactive iodine isotope to label plasma albumin involves unwarranted risks from low-level radiation. Report emphasizes techniques using Evans-blue-dye (T-1824) labeling of albumin, hematocrit or hemoglobin/hematocrit measurements, or blood densitometry. In Evans-blue-dye technique, plasma volume determined from decrease in dye concentration occurring after small amount of dye solution injected into circulatory system. Subjection of Evans blue dye to test for carcinogenicity gave negative results.

  16. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high altitude Blood clot in the lung Collapsed lung (pneumothorax) Heart attack Injury to the neck, chest wall, ... cavity with each breath. This can cause a collapsed lung . Bandage the wound with plastic wrap, a plastic ...

  17. Reliable noninvasive measurement of blood gases

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Alam, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vivo at least two of the five blood gas parameters (i.e., pH, PCO.sub.2, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PO.sub.2, and O.sub.2 sat.) in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 500 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of at least two of pH, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PCO.sub.2 and a measure of oxygen concentration. The determined values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The method also includes the steps of providing calibration samples, determining if the spectral intensities v. wavelengths from the tissue represents an outlier, and determining if any of the calibration samples represents an outlier. The determination of the unknown values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. Preferably, there is a separate calibration for each blood gas parameter being determined. The method can be utilized in a pulse mode and can also be used invasively. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  18. Multiplex analysis inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific evidence suggests that inflammation is associated with human health effects and health endpoints, yet most studies have focused on human populations that are already considered “unhealthy”.  As such, it is pertinent to measure inflammatory biomarkers in human biologica...

  19. The use of ambulatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, James A; Tucker, Katherine L; Martin, Una; Beesley, Louise; McManus, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of ambulatory blood pressure is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension in the UK. This article describes the use of ambulatory devices, and discusses the benefits and disadvantages of their use in clinical practice. PMID:26551492

  20. Accuracy of noninvasive breath methane measurements using Fourier transform infrared methods on individual cows.

    PubMed

    Lassen, J; Løvendahl, P; Madsen, J

    2012-02-01

    Individual methane (CH(4)) production was recorded repeatedly on 93 dairy cows during milking in an automatic milking system (AMS), with the aim of estimating individual cow differences in CH(4) production. Methane and CO(2) were measured with a portable air sampler and analyzer unit based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) detection. The cows were 50 Holsteins and 43 Jerseys from mixed parities and at all stages of lactation (mean=156 d in milk). Breath was captured by the FTIR unit inlet nozzle, which was placed in front of the cow's head in each of the 2 AMS as an admixture to normal barn air. The FTIR unit was running continuously for 3 d in each of 2 AMS units, 1 with Holstein and another with Jersey cows. Air was analyzed every 20 s. From each visit of a cow to the AMS, CH(4) and CO(2) records were summarized into the mean, median, 75, and 90% quantiles. Furthermore, the ratio between CH(4) and CO(2) was used as a derived measure with the idea of using CO(2) in breath as a tracer gas to quantify the production of methane. Methane production records were analyzed with a mixed model, containing cow as random effect. Fixed effects of milk yield and daily intake of the total mixed ration and concentrates were also estimated. The repeatability of the CH(4)-to-CO(2) ratio was 0.39 for Holsteins and 0.34 for Jerseys. Both concentrate intake and total mixed ration intake were positively related to CH(4) production, whereas milk production level was not correlated with CH(4) production. In conclusion, the results from this study suggest that the CH(4)-to-CO(2) ratio measured using the noninvasive method is an asset of the individual cow and may be useful in both management and genetic evaluations. PMID:22281353

  1. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    PubMed Central

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  2. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-05-23

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  3. Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, Nicholas S.

    2001-01-01

    Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood. The present invention includes the use of resonant laser ablation to analyze .ltoreq.1 .mu.L (or equivalent mass) samples of blood for lead content. A typical finger prick, for example, yields about 10 .mu.L. Solid samples may also readily be analyzed by resonant laser ablation. The sample is placed on a lead-free, electrically conducting substrate and irradiated with a single, focused laser beam which simultaneously vaporizes, atomizes, and resonantly ionizes an analyte of interest in a sample. The ions are then sorted, collected and detected using a mass spectrometer.

  4. [Usefulness of the integration between the values of the 1-hour blood xylose test and the hydrogen breath-test after xylose oral load for the indirect evaluation of mucosa damage].

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, M G; Lambertini, A; Romeo, N; Albini, P; Pozzi, M

    1985-01-01

    Considering 50 children affected by sub-acute gastrointestinal diseases by severe growth disorders, we have compared the "one-hour blood xylose test" with the "xylose and lactose H2 breath test, looking for a relationship with the duodeno-jejunal mucosal damage. Finally the integration between the "one hour blood xylose test" and the "xylose H2 breath test" may be useful in order to compare more exactly the results of both xylose tests with the mucosal damage. Lactose H2 breath test seems less reliable for our purposes because of the possible presence of children with lactase deficiences, hardly comparable with the mucosal damage. PMID:4094911

  5. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: A signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbé, K.; Van Moer, W.; Lauwers, L.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, the oscillometric waveform measured by automatic non-invasive blood pressure meters (NIBP) is analyzed by transforming the data from the time domain to the frequency domain. The signal's spectrum of the oscillometric waveform is in current literature badly understood or explored. The only known link between the oscillometric waveform and the blood pressure is the maximum of the oscillometry's envelope equalling the mean arterial pressure (MAP). This link is established under the assumption that the oscillometry is an AM-signal. Unfortunately, computing the MAP is difficult in practice due to the non-sinusoidal nature of the actual measured signals. In this paper, we construct the best AM-signal approximation of the oscillometry and explore its use to compute the MAP.

  6. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Breath Biomarkers to Measure Uptake of Volatile Organic Compounds by Bicyclists.

    PubMed

    Bigazzi, Alexander Y; Figliozzi, Miguel A; Luo, Wentai; Pankow, James F

    2016-05-17

    Breath biomarkers were used to study uptake of traffic-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from urban bicycling. Breath analysis was selected because it is one of the least invasive methods to assess urban traveler exposure. Research hurdles that were overcome included considering that factors other than on-road exposure can influence concentrations in the body, and absorbed doses during a trip can be small compared to baseline body burdens. Pre-trip, on-road, and post-trip breath concentrations and ambient air concentrations were determined for 26 VOCs for bicyclists traveling on different path types. Statistical analyses of the concentration data identified eight monoaromatic hydrocarbons potentially useful as breath biomarkers to compare differences in body levels brought about by urban travel choices. Breath concentrations of the biomarker compounds were significantly higher than background levels after riding on high-traffic arterial streets and on a path through a high-exposure industrial area, but not after riding on low-traffic local streets or on other off-street paths. Modeled effects of high-traffic streets on ambient concentrations were 100-200% larger than those of low-traffic streets; modeled effects of high-traffic streets on breath concentrations were 40-100% larger than those of low-traffic streets. Similar percentage increases in breath concentrations are expected for bicyclists in other cities. PMID:27097118

  8. Use of short-term breath measures to estimate daily methane production by cattle.

    PubMed

    Velazco, J I; Mayer, D G; Zimmerman, S; Hegarty, R S

    2016-01-01

    Methods to measure enteric methane (CH4) emissions from individual ruminants in their production environment are required to validate emission inventories and verify mitigation claims. Estimates of daily methane production (DMP) based on consolidated short-term emission measurements are developing, but method verification is required. Two cattle experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that DMP estimated by averaging multiple short-term breath measures of methane emission rate did not differ from DMP measured in respiration chambers (RC). Short-term emission rates were obtained from a GreenFeed Emissions Monitoring (GEM) unit, which measured emission rate while cattle consumed a dispensed supplement. In experiment 1 (Expt. 1), four non-lactating cattle (LW=518 kg) were adapted for 18 days then measured for six consecutive periods. Each period consisted of 2 days of ad libitum intake and GEM emission measurement followed by 1 day in the RC. A prototype GEM unit releasing water as an attractant (GEM water) was also evaluated in Expt. 1. Experiment 2 (Expt. 2) was a larger study based on similar design with 10 cattle (LW=365 kg), adapted for 21 days and GEM measurement was extended to 3 days in each of the six periods. In Expt. 1, there was no difference in DMP estimated by the GEM unit relative to the RC (209.7 v. 215.1 g CH(4)/day) and no difference between these methods in methane yield (MY, 22.7 v. 23.7 g CH(4)/kg of dry matter intake, DMI). In Expt. 2, the correlation between GEM and RC measures of DMP and MY were assessed using 95% confidence intervals, with no difference in DMP or MY between methods and high correlations between GEM and RC measures for DMP (r=0.85; 215 v. 198 g CH(4)/day SEM=3.0) and for MY (r=0.60; 23.8 v. 22.1 g CH(4)/kg DMI SEM=0.42). When data from both experiments was combined neither DMP nor MY differed between GEM- and RC-based measures (P>0.05). GEM water-based estimates of DMP and MY were lower than RC and GEM (P<0

  9. Effect of tubing deposition, breathing pattern, and temperature on aerosol mass distribution measured by cascade impactor.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Burak K; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced by nebulizers are often characterized on the bench using cascade impactors. We studied the effects of connecting tubing, breathing pattern, and temperature on mass-weighted aerodynamic particle size aerosol distributions (APSD) measured by cascade impaction. Our experimental setup consisted of a piston ventilator, low-flow (1.0 L/min) cascade impactor, two commercially available nebulizers that produced large and small particles, and two "T"-shaped tubes called "Tconnector(cascade)" and "Tconnector(nebulizer)" placed above the impactor and the nebulizer, respectively. Radiolabeled normal saline was nebulized using an airtank at 50 PSIG; APSD, mass balance, and Tconnector(cascade) deposition were measured with a gamma camera and radioisotope calibrator. Flow through the circuit was defined by the air tank (standing cloud, 10 L/min) with or without a piston pump, which superimposed a sinusoidal flow on the flow from the air tank (tidal volume and frequency of breathing). Experiments were performed at room temperature and in a cooled environment. With increasing tidal volume and frequency, smaller particles entered the cascade impactor (decreasing MMAD; e.g., Misty-Neb, 4.2 +/- 0.9 microm at lowest ventilation and 2.7 +/- 0.1 microm at highest, p = 0.042). These effects were reduced in magnitude for the nebulizer that produced smaller particles (AeroTech II, MMAD 1.8 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm; p = 0.0044). Deposition on Tconnector(cascade) increased with ventilation but was independent of cascade impactor flow. Imaging of the Tconnector(cascade) revealed a pattern of deposition unaffected by cascade impactor flow. These measurements suggest that changes in MMAD with ventilation were not artifacts of tubing deposition in the Tconnector(cascade). At lower temperatures, APSD distributions were more polydisperse. Our data suggest that, during patient inhalation, changes in particle distribution occur that are related to conditions in the tubing and

  10. How to measure blood pressure manually.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Melanie; Smith, Joyce

    2016-01-20

    Rationale and key points This article aims to help nurses to measure blood pressure (BP) manually using an aneroid sphygmomanometer. ▶ BP measurement is an essential clinical skill, and nurses must be competent in performing this procedure and taking accurate readings. ▶ Nurses should be aware of manual BP measurement techniques and understand the patient and environmental factors that may result in inaccurate readings that could compromise patient care. ▶ Nurses should regularly undertake manual BP measurement to ensure they remain competent to perform the procedure. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. Further learning needs to extend your professional development. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26786460

  11. Assessing and ensuring patient safety during breath-holding for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Green, S; Stevens, A M; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: While there is recent interest in using repeated deep inspiratory breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holds, to improve radiotherapy delivery, breath-holding has risks. There are no published guidelines for monitoring patient safety, and there is little clinical awareness of the pronounced blood pressure rise and the potential for gradual asphyxia that occur during breath-holding. We describe the blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding with air and test whether it can be abolished simply by pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia. Methods: We measured blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate in 12 healthy, untrained subjects performing breath-holds. Results: Even for deep inspiratory breath-holds with air, the blood pressure rose progressively (e.g. mean systolic pressure rose from 133 ± 5 to 175 ± 8 mmHg at breakpoint, p < 0.005, and in two subjects, it reached 200 mmHg). Pre-oxygenation and hypocapnia prolonged breath-hold duration and prevented the development of asphyxia but failed to abolish the pressure rise. The pressure rise was not a function of breath-hold duration and was not signalled by any fall in heart rate (remaining at resting levels of 72 ± 2 beats per minute). Conclusion: Colleagues should be aware of the progressive blood pressure rise during deep inspiratory breath-holding that so far is not easily prevented. In breast cancer patients scheduled for breath-holds, we recommend routine screening for heart, cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular disease, routine monitoring of patient blood pressure and SpO2 during breath-holding and requesting patients to stop if systolic pressure rises consistently >180 mmHg and or SpO2 falls <94%. Advances in knowledge: There is recent interest in using deep inspiratory breath-holds, or prolonged single breath-holding techniques, to improve radiotherapy delivery. But there appears to be no clinical awareness of the risks to patients from breath

  12. Standardised exhaled breath collection for the measurement of exhaled volatile organic compounds by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis for airway disease monitoring is promising. However, contrary to nitric oxide the method for exhaled breath collection has not yet been standardized and the effects of expiratory flow and breath-hold have not been sufficiently studied. These manoeuvres may also reveal the origin of exhaled compounds. Methods 15 healthy volunteers (34 ± 7 years) participated in the study. Subjects inhaled through their nose and exhaled immediately at two different flows (5 L/min and 10 L/min) into methylated polyethylene bags. In addition, the effect of a 20 s breath-hold following inhalation to total lung capacity was studied. The samples were analyzed for ethanol and acetone levels immediately using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS, Logan Research, UK). Results Ethanol levels were negatively affected by expiratory flow rate (232.70 ± 33.50 ppb vs. 202.30 ± 27.28 ppb at 5 L/min and 10 L/min, respectively, p < 0.05), but remained unchanged following the breath hold (242.50 ± 34.53 vs. 237.90 ± 35.86 ppb, without and with breath hold, respectively, p = 0.11). On the contrary, acetone levels were increased following breath hold (1.50 ± 0.18 ppm) compared to the baseline levels (1.38 ± 0.15 ppm), but were not affected by expiratory flow (1.40 ± 0.14 ppm vs. 1.49 ± 0.14 ppm, 5 L/min vs. 10 L/min, respectively, p = 0.14). The diet had no significant effects on the gasses levels which showed good inter and intra session reproducibility. Conclusions Exhalation parameters such as expiratory flow and breath-hold may affect VOC levels significantly; therefore standardisation of exhaled VOC measurements is mandatory. Our preliminary results suggest a different origin in the respiratory tract for these two gasses. PMID:23837867

  13. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ANALYSIS METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER SOLUABLE ENDOGENOUS COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled human breath analysis has become a standard technique for assessing exposure to exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trihalomethanes from water chlorination; aromatics, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates from fuels usage; and various chlorinated solvents from i...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN EXHALED BREATH AS COLLECTED IN EVACUATED ELECTROPOLISHED CANISTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of three complementary analytical methods were developed specifically for exhaled breath as collected in evacuated stainless steel canisters using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry detection. The first is a screening method to quantify the carbon dioxide component (gen...

  15. Response of Retinal Blood Flow to Systemic Hyperoxia as Measured with Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Gröschl, Martin; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is a long-standing interest in the study of retinal blood flow in humans. In the recent years techniques have been established to measure retinal perfusion based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the present study we used a technique called dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to characterize the effects of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood flow. These data were compared to data obtained with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Methods 10 healthy subjects were studied on 2 study days. On one study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was studied using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT. On the second study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Retinal vessel diameters were measured on both study days using a commercially available Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Retinal blood flow was calculated based on retinal vessel diameters and red blood cell velocity. Results As expected, breathing of pure oxygen induced a pronounced reduction in retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocities and retinal blood flow on both study days (p<0.001). Blood velocity data correlated well between the two methods applied under both baseline as well as under hyperoxic conditions (r = 0.98 and r = 0.75, respectively). Data as obtained with OCT were, however, slightly higher. Conclusion A good correlation was found between red blood cell velocity as measured with dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT and red blood cell velocity assessed by the laser Doppler method. Dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT is a promising approach for studying retinal blood velocities in vivo. PMID:23029289

  16. Laboratory and field evaluation of a SAW microsensor array for measuring perchloroethylene in breath.

    PubMed

    Groves, William A; Achutan, Chandran

    2004-12-01

    This article describes the laboratory and field performance evaluation of a small prototype instrument employing an array of six polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and a thermal desorption preconcentration unit for rapid analysis of perchloroethylene in breath. Laboratory calibrations were performed using breath samples spiked with perchloroethylene to prepare calibration standards spanning a concentration range of 0.1-10 ppm. A sample volume of 250 mL was preconcentrated on 40 mg of Tenax GR at a flow rate of 100 mL/min, followed by a dry air purge and thermal desorption at a temperature of 200 degrees C. The resulting pulse of vapor was passed over the sensor array at a flow rate of 20 mL/min and sensor responses were recorded and displayed using a laptop computer. The total time per analysis was 4.5 min. SAW sensor responses were linear, and the instrument's limit of detection was estimated to be 50 ppb based on the criterion that four of the six sensors show a detectable response. Field performance was evaluated at a commercial dry-cleaning operation by comparing prototype instrument results for breath samples with those of a portable gas chromatograph (NIOSH 3704). Four breath samples were collected from a single subject over the course of the workday and analyzed using the portable gas chromatograph (GC) and SAW instruments. An additional seven spiked breath samples were prepared and analyzed so that a broader range of perchloroethylene concentrations could be examined. Linear regression analysis showed excellent agreement between prototype instrument and portable GC breath sample results with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a slope of 1.04. The average error for the prototype instrument over a perchloroethylene breath concentration range of 0.9-7.2 ppm was 2.6% relative to the portable GC. These results demonstrate the field capabilities of SAW microsensor arrays for rapid analysis of organic vapors in breath. PMID:15742707

  17. Additional Value of CH4 Measurement in a Combined 13C/H2 Lactose Malabsorption Breath Test: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Els; De Preter, Vicky; Billen, Jaak; Van Ranst, Marc; Verbeke, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The lactose hydrogen breath test is a commonly used, non-invasive method for the detection of lactose malabsorption and is based on an abnormal increase in breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after an oral dose of lactose. We use a combined 13C/H2 lactose breath test that measures breath 13CO2 as a measure of lactose digestion in addition to H2 and that has a better sensitivity and specificity than the standard test. The present retrospective study evaluated the results of 1051 13C/H2 lactose breath tests to assess the impact on the diagnostic accuracy of measuring breath CH4 in addition to H2 and 13CO2. Based on the 13C/H2 breath test, 314 patients were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, 138 with lactose malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and 599 with normal lactose digestion. Additional measurement of CH4 further improved the accuracy of the test as 16% subjects with normal lactose digestion and no H2-excretion were found to excrete CH4. These subjects should have been classified as subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. In conclusion, measuring CH4-concentrations has an added value to the 13C/H2 breath test to identify methanogenic subjects with lactose malabsorption or SIBO. PMID:26371034

  18. Design and optimization of a widely tunable semiconductor laser for blood oxygenation and blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yafei; Deng, Haoyu; Song, Guangyi; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-11-01

    A method for measuring blood oxygenation and blood flow rate using a single widely tunable semiconductor laser is proposed and investigated. It is shown that a 700-nm-band tunable laser gives the highest sensitivity for blood oxygen measurement. The corresponding tunable laser is designed using the V-coupled cavity structure. The wavelength tuning range can reach 8 nm, which is sufficient for the blood oxygenation measurement in the 700-nm-band by using the Beer- Lambert law. In contrast to conventional blood oxygenation measurement method based on two LEDs, the laser can be used at the same time to measure the blood flow rate based on the Doppler principle.

  19. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  20. Human breath measurements in a clean-air chamber to determine half-lives for volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Sydney M.; Wallace, Lance A.; Pelllzzari, Edo D.; O'Neill, Hugh J.

    The expired breath of four non-occupationally exposed subjects was monitored following exposure at near-normal environmental concentrations using a specially developed pulmonary clearance technique. The four were exposed to polluted air on a heavily trafficked freeway or at a local dry-cleaning establishment, then spent the next 10 h in a clean-air environmental chamber. Breath and chamber-air samples were collected at regular intervals throughout the 10-h period and analyzed for the presence of selected target compounds. The breath levels of two of the compounds were elevated and decreased slowly with time once the subjects began to breathe clean air. Nonlinear least-squares fitting of the decay-uptake curves permitted the calculation of biological half-lives. Several of the target compounds occurred, however, at very low levels, and the resultant experimental scatter limited the value of these measurements. Higher initial exposures to most of the target compounds would have improved the reliability of the estimates.

  1. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube) in place. The breath may have an ammonia-like odor (also described as urine-like or " ... kidney failure (can cause breath to smell like ammonia ) Diabetes (fruity or sweet chemical smell associated with ...

  2. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard exercise. ... emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or bronchi, which are part ...

  3. Breathing difficulty

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary disease (COPD), such as chronic bronchitis or emphysema Other lung disease Pneumonia Pulmonary hypertension Problems with ... of breath; Breathlessness; Difficulty breathing; Dyspnea Images Lungs Emphysema References Kraft M. Approach to the patient with ...

  4. Breath odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a potentially life-threatening condition. Breath that smells like feces can occur with prolonged vomiting , especially ... renal failure Bowel obstruction (can cause breath to smell like feces) Bronchiectasis Chronic kidney failure (can cause ...

  5. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  6. Numerical simulation of noninvasive blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satoru; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Atsushi; Maruyama, Masaru

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a simulation model based on the partially pressurized collapsible tube model for reproducing noninvasive blood pressure measurement is presented. The model consists of a collapsible tube, which models the pressurized part of the artery, rigid pipes connected to the collapsible tube, which model proximal and distal region far from the pressurized part, and the Windkessel model, which represents the capacitance and the resistance of the distal part of the circulation. The blood flow is simplified to a one-dimensional system. Collapse and expansion of the tube is represented by the change in the cross-sectional area of the tube considering the force balance acting on the tube membrane in the direction normal to the tube axis. They are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. This simple model can easily reproduce the oscillation of inner fluid and corresponding tube collapse typical for the Korotkoff sounds generated by the cuff pressure. The numerical result is compared with the experiment and shows good agreement. PMID:16995754

  7. The breathing effect of the LF/HF ratio in the heart rate variability measurements of athletes.

    PubMed

    Saboul, Damien; Pialoux, Vincent; Hautier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of breathing frequency (BF) on heart rate variability (HRV) and specifically on the Low Frequency/High Frequency (LF/HF) ratio in athletes. Fifteen male athletes were subjected to HRV measurements under six randomised breathing conditions: spontaneous breathing frequency (SBF) and five others at controlled breathing frequencies (CBF) (0.20; 0.175; 0.15; 0.125 and 0.10 Hz). The subjects were divided in two groups: the first group included athletes with SBF <0.15 Hz (infSBF) and the second athletes with SBF higher than 0.15 Hz (supSBF). Fatigue and training load were evaluated using a validated questionnaire. There was no difference between the two groups for the fatigue questionnaire and training load. However, the LF/HF ratio during SBF was higher in infSBF than in supSBF (6.82 ± 4.55 vs. 0.72 ± 0.52; p<0.001). The SBF and LF/HF ratio were significantly correlated (R=-0.69; p=0.004). For the five CBF, no differences were found between groups; however, LF/HF ratios were very significantly different between sessions at 0.20; 0.175; 0.15 Hz and 0.125; 0.10 Hz. In this study, BF was the main modulator of the LF/HF ratio in both controlled breathing and spontaneous breathing. Although, none of the subjects of the infSBF group were overtrained, during SBF they all presented LF/HF ratios higher than four commonly interpreted as an overtraining syndrome. During each CBF, all athletes presented spectral energy mainly concentrated around their BF. Consequently, spectral energy was located either in LF or in HF band. These results demonstrate that the LF/HF ratio is unreliable for studying athletes presenting SBF close to 0.15 Hz leading to misclassification in fatigue. PMID:24444219

  8. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  9. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  10. Previous blood pressure measurement and associated factors in student adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Marina Gabriella Pereira de Andrada; Farah, Breno Quintella; de Barros, Mauro Virgilio Gomes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify prevalence of previous blood pressure measurement and analyze some associated factors in adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study included 6,077 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. Demographic characteristics included (sex, age, period of study, region of residence, work, skin color, and economic) status, history of blood pressure measurement within last 12 months, local of blood pressure measurement, and reading obtained. To assess associations between previous blood pressure measurement with demographic characteristics and high blood pressure we used descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results Out of the adolescents, 56.8% reported no blood pressure measurement within the last 12 months. The health centers and the physician’s office were most mentioned places for blood pressure measurement (28.3% and 36.9%, respectively). Boys (odds ratio of 1.64 95%CI: 1.46-1.84) aged 14 to 16 years (odds ratio of 1.12; 95%CI: 1.01-1.25), whose economic status was unfavorable (odds ratio of 1.48; 95%CI: 1.32-1.67) were significantly associated with no blood pressure measurement. Working was a protective factor for was not blood pressure measurement (odds ratio of 0.84; 95%CI: 0.73-0.97). Conclusion Most of adolescents did not have their blood pressure measured within the last 12 months. Boys aged 14 to 16 years and those with unfavorable economic status had higher chance of not having their blood pressure measured. PMID:26466061

  11. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  12. How Accurate Are Blood (or Breath) Tests for Identifying Self-Reported Heavy Drinking Among People with Alcohol Dependence?

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Winter, Michael R.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Saitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aims Managing patients with alcohol dependence includes assessment for heavy drinking, typically by asking patients. Some recommend biomarkers to detect heavy drinking but evidence of accuracy is limited. Methods Among people with dependence, we assessed the performance of disialo-carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (%dCDT, ≥1.7%), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, ≥66 U/l), either %dCDT or GGT positive, and breath alcohol (> 0) for identifying 3 self-reported heavy drinking levels: any heavy drinking (≥4 drinks/day or >7 drinks/week for women, ≥5 drinks/day or >14 drinks/week for men), recurrent (≥5 drinks/day on ≥5 days) and persistent heavy drinking (≥5 drinks/day on ≥7 consecutive days). Subjects (n = 402) with dependence and current heavy drinking were referred to primary care and assessed 6 months later with biomarkers and validated self-reported calendar method assessment of past 30-day alcohol use. Results The self-reported prevalence of any, recurrent and persistent heavy drinking was 54, 34 and 17%. Sensitivity of %dCDT for detecting any, recurrent and persistent self-reported heavy drinking was 41, 53 and 66%. Specificity was 96, 90 and 84%, respectively. %dCDT had higher sensitivity than GGT and breath test for each alcohol use level but was not adequately sensitive to detect heavy drinking (missing 34–59% of the cases). Either %dCDT or GGT positive improved sensitivity but not to satisfactory levels, and specificity decreased. Neither a breath test nor GGT was sufficiently sensitive (both tests missed 70–80% of cases). Conclusions Although biomarkers may provide some useful information, their sensitivity is low the incremental value over self-report in clinical settings is questionable. PMID:24740846

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  14. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  15. Reproducibility of measuring cerebral blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry in mice.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yosuke; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Masamoto, Kazuto; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Taniguchi, Junko; Kanno, Iwao; Saeki, Naokatsu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Laser-Doppler flowmetry has been widely used to trace hemodynamic changes in experimental stroke research. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the day-to-day test-retest reproducibility of measuring cerebral blood flow by LDF in awake mice. The flux indicating cerebral blood flow (CBF), red blood cell (RBC) velocity, and RBC concentration were measured with LDF via cranial windows for the bilateral somatosensory cortex in awake mice. LDF measurements were performed three times, at baseline, 1 hour after, and 7 days after the baseline measurement. Moreover, breathing rate (BR) and partial pressure of transcutaneous CO₂ (PtCO₂) were measured simultaneously with LDF measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and within-subject coefficient of variation (CVw) were calculated. CBF, RBC velocity, and RBC concentration showed good day-to-day test-retest reproducibility (ICC: 0.61 - 0.95, CVw: 8.3% - 15.4%). BR and PtCO₂ in awake mice were stable during the course of the experiments. The evaluation of cerebral microcirculation using LDF appears to be applicable to long-term studies. PMID:24389142

  16. Measurement Adherence in the Blood Pressure Self-Measurement Room

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Niels Henrik; Jespersen, Bente; Ahrendt, Peter; Bertelsen, Olav W.; Toftegaard, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with hypertension or receiving blood pressure (BP)-lowering treatment are often required to self-measure their BP in a dedicated self-measurement room before consultation. Current praxis does not guarantee valid measurements, possibly leading to misdiagnoses or inappropriate antihypertensive medication. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' ability to correctly self-report and follow recommendations. Patients and Methods: We used a context-aware system to gather information on BP measurements and relevant context parameters. Patients were not informed that the system automatically collected behavior data and were instructed to self-report their measurements on a paper sheet as usual. We then compared the automatically recorded data with the self-reported data in order to detect any nonadherent reporting behavior. Also, we investigated the patients' ability to adhere to the measurement recommendations. Results: We found that (1) a third of all 113 participating patients failed to self-report measured BP data correctly and (2) none of the 642 measurements obtained adhered fully to the recommendations. Conclusions: Results indicate that context-aware technology may be useful for accurately modeling aspects of nonadherent patient behavior. This may be used to inform staff of the validity of the measurement and pinpoint patients in need of additional training or to design better aids to assist the patients. The developed system is generally applicable to other self-measurement environments, including the home setting and remote outpatient clinics, as it is built using telemedicine technology and thus well suited for remote monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23631589

  17. Signal quality measures for unsupervised blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Sukor, J Abdul; Redmond, S J; Chan, G S H; Lovell, N H

    2012-03-01

    Accurate systolic and diastolic pressure estimation, using automated blood pressure measurement, is difficult to achieve when the transduced signals are contaminated with noise or interference, such as movement artifact. This study presents an algorithm for automated signal quality assessment in blood pressure measurement by determining the feasibility of accurately detecting systolic and diastolic pressures when corrupted with various levels of movement artifact. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to a manually annotated reference scoring (RS). Based on visual representations and audible playback of Korotkoff sounds, the creation of the RS involved two experts identifying sections of the recorded sounds and annotating sections of noise contamination. The experts determined the systolic and diastolic pressure in 100 recorded Korotkoff sound recordings, using a simultaneous electrocardiograph as a reference signal. The recorded Korotkoff sounds were acquired from 25 healthy subjects (16 men and 9 women) with a total of four measurements per subject. Two of these measurements contained purposely induced noise artifact caused by subject movement. Morphological changes in the cuff pressure signal and the width of the Korotkoff pulse were extracted features which were believed to be correlated with the noise presence in the recorded Korotkoff sounds. Verification of reliable Korotkoff pulses was also performed using extracted features from the oscillometric waveform as recorded from the inflatable cuff. The time between an identified noise section and a verified Korotkoff pulse was the key feature used to determine the validity of possible systolic and diastolic pressures in noise contaminated Korotkoff sounds. The performance of the algorithm was assessed based on the ability to: verify if a signal was contaminated with any noise; the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of this noise classification, and the systolic and diastolic pressure

  18. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  19. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  20. Breathing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    When you're short of breath, it's hard or uncomfortable for you to take in the oxygen your body needs. You may feel as if you're ... stuffy nose or hard exercise. But shortness of breath can also be a sign of a serious ...

  1. [Student diagnostic vignette. How to measure office blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Krzesinski, J-M; Saint-Remy, A

    2012-09-01

    Routinely measuring blood pressure is still performed according to the auscultatory method using recognition of Korotkoff sounds. This usual technique is, however, often mishandled and is thus a source of error in the estimation of the true blood pressure level. Accuracy of such measure is, however, of paramount importance to be useful in daily medical practice. This methodology paper more specifically written for medical students recalls the essential principles of blood pressure measurement at the medical office, but also at home. PMID:23115851

  2. Exploring effects of therapeutic massage and patient teaching in the practice of diaphragmatic breathing on blood pressure, stress, and anxiety in hypertensive African-American women: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Lenetra L

    2010-07-01

    The problem of hypertension among African-Americans is one of the major areas of health disparities. The American Heart Association (2009) noted that the prevalence of hypertension among African-Americans is perhaps among the highest in the world and this is particularly so among African-American women (44.0%). The purpose of this study was to determine how therapeutic chair massage and patient teaching in diaphragmatic breathing affected African-American women's blood pressure, stress, and anxiety levels over one week or six weeks time periods. A Modified Stress, Coping, and Adaptation Model (Roy, 1976; Lazarus, 1966), Descriptives, T-tests, Pearson Product Moment Correlations, Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and Multivariate analysis of variance with covariate (MANCOVA) were used. Descriptive statistics indicated a significance for decreased systolic blood pressure levels for the one week post massage intervention measurement with p = .01, diastolic blood pressure level significance for the same group p = .02, significance for this group's State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) Y2 Scale score p = .01, and Roy's Largest Root p = .03. PMID:20857772

  3. Methods of Blood Pressure Measurement in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Li-wei H.; Saeed, Mohammed; Talmor, Daniel; Mark, Roger; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Objective Minimal clinical research has investigated the significance of different blood pressure monitoring techniques in the ICU and whether systolic vs. mean blood pressures should be targeted in therapeutic protocols and in defining clinical study cohorts. The objectives of this study are to compare real-world invasive arterial blood pressure with noninvasive blood pressure, and to determine if differences between the two techniques have clinical implications. Design We conducted a retrospective study comparing invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure measurements using a large ICU database. We performed pairwise comparison between concurrent measures of invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure. We studied the association of systolic and mean invasive arterial blood pressure and noninvasive blood pressure with acute kidney injury, and with ICU mortality. Setting Adult intensive care units at a tertiary care hospital. Patients Adult patients admitted to intensive care units between 2001 and 2007. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Pairwise analysis of 27,022 simultaneously measured invasive arterial blood pressure/noninvasive blood pressure pairs indicated that noninvasive blood pressure overestimated systolic invasive arterial blood pressure during hypotension. Analysis of acute kidney injury and ICU mortality involved 1,633 and 4,957 patients, respectively. Our results indicated that hypotensive systolic noninvasive blood pressure readings were associated with a higher acute kidney injury prevalence (p = 0.008) and ICU mortality (p < 0.001) than systolic invasive arterial blood pressure in the same range (≤70 mm Hg). Noninvasive blood pressure and invasive arterial blood pressure mean arterial pressures showed better agreement; acute kidney injury prevalence (p = 0.28) and ICU mortality (p = 0.76) associated with hypotensive mean arterial pressure readings (≤60 mm Hg) were independent of

  4. THE UNIQUE VALUE OF BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ESTIMATING PHARMACOKINETIC RATE CONSTANTS AND BODY BURDEN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detection of breath odor is the oldest of the medical diagnostic techniques, blood and urine biomarker measurements are the current "gold standard" for modern exposure and health assessments. Of late, it has been recognized that collecting exhaled breath is an attractiv...

  5. A headset-mounted mini sampler for measuring exposure to welding aerosol in the breathing zone.

    PubMed

    Lidén, Göran; Surakka, Jouni

    2009-03-01

    There is a need for a small personal aerosol sampler for measuring occupational exposure to airborne particles in the breathing zone. Existing aerosol samplers are too large to be mounted inside modern welder's protective equipment without disturbing the worker. A headset-mounted mini sampler has been developed to fill this gap with focus on manganese exposure. This mini sampler is easy to use and can be mounted inside modern, slimline welder's face shield. The mini sampler is based on a commercially available 13-mm filter holder that has been modified to incorporate an inlet nozzle made of aluminium. The nominal flow rate of the mini sampler is 0.75 l min(-1). The mini sampler is to be worn mounted on a headset, modified from professional microphone headsets. Several aspects related to using the mini sampler have been tested by personal and static sampling at five workplaces and in the laboratory. Four headset models were tested for their suitability as a sampler holder, of which three models were accepted by the welders. The sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler and the open-face 25-mm filter holder, respectively, depends on the size distribution of the sampled aerosol. At the lowest encountered mass concentration ratio of the open-face 25-mm filter holder to the IOM sampler (0.65), the sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler is approximately -26% and versus the open-face 25-mm filter holder is approximately +12%. For manganese, the negative root mean square (RMS) sampling bias of the mini sampler versus the IOM sampler is -0.046 and versus the open-face 25-mm filter holder is non-significant. Both these biases are statistically non-significant. The mini sampler can therefore be employed for determining welders' occupational exposure to manganese. The pressure drop across the filter can become excessive due to the small filtration area. Compared to the Casella Apex pump, the SKC AirChek2000 pump was generally found to be able

  6. A new method of non-invasive blood pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liangling; Yang, Yongming; Yu, Chengbo; Guo, Qiaohui; Zhu, Gang

    2005-12-01

    Blood pressure reflects a person's health.It is proposed here that the method of detecting blood pressure may be the key to improving the precision of blood pressure measurements. The oscillometric blood pressure measurement technique is widely used in automatic blood pressure measurement instruments correctly. A method of blood pressure measurement by oscillometric method is first presented. In the oscillometric method, the basic principle of the "feature point" method and the "amplitude characteristic ratios" method is also explained and discussed here. A new method of blood pressure measurement, namely the coefficient difference comparative method, is proposed here,which is based on the feature point method and amplitude characteristic ratios method. The method is proved both effective and reliable through the analysis of many cases and clinical tests. Utilizing Visual C++, software for this new and novel method was developed and passed criterion simulation apparatus test. When applied in hospital situation, its error was +/-5%. It is concluded that the oscillometric blood pressure measurement method can provide better means of blood pressure measurements reference for doctors.

  7. Videodensitometry for measuring blood vessel diameter.

    PubMed

    Hoornstra, K; Hanselman, J M; Holland, W P; De Wey Peters, G W; Zwamborn, A W

    1980-01-01

    A method employing a special computer for determining the internal diameters of blood vessels from photofluorographic image is described; in vitro and in vivo experiments are performed with the system. The amount of contrast medium injected is restricted to 4 times 3 ml, and it is possible to determine the diameter (in the range from 2 to 16 mm) at any place where blood vessels can be catheterized. In the in vivo experiments the maximum systematic error is +/-5 percent in the 7 to 8 mm range. PMID:7424549

  8. Blood pressure measurement and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    System is described that employs solid state circuitry to transmit visual display of patient's blood pressure. Response of sphygmomanometer cuff and microphone provide input signals. Signals and their amplitudes, from turn-on time to turn-off time, are continuously fed to data transmitter which transmits to display device.

  9. Reliable noninvasive measurement of blood gases

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Alam, Mary K.

    1997-05-20

    This invention relates to methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining non-invasively and in vivo at least two of the five blood gas parameters (i.e., pH, [HCO.sub.3.sup.- ], PCO.sub.2, PO.sub.2, and O.sub.2 sat.) in a human.

  10. High-resolution breath-hold cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation work is composed of investigations of three methods for fast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These methods include (1) 2D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) cardiac imaging, (2) 3D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo cardiac imaging, and (3) real-time monitoring, feedback, and triggering for breath-hold MRI. The hypothesis of this work is that high resolution 2D and 3D magnetic resonance data sets for the heart can be acquired with the combination of magnetization prepared blood suppression for gradient echo techniques and accurate breath-holding methods. The 2D method included development of magnetic resonance data acquisition for cardiac imaging. The acquisition time is within a single breath-hold of 16 seconds (assuming heart 60/min). The data acquisition is synchronized with the electrocardiogram signal. Based on consistent observations of specific small cardiac structures like the papillary muscle, trabeculae, moderator band, and coronary vessels in studies of normal volunteers, the image quality represents a significant improvement over that obtained with fast imaging methods previously. To further improve the image quality provided by the 2D method, the first 3D cardiac MRI technique was developed. This method provides even better spatial resolution for cardiac images, with a voxel size of 1.09 [times] 2.19 [times] 4 mm[sup 3]. A 3D acquisition is completed in 8 breath-holds. The data acquisition for 3D cardiac imaging requires a consistent breath-hold position to avoid respiratory artifacts. To improve the reliability of the 3DFT acquisition, a new technique called MR breath-hold feedback was developed to provide reproducible breathholding. The diaphragm location is used as the index for breath-hold reproducibility measurement. The range of the diaphragm displacement in different breath-hold is reduced from 8.3 mm without the technique, to 1.3 mm with the technique.

  11. Blood Sugar Measurement in Zebrafish Reveals Dynamics of Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Stefani C.; Philipson, Louis H.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The adult zebrafish has the potential to become an important model for diabetes-related research. To realize this potential, small-scale methods for analyzing pancreas function are required. The measurement of blood glucose level is a commonly used method for assessing β-cell function, but the small size of the zebrafish presents challenges both for collecting blood samples and for measuring glucose. We have developed methods for collecting microsamples of whole blood and plasma for the measurement of hematocrit and blood glucose. We demonstrate that two hand-held glucose meters designed for use by human diabetics return valid results with zebrafish blood. Additionally, we present methods for fasting and for performing postprandial glucose and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. We find that the dynamics of zebrafish blood glucose homeostasis are consistent with patterns reported for other omnivorous teleost fish. PMID:20515318

  12. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth and between your teeth produce the bad odor. Other problems in your mouth, such as gum ... and medicines are associated with a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing ...

  13. Bad Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles are left in your mouth, they can rot ... Flossing once a day helps get rid of particles wedged between your teeth. Also, visit your dentist ...

  14. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  15. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Kayser, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF). We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E) during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF), [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC) and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope) in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10) with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2). During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (P<0.05). In hypoxia, MCAv and [Formula: see text]E slope below RC during exercise were elevated, while the onset of RC occurred at lower exercise intensity (P<0.05). Augmenting FICO2 in hypoxia increased [Formula: see text]E at RC (P<0.05) but no difference was observed in RC onset, MCAv, or [Formula: see text]E slope below RC (P>0.05). The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05). We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that

  16. Measurement of Lung Phosphatidylcholines in Exhaled Breath Particles by a Convenient Collection Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Shahid; Sandqvist, Sören; Beck, Olof

    2015-11-17

    An analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the quantitative determination of four phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in human exhaled breath particles. Analytes were conveniently collected on an electrostatic polymer filter and extracted with methanol prior to analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed on an ultraperformance liquid chromatographic ethylene bridged hybrid phenyl column using a mobile phase consisting of water and methanol containing 4 mM ammonium formate and 0.1% ammonia. The mass spectrometer operated in positive electrospray ionization and selected reaction monitoring mode. Detection limits for PC 16:0/16:0 (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC), PC 16:0/18:1, PC 16:0/18:2, and PC 18:0/18:2 were <0.01 ng/filter. Method recoveries at concentration levels of 0.1 and 10 ng/filter were 100-110% and 101-121%, respectively. Acceptable precision with coefficients of variation <20% and accuracies of 100% ± 20% were achieved. Identification of the individual PCs was performed on the basis of two product ions with correct ion ratios and chromatographic retention times. The highest amount in exhaled breath was found for DPPC with median concentration 1.14 ng/filter (range 0.6-21 ng/filter), and median molar ratios of DPPC/PC (16:0/18:1) of 1.98 (range 0.48-2.75). A different pattern with lower molar ratio (∼0.15) was found for oral fluid. The most significant element of this study was to use a precolumn in the LC system and to collecting exhaled particles in an electret polymer filter. Due to chromatographic interference by background contamination, an isolator column (PFC kit) was installed in between eluent mixer and injector to reduce contamination. This is the first LC/MS study where the method was successfully applied to analyze PCs in human exhaled breath by using a simple and convenient collection procedure. PMID:26505278

  17. Unilateral focal lesions in the rostrolateral medulla influence chemosensitivity and breathing measured during wakefulness, sleep, and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, M; Heywood, P; Moosavi, S; Guz, A; Stevens, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The rostrolateral medulla (RLM) has been identified in animals as an important site of chemosensitivity; in humans such site(s) have not been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological implications of unilateral lesions in the lower brainstem on the control of breathing.
METHODS—In 15 patients breathing was measured awake at rest, asleep, during exercise, and during CO2 stimulation. The lesions were located clinically and by MRI; in nine patients they involved the RLM (RLM group), in six they were in the pons, cerebellum, or medial medulla (Non-RLM group). All RLM group patients, and three non-RLM group patients had ipsilateral Horner's syndrome.
RESULTS—Six of the RLM group had a ventilatory sensitivity to inhaled CO2 (V̇/PET CO2) below normal (group A: V̇/PET CO2, mean, 0.87; range 0.3-1.4 l.min-1/mm Hg). It was normal in all of the non-RLM group (group B: V̇/PET CO2, mean, 3.0; range, 2.6-3.9 min-1/mmHg). There was no significant difference in breathing between groups during relaxed wakefulness (V̇, group A: 7.44 (SD 2.5) l.min-1; group B: 6.02 (SD 1.3) l.min-1; PET CO2, group A: 41.0 (SD 4.2) mm g; group B: 38.3 (SD2.0) mm Hg) or during exercise (V̇/V̇O2: group A: 21 (SD 6.0) l.min-1/l.min-1; group B: 24 (SD 7.3) l.min-1/l.min-1). During sleep, all group A had fragmented sleep compared with only one patient in group B (group A: arousals, range 13 to >60 events/hour); moreover, in group A there was a high incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea associated with hypoxaemia.
CONCLUSION—Patients with unilateral RLM lesions require monitoring during sleep to diagnose any sleep apnoea. The finding that unilateral RLM lesions reduce ventilatory sensitivity to inhaled CO2 is consistent with animal studies. The reduced chemosensitivity had a minimal effect on breathing awake at rest or during exercise.

 PMID:10519871

  18. Continuous measurement of oxygen tensions in the air-breathing organ of Pacific tarpon (Megalops cyprinoides) in relation to aquatic hypoxia and exercise.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Farrell, Anthony P; Christian, Keith; Clark, Timothy D; Bennett, Michael B; Wells, Rufus M G; Baldwin, John

    2007-07-01

    The Pacific tarpon is an elopomorph teleost fish with an air-breathing organ (ABO) derived from a physostomous gas bladder. Oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)) in the ABO was measured on juveniles (238 g) with fiber-optic sensors during exposure to selected aquatic PO(2) and swimming speeds. At slow speed (0.65 BL s(-1)), progressive aquatic hypoxia triggered the first breath at a mean PO(2) of 8.3 kPa. Below this, opercular movements declined sharply and visibly ceased in most fish below 6 kPa. At aquatic PO(2) of 6.1 kPa and swimming slowly, mean air-breathing frequency was 0.73 min(-1), ABO PO(2) was 10.9 kPa, breath volume was 23.8 ml kg(-1), rate of oxygen uptake from the ABO was 1.19 ml kg(-1) min(-1), and oxygen uptake per breath was 2.32 ml kg(-1). At the fastest experimental speed (2.4 BL s(-1)) at 6.1 kPa, ABO oxygen uptake increased to about 1.90 ml kg(-1) min(-1), through a variable combination of breathing frequency and oxygen uptake per breath. In normoxic water, tarpon rarely breathed air and apparently closed down ABO perfusion, indicated by a drop in ABO oxygen uptake rate to about 1% of that in hypoxic water. This occurred at a wide range of ABO PO(2) (1.7-26.4 kPa), suggesting that oxygen level in the ABO was not regulated by intrinsic receptors. PMID:17387483

  19. Thinking about breathing: Effects on respiratory sinus arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Marghescu, Domnica; Siegrist-Johnstone, Rosemarie

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), the increase and decrease in instantaneous heart rate (HR) with inspiration and expiration, is commonly evaluated as function of breathing frequency f. However, to the extent that RSA plays a role in the efficiency of gas exchange, it may be expected to correlate better with HR/f ('breathing specific heart rate') than with f, because the former is a better reflection of the cardio-respiratory coupling. We measured RSA breath-by-breath in 209 young men and women during spontaneous breathing and during volitional breathing under auditory cues at vastly different f. In either case, and for both genders, RSA correlated better with HR/f than with f. As HR/f increased so did RSA, in a linear manner. When compared on the basis of HR/f, RSA did not differ significantly between spontaneous and volitional breathing. It is proposed that RSA is a central mechanism that ameliorates the matching between the quasi-continuous pulmonary blood flow and the intermittent airflow, irrespective of the type of ventilatory drive (cortical or autonomic). PMID:26724603

  20. Quantitative blood flux measurement using MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to quantify red blood cell (RBC) flow through capillary loops and microvessels using optical microangiography (OMAG). Current existing methods of capillary flow quantification either require a very long scanning time (~few minutes) or a large acquisition number per location (+100 scans per location) to form a highresolution spectral estimation. We utilize a model-based super-resolution spectral estimation technique based on principle of orthogonality to quantify moving RBCs within a voxel. The scanning protocol required for our method is very similar to 3D ultrahigh sensitive OMAG that requires few scans per location (8) and can be performed in few seconds that makes it applicable for in vivo experiments. This method is analogous to power Doppler in ultrasonography and estimates the number of red blood cells passing through the beam as opposed to the velocity of the particles. The technique is tested both qualitatively and quantitatively by using OMAG to image microcirculation within mouse ear flap in vivo.

  1. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  2. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    MedlinePlus

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  3. Negative pressure breathing increases cardiac output and nitrogen elimination in seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Claes E G; Eckhardt, Lukas G; Senf, Curtis J; Bowdwin, Melina R; Pendergast, David R

    2013-01-01

    During denitrogenation for rescue, crew members of an internally pressurized disabled submarine (DISSUB) must sit upright, which may hamper venous return, cardiac output and peripheral circulation. Since negative pressure breathing (NPB) might counteract this problem, denitrogenation was measured in sitting subjects performing NPB. Seven male subjects completed 125-minute nitrogen (N2) washouts breathing either 100% oxygen (O2) or a normoxic gas (21% O2 in argon) in control conditions and intermittent (I: inspirations only) or continuous (C) NPB at -10 or -15 cmH2O. N2 elimination was measured using a closed rebreathing system. INPB (intermittent) (-15cmH2O) and CNPB (continous breathing) (-10 and -15cmH2O) increased cardiac output (CO) 9% during both O2 and normoxic breathing. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were unaffected by the CO increase, suggesting a peripheral vasodilatation and enhanced tissue perfusion leading to increased N2 elimination. With the CO boost, N2 washout increased 6% breathing O2 at -15 cmH2O CNPB and INPB, while during normoxic breathing there were 6% and 12% increases due to CNBP, -10 and -15 respectively and 6% with -15cmH2O INPB; breathing 100% O2 yielding 5% to 15% less N2 washout than normoxic breathing. Negative pressure breathing during denitrogenation may facilitate decompression in divers and in crew members being rescued from a DISSUB. PMID:24224284

  4. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    MedlinePlus

    ... breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead ...

  5. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  6. [Comparison of invasive blood pressure measurement in the aorta with indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement at the wrist and forearm].

    PubMed

    Saul, F; Aristidou, Y; Klaus, D; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1995-09-01

    Indirectly measured blood pressure at the wrist or upper arm was compared with directly measured values in the aortic arch during routinely performed diagnostic cardiac catheterization in 100 patients (31-80 years, mean 59.3 years, 60% males). The noninvasive measurements were carried out by oscillometric devices, NAiS Blood Pressure Watch for measurements at the wrist, and Hestia OZ80 at the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure measured at the wrist was 4.3 +/- 14.1 mm Hg, and the diastolic value 6.0 +/- 8.9 mm Hg higher than when measured at the aortic arch; the difference was significant in both cases. Correlation coefficients were 0.85 for systolic and 0.71 for diastolic blood pressure. In 16% of the patients the systolic blood pressure at the wrist differed more than +/- 20 mm Hg. The diastolic blood pressure at the wrist measured more than +/- 20 mm Hg higher than in the aorta in 5% of the patients. At the upper arm mean systolic values were not different to the aorta. The diastolic pressure was 9.3 +/- 9.8 mm Hg higher in the aorta than at the upper arm. To verify the accuracy of values measured with the NAiS Blood Pressure Watch compared with the standard technique at the upper arm, sequential measurements were made at wrist and ipsilateral upper arm in the same group of 100 patients. The systolic blood pressure at the left wrist was 3.4 +/- 13.3 mm Hg higher and the diastolic pressure 3.8 +/- 9.5 mm Hg lower than at the upper arm. Only 53% of systolic values lay within a range of +/- 10 mm Hg. The correspondence between wrist and upper arm values was better for diastolic blood pressure, the values differing by less than +/- 10 mm Hg in two-thirds of patients. Self-measurement of arterial blood pressure with an oscillometric device at the wrist can be recommended only in individual cases with a difference of simultaneously measured values at the upper arm of less than +/- 10 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The standard method for indirectly

  7. Automated analysis of blood pressure measurements (Korotkov sound)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. P.; Hoffler, G. W.; Wolthuis, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic system for noninvasive measurements of arterial blood pressure is described. System uses Korotkov sound processor logic ratios to identify Korotkov sounds. Schematic diagram of system is provided to show components and method of operation.

  8. Blood-flow measurement in muscle with Xe-133

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Kim, I.; Ryo, U.Y.; Maskin, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-11-01

    An alternative method to the conventional miniature probe system for the measurement of blood flow in muscle has been developed. Xenon-133 was injected into the quadriceps muscles of ten subjects. A gamma camera and an online computer were then used to measure the half-clearance time of the Xe-133 while the subject was both at rest and exercising on an upright bicycle ergometer. The blood flow in the muscle was then calculated from the acquired data.

  9. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R2 > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  10. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  11. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, René M; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats. PMID:25321400

  12. Metabolic breath analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument measures metabolic breathing rate and dynamics of human beings in atmospheres ranging from normal air to 100 percent oxygen at ambient pressures from 14.7 to 3.0 psia. Measurements are made at rest or performing tasks up to maximum physical capacity under either zero or normal gravity.

  13. Measuring tissue blood flow using ultrasound modulated diffused light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, A.; Racheli, N.; Breskin, I.; Metzger, Y.; Silman, Z.; Kamar, M.; Nini, A.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of a novel device employing ultrasound modulation of near infrared light (referred as "Ultrasound tagged light" or UTL) to perform non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the microvascular level in tissue. Monitoring microcirculatory blood flow is critical in clinical situations affecting flow to different organs, such as the brain or the limbs. . However, currently there are no non-invasive devices that measure microcirculatory blood flow in deep tissue continuously. Our prototype device (Ornim Medical, Israel) was used to monitor tissue blood flow on anesthetized swine during controlled manipulations of increased and decreased blood flow. Measurements were done on the calf muscle and forehead of the animal and compared with Laser Doppler (LD). ROC analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for detecting an increase in blood flow on the calf muscle, demonstrated AUC = 0.951 for 23 systemic manipulations of cardiac output by Epinephrine injection, which is comparable to AUC = 0.943 using laser Doppler. Some examples of cerebral blood flow monitoring are presented, along with their individual ROC curves. UTL flowmetry is shown to be effective in detecting changes in cerebral and muscle blood flow in swine, and has merit in clinical applications.

  14. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath when you walk 150 ... or less Have been in the hospital for breathing problems recently Use oxygen at home, even if ...

  15. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yue; Gao, Zhaohua; Liu, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Mengxiao; Zhao, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−), 2 (±), 3 (+), 4 (++), or 5 (+++) according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis. PMID:24900994

  16. Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Junichi; Tabata, Runa; Nakajima, Kana; Arai, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Masato; Kagawa, Shiro

    2014-11-22

    Air-breathing divers are assumed to have evolved to apportion their time between surface and underwater periods to maximize the benefit gained from diving activities. However, whether they change their time allocation depending on the aim of the dive is still unknown. This may be particularly crucial for 'surfacers' because they dive for various purposes in addition to foraging. In this study, we counted breath events at the surface and estimated oxygen consumption during resting, foraging and other dives in 11 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the wild. Breath events were counted by a head-mounted acceleration logger or direct observation based on an animal-borne video logger, and oxygen consumption was estimated by measuring overall dynamic body acceleration. Our results indicate that green turtles maximized their submerged time, following this with five to seven breaths to replenish oxygen for resting dives. However, they changed their dive tactic during foraging and other dives; they surfaced without depleting their estimated stores of oxygen, followed by only a few breaths for effective foraging and locomotion. These dichotomous surfacing tactics would be the result of behavioural modifications by turtles depending on the aim of each dive. PMID:25297856

  17. Surfacers change their dive tactics depending on the aim of the dive: evidence from simultaneous measurements of breaths and energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Junichi; Tabata, Runa; Nakajima, Kana; Arai, Nobuaki; Kobayashi, Masato; Kagawa, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Air-breathing divers are assumed to have evolved to apportion their time between surface and underwater periods to maximize the benefit gained from diving activities. However, whether they change their time allocation depending on the aim of the dive is still unknown. This may be particularly crucial for ‘surfacers’ because they dive for various purposes in addition to foraging. In this study, we counted breath events at the surface and estimated oxygen consumption during resting, foraging and other dives in 11 green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the wild. Breath events were counted by a head-mounted acceleration logger or direct observation based on an animal-borne video logger, and oxygen consumption was estimated by measuring overall dynamic body acceleration. Our results indicate that green turtles maximized their submerged time, following this with five to seven breaths to replenish oxygen for resting dives. However, they changed their dive tactic during foraging and other dives; they surfaced without depleting their estimated stores of oxygen, followed by only a few breaths for effective foraging and locomotion. These dichotomous surfacing tactics would be the result of behavioural modifications by turtles depending on the aim of each dive. PMID:25297856

  18. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p < 0.3] and diastolic [p < 0.02]). Nevertheless, such alterations were found to modify the amplitude of the Korotkoff sound, which can manifest itself as an apparent change in arterial blood pressure that is readily discerned by the human ear. The increase in diastolic pressure for the cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies. PMID:8463815

  19. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated. PMID:25767064

  20. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated.

  1. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  2. Easy-to-use blood velocity measurement instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David H. R.; Chilipka, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes a new kind of clinical instrument designed to allow non-specialists to quantitatively measure blood velocity. The instrument's design utilizes vector continuous-wave (CW) Doppler. Vector CW Doppler insonates a volume with simultaneous multiple-angle beams that define a measurement region; within that region, the velocity vector of the blood can be measured independently of the probe orientation. By eliminating the need for simultaneous imaging and the specially trained technician required for the complicated instrument needed for such imaging, easy and inexpensive blood velocity measurements becomes possible. A prototype for a CW vector Doppler instrument has been used to measure blood velocity in several clinically important arteries: the radial and ulnar in the arm, the femoral in the leg, and the carotid in the neck. We report here on its first clinical use -- monitoring the flow in dialysis access grafts to prevent graft thrombosis. These early clinical results show accuracy and rapid learning of proper instrument use. The design approach presented shows much promise in creating instruments that will provide simple and low-cost-of-use procedures for measurement of blood velocity.

  3. Temperature influence on non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2009-02-01

    Regular monitoring of blood sugar level is important for the management of diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is a promising approach and this involves some form of contact with the body skin. It is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environment and physiological conditions and the temperature has an influence on the glucose measurement. In this paper, in-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement were studied. The in-vitro results from FTIR spectrometer show that sample temperature has significant influence on water absorption, which significantly affects the glucose absorption measurement. The in-vivo results show that when skin temperature around the measurement site is taken into consideration, the prediction of blood glucose level greatly improves.

  4. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  5. Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure. A Self-Contained Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Chris Ellen

    This self-contained instructional module is designed to help adult caregivers learn how to measure arterial blood pressure in the home. The module includes the following parts: objectives; pretest (with answers); four sections of instructional material covering (1) equipment, (2) cuff placement and locating the brachial artery, (3) measuring blood…

  6. Application of end-expired breath sampling to estimate carboxyhemoglobin levels in community air pollution exposure assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, William E.; Colome, Steven D.; Wojciechowski, Sandra L.

    Measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in end-expired air after breath-holding permits the estimation of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. Some literature suggests that the precision of the method decreases at low COHb levels. As part of a community exposure and health study, the end-expired breath method was applied to estimate COHb levels in 28 men with ischemic heart disease. Paired samples of blood and breath were collected at the beginning and end of the 24-h CO monitoring periods. The aggregate regression of all subjects' COHb on breath CO displayed high variability. However, the variability was substantially reduced for any particular subject, promoting the use of individualized blood-breath standard curves to improve the precision of COHb estimates made from breath CO. The ultimate accuracy of the blood-breath relationship could not be resolved by our data. Two major sources of error are identified. The observed person-to-person variability may be caused by physiologic factors or differences in ability to deliver an end-expired breath sample representative of alveolar air. This variation may also be due to instrumentation factors, specifically the accuracy of the IL282 CO-Oximeter at 0-3% levels. Further research into the sources of variability in the end-expired breath method is recommended. Epidemiologists using similar end-expired breath measurements to predict COHb levels should be cognizant of the magnitude and probable direction of the error in COHb estimates. This non-invasive method should continue to allow evaluation of the success of personal monitoring efforts and pharmacokinetic modeling of CO uptake in community exposure research.

  7. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity

    PubMed Central

    Di, Ningning; Mao, Ning; Cheng, Wenna; Pang, Haopeng; Ren, Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Xinjiang; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa) from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Patients and methods BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19) and BPH (22) responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels), were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel pericyte density (MPD). The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI) was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI. Results After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05). PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002); however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or MVD in PCa than that in BPH (P>0.05). Conclusion Our results confirmed that the increased signal values induced by BOLD MRI well differentiated PCa from BPH and had a positive correlation with vessel maturity in both of them. BOLD MRI can be utilized as a surrogate marker for the noninvasive assessment of the degree of vessel maturity. PMID:27462169

  8. Superiority of home blood pressure measurements over office measurements for testing antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaur; Dubroca; Dutrey-Dupagne; Genès; Chatellier; Bouvier-d'Yvoire; Elkik; Ménard

    1998-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects on office blood pressure and home blood pressure of placebo and active drug administration. DESIGN: After a 2-week wash-out period, patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension entered a 2-week single-blind placebo period and then a 4-week double-blind period. Patients were randomly assigned to be administered either 2 mg trandolapril once daily or its placebo in a 2:1 proportion. Office blood pressure was measured by a physician at the end of each period, using a mercury sphygmomanometer (mean of three consecutive measurements). Home blood pressure was measured during the last week of each period according to standard procedure carefully taught to each patient by the physician. Compliance was checked by using electronic pill boxes. RESULTS: Data for 34 of the 44 patients who entered the study were eligible for analysis. Baseline systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure were significantly (P = 0.0001/P = 0.0001) higher for office blood pressure (161/101 mmHg) than they were for home blood pressure (145/93 mmHg). There was no statistically significant difference between the placebo and active-treatment groups at baseline. During the single-blind period, blood pressures measured at the office and at home did not change significantly. Office blood pressure decreased by 2.7 +/- 10 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and by 0.5 +/- 4 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure whereas home blood pressure increased by 0.8 +/- 6 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and by 0.7 +/- 4 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. During the double-blind period, office blood pressure fell significantly with trandolapril treatment (systolic by 10.2 +/- 12 mmHg, diastolic by 8.3 +/- 6 mmHg; P = 0.0005/0.0001, versus single-blind placebo period) but this decrease was not significantly different (P = 0.45/0.92) from the fall in members of the placebo group (systolic by 6.9 +/- 9 mmHg, diastolic by 8.0 +/-6 mmHg; P = 0.04/0.002, versus single-blind placebo period

  9. Microprobes For Blood Flow Measurements In Tissue And Small Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, P. A.; Salerud, E. G.

    1988-04-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry is a method for the continuous and non-invasive recording of tissue blood flow. The method has already proved to be advantageous in a number of clinical as well as theoretical medical disciplines. In dermatology, plastic- and gastrointestinal surgery laser Doppler measurements have substantially contributed to increase knowledge of microvascular perfusion. In experimental medicine, the method has been used in the study of a great variety of microvascular problems. Spontaneous rhythmical variations, spatial and temporal fluctuations in human skin blood flow are mentioned as examples of problem areas in which new knowledge has been generated. The method has facilitated further investigations of the nature of spongeous bone blood flow, testis and kidney cortex blood flow. Recently we have showed that a variant of the laser Doppler method principle, using a single optical fiber, can be advantageous in deep tissue measurements. With this method laser light is transmitted bidirectionally in a single fiber. The tissue trauma which affects blood flow can be minimized by introducing small diameter fibers (0.1-0.5 mm). A special set-up utilizing the same basic principle has been used for the recording of blood flow in small vessels.

  10. The blood beat measurement with near infrared ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Horio, Hideyuki; Masuda, Yasushi

    This paper describes the blood beat measurement system with near infra-red ray. A blood vessel was captured sequentially with a CCD camera, an near infra-red LED and an optical filter. In order to extract a blood vessel portion from each captured image, binarization processing was performed using the threshold on the basis of the first captured image. For the reduction of the error caused by the subject's hand slight movement, the position adjustment was performed with the landmark, which was found with skeltonizing and extracting the diverging point. The pixel number of the blood vessel portion was counted and the thickness of the blood vessel was analyzed by performing a Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis shows the peak at the frequency of 1.4 Hz corresponding to 84 beat count in a minute. For the evaluation of the proposed method, blood beat was measured with a sphygmomanometer simultaneously. As the results, the almost same pulse rate could be obtained from both method. These results indicate that the method has the possibility to count a pulse.

  11. Retinal blood flow measurement by using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Fabritius, Tapio; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2008-02-01

    Quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) retinal vessel structure and blood flow is demonstrated. 3D blood flow distribution is obtained by Doppler optical coherence angiography (D-OCA). Vessel parameters, i.e. diameter, orientation, and position, are determined in an en face vessel image. The Doppler angle is estimated as the angle between the retinal vessel and the incident probing beam in representative cross-sectional flow image which extracted from the 3D flow distribution according to the vessel parameters. Blood flow velocity and volume rate can be quantified with these vessel parameters. The retinal blood flow velocity and volume rate are measured in the retinal vessels around the optic nerve head.

  12. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  13. Nursing student caring behaviors during blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Becker, Mary Kay; Blazovich, Linda; Schug, Vicki; Schulenberg, Cathy; Daniels, Jessie; Neal, Diana; Pearson, Gloria; Preston, Sara; Ridgeway, Sharon; Simones, Joyce; Swiggum, Paula; Wenkel, Linda; Smith, MaryJo O

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this multisite, nonexperimental study was to examine, using a repeated measures design, the effects of a teaching intervention designed to promote caring behaviors as students learn the psychomotor skill of blood pressure measurement. Watson's theory of human caring and a combination of cognitive and connectionist learning theories were used as the organizing construct. Baccalaureate nursing student participants were videotaped and evaluated at two points in time while performing the psychomotor skill of blood pressure measurement on a role-player. Role-players rated the students' caring behaviors using the Role Player Survey of Caring Behaviors During Blood Pressure Measurement instrument. Between these data collection points, students learned about caring behaviors through analysis of a videotaped role-play and required readings. An evaluator randomly selected 10 student videotapes from each of the 6 baccalaureate nursing program study sites and noted the presence or absence of caring behaviors on the Caring Behaviors During Blood Pressure Measurement instrument. Pretest and posttest scores on both subjective and objective research instruments were compared using descriptive statistics and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Students demonstrated a significant improvement in objective and subjective caring behaviors between the two performance examinations. The findings support further investigation of teaching interventions to promote the development of caring behaviors during nursing psychomotor skill development. PMID:18380262

  14. Non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Beyerl, D

    1982-05-01

    Comparison of transcutaneous (TC) monitoring of blood oxygen levels to arterial blood gas analyses was made on patients at rest with room air, during exercise, and at rest with oxygen. Three different transcutaneous monitors were evaluated: Novametrix TC O2 Mette, Biochem Sensomat, and Radiometer TC M1. The Hewlett-Packard ear oximeter for measuring oxygen saturation was also compared to oxygen saturation values calculated on the Severinghaus slide rule. Using at least one measured PO2 as a baseline, either TC monitoring or ear oximetry were valuable tools in monitoring pulmonary function. PMID:7102718

  15. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened to measure alcohol in the human breath. Measurements obtained by this device are used in...

  20. Outdoor, indoor, and human breath content measurements of ammonia by tunable diode laser spectroscopy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, C.L.; Nadezhdinskii, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Trace contents of ammonia in outdoor, indoor and exhaled air were measured on the base of high resolution absorption spectra. Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) system developed for this purpose possesses: {approximately}one second time constant, {approximately}200 cm{sup 3} sample volume, 5 ppb-sensitivity. The calibration of unit was based on measurements of relative intensities of sQ(3,1){hor_ellipsis}sQ(3,3) absorption lines of {nu}{sub 2S} and following calculation on the base of a priori data on strength and broadening coefficients of detected lines. Measured indoor contents (20--50 ppb) of ammonia was in 5--10 times higher than outdoor contents ({approximately}5 ppb). Approximately two times drop in NH{sub 3} room content after 6 p.m. was detected. Obtained behavior of ammonia content in respiration right after the smoking demonstrates that the removing of ammonia from lungs has the ventilation character. Measured contents of NH{sub 3} in human respiration was ranged between 120 and 220 ppb. The absence of ammonia content differences from respiration of smoking and non-smoking persons demonstrates that the accumulation of NH{sub 3} by humans seems to be rather negligible for a short time exposure, e.g., like smoking.

  1. Outdoor, indoor, and human breath content measurements of ammonia by tunable diode laser spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Konstantin L.; Nadezhdinskii, Alexander I.

    1996-10-01

    Trace contents of ammonia in outdoor, indoor and exhaled air were measured on the base of high resolution absorption spectra. Tunable diode laser system developed for this purpose possesses approximately one second time constant, approximately 200 cm3 sample volume, 5 ppb sensitivity. The calibration of unit was based on measurements of relative intensities of sQ(3,1)...sQ(3,3) absorption lines of v2s and following calculation on the base of a priori data on strength and broadening coefficients of detected lines. Measured indoor contents of ammonia was in 5-10 times higher than outdoor contents. Approximately two times drop in NH3 room content after 6 p.m. was detected. Obtained behavior of ammonia content in respiration right after the smoking demonstrates that the removing of ammonia from lungs has the ventilation character. Measured contents of NH3 in human respiration was ranged between 120 and 220 ppb. The absence of ammonia content differences from respiration of smoking and non smoking persons demonstrates that the accumulation of NH3 by human organism seems to be rather negligible for a short time exposure, e.g. like smoking.

  2. EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that...

  3. Effects of breathing patterns and light exercise on linear and nonlinear heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Kumar, Mohit; Behrens, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Despite their use in cardiac risk stratification, the physiological meaning of nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) measures is not well understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate effects of breathing frequency, tidal volume, and light exercise on nonlinear HRV and to determine associations with traditional HRV indices. R-R intervals, blood pressure, minute ventilation, breathing frequency, and respiratory gas concentrations were measured in 24 healthy male volunteers during 7 conditions: voluntary breathing at rest, and metronome guided breathing (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Hz) during rest, and cycling, respectively. The effect of physical load was significant for heart rate (HR; p < 0.001) and traditional HRV indices SDNN, RMSSD, lnLFP, and lnHFP (p < 0.01 for all). It approached significance for sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension (D2) (p < 0.1 for both), while HRV detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) measures DFAα1 and DFAα2 were not affected by load condition. Breathing did not affect HR but affected all traditional HRV measures. D2 was not affected by breathing; DFAα1 was moderately affected by breathing; and DFAα2, approximate entropy (ApEn), and SampEn were strongly affected by breathing. DFAα1 was strongly increased, whereas DFAα2, ApEn, and SampEn were decreased by slow breathing. No interaction effect of load and breathing pattern was evident. Correlations to traditional HRV indices were modest (r from -0.14 to -0.67, p < 0.05 to <0.01). In conclusion, while light exercise does not significantly affect short-time HRV nonlinear indices, respiratory activity has to be considered as a potential contributor at rest and during light dynamic exercise. PMID:26187271

  4. Pharmacological modulation of gastric emptying rate of solids as measured by the carbon labelled octanoic acid breath test: influence of erythromycin and propantheline.

    PubMed Central

    Maes, B D; Hiele, M I; Geypens, B J; Rutgeerts, P J; Ghoos, Y F; Vantrappen, G

    1994-01-01

    The *C (13C or 14C) labelled octanoic acid breath test was recently developed to measure the gastric emptying rate of solids. This study aimed to investigate whether it is sensitive enough to detect pharmacologically induced changes in the gastric emptying rate. Nine healthy volunteers were studied in basal condition, after intravenous administration of 200 mg erythromycin, and after peroral administration of 30 mg propantheline. Erythromycin significantly enhanced gastric emptying in all subjects, with an increase of the gastric emptying coefficient (p = 0.0043) in eight of nine and a fall in both the gastric half emptying time (p = 0.0020) and the lag phase (p = 0.0044) in all nine. Propantheline significantly reduced the gastric emptying rate, with a decreased gastric emptying coefficient (p = 0.0007) and an increased gastric half emptying time (p = 0.0168) in all subjects, but no change in the lag phase (p = 0.1214). Further mathematical analysis showed that breath sampling at 15 minutes intervals over a four hour period is recommended to guarantee accuracy and the discriminative value of the breath test in various gastric emptying patterns. In conclusion the *C labelled octanoic acid breath test is sufficiently sensitive to show pharmacologically induced changes of gastric emptying rates of solids. PMID:8150342

  5. Viscoelastic properties of blood studied through piezoresistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyan; Turng, Lih-Sheng; Cui, Zhixiang; Woodson, Robert D; Li, Haimei; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Piezoresistance describes the change of electrical resistance in a material undergoing deformation. Heterogeneous materials having different resistivities of dispersed and continuous matrix phases, such as blood (comprised of red and white blood cells and platelets suspended in plasma), can exhibit the piezoresistance effect. For an initially isotropic material, two independent intrinsic material coefficients, λ1 and λ2, would uniquely describe the piezoresistance phenomenon. Materials undergoing deformation affect a material's resistivity in two ways: (a) by introducing anisotropy in the material, which is characterized by λ1 and (b) by changing the volume density of the inclusions, which is associated with (1/3 λ1+λ2). In this paper, the piezoresistance effect in bovine blood samples is studied under oscillatory shear flow with a planar sensor rosette. The first piezoresistance coefficient, λ1, was measured at various frequencies and shear rates in the blood flow and compared with cos δ (equal to G'/G*, where G' and G* are the storage and complex moduli, respectively), which reflects the degree of elasticity. The coefficient λ1 was found to have a trend similar to that of cos δ under all conditions tested. Thus λ1 might potentially be used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of blood and the deformability of red blood cells, thus clarifying pathophysiology and facilitating diagnosis. PMID:22156031

  6. Automated blood pressure measurement (ABPM) in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, P

    1996-01-01

    Application and feasibility of automated ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) in the elderly are comparable to younger age groups. Major side-effects are sleep disturbances and pain during cuff-inflation. The main indications for ABPM are diagnosis and control of treatment in hypertensive patients. Further indications are the diagnosis of syncope or hypotensive disorders and the diagnostic work-up of symptoms like vertigo, dizziness and dyspnea. In hypertensives, ABPM can easily assess the "white coat" effect and cases of "white coat" hypertension (prevalence in the elderly 15-25%). The prognostic implications of "white coat" hypertensions remain to be determined. Recording of the total 24-h blood pressure profile with analysis of circadian blood pressure changes, the day-night difference and the early morning surge raises the possibility to assess age-specific patterns. The drop in blood pressure at night (during sleep) is usually decreased and less frequently observed in elderly hypertensives. Possible explanations include decreased daytime activity, an altered sleep pattern in the elderly and secondary forms of hypertension. So-called "non-dippers", with no adequate drop in night-time blood pressure, show a significant increase in cardiovascular complications. Control of treatment via ABPM can assess non-responders and cases of overtreatment, and permits a fairly objective analysis of side-effects. Episodes of transient myocardial ischemia and possible trigger mechanisms can be assessed by simultaneous application of ABPM and Holter monitoring. The insufficient control of hypertension in the majority of elderly patients and the current lower target blood pressures in the elderly call for new methods to improve the level and quality of antihypertensive treatment. Although ABPM provides a closer correlation to target organ damage than measurement of office (casual) blood pressure, and ABPM frequently improves or at least facilitates the care of elderly

  7. Knowledge of accurate blood pressure measurement procedures in chiropractic students

    PubMed Central

    Crosley, Angela M.; Rose, James R. La

    2013-01-01

    Objective Blood pressure measurement is a basic clinical procedure. However, studies have shown that many errors are made when health care providers acquire blood pressure readings. Our study assessed knowledge of blood pressure measurement procedures in chiropractic students. Methods This was an observational, descriptive study. A questionnaire based on one created by the American Heart Association was given to 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and final year students (n = 186). A one way ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Of the students 80% were confident that their knowledge of this clinical skill was adequate or better. However, the overall score on the knowledge test of blood pressure–taking skills was 52% (range, 24%–88%). The only significant difference in the mean scores was between the 1st and 2nd year students compared to the 3rd and 4th year students (p < .005). Of the 16 questions given, the following mean scores were: 1st year 10.45, 2nd year 9.75, 3rd year 7.93, and 4th year 8.33. Of the 16 areas tested, 10 were of major concern (test item score <70%), showing the need for frequent retraining of chiropractic students. Conclusion Consistent with studies in other health care disciplines, our research found the knowledge of blood pressure skills to be deficient in our sample. There is a need for subsequent training in our teaching program. PMID:23957320

  8. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  9. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  10. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  11. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  12. Host and environmental predictors of exhaled breath temperature in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exhaled breath temperature has been suggested as a new method to detect and monitor pathological processes in the respiratory system. The putative mechanism of this approach is based upon changes in the blood flow. So far potential factors that influence breath temperature have not been studied in the general population. Methods The exhaled breath temperature was measured in 151 healthy non-smoking elderly (aged: 60–80 years) at room temperature with the X-halo device with an accuracy of 0.03°C. We related exhaled breath temperature by use of regression models with potential predictors including: host factors (sex, age) and environmental factors (BMI, physical activity, and traffic indicators). Results Exhaled breath temperature was lower in women than in men and was inversely associated with age, physical activity. BMI and daily average ambient temperature were positively associated with exhaled breath temperature. Independent of the aforementioned covariates, exhaled breath temperature was significantly associated with several traffic indicators. Residential proximity to major road was inversely associated with exhaled breath temperature: doubling the distance to the nearest major intense road was observed a decrease of 0.17°C (95% CI: -0.33 to -0.01; p = 0.036). Conclusions Exhaled breath temperature has been suggested as a noninvasive method for the evaluation of airway inflammation. We provide evidence that several factors known to be involved in proinflammatory conditions including BMI, physical activity and residential proximity to traffic affect exhaled breath temperature. In addition, we identified potential confounders that should be taken into account in clinical and epidemiological studies on exhaled breath temperature including sex, age, and ambient temperature. PMID:24365236

  13. Software Tool for Analysis of Breathing-Related Errors in Transthoracic Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtahi, F.; Gyllensten, I. C.; Lindecrantz, K.; Seoane, F.

    2012-12-01

    During the last decades, Electrical Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (EBIS) has been applied in a range of different applications and mainly using the frequency sweep-technique. Traditionally the tissue under study is considered to be timeinvariant and dynamic changes of tissue activity are ignored and instead treated as a noise source. This assumption has not been adequately tested and could have a negative impact and limit the accuracy for impedance monitoring systems. In order to successfully use frequency-sweeping EBIS for monitoring time-variant systems, it is paramount to study the effect of frequency-sweep delay on Cole Model-based analysis. In this work, we present a software tool that can be used to simulate the influence of respiration activity in frequency-sweep EBIS measurements of the human thorax and analyse the effects of the different error sources. Preliminary results indicate that the deviation on the EBIS measurement might be significant at any frequency, and especially in the impedance plane. Therefore the impact on Cole-model analysis might be different depending on method applied for Cole parameter estimation.

  14. Arterial compliance probe for local blood pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Arterial compliance and vessel wall dynamics are significant in vascular diagnosis. We present the design of arterial compliance probes for measurement of local pulse wave velocity (PWV). Two designs of compliance probe are discussed, viz (a) a magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) based probe, and (b) a photoplethysmograph (PPG) based probe. The ability of the local PWV probes to consistently capture carotid blood pulse waves is verified by in-vivo trials on few volunteers. The probes could reliably perform repeatable measurements of local PWV from carotid artery along small artery sections less than 20 mm. Further, correlation between the measured values of local PWV using probes and various measures of blood pressure (BP) was also investigated. The study indicates that such arterial compliance probes have strong potential in cuff less BP monitoring. PMID:26737589

  15. How Cities Breathe: Ground-Referenced, Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging Precursor Measurements To Space-Based Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Ira; Tratt, David; Quattrochi, Dale; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John

    2013-01-01

    the complex and often aerosol laden, humid, urban microclimates, atmospheric transport and profile monitoring, spatial resolution, temporal cycles (diurnal and seasonal which involve interactions with the surrounding environment diurnal and seasonal cycles) and representative measurement approaches given traffic realities. Promising approaches incorporate contemporaneous airborne remote sensing and in situ measurements, nocturnal surface surveys, with ground station measurement

  16. NEW METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFYING POTENTIAL HUMAN BIOMARKERS BY COLLECTION AND CONCENTRATION OF EXHALED BREATH CONDENSATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many studies of human exposure, the measurement of pollutant chemicals in the environment (air, water, food, soil, etc.) is being supplemented by their additional measurement in biological media such as human breath, blood, and urine. This allows an unambiguous confirmation...

  17. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-01-01

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p < 0.05) between the mean individual breath acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D

  18. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  19. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    PubMed

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  20. Simplified, noninvasive PET measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Iannotti, F.; Fieschi, C.; Alfano, B.; Picozzi, P.; Mansi, L.; Pozzilli, C.; Punzo, A.; Del Vecchio, G.; Lenzi, G.L.; Salvatore, M.

    1987-05-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in four normal volunteers and in 11 patients with brain tumors. A unidirectional transfer constant, Ki, was calculated applying multiple-time graphical analysis (MTGA). This method allows the detection of backflux from brain to blood and, by generalization, the measurement of the constant Kb (brain to blood). Furthermore, the need for an independent measurement of the intravascular tracer is obviated: MTGA itself provides an estimate of the cerebral plasma volume (Vp). In the four normal volunteers the Ki was 3.0 +/- 0.8 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (mean +/- SD) and the Vp 0.034 +/- 0.007 ml g-1. A net increase in Ki up to a maximum of 121.0 X 10(-4) ml g-1 min-1 (correspondent value of Kb = 0.025 min-1) as well as an increase of Vp was observed in malignant tumors. The input function was calculated using both the (/sup 68/Ga)EDTA concentration in sequential arterial blood samples and, noninvasively, the activity derived from the superior sagittal sinus image. The values of Ki and Vp from these two calculations were in good agreement. The application of MTGA to PET permits the evaluation of passage of substances across the BBB without making assumptions about the compartments in which the tracer distributes.

  1. Intravital video microscopy measurements of retinal blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Norman R; Watts, Megan N; Leskova, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in retinal blood flow can contribute to, or be a consequence of, ocular disease and visual dysfunction. Therefore, quantitation of altered perfusion can aid research into the mechanisms of retinal pathologies. Intravital video microscopy of fluorescent tracers can be used to measure vascular diameters and bloodstream velocities of the retinal vasculature, specifically the arterioles branching from the central retinal artery and of the venules leading into the central retinal vein. Blood flow rates can be calculated from the diameters and velocities, with the summation of arteriolar flow, and separately venular flow, providing values of total retinal blood flow. This paper and associated video describe the methods for applying this technique to mice, which includes 1) the preparation of the eye for intravital microscopy of the anesthetized animal, 2) the intravenous infusion of fluorescent microspheres to measure bloodstream velocity, 3) the intravenous infusion of a high molecular weight fluorescent dextran, to aid the microscopic visualization of the retinal microvasculature, 4) the use of a digital microscope camera to obtain videos of the perfused retina, and 5) the use of image processing software to analyze the video. The same techniques can be used for measuring retinal blood flow rates in rats. PMID:24429840

  2. Optimal Blood Suppression Inversion Time Based on Breathing Rates and Heart Rates to Improve Renal Artery Visibility in Spatial Labeling with Multiple Inversion Pulses: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yigang; Li, Fang; Shen, Hao; Long, Xueying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Jinkang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). Materials and Methods This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. Results The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. Conclusion In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency. PMID:26798218

  3. Real-time analysis of breath for carbon tetrachloride and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, D.V.; Callahan, P.J.; Thrall, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    Real-time breath analysis offers a non-invasive method to detect exposure to toxic air pollutants. Breath measurements are useful in environmental exposure studies, and may provide evidence about previous long-term or repeated exposures in environments that are not easy to monitor. If breath samples are collected during or immediately following a short term exposure, breath measurements can be used to predict the peak exposure. Previous breath sampling methodologies have been to collect repeated 1-minute breath samples at 5 minute intervals. Although this method can aid in describing the rapid exponential emptying of the blood compartment that occurs following peak exposure, sampling 5 minute intervals still forces an approximation of the true shape of the clearance kinetics. The authors have developed a methodology to quantitively measure the concentration of exhaled volatile compounds in real-time using laboratory rats. Continuously monitoring breath for a parent toxicant and its metabolite(s) provides input into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the bio-kinetics of a chemical in the body. Real-time analyses are better than batch sampling methods because of the rapidly changing kinetics of elimination of some volatile chemicals from the body.

  4. Measurement of normal portal venous blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brown, H S; Halliwell, M; Qamar, M; Read, A E; Evans, J M; Wells, P N

    1989-04-01

    The volume flow rate of blood in the portal vein was measured using a duplex ultrasound system. The many errors inherent in the duplex method were assessed with particular reference to the portal vein and appropriate correction factors were obtained by in vitro calibration. The effect of posture on flow was investigated by examining 45 healthy volunteers in three different positions; standing, supine and tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. The mean volume blood flow in the supine position was 864 (188)ml/min (mean 1SD). When standing, the mean volume blood flow was significantly reduced by 26% to 662 (169)ml/min. There was, however, no significant difference between flow when supine and when tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. PMID:2653973

  5. Absolute blood velocity measured with a modified fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Lemaillet, Paul; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Hiller, Matthias; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2010-09-01

    We present a new method for the quantitative estimation of blood flow velocity, based on the use of the Radon transform. The specific application is for measurement of blood flow velocity in the retina. Our modified fundus camera uses illumination from a green LED and captures imagery with a high-speed CCD camera. The basic theory is presented, and typical results are shown for an in vitro flow model using blood in a capillary tube. Subsequently, representative results are shown for representative fundus imagery. This approach provides absolute velocity and flow direction along the vessel centerline or any lateral displacement therefrom. We also provide an error analysis allowing estimation of confidence intervals for the estimated velocity.

  6. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body & lifestyle changes > Shortness of breath Shortness of breath E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... oxygen your baby gets. Causes of shortness of breath during pregnancy Early pregnancy In the first few ...

  7. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  8. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than a minute before a child regains consciousness and resumes breathing normally. Breath-holding spells can ... spells cause kids to stop breathing and lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ...

  9. Measuring blood glucose in neonatal units: how does hemocue compare?

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, S A; Matthews, J N; Platt, M P

    1996-01-01

    Rapid and reliable determination of blood glucose concentration is essential during the neonatal period to prevent adverse neurodevelopmental outcome from hypoglycaemia. Despite their unreliability, reagent strip methods continue to be used extensively in neonatal nurseries due to their rapidity and convenience. Recently, a new portable laboratory standard technique has been introduced (HemoCue B-Glucose system) for whole blood glucose determination. It is particularly suitable for near-patient testing in neonatal units. This new method, as well as other established methods of whole blood (Yellow Springs Instrument (YSI) and a hexokinase method on Cobas Bio), and plasma (Kodak Ektachem) glucose measurement, were therefore evaluated for their accuracy and concordance of measurements taken in the neonatal period. There were substantial discrepancies among the four methods of glucose measurement with wide limits of agreement between these methods. The glucose concentrations measured by HemoCue and YSI (n = 206), HemoCue and hexokinase (n = 113), HemoCue and plasma glucose on Ektachem (n = 69) and hexokinase and Ektachem (n = 66) were likely to differ by -29 to +61%, -23 to +56%, -36 to +65%, and -19 to +30%, respectively. Even the laboratory methods of blood glucose determination, therefore, can not be used interchangeably. Using a model based approach, the probabilities of "discordant" classification as hypo- or normo-glycaemia were estimated to be 6.8%, 6.5%, and 7.1% between HemoCue and YSI, HemoCue and hexokinase on Cobas Bio, and HemoCue and Ektachem analysers, respectively. In view of these low probabilities of discordant classification with other glucose analysers, the HemoCue system may offer a reasonable compromise between bedside and laboratory blood glucose estimations in neonates. PMID:8976688

  10. The increase of breath ammonia induced by niacin ingestion quantified by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Wang, Tianshu; Spanel, Patrik; Bloor, Roger

    2006-06-01

    The ingestion of relatively large doses of the vitamin niacin by healthy volunteers results in a reddening of the skin, a skin 'flush'. Thus, we have carried out a study of the breath metabolites of two healthy volunteers following (i) the ingestion of 200 mg of immediate-release niacin, (ii) as (i) but preceded by the ingestion of 325 mg of aspirin that diminishes the skin 'flush', (iii) ingestion of 500 mg of slow-release niacin. On-line breath analysis was carried out using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS. The interesting new observation is that the breath ammonia levels of both volunteers clearly increased following (i) and (ii), and an obvious skin flush did occur following (i) but not following (ii). The slow-release niacin (iii) did not result in a flush and the breath ammonia levels increased more slowly and did not reach the higher levels produced by (i) and (ii). The results of these experiments demonstrate that breath ammonia levels are dependent on the blood/plasma levels of niacin, but are not directly related to the flushing phenomenon, and that the observed increases in blood/breath ammonia levels are consistent with current knowledge of the metabolic pathways of niacin. The parallel measurements of breath isoprene are presented, which demonstrate the quality of breath analyses that can be achieved using SIFT-MS. PMID:16603796

  11. Blood biomarkers for brain injury: What are we measuring?

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Keisuke; Liu, Charles Y.; Merkel, Steven F.; Ramirez, Servio H.; Tierney, Ryan T.; Langford, Dianne

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) remains challenging, as prognosis and return-to-play/work decisions are based largely on patient reports. Numerous investigations have identified and characterized cellular factors in the blood as potential biomarkers for TBI, in the hope that these factors may be used to gauge the severity of brain injury. None of these potential biomarkers have advanced to use in the clinical setting. Some of the most extensively studied blood biomarkers for TBI include S100β, neuron-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Tau. Understanding the biological function of each of these factors may be imperative to achieve progress in the field. We address the basic question: what are we measuring? This review will discuss blood biomarkers in terms of cellular origin, normal and pathological function, and possible reasons for increased blood levels. Considerations in the selection, evaluation, and validation of potential biomarkers will also be addressed, along with mechanisms that allow brain-derived proteins to enter the bloodstream after TBI. Lastly, we will highlight perspectives and implications for repetitive neurotrauma in the field of blood biomarkers for brain injury. PMID:27181909

  12. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  13. Observing the human exposome as reflected in breath biomarkers: heat map data interpretation for environmental and intelligence research.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Sobus, Jon R; Liu, Qian; Madden, Michael C

    2011-09-01

    Over the past decade, the research of human system biology and the interactions with the external environment has permeated all phases of environmental, medical and public health research. Similar to the fields of genomics and proteomics research, the advent of new instrumentation for measuring breath biomarkers and their associated meta-data also provide very useful, albeit complex, data structures. The biomarker research community is beginning to invoke tools from system biology to assess the impact of environmental exposures, as well as from internal health states, on the expression of suites of chemicals in exhaled breath. This new approach introduces the concept of the exposome as a complement to the genome in exploring the environment-gene interaction. In addition to answering questions regarding health status for the medical community, breath biomarker patterns are useful for assessing public health risks from environmental exposures. Furthermore, breath biomarker patterns can inform security risks from suspects via covert interrogation of blood borne chemical levels that reflect previous activities. This paper discusses how different classes of exhaled breath biomarker measurements can be used to rapidly assess patterns in complex data. We present exhaled breath data sets to demonstrate the value of the graphical 'heat map' approach for hypothesis development and subsequent guidance for stochastic and mixed effect data interpretation. We also show how to graphically interpret exhaled breath measurements of exogenous jet fuel components, as well as exhaled breath condensate measurements of endogenous chemicals. PMID:21654022

  14. [Oversized patient arms: a problem with blood pressure measurements].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Fritz; Meyer, Thomas; Klein, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    The increase in the worldwide prevalence of obesity systematically leads to a higher number of individuals who may be wrongly diagnosed as hypertensive because their arms are too large for standard blood pressure cuffs, which are ordinarily appropriate in patients with normal sized arms. The aim was to gain real data of upper arm and wrist circumferences in 327 elected subjects with larger arms (upper arm circumference >32.5 cm) from two Bavarian general practices. We found that 93.9% of all patients had an upper arm circumference of a maximum of 41.0 cm and a wrist circumference of at most 20.5 cm. These data were then compared with the approved size ranges of six wrist blood pressure measurement devices, one special three-in-one cuff for different sizes and the two large adult cuffs recommended by the German Hypertension Society. Availability of one large cuff and one wrist blood measurement device (either used at the upper arm or at the wrist depending on patient dimensions) seems to be sufficient. This should allow for true blood pressure readings to be obtained in at least 96% of all patients with arms of more than normal circumference. PMID:16955625

  15. In vivo measurement of blood flow in the vitelline network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelma, Christian; Vennemann, Peter; Lindken, Ralph; Westerweel, Jerry

    2007-11-01

    The growth and adaptation of blood vessels is studied in vivo in the so-called vitelline network of a chick embryo. The vitelline network, a system of extra-embryonic blood vessels that transports nutrients from the yolk sac to the chick embryo, is an easily accessible model system for the study of human cardiovascular development and functioning. We present measurements obtained by means of scanning microscopic Particle Image Velocimetry. Using phase-locking, we can reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow as a function of the cardiac cycle. Typical reconstructed volumes are 0.4x0.5x0.2 mm^3 with a spatial resolution (i.e. vector spacing) of 6 μm. These hemodynamic measurements allow a study of the coupling between form and functioning of the blood vessels. Special attention is given to the local wall shear stress (WSS), an important physiological parameter that is thought to determine - to great extent - the adaptation of the vessels to changing conditions. The WSS can be estimated directly from the velocity gradient at the wall or from a fit to the blood velocity profile. The former method slightly underestimates the WSS (most likely due to lack of resolution) but is significantly easier to apply in the complex geometries under consideration.

  16. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  17. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  18. Can the single-breath helium dilution method predict lung volumes as measured by whole-body plethysmography?*

    PubMed Central

    Coertjens, Patrícia Chaves; Knorst, Marli Maria; Dumke, Anelise; Pasqualoto, Adriane Schmidt; Riboldi, João; Barreto, Sérgio Saldanha Menna

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare TLC and RV values obtained by the single-breath helium dilution (SBHD) method with those obtained by whole-body plethysmography (WBP) in patients with normal lung function, patients with obstructive lung disease (OLD), and patients with restrictive lung disease (RLD), varying in severity, and to devise equations to estimate the SBHD results. METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study involving 169 individuals, of whom 93 and 49 presented with OLD and RLD, respectively, the remaining 27 having normal lung function. All patients underwent spirometry and lung volume measurement by both methods. RESULTS: TLC and RV were higher by WBP than by SBHD. The discrepancy between the methods was more pronounced in the OLD group, correlating with the severity of airflow obstruction. In the OLD group, the correlation coefficient of the comparison between the two methods was 0.57 and 0.56 for TLC and RV, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). We used regression equations, adjusted for the groups studied, in order to predict the WBP values of TLC and RV, using the corresponding SBHD values. It was possible to create regression equations to predict differences in TLC and RV between the two methods only for the OLD group. The TLC and RV equations were, respectively, ∆TLCWBP-SBHD in L = 5.264 − 0.060 × FEV1/FVC (r2 = 0.33; adjusted r2 = 0.32) and ∆RVWBP-SBHD in L = 4.862 − 0.055 × FEV1/FVC (r2 = 0.31; adjusted r2 = 0.30). CONCLUSIONS: The correction of TLC and RV results obtained by SBHD can improve the accuracy of this method for assessing lung volumes in patients with OLD. However, additional studies are needed in order to validate these equations. PMID:24473761

  19. Transcutaneous Measurement of Blood Analyte Concentration Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Ishan; Singh, Gajendra P.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2008-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder, affecting nearly 200 million people worldwide. Acute complications, such as hypoglycemia, cardiovascular disease and retinal damage, may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. As diabetes has no known cure, tight control of glucose levels is critical for the prevention of such complications. Given the necessity for regular monitoring of blood glucose, development of non-invasive glucose detection devices is essential to improve the quality of life in diabetic patients. The commercially available glucose sensors measure the interstitial fluid glucose by electrochemical detection. However, these sensors have severe limitations, primarily related to their invasive nature and lack of stability. This necessitates the development of a truly non-invasive glucose detection technique. NIR Raman Spectroscopy, which combines the substantial penetration depth of NIR light with the excellent chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy, provides an excellent tool to meet the challenges involved. Additionally, it enables simultaneous determination of multiple blood analytes. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of Raman spectroscopy for blood analytes' detection in biological media. The preliminary success of our non-invasive glucose measurements both in vitro (such as in serum and blood) and in vivo has provided the foundation for the development of feasible clinical systems. However, successful application of this technology still faces a few hurdles, highlighted by the problems of tissue luminescence and selection of appropriate reference concentration. In this article we explore possible avenues to overcome these challenges so that prospective prediction accuracy of blood analytes can be brought to clinically acceptable levels.

  20. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the practical and theoretical limitations encountered in the use of totally implantable CW Doppler flowmeters is provided. Theoretical analyses, computer models, in-vitro and in-vivo calibration studies describe the sources and magnitudes of potential errors in the measurement of blood flow through the renal artery, as well as larger vessels in the circulatory system. The evaluation of new flowmeter/transducer systems and their use in physiological investigations is reported.

  1. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  2. Near-infrared spectral methods for noninvasively measuring blood glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Sun; Kong, Deyi; Mei, Tao; Tao, Yongchun

    2004-05-01

    Determination of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients is a frequently occurring procedure and an important tool for diabetes management. Use of noninvasive detection techniques can relieve patients from the pain of frequent finger pokes and avoid the infection of disease via blood. This thesis discusses current research and analyzes the advantages and shortages of different measurement methods, including: optical methods (Transmission, Polarimetry and scattering), then, we give emphasis to analyze the technology of near-infrared (NIR) spectra. NIR spectral range 700 nm ~2300 nm was used because of its good transparency for biological tissue and presence of glucose absorption band. In this work, we present an outline of noninvasive blood glucose measurement. A near-infrared light beam is passed through the finger, and the spectral components of the emergent beam are measured using spectroscopic techniques. The device includes light sources having the wavelengths of 600 nm - 1800 nm to illuminate the tissue. Receptors associated with the light sources for receiving light and generating a transmission signal representing the light transmitted are also provided. Once a transmission signal is received by receptors, and the high and low values from each of the signals are stored in the device. The averaged values are then analyzed to determine the glucose concentration, which is displayed on the device.

  3. An ultrasonic Doppler venous outflow method for the continuous measurement of cerebral blood flow in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Upton, R; Grant, C; Ludbrook, G

    1994-07-01

    A pulsed ultrasonic Doppler venous outflow method was developed for the continuous measurement of global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in conscious sheep. The sheep were prepared under anesthesia with a "suture down"-style ultrasonic flow probe on the dorsal sagittal sinus placed via a trephine hole. Angiographic and dye studies showed that the dorsal sagittal sinus at the point of placement of the probe collected the majority of the blood from the cerebral hemispheres. Studies of the blood velocity profile across the sinus showed that the dimensions of the dorsal sagittal sinus changed minimally with changes in CBF in vivo. The velocity measurements were calibrated under anesthesia against an in vivo direct venous outflow method. Control CBF values for six sheep ranged from 31 to 53 ml/min for the area of brain described above; for two sheep in which the weight of the brain was determined, this gave total CBF values of approximately 34 and 30 ml min-1 100 g-1. The CBF measured varied in the expected manner with changes in the end-tidal CO2 concentration in expired breath and showed transient reductions with the barbiturate thiopentone and transient increases with the opiate alfentanil. It is concluded that the method is simple and accurate. PMID:8014216

  4. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  5. Spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of redox status is most frequently performed by measuring redox biomarkers. The spectrophotometer is the most commonly used analytical instrument in biochemistry. There is a huge number of spectrophotometric redox biomarkers and assays, thus distinguishing the most appropriate biomarkers and protocols is overwhelming. The aim of the present review is to propose valid and reliable spectrophotometric assays for measuring redox biomarkers in blood. It is hoped that this work will help researchers to select the most suitable redox biomarkers and assays. PMID:26809994

  6. Chronic intestinal ischaemia: measurement of the total splanchnic blood flow.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D

    2013-04-01

    A redundant collateral network between the intestinal arteries is present at all times. In case of ischaemia in the gastrointestinal tract, the collateral blood supply can develop further, thus accommodating the demand for oxygen even in the presence of significant stenosis or occlusion of the intestinal arteries without clinical symptoms of intestinal ischaemia. Symptoms of ischemia develop when the genuine and collateral blood supply no longer can accommodate the need for oxygen. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of obliteration in the intestinal arteries. In chronic intestinal ischaemia (CII), the fasting splanchnic blood flow (SBF) is sufficient, but the postprandial increase in SBF is inadequate and abdominal pain will therefore develop in relation to food intake causing the patient to eat smaller meals at larger intervals with a resulting weight loss. Traditionally, the CII-diagnosis has exclusively been based upon morphology (angiography) of the intestinal arteries; however, substantial discrepancies between CII-symptoms and the presence of atherosclerosis/stenosis in the intestinal arteries have been described repeatedly in the literature impeding the diagnosis of CII. This PhD thesis explores a method to determine the total SBF and its potential use as a diagnostic tool in patients suspected to suffer from CII. The SBF can be measured using a continuous infusion of a tracer and catheterisation of a hepatic vein and an artery. By measuring the SBF before and after a standard meal it is possible to assess the ability or inability to enhance the SBF and thereby diagnosing CII. In Study I, measurement of SBF was tested against angiography in a group of patients suspected to suffer from CII due to pain and weight loss. A very good agreement between the postprandial increase in SBF and angiography was found. The method was validated against a well-established method independent of the hepatic extraction of tracer using pAH in a porcine model (study II

  7. Oxygen tension measurement using an automatic blood gas analyser1

    PubMed Central

    Becket, J; Chakrabarti, M K; Gillies, I D S; Orchard, C; Hall, G M; Bourdillon, P J

    1981-01-01

    Two different methods of assessing the reliability of the oxygen electrode of one model of an automatic blood gas analyser (BGA) have been studied. In the first, a single automatic BGA was assessed by using outdated bank blood which was pumped around a small extracorporeal circuit into which known gas mixtures were passed. Oxygen tension was varied between 2 and 16 kPa. In the second, fresh heparinized blood was tonometered with calibrated gases and submitted to the automatic BGA used in the first part of the study and also to three other identical machines. Each of the machines was between 3 and 4 years old. Eighteen different units of blood were used in the first part of the study. The correlation coefficient between the automatic BGA and the Po2 in the extracorporeal circuit varied between 0.29 and 0.99. 31% of the total of 209 measurements made by the automatic BGA were more than 1.2 kPa from the reference value, 25% of them being between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the reference value. In the second part of the study, the correlation coefficient between this automatic BGA and the tonometered blood was 0.96. The correlation coefficients for the 3 other identical BGAs were 0.84, 0.97 and 0.88, indicating that the BGA used in the first part of the study was no worse than any of the others. It is suggested that although clinicians are likely to ignore readings of an automatic BGA that are more than 4.0 kPa from the true value and are likely to repeat the investigation, readings between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the true value may adversely affect patient management. PMID:7288796

  8. Oxygen tension measurement using an automatic blood gas analyser.

    PubMed

    Becket, J; Orchard, C; Chakrabarti, M K; Hall, G M; Gillies, I D; Bourdillon, P J

    1981-08-01

    Two different methods of assessing the reliability of the oxygen electrode of one model of an automatic blood gas analyser (BGA) have been studied. In the first, a single automatic BGA was assessed by using outdated bank blood which was pumped around a small extracorporeal circuit into which known gas mixtures were passed. Oxygen tension was varied between 2 and 16 kPa. In the second, fresh heparinized blood was tonometered with calibrated gases and submitted to the automatic BGA used in the first part of the study and also to three other identical machines. Each of the machines was between 3 and 4 years old.Eighteen different units of blood were used in the first part of the study. The correlation coefficient between the automatic BGA and the Po(2) in the extracorporeal circuit varied between 0.29 and 0.99. 31% of the total of 209 measurements made by the automatic BGA were more than 1.2 kPa from the reference value, 25% of them being between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the reference value. In the second part of the study, the correlation coefficient between this automatic BGA and the tonometered blood was 0.96. The correlation coefficients for the 3 other identical BGAs were 0.84, 0.97 and 0.88, indicating that the BGA used in the first part of the study was no worse than any of the others.It is suggested that although clinicians are likely to ignore readings of an automatic BGA that are more than 4.0 kPa from the true value and are likely to repeat the investigation, readings between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the true value may adversely affect patient management. PMID:7288796

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance and transcutaneous electromagnetic blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Battocletti, J H; Halbach, R E; Salles-Cunha, S X; Sances, A

    1983-09-01

    Static and alternating magnetic fields are employed in blood flowmeters using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) principles and electromagnetic induction by a moving conductor (TEM). Both techniques require high steady magnetic fields, obtained either from permanent magnets or from electromagnets. A relatively homogeneous magnetic field is needed for NMR, but, though important for calibration, homogeneity is not critical for TEM. NMR is more complex than TEM since it requires radio-frequency and audio-frequency magnetic fields. However, the TEM method requires surface electrodes in contact with the skin, or needle electrodes placed subcutaneously, whereas NMR is contactless. The NMR flowmeter can be calibrated directly, but appropriate and approximate models must be assumed and then solved by computer to quantify blood flow by the TEM flowmeter. Flow in individual vessels is measured a priori in the TEM flowmeter by virtue of the assumed models. To measure flow in individual vessels by NMR, a scanning or ranging method is required, which logically leads to blood flow imaging. The levels of steady, radio-frequency, and audio-frequency magnetic fields used in the two types of flowmeters are low enough so as not to cause any apparent stimulus to human volunteers and patients tested. PMID:6228667

  10. The lung cancer breath signature: a comparative analysis of exhaled breath and air sampled from inside the lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Ghezzi, Silvia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Roscioni, Claudio; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Galluccio, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; di Natale, Corrado; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2015-11-01

    Results collected in more than 20 years of studies suggest a relationship between the volatile organic compounds exhaled in breath and lung cancer. However, the origin of these compounds is still not completely elucidated. In spite of the simplistic vision that cancerous tissues in lungs directly emit the volatile metabolites into the airways, some papers point out that metabolites are collected by the blood and then exchanged at the air-blood interface in the lung. To shed light on this subject we performed an experiment collecting both the breath and the air inside both the lungs with a modified bronchoscopic probe. The samples were measured with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and an electronic nose. We found that the diagnostic capability of the electronic nose does not depend on the presence of cancer in the sampled lung, reaching in both cases an above 90% correct classification rate between cancer and non-cancer samples. On the other hand, multivariate analysis of GC-MS achieved a correct classification rate between the two lungs of only 76%. GC-MS analysis of breath and air sampled from the lungs demonstrates a substantial preservation of the VOCs pattern from inside the lung to the exhaled breath.

  11. The lung cancer breath signature: a comparative analysis of exhaled breath and air sampled from inside the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Rosamaria; Santonico, Marco; Pennazza, Giorgio; Ghezzi, Silvia; Martinelli, Eugenio; Roscioni, Claudio; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Galluccio, Giovanni; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; D’Amico, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    Results collected in more than 20 years of studies suggest a relationship between the volatile organic compounds exhaled in breath and lung cancer. However, the origin of these compounds is still not completely elucidated. In spite of the simplistic vision that cancerous tissues in lungs directly emit the volatile metabolites into the airways, some papers point out that metabolites are collected by the blood and then exchanged at the air-blood interface in the lung. To shed light on this subject we performed an experiment collecting both the breath and the air inside both the lungs with a modified bronchoscopic probe. The samples were measured with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and an electronic nose. We found that the diagnostic capability of the electronic nose does not depend on the presence of cancer in the sampled lung, reaching in both cases an above 90% correct classification rate between cancer and non-cancer samples. On the other hand, multivariate analysis of GC-MS achieved a correct classification rate between the two lungs of only 76%. GC-MS analysis of breath and air sampled from the lungs demonstrates a substantial preservation of the VOCs pattern from inside the lung to the exhaled breath. PMID:26559776

  12. Comparison of cardiac stroke volume measurement determined using stereological analysis of breath-hold cine MRI and phase contrast velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Graves, M J; Dommett, D M

    2000-08-01

    Cine MRI of the heart using segmented k-space pulse sequences permits multiphase images to be acquired in a single breath-hold. Whilst image quality is improved compared with conventional (non-segmented) cine imaging, subsequent analysis can be relatively time consuming. In this study, multiple slice breath-hold cine imaging of the heart was performed in 11 normal volunteers. Left and right ventricular stroke volume (SV) was estimated from the images by application of the Cavalieri method of modern design stereology in combination with point counting. The measured SVs were compared with those obtained by cine phase contrast velocity mapping in the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery. Excellent agreement was found between the SVs determined by the two techniques, with mean differences (+/- one SD) of 0.41 +/- 3.00 ml and 0.41 +/- 4.78 ml for left and right ventricles, respectively. Comparison of left and right ventricular SV using stereology yielded a mean difference of 0.84 +/- 5.70 ml. Breath-hold data acquisition together with stereological analysis is demonstrated to be an accurate and unbiased technique for the rapid assessment of cardiac function. PMID:11026856

  13. Breath Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cikach, Frank S.; Tonelli, Adriano R.; Barnes, Jarrod; Paschke, Kelly; Newman, Jennie; Grove, David; Dababneh, Luma; Wang, Sihe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and devastating condition characterized by vascular cell proliferation and is associated with several metabolic derangements. We hypothesized that metabolic derangements in PAH can be detected by measuring metabolic by-products in exhaled breath. Methods: We collected breath and blood samples from patients with PAH at the time of right-sided heart catheterization (n = 31) and from healthy control subjects (n = 34). Breath was analyzed by selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry in predetermined training and validation cohorts. Results: Patients with PAH were 51.5 ± 14 years old, and 27 were women (85%). Control subjects were 38 ± 13 years old, and 22 were women (65%). Discriminant analysis in the training set identified three ion peaks (H3O+29+, NO+56+, and O2+98+) and the variable age that correctly classified 88.9% of the individuals. In an independent validation cohort, 82.8% of the individuals were classified correctly. The concentrations of the volatile organic compounds 2-propanol, acetaldehyde, ammonia, ethanol, pentane, 1-decene, 1-octene, and 2-nonene were different in patients with PAH compared with control subjects. Exhaled ammonia was higher in patients with PAH (median [interquartile range]: 94.7 parts per billion (ppb) [70-129 ppb] vs 60.9 ppb [46-77 ppb], P < .001) and was associated with right atrial pressure (ρ = 0.57, P < .001), mean pulmonary artery pressure (ρ = 0.43, P = .015), cardiac index by thermodilution (ρ = −0.39, P = .03), pulmonary vascular resistance (ρ = 0.40, P = .04), mixed venous oxygen (ρ = −0.59, P < .001), and right ventricular dilation (ρ = 0.42, P = .03). Conclusions: Breathprint is different between patients with PAH and healthy control subjects. Several specific compounds, including ammonia, were elevated in the breath of patients with PAH. Exhaled ammonia levels correlated with severity of disease. PMID:24091389

  14. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, M. Bradley; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Yang, Jenny; Chen, Ting-huei; Quibrera, Pedro Miguel; Anderson, Wayne; Barr, R. Graham; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Beaty, Terri; Casaburi, Richard; Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H.; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Criner, Gerard; Demeo, Dawn; Christenson, Stephanie A.; Couper, David J.; Doerschuk, Claire M.; Freeman, Christine M.; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Han, MeiLan K.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hersh, Craig P.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kaner, Robert J.; Kanner, Richard E.; Kleerup, Eric C.; Lutz, Sharon; Martinez, Fernando J.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Silverman, Edwin K.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Bowler, Russell P.

    2016-01-01

    Implementing precision medicine for complex diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) will require extensive use of biomarkers and an in-depth understanding of how genetic, epigenetic, and environmental variations contribute to phenotypic diversity and disease progression. A meta-analysis from two large cohorts of current and former smokers with and without COPD [SPIROMICS (N = 750); COPDGene (N = 590)] was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with measurement of 88 blood proteins (protein quantitative trait loci; pQTLs). PQTLs consistently replicated between the two cohorts. Features of pQTLs were compared to previously reported expression QTLs (eQTLs). Inference of causal relations of pQTL genotypes, biomarker measurements, and four clinical COPD phenotypes (airflow obstruction, emphysema, exacerbation history, and chronic bronchitis) were explored using conditional independence tests. We identified 527 highly significant (p < 8 X 10−10) pQTLs in 38 (43%) of blood proteins tested. Most pQTL SNPs were novel with low overlap to eQTL SNPs. The pQTL SNPs explained >10% of measured variation in 13 protein biomarkers, with a single SNP (rs7041; p = 10−392) explaining 71%-75% of the measured variation in vitamin D binding protein (gene = GC). Some of these pQTLs [e.g., pQTLs for VDBP, sRAGE (gene = AGER), surfactant protein D (gene = SFTPD), and TNFRSF10C] have been previously associated with COPD phenotypes. Most pQTLs were local (cis), but distant (trans) pQTL SNPs in the ABO blood group locus were the top pQTL SNPs for five proteins. The inclusion of pQTL SNPs improved the clinical predictive value for the established association of sRAGE and emphysema, and the explanation of variance (R2) for emphysema improved from 0.3 to 0.4 when the pQTL SNP was included in the model along with clinical covariates. Causal modeling provided insight into specific pQTL-disease relationships for airflow obstruction and emphysema. In

  15. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Kechris, Katerina; Jacobson, Sean; Drummond, M Bradley; Hawkins, Gregory A; Yang, Jenny; Chen, Ting-Huei; Quibrera, Pedro Miguel; Anderson, Wayne; Barr, R Graham; Basta, Patricia V; Bleecker, Eugene R; Beaty, Terri; Casaburi, Richard; Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D; Criner, Gerard; Demeo, Dawn; Christenson, Stephanie A; Couper, David J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Doerschuk, Claire M; Freeman, Christine M; Gouskova, Natalia A; Han, MeiLan K; Hanania, Nicola A; Hansel, Nadia N; Hersh, Craig P; Hoffman, Eric A; Kaner, Robert J; Kanner, Richard E; Kleerup, Eric C; Lutz, Sharon; Martinez, Fernando J; Meyers, Deborah A; Peters, Stephen P; Regan, Elizabeth A; Rennard, Stephen I; Scholand, Mary Beth; Silverman, Edwin K; Woodruff, Prescott G; O'Neal, Wanda K; Bowler, Russell P

    2016-08-01

    Implementing precision medicine for complex diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) will require extensive use of biomarkers and an in-depth understanding of how genetic, epigenetic, and environmental variations contribute to phenotypic diversity and disease progression. A meta-analysis from two large cohorts of current and former smokers with and without COPD [SPIROMICS (N = 750); COPDGene (N = 590)] was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with measurement of 88 blood proteins (protein quantitative trait loci; pQTLs). PQTLs consistently replicated between the two cohorts. Features of pQTLs were compared to previously reported expression QTLs (eQTLs). Inference of causal relations of pQTL genotypes, biomarker measurements, and four clinical COPD phenotypes (airflow obstruction, emphysema, exacerbation history, and chronic bronchitis) were explored using conditional independence tests. We identified 527 highly significant (p < 8 X 10-10) pQTLs in 38 (43%) of blood proteins tested. Most pQTL SNPs were novel with low overlap to eQTL SNPs. The pQTL SNPs explained >10% of measured variation in 13 protein biomarkers, with a single SNP (rs7041; p = 10-392) explaining 71%-75% of the measured variation in vitamin D binding protein (gene = GC). Some of these pQTLs [e.g., pQTLs for VDBP, sRAGE (gene = AGER), surfactant protein D (gene = SFTPD), and TNFRSF10C] have been previously associated with COPD phenotypes. Most pQTLs were local (cis), but distant (trans) pQTL SNPs in the ABO blood group locus were the top pQTL SNPs for five proteins. The inclusion of pQTL SNPs improved the clinical predictive value for the established association of sRAGE and emphysema, and the explanation of variance (R2) for emphysema improved from 0.3 to 0.4 when the pQTL SNP was included in the model along with clinical covariates. Causal modeling provided insight into specific pQTL-disease relationships for airflow obstruction and emphysema. In

  16. Blood pressure measurement: lessons learned from our ancestors.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, Marianna; Papaioannou, Theodore G; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    The profound observations of William Harvey (1578-1657), in blood circulation and the progress of physical science laid the foundation for the development of the Iatrophysical School that contributed to the evolution of clinical sphygmomanometry. The pioneer work of Reverend Stephen Hales (1677-1761) demonstrated the dynamics of the vascular system. One century later the French physician Jean-Léonard-Marie Poiseuille (1797-1867) invented a U-tube mercury manometer and in 1860 the physiologist Etienne- Jules Marey (1830-1904) devised the first portable sphygmograph for recording the pulse wave. The non-invasive techniques of blood pressure measurement were completed by Scipione Riva-Rocci (1896-1937) sphygmomanometer and the description of "Korotkov sounds" by the Russian surgeon Nikolai- Sergeyevich Korotkov (1874-1920). PMID:25341864

  17. [Scientific production of Brazilian nurses on blood pressure measurement].

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Edna Apparecida Moura; de Araújo, Thelma Leite; Veiga, Eugênia Veludo; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; Lamas, José Luiz Tatagiba; Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2007-06-01

    In the previous issue of this journal the authors celebrated in an article the discovery of the Korotkoff sounds, in 1905, and presented the historical facts that determined the important role of the University of São Paulo's Nursing School (EEUSP) in the development of the oldest blood pressure research line in Brazilian Nursing: "Cuff Width Influence in Blood Pressure Measurement." This new article presents the scientific production derived from the studies carried out by nurses with a PhD from EEUSP during and after their doctoral programs in the area. The path each researcher followed in his/her group and laboratory is emphasized. The data presented is aimed at offering a number of qualitative and quantitative indicators that make possible to evaluate the impact of the research that they have carried out, as well as the development of knowledge in the area. PMID:17722397

  18. Measurement of Blood Thiamine Metabolites for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoli; Fei, Guoqiang; Lu, Jingwen; Jin, Lirong; Pan, Shumei; Chen, Zhichun; Wang, Changpeng; Sang, Shaoming; Liu, Huimin; Hu, Weihong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhiliang; Tan, Qiong; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Qunying; Xie, Xueping; Ji, Yong; Cui, Donghong; Gu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yuguo; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain glucose hypometabolism is an invariant feature and has significant diagnostic value for Alzheimer's disease. Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) is a critical coenzyme for glucose metabolism and significantly reduced in brain and blood samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aims To explore the diagnostic value of the measurement of blood thiamine metabolites for AD. Methods Blood TDP, thiamine monophosphate, and thiamine levels were detected using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The study included the exploration and validation phases. In the exploration phase, the samples of 338 control subjects and 43 AD patients were utilized to establish the models for AD diagnosis assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, including the variable γ that represents the best combination of thiamine metabolites and age to predict the possibility of AD. In the validation phase, the values of models were further tested for AD diagnosis using samples of 861 control subjects, 81 AD patients, 70 vascular dementia patients, and 13 frontotemporal dementia patients. Results TDP and the γ exhibited significant and consistent values for AD diagnosis in both exploration and validation phases. TDP had 0.843 and 0.837 of the areas under ROC curve (AUCs), 77.4% and 81.5% of sensitivities, and 78.1% and 77.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. The γ had 0.938 and 0.910 of AUCs, 81.4% and 80.2% of sensitivities, and 90.5% and 87.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. TDP and the γ can effectively distinguish AD from vascular dementia (64.3% for TDP, 67.1% for γ) and frontotemporal dementia (84.6% for TDP, 100.0% for γ). Interpretation. The measurement of blood thiamine metabolites by HPLC is an ideal diagnostic test for AD with inexpensive, easy to perform, noninvasive merits. PMID:26870826

  19. Noninvasive blood glucose measurement using multiple laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, E. T.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, J. H.; Soh, P. H.; Ng, K.; Yeo, J. H.

    2007-02-01

    In the event of diabetes clinicians have advocated that frequent monitoring of a diabetic's blood glucose level is the key to avoid future complications (kidney failure, blindness, amputations, premature death, etc.,) associated with the disease. While the test-strip glucose meters available in current consumer markets allow for frequent monitoring, a more convenient technique that is accurate, painless and sample-free is preferable in a diabetic's daily routine. This paper presents a non-invasive blood glucose measurement technique using diffuse reflectance near infrared (NIR) signals. This technique uses a set of laser diodes, each operating at fixed wavelengths in the first overtone region. The NIR signals from the laser diodes are channeled to the measurement site viz., the nail-bed by means of optical fibers. A series of in vivo experiments have been performed on eight normal human subjects using a standard Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) protocol. The reflected NIR signals are inputs to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) algorithm for calibration and future predictions. The calibration models used are developed using in vivo datasets and are unique to a particular individual. The 1218 paired points collected from the eight test subjects plotted on the Clarke Error Grid, revealed that 87.3% of these points fall within the A zone while the remainder, within the B zone, both of which, are clinically accepted. The standard error of prediction was +/-13.14mg/dL for the best calibration model. A Bland-Altman analysis of the 1218 paired points yields a 76.3% confidence level for a measurement accuracy of +/-20mg/dL. These results demonstrate the initial potential of the technique for non-invasive blood glucose measurements in vivo.

  20. SU-E-J-236: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Breath-Hold Lung Tumor Position Reproducibility Measured with 4D MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Keall, P; Greer, P; Lapuz, C; Ludbrook, J; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Audiovisual biofeedback breath-hold (AVBH) was employed to reproduce tumor position on inhale and exhale breath-holds for 4D tumor information. We hypothesize that lung tumor position will be more consistent using AVBH compared with conventional breath-hold (CBH). Methods: Lung tumor positions were determined for seven lung cancer patients (age: 25 – 74) during to two separate 3T MRI sessions. A breathhold training session was performed prior to the MRI sessions to allow patients to become comfortable with AVBH and their exhale and inhale target positions. CBH and AVBH 4D image datasets were obtained in the first MRI session (pre-treatment) and the second MRI session (midtreatment) within six weeks of the first session. Audio-instruction (MRI: Siemens Skyra) in CBH and verbal-instruction (radiographer) in AVBH were used. A radiation oncologist contoured the lung tumor using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems); tumor position was quantified as the centroid of the contoured tumor after rigid registration based on vertebral anatomy across two MRI sessions. CBH and AVBH were compared in terms of the reproducibility assessed via (1) the difference between the two exhale positions for the two sessions and the two inhale positions for the sessions. (2) The difference in amplitude (exhale to inhale) between the two sessions. Results: Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of two exhale (or inhale) lung tumor positions relative to each other by 33%, from 6.4±5.3 mm to 4.3±3.0 mm (p=0.005). Compared to CBH, AVBH improved the reproducibility of exhale and inhale amplitude by 66%, from 5.6±5.9 mm to 1.9±1.4 mm (p=0.005). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be utilized for improving the reproducibility of breath-hold lung tumor position. These results are advantageous towards achieving more accurate emerging radiation treatment planning methods, in addition to imaging and treatment modalities utilizing breath

  1. Measurement of red blood cell mechanics during morphological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine; Dasari, Ramachandra; Feld, Michael; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark; Levine, Alex

    2010-03-01

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane, a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network, provides the principal control of the cell's morphology and mechanics. These properties, in turn, influence the ability of RBCs to transport oxygen in circulation. Current mechanical measurements of RBCs rely on external loads. Here we apply a Noncontact optical interferometric technique to quantify the thermal fluctuations of RBC membranes with 3 nm accuracy over a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Combining this technique with a new mathematical model describing RBC membrane undulations, we measure the mechanical changes of RBCs as they undergo a transition from the normal discoid shape to the abnormal echinocyte and spherical shapes. These measurements indicate that, coincident with this morphological transition, there is a significant increase in the membrane's shear and bending moduli. This mechanical transition can alter cell circulation and impede oxygen delivery.

  2. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements. PMID:21950780

  3. Measurement of Blood Volume in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Theodore R; Blue, Steven W; Park, Byung S; Greisel, Jennifer J; Conn, P Michael; Pau, Francis K-Y

    2015-01-01

    Most biomedical facilities that use rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) limit the amount of blood that may be collected for experimental purposes. These limits typically are expressed as a percentage of blood volume (BV), estimated by using a fixed ratio of blood (mL) per body weight (kg). BV estimation ratios vary widely among facilities and typically do not factor in variables known to influence BV in humans: sex, age, and body condition. We used indicator dilution methodology to determine the BV of 20 adult rhesus macaques (10 male, 10 female) that varied widely in body condition. We measured body composition by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, weight, crown-to-rump length, and body condition score. Two indicators, FITC-labeled hydroxyethyl starch (FITC–HES) and radioiodinated rhesus serum albumin (125I-RhSA), were injected simultaneously, followed by serial blood collection. Plasma volume at time 0 was determined by linear regression. BV was calculated from the plasma volume and Hct. We found that BV calculated by using FITC–HES was consistently lower than BV calculated by using 125I-RhSA. Sex and age did not significantly affect BV. Percentage body fat was significantly associated with BV. Subjects categorized as having ‘optimal’ body condition score had 18% body fat and 62.1 mL/kg BV (by FITC–HES; 74.5 mL/kg by 125I-RhSA). Each 1% increase in body fat corresponded to approximately 1 mL/kg decrease in BV. Body condition score correlated with the body fat percentage (R2 = 0.7469). We provide an equation for calculating BV from weight and body condition score. PMID:26632777

  4. Measurement of Blood Volume in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Theodore R; Blue, Steven W; Park, Byung S; Greisel, Jennifer J; Conn, P Michael; Pau, Francis K-Y

    2015-11-01

    Most biomedical facilities that use rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) limit the amount of blood that may be collected for experimental purposes. These limits typically are expressed as a percentage of blood volume (BV), estimated by using a fixed ratio of blood (mL) per body weight (kg). BV estimation ratios vary widely among facilities and typically do not factor in variables known to influence BV in humans: sex, age, and body condition. We used indicator dilution methodology to determine the BV of 20 adult rhesus macaques (10 male, 10 female) that varied widely in body condition. We measured body composition by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, weight, crown-to-rump length, and body condition score. Two indicators, FITC-labeled hydroxyethyl starch (FITC-HES) and radioiodinated rhesus serum albumin ((125)I-RhSA), were injected simultaneously, followed by serial blood collection. Plasma volume at time 0 was determined by linear regression. BV was calculated from the plasma volume and Hct. We found that BV calculated by using FITC-HES was consistently lower than BV calculated by using (125)I-RhSA. Sex and age did not significantly affect BV. Percentage body fat was significantly associated with BV. Subjects categorized as having 'optimal' body condition score had 18% body fat and 62.1 mL/kg BV (by FITC-HES; 74.5 mL/kg by (125)I-RhSA). Each 1% increase in body fat corresponded to approximately 1 mL/kg decrease in BV. Body condition score correlated with the body fat percentage (R(2) = 0.7469). We provide an equation for calculating BV from weight and body condition score. PMID:26632777

  5. Stephen Hales and the measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, O

    1994-12-01

    Natural philosopher and inventor, Stephen Hales (1677-1761), undertook a lengthy series of experiments on animals described in Haemastaticks (1733) which led to the first direct measurement of blood pressure. Hales retained his interest in health and disease throughout his life, and this prompted what he regarded as his most important work: the invention of ventilation systems for use in ships or prisons. Hales was the 'perpetual curate' of Teddington, Middlesex, and he combined a mechanistic, quantitative approach to his experimental work with a need and, as he saw it, a duty to discover and wonder at the wisdom and goodness of God by studying His creation. PMID:7884783

  6. Engineering studies of vectorcardiographs in blood pressure measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The following projects involving cardiovascular instrumentation were conducted: (1) the development and fabrication of a three-dimensional display measurement system for vectorcardiograms, (2) the development and fabrication of a cardiovascular monitoring system to noninvasively monitor beat-by-beat the blood pressure and heart rate using aortic pulse wave velocity, (3) the development of software for an interactive system to analyze systolic time interval data, and (4) the development of microprocessor-based physiologic instrumentation, focussing initially on EKG rhythm analysis. Brief descriptions of these projects were given.

  7. Patients' experiences and opinions of home blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Rickerby, J; Woodward, J

    2003-07-01

    Regular measurement of the blood pressure (BP) is necessary to monitor the treatment of hypertension, and self-measurement is one technique of obtaining such measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of individuals who have carried out home BP measurement. A qualitative method using semistructured interviews was used with 13 subjects. These were adults with hypertension who had previous experience of measuring their own BP, and were recruited to the study from one UK general medical practice. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data from the interviews have been analysed using phenomenological principles and identifying 'meaning units.' The findings suggest that participants were willing to carry out home measurements and several were pleased to have been asked to be more involved in their own management. All found the technique straightforward. Most noted marked variability in the day-to-day BP measurements. Several exhibited the 'white coat' phenomenon (spuriously raised BP in certain settings only). Some participants showed considerable know-ledge of hypertension and its consequences. They reported being aware of their own BP level and whether this was within acceptable limits. They also reported being willing to take further measurements, and to consider adjusting their treatment in the light of these measurements. Other participants showed less knowledge and enthusiasm, and considered the management of hypertension to be the doctor's job. The findings suggest that for some individuals home BP measurement is acceptable. They also help to explain why, for some individuals, it is not. Using the findings, a number of changes to current practice could be made, which might make home measurements more acceptable and easier to perform. As a result, a new proforma for use in everyday practice has been designed. The study shows that there is considerable scope for sharing BP measurement and management decisions in hypertension with

  8. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... fight infection and are part of your body's defense system. Platelets help blood to clot when you have a cut or wound. Bone marrow, the spongy material inside your bones, makes new blood cells. Blood cells ...

  9. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  10. Quantitative photoacoustic blood oxygenation measurement of whole porcine blood samples using a multi-wavelength semiconductor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Claus-Stefan; Mienkina, Martin P.; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Jörger, Manfred; Strauß, Andreas; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2011-07-01

    We present a photoacoustic measurement system based on semiconductor lasers for blood oxygenation measurements. It permits to use four different optical wavelengths (650nm, 808nm, 850nm, 905nm) to generate photoacoustic signals. As the optical extinction coefficient of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin is different at specific wavelengths, a blood oxygenation measurement by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic laser system is feasible. Especially at 650nm, the clear difference between the extinction coefficients of the two hemoglobin derivates permits to determine the blood oxygenation in combination with other near infrared wavelengths. A linear model based on tabulated values of extinction coefficients for fully oxygenated and fully deoxygenated hemoglobin is presented. We used heparin stabilized whole porcine blood samples to model the optical behavior of human blood, as the optical absorption behavior of porcine hemoglobin does not differ significantly from human hemoglobin. To determine the real oxygen saturation values of the blood samples, we measured the partial oxygen pressure with an IRMA Trupoint Blood Analysis System. The oxygen saturation values were calculated from a dissociation curve for porcine blood. The results of the photoacoustic measurement are in qualitatively good agreement with the predicted linear model. Further, we analyze the abilities and the limitations of quantitative oxygenation measurements.

  11. Quantitative measurement of local cerebral blood flow in humans by positron computed tomography and /sup 15/O-water

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.; Carson, R.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Carson, J.; MacDonald, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1983-06-01

    A noninvasive method that employs /sup 15/O-water and positron-computed tomography (PCT) was used to measure quantitative local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) in man. /sup 15/O-Water (about 30-50 mCi) was introduced through a single-breath inhalation of /sup 15/O-carbon dioxide or through an intravenous bolus injection of /sup 15/O-water. A sequence of five 2-min PCT scans was initiated at the time of tracer administration. A series of 15-20 blood samples (1 ml each) was withdrawn from the radial artery of the subject over a period of 10 min. Oxygen-15 radioactivities in the blood samples were immediately counted in a well counter to give an input function, which together with the projection data collected by PCT were processed to provide images of 1CBF and local water distribution volume. The method was found to be convenient to use and gave good-quality images of 1CBF. Quantitative values of 1CBF in images were 59 +/- 11 and 20 +/- 4 ml/min/100 g for gray and white matter, respectively, with a gray-to-white matter ratio of 2.93 and a global flow value of 42 +/- 8 ml/min/100 g. Distribution volume of water was 0.85 +/- 0.03, 0.76 +/- 0.03, and 0.81 +/- 0.02 ml/g respectively, for gray matter, white matter, and whole brain.

  12. Factors Affecting Blood Glucose Monitoring: Sources of Errors in Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Barry H.

    2009-01-01

    Glucose monitoring has become an integral part of diabetes care but has some limitations in accuracy. Accuracy may be limited due to strip manufacturing variances, strip storage, and aging. They may also be due to limitations on the environment such as temperature or altitude or to patient factors such as improper coding, incorrect hand washing, altered hematocrit, or naturally occurring interfering substances. Finally, exogenous interfering substances may contribute errors to the system evaluation of blood glucose. In this review, I discuss the measurement of error in blood glucose, the sources of error, and their mechanism and potential solutions to improve accuracy in the hands of the patient. I also discuss the clinical measurement of system accuracy and methods of judging the suitability of clinical trials and finally some methods of overcoming the inaccuracies. I have included comments about additional information or education that could be done today by manufacturers in the appropriate sections. Areas that require additional work are discussed in the final section. PMID:20144340

  13. Measurement of microvesicle levels in human blood using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Wayne L

    2016-07-01

    Microvesicles are fragments of cells released when the cells are activated, injured, or apoptotic. Analysis of microvesicle levels in blood has the potential to shed new light on the pathophysiology of many diseases. Flow cytometry is currently the only method that can simultaneously separate true lipid microvesicles from other microparticles in blood, determine the cell of origin and other microvesicle characteristics, and handle large numbers of clinical samples with a reasonable effort, but expanded use of flow cytometric measurement of microvesicle levels as a clinical and research tool requires improved, standardized assays. The goal of this review is to aid investigators in applying current best practices to microvesicle measurements. First pre-analytical factors are evaluated and data summarized for anticoagulant effects, sample transport and centrifugation. Next flow cytometer optimization is reviewed including interference from background in buffers and reagents, accurate microvesicle counting, swarm interference, and other types of coincidence errors, size calibration, and detection limits using light scattering, impedance and fluorescence. Finally current progress on method standardization is discussed and a summary of current best practices provided. © 2016 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26606416

  14. Strategies to reduce pitfalls in measuring blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Badeli, Hamidreza; Assadi, Farahnak

    2014-03-01

    Errors in blood pressure (BP) measurement are common in the clinical practice. Inaccurate measurements of BP may lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of hypertension. The preferred method of BP measurement in the clinical setting is auscultation, using the first and the fifth Korotkoff sounds. However, the use of mercury sphygmomanometer is declining. Automated oscillometric devices are an acceptable alternative method of BP measurements if the proper cuff size is used. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. At 24 h ambulatory monitoring is also useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension and resistance hypertension. There is increasing evidence that lack of nocturnal BP dipping during the night may be associated with increased cardiovascular event. This report attempts to address the need for accurate BP measurements in children and adolescents by reducing human and equipment errors and providing clinicians with the accurate measurement of BP, which is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain BP-related CV risks and to guide management. PMID:24791186

  15. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: differences between measured and calculated mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Kiers, H D; Hofstra, J M; Wetzels, J F M

    2008-12-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is often used as an index of overall blood pressure. In recent years, the use of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices is increasing. These devices directly measure and display MAP; however, MAP is often calculated from systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) as displayed by the device. In this study we have analysed measured and calculated MAP, obtained by two different oscillometric BP measurement devices in two different patient cohorts. The first cohort included 242 healthy subjects (male 40.5%, 50+/-13 years). BP measurements were performed with a Welch Allyn 5300P device. We found a small but significant difference between measured MAP and calculated MAP (MAP(m-c:) -1.8 mmHg, range -5.7 to 12.9 mmHg, p < 0.001). MAP(m-c) showed a significant, but weak correlation with DBP and SBP. The second cohort included included 134 patients with glomerular diseases (male 63%, 50+/14 years). BP measurements were performed with a Dinamap 487210 device. In this group we also observed a small difference between measured MAP and calculated MAP (+1.7 mmHg, range -15.3 to 28.2 mmHg, p<0.001). MAP (m-c) correlated with age, all blood pressure indices and heart rate. An overall analysis showed that age, SBP, DBP, and type of device are all independently related to MAP (m-c). There is a significant difference between measured and calculated MAP. The difference is small on average; however, this MAP(m-c) can be large in the individual patient. Moreover, there are differences of reported MAP between devices. Our data suggest that calculated and measured MAP cannot be used interchangeably. PMID:19075313

  16. Measurement of complex refractive index of human blood by low-coherence interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the usefulness of the optical technique for measurements of blood complex refractive index has been examined. Measurement of optical properties of human blood is difficult to perform because of its nonuniform nature. However, results of my investigation have shown the usefulness of low-coherence interferometry for measurement complex refractive index of human blood. Furthermore, mathematical analysis of spectrum of measured signal have made possible to determined relationship between complex refractive index and hematocrit level in human blood.

  17. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  18. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Elmiro, Nathália S.; Velloso, Marcelo; Britto, Raquel R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using the optoelectronic plethysmography system in a supine position with a trunk inclination of 45° during quiet breathing and the breathing exercises. The order of the breathing exercises was randomized. Statistical analysis was performed by the Friedman test and an ANOVA for repeated measures with one factor (breathing exercises), followed by preplanned contrasts and Bonferroni correction. A p<0.005 value was considered significant. RESULTS: All breathing exercises significantly increased the tidal volume of the chest wall (Vcw) and reduced the respiratory rate (RR) in comparison to quiet breathing. The diaphragmatic breathing exercise was responsible for the lowest Vcw, the lowest contribution of the rib cage, and the highest contribution of the abdomen. The sustained maximal inspiration exercise promoted greater reduction in RR compared to the diaphragmatic and intercostal exercises. Inspiratory sighs and intercostal exercises were responsible for the highest values of minute ventilation. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony variables increased significantly during diaphragmatic breathing. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the breathing exercises investigated in this study produced modifications in the breathing pattern (e.g., increase in tidal volume and decrease in RR) as well as in thoracoabdominal motion (e.g., increase in abdominal contribution during diaphragmatic breathing), among others. PMID:25590447

  19. [A software for comparing ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM)].

    PubMed

    Legras, B

    1998-08-01

    The software (MAPA-PC) for personal computers, designed by the author, provides precise and fast studies of ABPM, especially when comparing two anti-hypertensive treatments. It implies strict definitions of groups (e.g. dippers), indices (peak, trough, peak/trough ratio), and the type of smoothing of measured values: means (over 1, 2 or 3 hours) or smoothing by functions (polynomials or trigonometric series). The software calculates standard parameters (nighttime and daytime means, peak, trough...) as well as more original values (nighttime and period from points of inflexion in the curve, slope in these points, coefficients of variation on differences between 2 ABPM of a given subject...). It uses statistical tests (Mann and Whitney's U. Pearson's chi square, Snedecor's F) to compare results of treatment. It provides many types of curves (blood pressure lines, box-plots) which show kinetics and variability of blood pressure. The user can compare various types of smoothing (e.g. 2 vs 3 harmonics in Fourier series). The software was used on 237 records of 79 patients, in a randomized trial. It was written with Turbo Pascal and works on DOS personal computers. It is interesting for epidemiologic studies or clinical trials in which ABPM are used. PMID:9749148

  20. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    PubMed Central

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice PMID:16863591

  1. [Personal protection measures against blood-sucking insects and ticks].

    PubMed

    Orshan, Laor; Wilamowski, Amos; Pener, Hedva

    2010-09-01

    Blood-sucking arthropods are major vectors of various pathogens like viruses, bacteria, protozoa and nematodes. Preventing exposure to the vector is imperative especially when vaccine and prophylactic treatments are not available. Personal protection measures (PPM) are essential and often the only means available when dealing with blood-sucking disease transmitting arthropods. Awareness of the risk in the specific areas of travel is the first step to be taken before and while traveling. PPM include preventive personal behavior, suitable clothing, application of insect repellents to the skin, the use of space repellents, impregnation of clothing, camping gear and bed nets and, when necessary, ground spraying of insecticides. The registered and recommended active ingredients for skin application are Deet, picaridin (icaridin), p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD) and IR3535. Volatile pyrethrins are used as space repellents while pyrethroids, especially permethrin, are employed for impregnation and for ground spraying. It is recommended to purchase only products registered in Israel or other developed countries. These products should have a detailed label specifying the concentration of the active ingredient, application instructions and the duration of protection. PMID:21302476

  2. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... confronted Breath holding spells are more common in children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells (parents ...

  3. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  4. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  5. Exercise blood pressure: clinical relevance and correct measurement.

    PubMed

    Sharman, J E; LaGerche, A

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory safety measure during graded intensity clinical exercise stress testing. While it is generally accepted that exercise hypotension is a poor prognostic sign linked to severe cardiac dysfunction, recent meta-analysis data also implicate excessive rises in submaximal exercise BP with adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, irrespective of resting BP. Although more data is needed to derive submaximal normative BP thresholds, the association of a hypertensive response to exercise with increased cardiovascular risk may be due to underlying hypertension that has gone unnoticed by conventional resting BP screening methods. Delayed BP decline during recovery is also associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Thus, above and beyond being used as a routine safety measure during stress testing, exercise (and recovery) BP may be useful for identifying high-risk individuals and also as an aid to optimise care through appropriate follow-up after exercise stress testing. Accordingly, careful attention should be paid to correct measurement of exercise stress test BP (before, during and after exercise) using a standardised approach with trained operators and validated BP monitoring equipment (manual or automated). Recommendations for exercise BP measurement based on consolidated international guidelines and expert consensus are presented in this review. PMID:25273859

  6. Comparisons of home and daytime ambulatory blood pressure measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Home (HBPM) and ambulatory (ABPM) blood pressure measurements have their advantages and disadvantages in diagnosing and managing hypertension. We studied HBPMs and ABPMs in volunteers taking part in a survey. Methods Of 366 respondents, 270 provided a total of 5997 triplicate HBPMs ( Part 1 ); 175 also provided data on ABPMs, of which the measurements obtained between 6 am and 10 pm were used in this study (Part 2 ). Results Part 1 , When all 5997 triplicate HPPMs were considered, 1st readings tended to be significantly higher than those of the 2nd and 3rd for both, systolic and diastolic pressures, but when the consideration was restricted to the very first triplicate of each of the 270 subjects, this was true only for systolic HBPM. Part 2 , The ABPMs tended to have a wider range than the corresponding HBPMs, and to be distributed towards higher values. Of the non-parametric indices of (ABPM - corresponding HBPM), (First Quartile, Median, Third Quartile and Maximim) all but the minima had positive values. Conclusions In triplicate HBPMs, the first measurement is usually but not always the highest. Increasing the number of triplicates provided by each subject increases the chance of discriminating between measurements in the triplicates. ABPMs tended to be higher than the corresponding HBPMs. PMID:25084732

  7. Blood viscoelasticity measurement using steady and transient flow controls of blood in a microfluidic analogue of Wheastone-bridge channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood viscoelasticity including viscosity and elasticity is essential in estimating blood flows in arteries, arterials, and capillaries and in investigating sub-lethal damage of RBCs. Furthermore, the blood viscoelasticity could be clinically used as key indices in monitoring patients with cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we propose a new method to simultaneously measure the viscosity and elasticity of blood by simply controlling the steady and transient blood flows in a microfluidic analogue of Wheastone-bridge channel, without fully integrated sensors and labelling operations. The microfluidic device is designed to have two inlets and outlets, two side channels, and one bridge channel connecting the two side channels. Blood and PBS solution are simultaneously delivered into the microfluidic device as test fluid and reference fluid, respectively. Using a fluidic-circuit model for the microfluidic device, the analytical formula is derived by applying the linear viscoelasticity model for rheological representation of blood. First, in the steady blood flow, the relationship between the viscosity of blood and that of PBS solution (μBlood/μPBS) is obtained by monitoring the reverse flows in the bridge channel at a specific flow-rate rate (QPBSSS/QBloodL). Next, in the transient blood flow, a sudden increase in the blood flow-rate induces the transient behaviors of the blood flow in the bridge channel. Here, the elasticity (or characteristic time) of blood can be quantitatively measured by analyzing the dynamic movement of blood in the bridge channel. The regression formula (ABlood (t) = Aα + Aβ exp [−(t − t0)/λBlood]) is selected based on the pressure difference (ΔP = PA − PB) at each junction (A, B) of both side channels. The characteristic time of bloodBlood) is measured by analyzing the area (ABlood) filled with blood in the bridge channel by selecting an appropriate detection window in the

  8. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  9. Fundamentals of breath malodour.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Roldán, S; Herrera, D

    2001-11-15

    Breath malodour is a condition that has health and social implications. The origin of breath malodour problems are related to both systemic and oral conditions. The advice of dental professionals for treatment of this condition occurs with regularity since 90% of breath odor problems emanate from the oral cavity. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the etiology of breath odor, its prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for the condition. PMID:12167916

  10. Measurements of enlarged blood pump models using Laser Doppler Anemometer.

    PubMed

    Chua, L P; Yu, S C; Leo, H L

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier study (Chua et al., 1998, 1999a), a 5:1 enlarged model of the Kyoto-NTN Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Blood Pump (Akamatsu et al., 1995) with five different impeller blade profiles was designed and constructed. Their respective flow characteristics with respect to (1) the three different blade profile designs: forward, radial, and backward, (2) the number of blades used, and (3) the rotating speed were investigated. Among the five impeller designs, the results obtained suggested that impellers A and C designs should be adopted if higher head is required. Impellers A and C therefore were selected for the flow in between their blades to be measured using Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA), so as to have a better understanding of the flow physics with respect to the design parameters. PMID:10999377

  11. Why some adult Canadians do not have blood pressure measured.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest; Campbell, Norman R C; Maxwell, Colleen; Onysko, Jay; Quan, Hude

    2007-12-01

    Regular blood pressure (BP) measurements are required to identify people with hypertension and to optimally manage their cardiovascular risk. Analyses of data from the 2000-2001 Canadian Community Health Survey showed that most adult Canadians have had a BP assessment in the previous 2 years and few have never had one. Large numbers of persons without BP recordings were observed, however, among persons who were younger, were male, who did not have either a regular doctor or physician contact in the previous year, who were recent immigrants or visible minorities (nonwhite and non-Aboriginal), and who spoke neither French nor English. Common reasons reported for not having a BP assessment included believing it was not necessary and simply not getting around to it. Education programs targeting those at risk as well as more convenient BP screening may improve awareness and testing. PMID:18046100

  12. Measurement of the nonlinear elasticity of red blood cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Feld, Michael S.; Levine, Alex J.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The membranes of human red blood cells (RBCs) are a composite of a fluid lipid bilayer and a triangular network of semiflexible filaments (spectrin). We perform cellular microrheology using the dynamic membrane fluctuations of the RBCs to extract the elastic moduli of this composite membrane. By applying known osmotic stresses, we measure the changes in the elastic constants under imposed strain and thereby determine the nonlinear elastic properties of the membrane. We find that the elastic nonlinearities of the shear modulus in tensed RBC membranes can be well understood in terms of a simple wormlike chain model. Our results show that the elasticity of the spectrin network can mostly account for the area compression modulus at physiological osmolality, suggesting that the lipid bilayer has significant excess area. As the cell swells, the elastic contribution from the now tensed lipid membrane becomes dominant.

  13. Measuring and communicating blood loss during obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Kristi T; Weeber, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Accurate quantification of blood loss is an essential skill necessary to prevent maternal morbidity and mortality associated with obstetric hemorrhage. Visual estimation of blood has been consistently shown to be extremely inaccurate. The nurse plays a pivotal role in quantifying blood loss after birth, recognizing triggers, mobilizing needed interventions, and providing essential communication. PMID:22548283

  14. Novel laser Doppler flowmeter for pulpal blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, De Yu; Millerd, James E.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.

    1996-04-01

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a new configuration of laser Doppler flowmetry for dental pulpal blood flow measurements. To date, the vitality of a tooth can be determined only by subjective thermal or electric tests, which are of questionable reliability and may induced pain in patient. Non-invasive techniques for determining pulpal vascular reactions to injury, treatment, and medication are in great demand. The laser Doppler flowmetry technique is non-invasive; however, clinical studies have shown that when used to measure pulpal blood flow the conventional back-scattering Doppler method suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and unreliable flux readings rendering it impossible to calibrate. A simplified theoretical model indicates that by using a forward scattered geometry the detected signal has a much higher SNR and can be calibrated. The forward scattered signal is readily detectable due to the fact that teeth are relatively thin organs with moderate optical loss. A preliminary experiment comparing forward scattered detection with conventional back- scattered detection was carried out using an extracted human molar. The results validated the findings of the simple theoretical model and clearly showed the utility of the forward scattering geometry. The back-scattering method had readings that fluctuated by as much as 187% in response to small changes in sensor position relative to the tooth. The forward scattered method had consistent readings (within 10%) that were independent of the sensor position, a signal-to-noise ratio that was at least 5.6 times higher than the back-scattering method, and a linear response to flow rate.

  15. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en ... Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  16. Breathing patterns during eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Lechauve, J B; Perrault, H; Aguilaniu, B; Isner-Horobeti, M E; Martin, V; Coudeyre, E; Richard, R

    2014-10-01

    Eccentric (ECC) work is interesting for rehabilitation purposes because it is more efficient than concentric (CON). This study assessed respiratory patterns and electromyographic activity (EMG) during ECC and CON cycling, both at similar power outputs and VO2 in eight healthy male subjects. Measurements include ventilation (VE), tidal volume (Vt), breathing frequency (Fb), arterial blood gases, and vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps brachii (BB) EMG. At the same mechanical power, VO2 and VE were fivefold lower in ECC as was VL EMG while BB EMG, Vd/Vt, PaO2 and PaCO2, were not different between modalities. At the same VO2, there was no difference in VE but Vt was lower and Fb higher in ECC. VL EMG was not different between modalities while BB EMG was higher in ECC. The latter observation suggests that ECC cycling may result in arm bracing and restricted chest expansion. Since hyperpnea is a known trigger of exaggerated dynamic hyperinflation, the prescription of ECC cycling for patient rehabilitation requires further assessment. PMID:25083913

  17. MEASUREMENT-TO-MEASUREMENT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IS RELATED TO COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE: THE MAINE-SYRACUSE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Torres, Rachael V.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the association between variability in blood pressure and cognitive function for sitting, standing and reclining blood pressure values, and variability derived from all 15 measures. In previous studies only sitting blood pressure values have been examined, and only a few cognitive measures have been employed. A secondary objective was to examine associations between blood pressure variability and cognitive performance in hypertensive individuals stratified by treatment success. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on 972 participants of the Maine Syracuse Study for whom 15 serial blood pressure clinic measures (5 sitting, 5 recumbant and 5 standing) were obtained, prior to testing of cognitive performance. Using all 15 measures, higher variability in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was associated with poorer performance on multiple measures of cognitive performance, independent of demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and pulse pressure. When sitting, reclining and standing systolic blood pressure values were compared, only variability in standing blood pressure was related to measures of cognitive performance. However, for diastolic blood pressure, variability in all three positions was related to cognitive performance. Mean blood pressure values were weaker predictors of cognition. Furthermore, higher overall variability in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was associated with poorer cognitive performance in unsuccessfully treated hypertensive individuals (with blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg), but these associations were not evident in those with controlled hypertension. PMID:25156168

  18. Development of automatic blood extraction device with a micro-needle for blood-sugar level measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanaka, Kaichiro; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2008-12-01

    In this study, a portable type HMS (Health Monitoring System) device is newly developed. It has features 1) puncturing a blood vessel by using a minimally invasive micro-needle, 2) extracting and transferring human blood and 3) measuring blood glucose level. This miniature SMBG (Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose) device employs a syringe reciprocal blood extraction system equipped with an electro-mechanical control unit for accurate and steady operations. The device consists of a) a disposable syringe unit, b) a non-disposable body unit, and c) a glucose enzyme sensor. The syringe unit consists of a syringe itself, its cover, a piston and a titanium alloy micro-needle, whose inner diameter is about 100µm. The body unit consists of a linear driven-type stepping motor, a piston jig, which connects directly to the shaft of the stepping motor, and a syringe jig, which is driven by combining with the piston jig and slider, which fixes the syringe jig. The required thrust to drive the slider is designed to be greater than the value of the blood extraction force. Because of this driving mechanism, the automatic blood extraction and discharging processes are completed by only one linear driven-type stepping motor. The experimental results using our miniature SMBG device was confirmed to output more than 90% volumetric efficiency under the driving speed of the piston, 1.0mm/s. Further, the blood sugar level was measured successfully by using the glucose enzyme sensor.

  19. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of a forearm blood pressure measurement method in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Marie-Ève; Cloutier, Lyne; Poirier, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For blood pressure assessment, it has been reported that forearm blood pressure measurement appears to be as valid as an upper-arm blood pressure measurement method in individuals with severe obesity when correlated to the intra-arterial method, considered as the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the presence of systemic hypertension in 25 severely obese patients from 352 blood pressure measurements were calculated. The sensitivity (0.98) and the positive predictive value (0.93) for hypertension on forearm blood pressure measurements are excellent, indicating that the forearm approach is a promising alternative to systemic hypertension diagnosis in severe obesity. PMID:25757220

  20. Outcome-Driven Thresholds for Home Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Niiranen, Teemu J.; Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Johansson, Jouni K.; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Boggia, José; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S.; Tsuji, Ichiro; Jula, Antti M.; Imai, Yutaka; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of outcome-driven operational thresholds limits the clinical application of home blood pressure (BP) measurement. Our objective was to determine an outcome-driven reference frame for home BP measurement. We measured home and clinic BP in 6470 participants (mean age, 59.3 years; 56.9% women; 22.4% on antihypertensive treatment) recruited in Ohasama, Japan (n=2520); Montevideo, Uruguay (n=399); Tsurugaya, Japan (n=811); Didima, Greece (n=665); and nationwide in Finland (n=2075). In multivariable-adjusted analyses of individual subject data, we determined home BP thresholds, which yielded 10-year cardiovascular risks similar to those associated with stages 1 (120/80 mm Hg) and 2 (130/85 mm Hg) prehypertension, and stages 1 (140/90 mm Hg) and 2 (160/100 mm Hg) hypertension on clinic measurement. During 8.3 years of follow-up (median), 716 cardiovascular end points, 294 cardiovascular deaths, 393 strokes, and 336 cardiac events occurred in the whole cohort; in untreated participants these numbers were 414, 158, 225, and 194, respectively. In the whole cohort, outcome-driven systolic/diastolic thresholds for the home BP corresponding with stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension were 121.4/77.7, 127.4/79.9, 133.4/82.2, and 145.4/86.8 mm Hg; in 5018 untreated participants, these thresholds were 118.5/76.9, 125.2/79.7, 131.9/82.4, and 145.3/87.9 mm Hg, respectively. Rounded thresholds for stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension amounted to 120/75, 125/80, 130/85, and 145/90 mm Hg, respectively. Population-based outcome-driven thresholds for home BP are slightly lower than those currently proposed in hypertension guidelines. Our current findings could inform guidelines and help clinicians in diagnosing and managing patients. PMID:23129700

  1. Effect of gaseous anaesthesia on blood carbon dioxide measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, R. R.; Howie, G. F. A.

    1965-01-01

    The present study of the effect of two common anaesthetic gases on blood acid-base parameters shows that the micro-Astrup measurement of carbon dioxide tension is not invalidated by the presence of nitrous oxide. This result was anticipated from the theoretical aspect of this technique. The mean error involved in estimating plasma carbon dioxide content in the presence of nitrous oxide using the volumetric Van Slyke apparatus without absorption of carbon dioxide by sodium hydroxide can be of the order of 25%. No such effect was measurable in estimating carbon dioxide contents in the presence of halothane. The degree of respiratory alkalosis during anaesthesia reported in earlier papers (Walker, Morgan, Breckenridge, Watt, Ogilvie, and Douglas, 1963; Morgan, Ogilvie, and Walker, 1963) was greater than had been originally appreciated. A `false' increase in carbon dioxide content will also falsely increase buffer base or `base excess' as calculated from standard nomograms (Singer and Hastings, 1948; Davenport, 1958; Siggaard-Andersen, 1963). PMID:14304255

  2. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  3. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  4. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction. PMID:23402665

  5. Development of a handheld blood flow measurement system using laser speckle flowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Chul; Konishi, Naoki; Fujii, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    A new handheld blood flow measurement system using laser speckle flowgraphy was developed for easy measurement of blood flow. The developed system features a small display unit that allows measurement results to be viewed without a PC. The system is miniaturized, integrated with a microcontroller, a line sensor, and a laser unit. Our experiment was carried out to confirm the usefulness of the developed system to measure the blood flow variation.

  6. Secondary electrospray ionization coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals tryptophan pathway metabolites in exhaled human breath.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Diego; Gaisl, Thomas; Bregy, Lukas; Martínez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Kohler, Malcolm; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-06-30

    Many studies and personalized medicine in general require frequent measurements and/or rapid results of biomarker levels. Here we show that 20 low volatility metabolites of the tryptophan pathway can be detected in exhaled human breath. This real-time and non-invasive method offers an attractive alternative to blood analysis. PMID:27273568

  7. 21 CFR 868.2375 - Breathing frequency monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Breathing frequency monitor. 868.2375 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2375 Breathing frequency monitor. (a) Identification. A breathing (ventilatory) frequency monitor is a device intended to measure or monitor a...

  8. Measurement of blood pressure—a routine test in need of standardization

    PubMed Central

    Thulin, T.; Andersson, G.; Scherstén, B.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the different factors that can influence the measurement of blood pressure are discussed. It is essential that those engaged in the care of patients with high blood pressure should standardize the measurement of blood pressure so that the established routine is followed at each attendance. This is especially important today because so many people perform blood pressure checks. It is important to use the correct cuff and manometer. When considering costs, one should remember that the measurement of blood pressure is an inexpensive examination, but that poor equipment will prove costly both for the patient and for the community medical programme. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:1215253

  9. A computational physiology approach to personalized treatment models: the beneficial effects of slow breathing on the human cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Fonoberova, Maria; Mezić, Igor; Buckman, Jennifer F.; Fonoberov, Vladimir A.; Mezić, Adriana; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.; Mun, Eun-Young; Vaschillo, Bronya

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback intervention involves slow breathing at a rate of ∼6 breaths/min (resonance breathing) to maximize respiratory and baroreflex effects on heart period oscillations. This intervention has wide-ranging clinical benefits and is gaining empirical support as an adjunct therapy for biobehavioral disorders, including asthma and depression. Yet, little is known about the system-level cardiovascular changes that occur during resonance breathing or the extent to which individuals differ in cardiovascular benefit. This study used a computational physiology approach to dynamically model the human cardiovascular system at rest and during resonance breathing. Noninvasive measurements of heart period, beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiration period were obtained from 24 healthy young men and women. A model with respiration as input was parameterized to better understand how the cardiovascular processes that control variability in heart period and blood pressure change from rest to resonance breathing. The cost function used in model calibration corresponded to the difference between the experimental data and model outputs. A good match was observed between the data and model outputs (heart period, blood pressure, and corresponding power spectral densities). Significant improvements in several modeled cardiovascular functions (e.g., blood flow to internal organs, sensitivity of the sympathetic component of the baroreflex, ventricular elastance) were observed during resonance breathing. Individual differences in the magnitude and nature of these dynamic responses suggest that computational physiology may be clinically useful for tailoring heart rate variability biofeedback interventions for the needs of individual patients. PMID:25063789

  10. A computational physiology approach to personalized treatment models: the beneficial effects of slow breathing on the human cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Fonoberova, Maria; Mezić, Igor; Buckman, Jennifer F; Fonoberov, Vladimir A; Mezić, Adriana; Vaschillo, Evgeny G; Mun, Eun-Young; Vaschillo, Bronya; Bates, Marsha E

    2014-10-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback intervention involves slow breathing at a rate of ∼6 breaths/min (resonance breathing) to maximize respiratory and baroreflex effects on heart period oscillations. This intervention has wide-ranging clinical benefits and is gaining empirical support as an adjunct therapy for biobehavioral disorders, including asthma and depression. Yet, little is known about the system-level cardiovascular changes that occur during resonance breathing or the extent to which individuals differ in cardiovascular benefit. This study used a computational physiology approach to dynamically model the human cardiovascular system at rest and during resonance breathing. Noninvasive measurements of heart period, beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and respiration period were obtained from 24 healthy young men and women. A model with respiration as input was parameterized to better understand how the cardiovascular processes that control variability in heart period and blood pressure change from rest to resonance breathing. The cost function used in model calibration corresponded to the difference between the experimental data and model outputs. A good match was observed between the data and model outputs (heart period, blood pressure, and corresponding power spectral densities). Significant improvements in several modeled cardiovascular functions (e.g., blood flow to internal organs, sensitivity of the sympathetic component of the baroreflex, ventricular elastance) were observed during resonance breathing. Individual differences in the magnitude and nature of these dynamic responses suggest that computational physiology may be clinically useful for tailoring heart rate variability biofeedback interventions for the needs of individual patients. PMID:25063789

  11. Measurement and modeling of coronary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Matthew D; Lee, Jack; Cookson, Andrew N; Rivolo, Simone; Hyde, Eoin R; Smith, Nicolas P

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease that comprises both coronary artery disease and microvascular disease is the single greatest cause of death globally. In this context, enhancing our understanding of the interaction of coronary structure and function is not only fundamental for advancing basic physiology but also crucial for identifying new targets for treating these diseases. A central challenge for understanding coronary blood flow is that coronary structure and function exhibit different behaviors across a range of spatial and temporal scales. While experimental studies have sought to understand this feature by isolating specific mechanisms, in tandem, computational modeling is increasingly also providing a unique framework to integrate mechanistic behaviors across different scales. In addition, clinical methods for assessing coronary disease severity are continuously being informed and updated by findings in basic physiology. Coupling these technologies, computational modeling of the coronary circulation is emerging as a bridge between the experimental and clinical domains, providing a framework to integrate imaging and measurements from multiple sources with mathematical descriptions of governing physical laws. State-of-the-art computational modeling is being used to combine mechanistic models with data to provide new insight into coronary physiology, optimization of medical technologies, and new applications to guide clinical practice. PMID:26123867

  12. Seeking a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular properties.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Gottschalk, Allan; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2016-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse pressure (PP) are blood pressure (BP)-dependent surrogates for vascular stiffness. Considering that there are no clinically useful markers for arterial stiffness that are BP-independent, our objective was to identify novel indices of arterial stiffness and compare them with previously described markers. PWV and PP were measured in young and old male Fisher rats and in young and old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) over a wide range of BPs. The BP dependence of these and several other indices of vascular stiffness were evaluated. An index incorporating PWV and PP was also constructed. Both PWV and PP increase in a non-linear manner with rising BP for both strains of animals (Fisher and SHRs). Age markedly changes the relationship between PWV or PP and BP. The previously described Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) was able to differentiate between young and old vasculature, whereas the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) did not reliably differentiate between the two. The novel Arterial Stiffness Index (ASI) differentiated stiffer from more compliant vasculature. Considering the limitations of the currently available indices of arterial stiffness, we propose a novel index of intrinsic arterial stiffness, the ASI, which is robust over a range of BPs and allows one to distinguish between compliant and stiff vasculature in both Fisher rats and SHRs. Further studies are necessary to validate this index in other settings. PMID:26490088

  13. Capillary bedside blood glucose measurement in neonates: missing a diagnosis of galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Öcal, Murat; Tanrıverdi, Sibel; Baysal, Birsen; Deniz, Ahmet; Öncel, Kahraman; Demirbilek, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    A number of factors may lead to inaccuracy in measurement of capillary blood glucose with a glucometer. Measurement of other carbohydrate molecules such as galactose and fructose along with glucose can potentially be a cause of error. We report a newborn patient who was referred to our hospital with conjugated bilirubinemia, hepatomegaly and high capillary blood glucose levels measured with a glucometer. Simultaneous biochemical measurements revealed normal blood glucose levels. Further investigation led to a diagnosis of classical galactosemia. Capillary blood glucose level measured with glucometer also dropped to normal values following cessation of breastfeeding and initiation of feeding with a lactose-free formula. PMID:25800483

  14. Immunoglobulin G measurement in blood plasma using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; McClure, J Trenton; Shaw, R Anthony; Riley, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and inexpensive method to measure the immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations in blood samples in human and veterinary medicine is highly desired. Infrared spectroscopy (coupled with chemometric manipulation of spectral data) has the advantages of simple sample preparation, rapid implementation of analysis, and low cost. Here a method that exploits infrared spectroscopy as the basis to measure IgG concentration in animal plasma samples is reported, with radial immunodiffusion (RID) used as the reference test method for partial least squares (PLS) calibration model development. Smoothed non-derivative and the second-order derivative spectra were used to develop calibration models. Various additional spectral preprocessing steps were evaluated to optimize the calibration models, and the possible benefits of using an internal standard (potassium thiocyanate [KSCN]) were investigated. Monte Carlo cross-validation was used to determine the optimal number of PLS factors, and an independent prediction set was used to test the predictive performances of provisional models. The effects of various preprocessing options (spectral smoothing, derivation, normalization, region selection, mean-centering, and standard deviation scaling) on quantification accuracy were investigated. The root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) for different combinations of spectra preprocessing steps was 394 ± 36 mg/dL for the non-derivative spectra and 427 ± 101 mg/dL for the second-order derivative spectra. Immunoglobulin G concentrations produced by the optimized PLS model for the non-derivative spectra (RMSEP = 352 mg/dL) were found to be stable with respect to different splits of the samples among the calibration, validation, and prediction sets. The precision of the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) method is found to be slightly superior to that of the RID method. The results of this work indicate that infrared spectroscopy is a promising technique for economically and

  15. Precise 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio measurements for breath diagnosis with a 2-μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Ma, Hongliang; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. The cell has 10 cm long base length with 26.4 m optical path length in total and 330 cm3 volume. The cell pressure and temperature are controlled at 50 Torr and 28°, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06‰ was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter.

  16. Substitution of Fingertip Blood for Venous Blood in the Measurement of Hematocrit and Hemoglobin Following Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Thomas D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results from comparative testing indicate that fingertip blood is a valid indicator of antecubital venous hematocrit (hct) and hemoglobin (hgb), and that hct ratios determined on the Coulter counter are comparable to those found by the microhematocrit method. (MB)

  17. Introduction to Non-Invasive Glucose Measurement - A Physicist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Daniel; Simske, Steven; Vadgama, Pankaj

    2011-10-01

    The Quest, The Elusive Art and Science, Many Efforts and Investments, Physiology of Blood and Epidermal Regions, Some Methods including Eyes, Breath, Skin Coupling using Spectroscopy, Ring-down Spectroscopy, IR Measurement, Florescence - all as General Introductory Material.

  18. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  19. Breathing metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a breathing metabolic simulator (BMS) is reported. This BMS simulates all of the breathing and metabolic parameters required for complete evaluation and test of life support and resuscitation equipment. It is also useful for calibrating and validating mechanical and gaseous pulmonary function test procedures. Breathing rate, breathing depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake, and carbon dioxide release are all variable over wide ranges simulating conditions from sleep to hard work with respiratory exchange ratios covering the range from hypoventilation. In addition, all of these parameters are remotely controllable to facilitate use of the device in hostile or remote environments. The exhaled breath is also maintained at body temperature and a high humidity. The simulation is accurate to the extent of having a variable functional residual capacity independent of other parameters.

  20. Synchrotron microimaging technique for measuring the velocity fields of real blood flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Guk Bae

    2005-03-15

    Angiography and Doppler methods used for diagnosing vascular diseases give information on the shape of blood vessels and pointwise blood speed but do not provide detailed information on the flow fields inside the blood vessels. In this study, we developed a method for visualizing blood flow by using coherent synchrotron x rays. This method, which does not require the addition of any contrast agent or tracer particles, visualizes the flow pattern of blood by enhancing the diffraction and interference characteristics of the blood cells. This was achieved by optimizing the sample- (blood) to-detector (charge-coupled device camera) distance and the sample thickness. The proposed method was used to extract quantitative velocity field information from blood flowing inside an opaque microchannel by applying a two-frame particle image velocimetry algorithm to enhanced x-ray images of the blood flow. The measured velocity field data showed a flow structure typical of flow in a macrochannel.

  1. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS AND HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled breath collection and analysis has historically been used in environmental research studies to characterize exposures to volatile organic compounds. The use of this approach is based on the fact that many compounds present in blood are reflected in the breath, and that u...

  2. [Mobile Health: IEEE Standard for Wearable Cuffless Blood Pressure Measuring Devices].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Wu, Wenli; Bao, Shudi

    2015-07-01

    IEEE Std 1708-2014 breaks through the traditional standards of cuff based blood pressure measuring devices and establishes a normative definition of wearable cuffless blood pressure measuring devices and the objective performance evaluation of this kind of devices. This study firstly introduces the background of the new standard. Then, the standard details will be described, and the impact of cuffless blood pressure measuring devices with the new standard on manufacturers and end users will be addressed. PMID:26665952

  3. Effects of blood sample handling procedures on measurable inflammatory markers in plasma, serum and dried blood spot samples.

    PubMed

    Skogstrand, Kristin; Ekelund, Charlotte K; Thorsen, Poul; Vogel, Ida; Jacobsson, Bo; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Hougaard, David M

    2008-07-20

    The interests in monitoring inflammation by immunoassay determination of blood inflammatory markers call for information on the stability of these markers in relation to the handling of blood samples. The increasing use of stored biobank samples for such ventures that may have been collected and stored for other purposes, justifies the study hereof. Blood samples were stored for 0, 4, 24, and 48 h at 4 degrees C, room temperature (RT), and at 35 degrees C, respectively, before they were separated into serum or plasma and frozen. Dried blood spot samples (DBSS) were stored for 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, and 30 days at the same temperatures. 27 inflammatory markers in serum and plasma and 25 markers in DBSS were measured by a previously validated multiplex sandwich immunoassay using Luminex xMAP technology. The measurable concentrations of several cytokines in serum and plasma were significantly increased when blood samples were stored for a period of time before the centrifugation, for certain cytokines more than 1000 fold compared to serum and plasma isolated and frozen immediately after venepuncture. The concentrations in serum generally increased more than in plasma. The measurable concentrations of inflammatory markers also changed in DBSS stored under various conditions compared to controls frozen immediately after preparation, but to a much lesser degree than in plasma or serum. The study demonstrates that trustworthy measurement of several inflammatory markers relies on handling of whole blood samples at low temperatures and rapid isolation of plasma and serum. Effects of different handling procedures for all markers studied are given. DBSS proved to be a robust and convenient way to handle samples for immunoassay analysis of inflammatory markers in whole blood. PMID:18495149

  4. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  5. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    PubMed

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  6. Rapid shallow breathing index

    PubMed Central

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  7. [A multichannel telemetry system for autonomic neural signals, blood flow velocity, blood pressure, and ECG measurements].

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Y; Takenoshita, M; Ninomiya, I

    1992-01-01

    A radio multichannel telemetry system has been developed for use with chronically instrumented, unrestrained, small animals. The system can simultaneously record autonomic neural signals, blood flow velocity, blood pressure, and ECG. The system is time-multiplexed and pulse width modulation (PWM)/FM device, which employs two sampling frequencies. The system is designed with 10 standard low power integrated circuits, a 3 terminal voltage regulator, and a transistor. The size is 53 x 42 x 20 mm, and the weight, including two batteries is 40 grams. The system is powered by two lithium cells, which provide 60 hours of continuous operation. PMID:1494988

  8. Blood pressure monitor with a position sensor for wrist placement to eliminate hydrostatic pressure effect on blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hironori; Koshimizu, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Shingo; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure at wrist requires the heart and wrist to be kept at the same level to avoid the effects of hydrostatic pressure. Although a blood pressure monitor with a position sensor that guides appropriate forearm angle without use of a chair and desk has already been proposed, a similar functioning device for measuring upper arm blood pressure with a chair and desk is needed. In this study, a calculation model was first used to explore design of such a system. The findings were then implemented into design of a new blood pressure monitor. Results of various methods were compared. The calculation model of the wrist level from arthrosis angles and interarticulars lengths was developed and considered using published anthropometric dimensions. It is compared with 33 volunteer persons' experimental results. The calculated difference of level was -4.1 to 7.9 (cm) with a fixed chair and desk. The experimental result was -3.0 to 5.5 (cm) at left wrist and -2.1 to 6.3(cm) at right wrist. The absolute difference level equals ±4.8 (mmHg) of blood pressure readings according to the calculated result. This meets the AAMI requirements for a blood pressure monitor. In the conclusion, the calculation model is able to effectively evaluate the difference between the heart and wrist level. Improving the method for maintaining wrist to heart level will improve wrist blood pressure measurement accuracy when also sitting in the chair at a desk. The leading angle of user's forearm using a position sensor is shown to work for this purpose. PMID:24110067

  9. Validation of thermal techniques for measurement of pelvic organ blood flows in the nonpregnant sheep: comparison with transit-time ultrasonic and microsphere measurements of blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, N.J.; Beard, R.W.; Sutherland, I.A.; Figueroa, J.P.; Drost, C.J.; Nathanielsz, P.W.

    1988-03-01

    Data obtained from a thermal system capable of measuring changes in organ temperature as well as tissue thermal clearance in the uterus and vagina have been compared with blood flow measured continuously with a transit-time ultrasound volume-flow sensor placed around the common internal iliac artery and intermittently with radioactive microspheres in the chronically instrumented nonpregnant sheep. Temperature changes in both the uterus and the vagina correlated well with blood flow changes measured by both techniques after intravenous administration of estradiol or norepinephrine. Thermal clearance did not correlate well with blood flow in the vagina or uterus. These methods may have value in the investigation of blood flow patterns in various clinical situations such as the pelvic pain syndrome and early pregnancy.

  10. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  11. Measurements of the Weak UV Absorptions of Isoprene and Acetone at 261–275 nm Using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy for Evaluation of a Potential Portable Ringdown Breath Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2013-01-01

    The weak absorption spectra of isoprene and acetone have been measured in the wavelength range of 261–275 nm using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. The measured absorption cross-sections of isoprene in the wavelength region of 261–266 nm range from 3.65 × 10−21 cm2·molecule−1 at 261 nm to 1.42 × 10−21 cm2·molecule−1 at 266 nm; these numbers are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. In the longer wavelength range of 270–275 nm, however, where attractive applications using a single wavelength compact diode laser operating at 274 nm is located, isoprene has been reported in the literature to have no absorption (too weak to be detected). Small absorption cross-sections of isoprene in this longer wavelength region are measured using cavity ringdown spectroscopy for the first time in this work, i.e., 6.20 × 10−23 cm2·molecule−1 at 275 nm. With the same experimental system, wavelength-dependent absorption cross-sections of acetone have also been measured. Theoretical detection limits of isoprene and comparisons of absorbance of isoprene, acetone, and healthy breath gas in this wavelength region are also discussed. PMID:23803787

  12. Evaluation of the appropriateness of using glucometers for measuring the blood glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yu; Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Kyohara, Mayu; Miyazawa, Ayumi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Hamada, Mari; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Glucometers are also widely used in diabetes research conducted using animal models. However, the appropriateness of measuring blood glucose levels using glucometers in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the consistency between the blood glucose levels measured by 11 models of glucometers and plasma glucose levels measured by a laboratory biochemical test in blood samples collected by retro-orbital sinus puncture or tail-tip amputation. In both blood samples obtained by retro-orbital sinus puncture and those obtained by tail-tip amputation, 10 of the 11 models of glucometers yielded higher glucose values, while 1 yielded lower glucose values, than the plasma glucose values yielded by the laboratory test, the differences being in direct proportion to the plasma glucose values. Most glucometers recorded higher blood glucose levels after glucose loading and lower blood glucose levels after insulin loading in retro-orbital sinus blood as compared to tail vein blood. Our data suggest that the blood glucose levels measured by glucometers in mice tended to be higher than the plasma glucose levels yielded by the biochemical test under the hyperglycemic state, and that differences in the measured levels were observed according to the blood collection method depending on the glycemia status. PMID:27151424

  13. Evaluation of the appropriateness of using glucometers for measuring the blood glucose levels in mice

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Yu; Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Kyohara, Mayu; Miyazawa, Ayumi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Hamada, Mari; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Glucometers are also widely used in diabetes research conducted using animal models. However, the appropriateness of measuring blood glucose levels using glucometers in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the consistency between the blood glucose levels measured by 11 models of glucometers and plasma glucose levels measured by a laboratory biochemical test in blood samples collected by retro-orbital sinus puncture or tail-tip amputation. In both blood samples obtained by retro-orbital sinus puncture and those obtained by tail-tip amputation, 10 of the 11 models of glucometers yielded higher glucose values, while 1 yielded lower glucose values, than the plasma glucose values yielded by the laboratory test, the differences being in direct proportion to the plasma glucose values. Most glucometers recorded higher blood glucose levels after glucose loading and lower blood glucose levels after insulin loading in retro-orbital sinus blood as compared to tail vein blood. Our data suggest that the blood glucose levels measured by glucometers in mice tended to be higher than the plasma glucose levels yielded by the biochemical test under the hyperglycemic state, and that differences in the measured levels were observed according to the blood collection method depending on the glycemia status. PMID:27151424

  14. COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better ... Trial to Look at Home Oxygen Therapy for COPD The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) ...

  15. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  16. Engineering studies of vectorcardiographs in blood pressure measuring systems, appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a cardiovascular monitoring system to noninvasively monitor the blood pressure and heart rate using pulse wave velocity was described. The following topics were covered: (1) pulse wave velocity as a measure of arterial blood pressure, (2) diastolic blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in humans, (3) transducer development for blood pressure measuring device, and (4) cardiovascular monitoring system. It was found, in experiments on dogs, that the pulse wave velocity is linearly related to diastolic blood pressure over a wide range of blood pressure and in the presence of many physiological perturbations. A similar relationship was observed in normal, young human males over a moderate range of pressures. Past methods for monitoring blood pressure and a new method based on pulse wave velocity determination were described. Two systems were tested: a Doppler ultrasonic transducer and a photoelectric plethysmograph. A cardiovascular monitoring system was described, including operating instructions.

  17. X-ray PIV measurements of blood flows without tracer particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed the non-Newtonian flow characteristics of blood moving in a circular tube flow using an X-ray PIV method and compared the experimental results with hemodynamic models. The X-ray PIV method was improved for measuring quantitative velocity fields of blood flows using a coherent synchrotron X-ray. Without using any contrast media, this method can visualize flow pattern of blood by enhancing the phase-contrast and interference characteristics of blood cells. The enhanced X-ray images were achieved by optimizing the sample-to-scintillator distance, the sample thickness, and hematocrit in detail. The quantitative velocity fields of blood flows inside opaque conduits were obtained by applying a two-frame PIV algorithm to the X-ray images of the blood flows. The measured velocity data show typical features of blood flow such as the yield stress and shear-thinning effects.

  18. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  19. Simulated breath waveform control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed which provides twelve waveform controls to breath drive mechanism. Twelve position, magnetically actuated rotary switch is connected to one end of crankshaft drive, such that it makes one complete revolution for each simulated breath. Connections with common wired point are included in modifications made to standard motor speed controller.

  20. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breathing Problems Rett Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with ethanol intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1986-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured via the 133Xenon inhalation technique in 26 healthy volunteers before and 60 minutes after the oral administration of ethyl alcohol or placebo on a double-blind basis. The cerebral blood flow values, corrected for test-retest differences in carbon dioxide showed a significant bilateral increase after ethanol administration. Blood levels of ethanol, estimated with a breath analyser, did not correlate with the CBF changes.

  2. Prediction of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients of volatile organic compounds for the interpretation of data in breath gas analysis6

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christian; Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl; Agapiou, Agapios; Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a database of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients (λb:a and λf:a) is reported for estimating 1678 volatile organic compounds recently reported to appear in the volatilome of the healthy human. For this purpose, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was applied and a novel method for Henry’s law constants prediction developed. A random forest model based on Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) descriptors based on 2619 literature-reported Henry’s constant values was built. The calculated Henry’s law constants correlate very well (R2test = 0.967) with the available experimental data. Blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients were calculated according to the method proposed by Poulin and Krishnan using the estimated Henry’s constant values. The obtained values correlate reasonably well with the experimentally determined ones for a test set of 90 VOCs (R2 = 0.95). The provided data aim to fill in the literature data gap and further assist the interpretation of results in studies of the human volatilome. PMID:26815030

  3. Prediction of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients of volatile organic compounds for the interpretation of data in breath gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christian; Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl; Agapiou, Agapios; Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-03-01

    In this article, a database of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients (λ b:a and λ f:a) is reported for estimating 1678 volatile organic compounds recently reported to appear in the volatilome of the healthy human. For this purpose, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was applied and a novel method for Henry's law constants prediction developed. A random forest model based on Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) descriptors based on 2619 literature-reported Henry's constant values was built. The calculated Henry's law constants correlate very well (R(2) test  =  0.967) with the available experimental data. Blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients were calculated according to the method proposed by Poulin and Krishnan using the estimated Henry's constant values. The obtained values correlate reasonably well with the experimentally determined ones for a test set of 90 VOCs (R(2)  =  0.95). The provided data aim to fill in the literature data gap and further assist the interpretation of results in studies of the human volatilome. PMID:26815030

  4. Aortic blood pressure measured via EIT: investigation of different measurement settings.

    PubMed

    Braun, Fabian; Proença, Martin; Rapin, Michael; Lemay, Mathieu; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Solà, Josep; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) allows the measurement of intra-thoracic impedance changes related to cardiovascular activity. As a safe and low-cost imaging modality, EIT is an appealing candidate for non-invasive and continuous haemodynamic monitoring. EIT has recently been shown to allow the assessment of aortic blood pressure via the estimation of the aortic pulse arrival time (PAT). However, finding the aortic signal within EIT image sequences is a challenging task: the signal has a small amplitude and is difficult to locate due to the small size of the aorta and the inherent low spatial resolution of EIT. In order to most reliably detect the aortic signal, our objective was to understand the effect of EIT measurement settings (electrode belt placement, reconstruction algorithm). This paper investigates the influence of three transversal belt placements and two commonly-used difference reconstruction algorithms (Gauss-Newton and GREIT) on the measurement of aortic signals in view of aortic blood pressure estimation via EIT. A magnetic resonance imaging based three-dimensional finite element model of the haemodynamic bio-impedance properties of the human thorax was created. Two simulation experiments were performed with the aim to (1) evaluate the timing error in aortic PAT estimation and (2) quantify the strength of the aortic signal in each pixel of the EIT image sequences. Both experiments reveal better performance for images reconstructed with Gauss-Newton (with a noise figure of 0.5 or above) and a belt placement at the height of the heart or higher. According to the noise-free scenarios simulated, the uncertainty in the analysis of the aortic EIT signal is expected to induce blood pressure errors of at least ± 1.4 mmHg. PMID:26007662

  5. A simple method of blood pressure measurement in the pig using a neonatal cuff.

    PubMed

    Chow, P K; Ng, T H; Heng, D; Mack, P O

    1999-01-01

    The pig is a commonly used large animal model in experimental studies. Few non-invasive techniques exist however for the measurement of blood pressure in the porcine model. This study evaluates the novel use of the easily available neonatal blood pressure cuff for measuring blood pressure in the pig. Six Yorkshire pigs were used for the study. Blood pressure measurements obtained by the application of neonatal blood pressure cuff (Hewlett Packard) around the base of the tail were compared with results obtained from intra-arterial measurements in the normotensive range as well as in experimentally created hypertensive (intravenous dopamine) and hypotensive (hypovolaemic shock) ranges. Results of the two techniques are closely correlated (Pearson's coefficient = 0.95, 0.97, 0.90). Systematic bias was however detected at the extremes of hypertensive and hypotensive blood pressure. Analysis of the limits of agreement (method of Bland and Altman) showed that neonatal blood pressure cuff measurements fall within--2 to 2.5 mmHg of the readings obtained from the invasive technique (95% confidence interval). The neonatal blood pressure cuff technique is a good substitute for the standard invasive intra-arterial measurement of blood pressure in the pig model. PMID:10374020

  6. Efficiency measurement and uncertainty discussion of an electric engine powered by a "self-breathing" and "self-humidified" proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Schiavetti, Pierluigi; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2007-08-01

    The efficiency of an automotive engine based on a "self-breathing" and "self-humidified" proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack (PEM FC) connected to a dc brushless electrical motor was measured under variable power load conditions. Experiments have been carried out on a small scale 150 W engine model. After determining the fuel cell static polarization curve and the time response to power steps, the system was driven to copy on the test bench a "standard urban load cycle" and its instantaneous efficiencies were measured at an acquisition rate of 5 Hz. The integral system efficiency over the entire urban load cycle, comprising the losses of the unavoidable auxiliary components of the engine, was then calculated. The fuel cell stack was operated mainly in "partial" dead-end mode, with a periodic anode flow channel purging, and one test was carried out in "pure" dead-end mode, with no anode channel purging. An uncertainty analysis of the efficiencies was carried out, taking into account either type A and type B evaluation methods, strengthening the discussion about the outcomes obtained for a system based on this novel simplified FC type. For our small scale engine we measured over the standard urban cycle, on the basis of the H(2) high heating value (HHV), a tank-to-wheel integral efficiency of (18.2+/-0.8)%, when the fuel cell was operated with periodic flow channel purging, and of (21.5+/-1.3)% in complete dead-end operation mode. PMID:17764355

  7. Measures of blood pressure and cognition in dialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few reports on the relationship of blood pressure with cognitive function in maintenance dialysis patients. The Cognition and Dialysis Study is an ongoing investigation of cognitive function and its risk factors in six Boston area hemodialysis units. In this analysis, we evaluated the rela...

  8. Measurement of T1 of human arterial and venous blood at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Rane, S.; Gore, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for measuring cerebral perfusion require accurate longitudinal relaxation (T1) of blood, a MRI parameter that is field dependent. T1 of arterial and venous human blood was measured at 7T using three different sources – pathology laboratory, blood bank and in vivo. The T1 of venous blood was measured from sealed samples from a pathology lab and in vivo. Samples from a blood bank were oxygenated and mixed to obtain different physiological concentrations of hematocrit and oxygenation. T1 relaxation times were estimated using a three-point fit to a simple inversion recovery equation. At 37° C, the T1 of blood at arterial pO2was 2.29 ± 0.1 s and 2.07 ± 0.12 at venous pO2. The in vivo T1 of venous blood, in three subjects, was slightly longer at 2.45 ± 0.11s. T1 of arterial and venous blood at 7T was measured and found to be significantly different. The T1 values were longer in vivo than in vitro. While the exact cause for the discrepancy is unknown, the additives in the blood samples, degradation during experiment, oxygenation differences, and the non-stagnant nature of blood in vivo could be potential contributors to the lower values of T1 in the venous samples. PMID:23102945

  9. The Chronic and Acute Effects of Exercise Upon Selected Blood Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roitman, J. L.; Brewer, J. P.

    This study investigated the effects of chronic and acute exercise upon selected blood measures and indices. Nine male cross-country runners were studied. Red blood count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured using standard laboratory techniques; mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin…

  10. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. PMID:26079672

  11. Applications of breath gas analysis in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amann, Anton; Poupart, Guy; Telser, Stefan; Ledochowski, Maximilian; Schmid, Alex; Mechtcheriakov, Sergei

    2004-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath gas provide valuable information about the subjects' physiological and pathophysiological condition. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) allows rapid and online measurements of these substances. We present results of three studies illustrating the potential of breath gas analysis by PTR-MS in various contexts: long-time online monitoring of VOCs in sleeping subjects suggests that VOC profiles are related to sleep stages. Analysis of VOC concentrations in the breath of carbohydrate malabsorbers emphasizes the role played by bacteria in the gut. Finally, we demonstrate the large intra- and intersubject concentration variability of VOCs by considering one particular mass.

  12. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  13. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  14. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Domanović, D; Kitchen, A; Politis, C; Panagiotopoulos, T; Bluemel, J; Van Bortel, W; Overbosch, D; Lieshout-Krikke, R; Fabra, C; Facco, G; Zeller, H

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria in Greece started in 2009 and peaked in 2011. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing transmission of malaria raised questions of how to define spatial boundaries of such an area and when to trigger any specific blood safety measures, including whether and which blood donation screening strategy to apply. To provide scientific advice the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) organised expert meetings in 2013. The outcomes of these consultations are expert opinions covering spatial targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria and blood donation screening strategy for evidence of malaria infection in these areas. Opinions could help EU national blood safety authorities in developing a preventive strategy during malaria outbreaks. PMID:27238883

  15. Hand-free stethoscope--method and instrument for more reliable blood pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Ljungvall, P; Thulin, T

    1991-09-01

    Measurement of blood pressure is subject to two sources of variation: biological and measurement variation. It is important to bear in mind that the ability to interpret the Korotkoff sounds correctly determines the levels of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. To improve the ability to distinguish between the Korotkoff phases, the handfree stethoscope and the hand-free method were developed. The improved stethoscope head was fixed under the edge of the cuff, thus reducing the noise generated from physiological tremor and other movements. This resulted in more distinct Korotkoff sounds. Furthermore, the new method reduced the spreading of blood pressure values. In 107 patients the average systolic blood pressure recording was 3.1 mmHg higher and the average diastolic blood pressure was 3.5 mmHg lower. We conclude that the new stethoscope and technique provide a means of significantly improving the indirect measurement of blood pressure. PMID:1895043

  16. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system. PMID:27225558

  17. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    PubMed Central

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange. PMID:27311826

  18. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K.; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-06-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange.

  19. FEV manoeuvre induced changes in breath VOC compositions: an unconventional view on lung function tests.

    PubMed

    Sukul, Pritam; Schubert, Jochen K; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Taunk, Khushman; Trefz, Phillip; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis can open a non-invasive window onto pathological and metabolic processes in the body. Decades of clinical breath-gas analysis have revealed that changes in exhaled VOC concentrations are important rather than disease specific biomarkers. As physiological parameters, such as respiratory rate or cardiac output, have profound effects on exhaled VOCs, here we investigated VOC exhalation under respiratory manoeuvres. Breath VOCs were monitored by means of real-time mass-spectrometry during conventional FEV manoeuvres in 50 healthy humans. Simultaneously, we measured respiratory and hemodynamic parameters noninvasively. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 292 and 171% during the manoeuvre. FEV manoeuvre induced substance specific changes in VOC concentrations. pET-CO2 and alveolar isoprene increased by 6 and 21% during maximum exhalation. Then they decreased by 18 and 37% at forced expiration mirroring cardiac output. Acetone concentrations rose by 4.5% despite increasing minute ventilation. Blood-borne furan and dimethyl-sulphide mimicked isoprene profile. Exogenous acetonitrile, sulphides, and most aliphatic and aromatic VOCs changed minimally. Reliable breath tests must avoid forced breathing. As isoprene exhalations mirrored FEV performances, endogenous VOCs might assure quality of lung function tests. Analysis of exhaled VOC concentrations can provide additional information on physiology of respiration and gas exchange. PMID:27311826

  20. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mosing, Martina; Waldmann, Andreas D.; MacFarlane, Paul; Iff, Samuel; Auer, Ulrike; Bohm, Stephan H.; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Bardell, David

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline) and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding), the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI) (distribution of ventilation) and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at p<0.05. All horses demonstrated inspiratory breath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia. PMID:27331910

  1. An Ultrasonic Contactless Sensor for Breathing Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arlotto, Philippe; Grimaldi, Michel; Naeck, Roomila; Ginoux, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569). PMID:25140632

  2. An ultrasonic contactless sensor for breathing monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arlotto, Philippe; Grimaldi, Michel; Naeck, Roomila; Ginoux, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569). PMID:25140632

  3. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity. PMID:25308111

  4. Continuous blood pressure measurement using the pulse transit time: Comparison to intra-arterial measurement.

    PubMed

    Patzak, Andreas; Mendoza, Yuri; Gesche, Heiko; Konermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Continuous blood pressure (BP) measurement allows the investigation of transient changes in BP and thus may give insights into mechanisms of BP control. We validated a continuous, non-invasive BP measurement based on the pulse transit time (PTT), i.e., BP(PTT), by comparing it with the intra-arterial BP (BP(i.a.)) measurement. Twelve subjects (five females and seven males) were included. BP(i.a.) was obtained from the radial artery using a system from ReCor Medical. Systolic and diastolic BP were calculated using the PTT (BP(PTT), SOMNOscreen). (PTT) was determined from the electrocardiogram and the peripheral pulse wave. The BP was modulated by application of increasing doses of dobutamine (5, 10, 20 μg/kg body mass). Systolic BP(PTT) and systolic BP(i.a.) correlated significantly (R = 0.94). The limits of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot were ± 19 mmHg; the mean values differed by 1 mmHg. The correlation coefficient for the diastolic BP measurements was R = 0.42. The limits of agreement in the Bland-Altman plot were ± 18 mmHg, with a mean difference of 5 mmHg in favour of the BP(PTT). The study demonstrates a significant correlation between the measurement methods for systolic BP. The results encourage the application of PTT-based BP measurement for the evaluation of BP dynamics and pathological BP changes. PMID:25857601

  5. Ocular Blood Flow Measured Noninvasively in Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Manuel, Francis K.; Geiser, Martial; Moret, Fabrice; Messer, Russell K.; King, James F.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2003-01-01

    In spaceflight or a reduced-gravity environment, bodily fluids shift to the upper extremities of the body. The pressure inside the eye, or intraocular pressure, changes significantly. A significant number of astronauts report changes in visual acuity during orbital flight. To date this remains of unknown etiology. Could choroidal engorgement be the primary mechanism and a change in the curvature or shape of the cornea or lens be the secondary mechanism for this change in visual acuity? Perfused blood flow in the dense meshwork of capillaries of the choroidal tissue (see the preceding illustration) provides necessary nutrients to the outer layers of the retina (photoreceptors) to keep it healthy and maintain good vision. Unlike the vascular system, the choroid has no baroreceptors to autoregulate fluid shifts, so it can remain engorged, pushing the macula forward and causing a hyperopic (farsighted) shift of the eye. Experiments by researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center could help answer this question and facilitate planning for long-duration missions. We are investigating the effects of zero gravity on the choroidal blood flow of volunteer subjects. This pilot project plans to determine if choroidal blood flow is autoregulated in a reduced-gravity environment.

  6. Low-frequency variability in the blood volume and in the blood volume pulse measured by photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Turivnenko, Sergei; Milston, Adina; Babchenko, Anatoly; Mahler, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Besides heart rate and arterial blood pressure, several parameters of the cardiovascular system fluctuate spontaneously. In the current study, the fluctuations of tissue blood content and blood volume pulse were investigated using two parameters of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal: the parameter BV, defined by: BV equals Const-BL where BL is the baseline of the PPG signal, and the amplitude (AM), which are related to the blood volume an to the systolic blood volume increase, respectively. The PPG measurements were performed on the fingertips of ten healthy male subjects for 5 to 10 min and the PPG signal was digitally analyzed. Both BV and AM show low frequency fluctuations, which, for 23 out of 26 examinations, were positively correlated, with a lag of BV relative to AM. In three examinations, however, the two parameters were inversely correlated. A lower correlation was found between each of these parameters and the PPG period, which is actually the cardiac period. The results show that several mechanisms are involved in the spontaneous periodic fluctuations in the vascoconstriction level, which are known to be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. The digital PPG provides, therefore, a potential tool for evaluating the role of the sympathetic nerves in the regulation of the microcirculation.

  7. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  8. Sit, breathe, smile: effects of single and weekly seated Qigong on blood pressure and quality of life in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Shane R; Hanik, Sarah-Anne E; Littlejohn, Meagan L; Malandruccolo, Amanda A; Coughlin, Joanna; Warren, Bernie; McGowan, Cheri L

    2014-02-01

    Long-term care (LTC) facilities house individuals with diverse combinations of cognitive and physical impairments, and the practice of Seated Qigong eliminates common exercise barriers. This study hypothesized: 1) a single session would lower blood pressure (BP) and improve quality of life (QOL) in a generalized LTC population, and 2) these responses would be attenuated with chronic (weekly) Seated Qigong practice. Ten residents (6 female; 86 ± 7 years) participated in 1X/week Seated Qigong sessions for 10-weeks. BP and QOL were assessed pre- and post-session at baseline and following 5- and 10-weeks of Qigong. Systolic BP was significantly reduced immediately post-session after 10-weeks of Qigong (P = 0.03), yet unchanged at baseline and after 5-weeks (all P > 0.05). Diastolic BP and QOL remained unchanged (P > 0.05). A session of Seated Qigong elicits a hypotensive response with exposure, supporting the notion that repeated sessions may provide advantageous health benefits. PMID:24439645

  9. Hydrogen clearance: Assessment of technique for measurement of skin-flap blood flow in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.G.; Kerrigan, C.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The hydrogen clearance technique has been used for many years by investigators to determine brain blood flow and has been partially validated in this setting using other methods of blood flow measurement. The method has been modified to allow blood flow measurements in skin, but the accuracy of H2 clearance for measuring skin blood flow has not been determined. Multiple blood flow measurements were performed using H2 clearance and radioactive microspheres on skin flaps and control skin in pigs. On 12 pigs, a total of 117 flap and 42 control skin measurements were available for analysis. There was no significant difference between the two techniques in measuring mean control skin blood flow. In skin flaps, H2 clearance was significantly correlated to microsphere-measured blood flow, but it consistently gave an overestimate. Sources of error may include injury to the tissues by insertion of electrodes, consumption of H2 by the electrodes, or diffusion of H2 from the relatively ischemic flap to its well-vascularized bed. Further studies are necessary to determine the cause of this error and to measure the technique's accuracy in skeletal muscle and other flaps.

  10. Measurement of human blood viscosity by an electromagnetic spinning sphere viscometer.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Koji; Abumiya, Takeo; Sakai, Keiji; Hirano, Miki; Osanai, Toshiya; Shichinohe, Hideo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Aida, Toshimitsu; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-08-01

    We herein applied an electromagnetic spinning sphere (EMS) viscometer to the measurement of human blood viscosity for the first time. We collected blood samples from 100 healthy outpatient volunteers in order to analyse viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters and on the shear rate with a simple approximation formula [ηi (γ)\\, = Ai γ(- pi) + η0]. Viscosity dependence on blood cell parameters was relatively high at a high shear rate, but became lower as the shear rate decreased. The approximation formula with appropriate parameters of Ai and pi nearly faithfully reproduced actual blood rheological behaviour with a standard deviation of 1.5%. The distributions of Ai and pi values were broad, suggesting that the pattern of viscosity dependence on the shear rate varied with individual differences. The results obtained using the EMS viscometer suggest that blood viscosity values are individual-specific and actual individual measurements are important for understanding rheological conditions. PMID:27167739

  11. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.

  12. Investigations on the influence of breathing on brain activity using optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandavilli, Mukanda R.; Blazek, Vladimir; Schmitt, Hans J.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years investigation and understanding of the brain activity is receiving much attention. Such investigations are generally confined to few select premier research institutions where expensive and sophisticated facilities like EEG, PET, FMRI, etc. are available. Of late optical sensors are receiving much attention for biomedical applications because they are relatively simple in construction, easy to use and comparatively inexpensive. Among the biomedical optical sensors, photophlethysmographic (PPG) measuring systems have a unique position. They function as transcutaneous registration of blood volume changes in the near skin blood vessels. By recording the signals from the supply to the left and right lobes of the brain in the cerebral cortex. The oxygen content in the arterary blood flow to the brain will naturally have an important role to play in the activity of the brain. It is suggested that by positioning sensitive temperature sensors in the nostrils of a subject, one could monitor his breathing activity. By recording the outputs rom these temperature sensor for several hours, it has been noticed that the breathing activity of a subject will change from one nostril to another periodically. Besides, it has also been observed that any sudden fluctuations in the breathing pattern is accompanied by changes in the blood flow to the brain as monitored by PPG optical sensors mounted on the temples of a subject. An attempt is made to understand such events.

  13. Development of dual micro-PIV system for simultaneous velocity measurements: optical arrangement techniques and application to blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvon, Alexandr; Lee, Yeon Ho; Cheema, Taqi Ahmad; Park, Cheol Woo

    2014-07-01

    Blood rheological characteristics can significantly vary with the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in plasma. Moreover, RBCs show a complicated behavior in micro vessels. Thus, the determination of either plasma or blood cell velocity distribution has been the primary objective in blood flow analysis. However, the conditions during blood flow analyses are different from the actual physiological conditions, wherein the motion of the two distinct blood phases simultaneously occurs. In this study, we used an in vitro micro-particle image velocimetry, which is a reliable velocity field measurement technique, to evaluate the velocity distribution of plasma and blood cells simultaneously. Blood flow through a rectangular microchannel was determined using special optical filter arrangements and by assuming two different hematocrit values. Using the proposed technique, the averaged parabolic velocity profiles for the RBCs and plasma were successfully obtained and compared. The developed simultaneous measurement technique can be used to predict blood cell and plasma behaviors simultaneously with high accuracy under given clinical conditions.

  14. Cerebral aneurysms treated with flow-diverting stents: Computational models using intravascular blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael R; McGah, Patrick M; Aliseda, Alberto; Mourad, Pierre D; Nerva, John D; Vaidya, Sandeep S; Morton, Ryan P; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Computational fluid dynamics modeling is useful in the study of the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms, but patient-specific measurements of boundary conditions, such as blood flow velocity and pressure, have not been previously applied to the study of flow-diverting stents. We integrated patient-specific intravascular blood flow velocity and pressure measurements into computational models of aneurysms before and after treatment with flow-diverting stents to determine stent effects on aneurysm hemodynamics. Methods Blood flow velocity and pressure were measured in peri-aneurysmal locations using an intravascular dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity guidewire before and after flow-diverting stent treatment of four unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements defined inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational models. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates, wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient were calculated. Results Measurements of inflow velocity and outflow pressure were successful in all four patients. Computational models incorporating these measurements demonstrated significant reductions in intra-aneurysmal wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient, and a trend in reduced intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Conclusions Integration of intravascular dual-sensor guidewire measurements of blood flow velocity and blood pressure provided patient-specific computational models of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm treatment with flow-diverting stents reduces blood flow and hemodynamic shear stress in the aneurysm dome. PMID:23868162

  15. Controlled breathing protocols probe human autonomic cardiovascular rhythms.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W H; Cox, J F; Diedrich, A M; Taylor, J A; Beightol, L A; Ames, J E; Hoag, J B; Seidel, H; Eckberg, D L

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how breathing protocols requiring varying degrees of control affect cardiovascular dynamics. We measured inspiratory volume, end-tidal CO2, R-R interval, and arterial pressure spectral power in 10 volunteers who followed the following 5 breathing protocols: 1) uncontrolled breathing for 5 min; 2) stepwise frequency breathing (at 0.3, 0.25, 0.2, 0.15, 0.1, and 0.05 Hz for 2 min each); 3) stepwise frequency breathing as above, but with prescribed tidal volumes; 4) random-frequency breathing (approximately 0.5-0.05 Hz) for 6 min; and 5) fixed-frequency breathing (0.25 Hz) for 5 min. During stepwise breathing, R-R interval and arterial pressure spectral power increased as breathing frequency decreased. Control of inspired volume reduced R-R interval spectral power during 0.1 Hz breathing (P < 0.05). Stepwise and random-breathing protocols yielded comparable coherence and transfer functions between respiration and R-R intervals and systolic pressure and R-R intervals. Random- and fixed-frequency breathing reduced end-tidal CO2 modestly (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that stringent tidal volume control attenuates low-frequency R-R interval oscillations and that fixed- and random-rate breathing may decrease CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation. We conclude that autonomic rhythms measured during different breathing protocols have much in common but that a stepwise protocol without stringent control of inspired volume may allow for the most efficient assessment of short-term respiratory-mediated autonomic oscillations. PMID:9486278

  16. Controlled breathing protocols probe human autonomic cardiovascular rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W. H.; Cox, J. F.; Diedrich, A. M.; Taylor, J. A.; Beightol, L. A.; Ames, J. E. 4th; Hoag, J. B.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how breathing protocols requiring varying degrees of control affect cardiovascular dynamics. We measured inspiratory volume, end-tidal CO2, R-R interval, and arterial pressure spectral power in 10 volunteers who followed the following 5 breathing protocols: 1) uncontrolled breathing for 5 min; 2) stepwise frequency breathing (at 0.3, 0.25, 0.2, 0.15, 0.1, and 0.05 Hz for 2 min each); 3) stepwise frequency breathing as above, but with prescribed tidal volumes; 4) random-frequency breathing (approximately 0.5-0.05 Hz) for 6 min; and 5) fixed-frequency breathing (0.25 Hz) for 5 min. During stepwise breathing, R-R interval and arterial pressure spectral power increased as breathing frequency decreased. Control of inspired volume reduced R-R interval spectral power during 0.1 Hz breathing (P < 0.05). Stepwise and random-breathing protocols yielded comparable coherence and transfer functions between respiration and R-R intervals and systolic pressure and R-R intervals. Random- and fixed-frequency breathing reduced end-tidal CO2 modestly (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that stringent tidal volume control attenuates low-frequency R-R interval oscillations and that fixed- and random-rate breathing may decrease CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation. We conclude that autonomic rhythms measured during different breathing protocols have much in common but that a stepwise protocol without stringent control of inspired volume may allow for the most efficient assessment of short-term respiratory-mediated autonomic oscillations.

  17. [Counter-measures against patient misidentification and specimen mismanagement with blood collection].

    PubMed

    Ohgoe, Kazuhiko

    2013-08-01

    My theme for this symposium is counter-measures against patient misidentification and specimen mismanagement with blood collection due to the lack of using authentication systems. What is applicable to our laboratory is patient misidentification counter-measures for specimen management at the time of inpatient ward blood collection and specimen examination (mistakes in appending bar code labels and entering specimen numbers). During the period from January 2008 to July 2012 at our laboratory, there were 9 cases of patient misidentification for hospital ward blood collection and specimen management. There were 2 cases in 2008 (1 for blood collection, 1 for specimen management), no cases in 2009, 3 cases in 2010 involving blood collection, 1 case in 2011 involving specimen management, and 3 cases in 2012 (1 for blood collection, 2 for specimen management). All patient misidentifications involving hospital ward blood collection arose from bedside blood collection. As a counter-measure, training slides were created at a medical safety management review session, repeated training in attention and patient check procedures was conducted with staff members, and hands-on training in pointing and naming was carried out. With these training slides, the goal was the execution of verification duties by encouraging conversations that include the patient's name, such as "Mr./Ms. XXXX, today we'll be collecting 3 tubes of blood," as a link to patient verification duties. With specimen management, 3 of the 4 cases occurred during overtime for day-shift work. As counter measures: 1) adherence to 1 patient, 1 tray, and signing when matching; 2) as a counter-measure against mistaking specimens for blood gas hemolysis, confirmation as other specimens, separating approximately 3 drops of blood that cannot be used for sampling, confirming hemolysis, and preventing misidentification. PMID:24218774

  18. On line cerebral blood flow velocity and blood pressure measurement in neonates: a new method.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, A C; Evans, D H; Levene, M I

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that impairment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular autoregulation play a part in the pathogenesis of neurological injury in the critically sick neonate, we tested in 33 infants a small, light-weight probe and cable that are attached to the infant's skin to record cerebral blood flow velocity from the middle cerebral artery over a period of hours. This considerably reduced the amount of handling of the infant compared with conventional assessment. Captured data were analysed and displayed graphically at the cotside. The system is applicable for use on infants over a wide range of gestational ages and may give information on the complex haemodynamic changes occurring in the cerebral circulation. PMID:2407196

  19. Anxiety and cerebral blood flow during behavioral challenge. Dissociation of central from peripheral and subjective measures

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, J.; Insel, T.R.; Berman, K.F.; Foa, E.B.; Hill, J.L.; Weinberger, D.R.

    1989-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety and regional cerebral blood flow, we administered behavioral challenges to 10 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder while measuring regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Each patient was studied under three conditions: relaxation, imaginal flooding, and in vivo (actual) exposure to the phobic stimulus. Subjective anxiety, obsessive-compulsive ratings, and autonomic measures (heart rate, blood pressure) increased significantly, but respiratory rate and PCO/sub 2/ did not change across the three conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow increased slightly (in the temporal region) during imaginal flooding, but decreased markedly in several cortical regions during in vivo exposure, when anxiety was highest by subjective and peripheral autonomic measures. These results demonstrate that intense anxiety can be associated with decreased rather than increased cortical perfusion and that ostensibly related states of anxiety (eg, anticipatory and obsessional anxiety) may be associated with opposite effects on regional cerebral blood flow.

  20. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with obstructive sleep apnea, for example. Prolonged apnea means a person has stopped breathing. If ... that requires immediate medical attention and first aid. Prolonged apnea with no heart activity in a person ...

  1. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  2. Breathing Dynamics in Heteropolymer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K.; Krichevsky, Oleg; Metzler, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    While the statistical mechanical description of DNA has a long tradition, renewed interest in DNA melting from a physics perspective is nourished by measurements of the fluctuation dynamics of local denaturation bubbles by single molecule spectroscopy. The dynamical opening of DNA bubbles (DNA breathing) is supposedly crucial for biological functioning during, for instance, transcription initiation and DNA's interaction with selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Motivated by this, we consider the bubble breathing dynamics in a heteropolymer DNA based on a (2+1)-variable master equation and complementary stochastic Gillespie simulations, providing the bubble size and the position of the bubble along the sequence as a function of time. We utilize new experimental data that independently obtain stacking and hydrogen bonding contributions to DNA stability. We calculate the spectrum of relaxation times and the experimentally measurable autocorrelation function of a fluorophore-quencher tagged basepair, and demonstrate good agreement with fluorescence correlation experiments. A significant dependence of opening probability and waiting time between bubble events on the local DNA sequence is revealed and quantified for a promoter sequence of the T7 phage. The strong dependence on sequence, temperature and salt concentration for the breathing dynamics of DNA found here points at a good potential for nanosensing applications by utilizing short fluorophore-quencher dressed DNA constructs. PMID:17237209

  3. Development of portable health monitoring system for automatic self-blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Huijun; Mizuno, Yoshihumi; Nakamachi, Eiji; Morita, Yusuke

    2010-02-01

    In this study, a new HMS (Health Monitoring System) device is developed for diabetic patient. This device mainly consists of I) 3D blood vessel searching unit and II) automatic blood glucose measurement (ABGM) unit. This device has features such as 1)3D blood vessel location search 2) laptop type, 3) puncturing a blood vessel by using a minimally invasive micro-needle, 4) very little blood sampling (10μl), and 5) automatic blood extraction and blood glucose measurement. In this study, ABGM unit is described in detail. It employs a syringe type's blood extraction mechanism because of its high accuracy. And it consists of the syringe component and the driving component. The syringe component consists of a syringe itself, a piston, a magnet, a ratchet and a micro-needle whose inner diameter is about 80μm. And the syringe component is disposable. The driving component consists of body parts, a linear stepping motor, a glucose enzyme sensor and a slider for accurate positioning control. The driving component has the all-in-one mechanism with a glucose enzyme sensor for compact size and stable blood transfer. On designing, required thrust force to drive the slider is designed to be greater than the value of the blood extraction force. Further, only one linear stepping motor is employed for blood extraction and transportation processes. The experimental result showed more than 80% of volume ratio under the piston speed 2.4mm/s. Further, the blood glucose was measured successfully by using the prototype unit. Finally, the availability of our ABGM unit was confirmed.

  4. Does Measurement of Central Blood Pressure have Treatment Consequences in the Clinical Praxis?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-08-01

    Interest in relations between central aortic pressure and cardiovascular disease risk has increased markedly over the past two decades. Numerous studies have shown that higher pulse pressure is associated with increased risk. Further, pulse pressure differs variably and sometimes dramatically between the central aorta and the brachial artery, where blood pressure is generally measured. In light of the potential for variable misclassification of central systolic and pulse pressure by brachial measurements, central blood pressure has emerged as a potentially superior blood pressure measure. This brief review will examine the evidence supporting the use of central pressure to stratify risk and guide therapy in patients with hypertension. PMID:26142539

  5. Blood pressure measurement in pregnancy: the effect of arm circumference and sphygmomanometer cuff size

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Chye L; Brown, Mark A; Ong, Sharon L H; Mangos, George J

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the difference in blood pressure readings between the standard and large cuff and to determine if such a difference applies over a range of arm circumferences (ACs) in pregnancy. We measured blood pressure on 219 antenatal women. Six blood pressure readings were taken, three with a standard ‘adult’ and three with a ‘large’ cuff, in random order. A random zero sphygmomanometer was used by a trained observer. Women with an AC >33 cm were similar in age, gestational age and parity but were heavier and had more hypertension than those with AC ≤33 cm. There was a systematic difference between the standard and large cuff of 5–7 mmHg with little effect due to AC. We were unable to demonstrate an association between the standard and large cuff blood pressure difference and increasing blood pressure. Our study has shown that both systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements are more dependent on the cuff size used than AC and for the individual it is difficult to predict the magnitude of effect the different cuff sizes will have on blood pressure measurements. This study has shown the presence of an average difference in blood pressure measurement between standard and large cuffs in pregnancy, and does not support the arbitrary 33 cm ‘cut-off’ recommended in guidelines for the use of a large cuff in pregnancy.

  6. Student Nurses' Knowledge in Relation to Blood Pressure Measurement by Sphygmomanometry and Auscultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrance, Colin; Serginson, Eve

    1996-01-01

    British nursing students (78 of 93) completed a questionnaire about blood pressure; 90% were not familiar with Korotkoff sounds or auscultary gap; most thought blood pressure was the same in both arms; 63% knew resting was essential before measurement; 59% assessed the arm for cuff size; only 25% thought the cuff should be placed at heart level.…

  7. Comparison of direct and indirect blood pressure measurements in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gains, M J; Grodecki, K M; Jacobs, R M; Dyson, D; Foster, R A

    1995-01-01

    The precision and accuracy of an indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement technique (Dinamap 8100) was assessed in 11 anesthetized Beagle dogs weighing 8 to 11.5 kg. Direct blood pressure measurements were made by catheterization of the lingual artery, and simultaneous indirect measurements were determined by placing a cuff over the median artery (midradial area). Blood pressure measurements at 2 different planes of anesthesia (light and deep) were recorded in triplicate. At a light plane of anesthesia, the Dinamap 8100 underestimated diastolic and mean arterial pressure, and at a deep anesthetic plane overestimated systolic pressure. The indirect technique had good repeatability of systolic pressures. Regression analysis for the 2 techniques showed excellent correlation (r = 0.93). The results indicate that the indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement technique provides a good estimate of systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure in dogs weighing 8-11.5 kg. PMID:8521360

  8. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Implantable pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter development has resulted in designs for application to the aortas of dogs and humans, and to human renal and coronary arteries. A figure of merit was derived for each design, indicating the degree of its precision. An H-array design for transcutaneous observation of blood flow was developed and tested in vitro. Two other simplified designs for the same purpose obviate the need to determine vessel orientation. One of these will be developed in the next time period. Techniques for intraoperative use and for implantation have had mixed success. While satisfactory on large vessels, higher ultrasonic frequencies and alteration of transducer design are required for satisfactory operation of pulsed Doppler flowmeters with small vessels.

  9. Predicting stroke outcome using DCE-CT measured blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, Jaap; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D.; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-03-01

    CT plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute stroke patients. Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can estimate local tissue perfusion and extent of ischemia. However, hemodynamic information of the large intracranial vessels may also be obtained from DCE-CT data and may contain valuable diagnostic information. We describe a novel method to estimate intravascular blood velocity (IBV) in large cerebral vessels using DCE-CT data, which may be useful to help predict stroke outcome. DCE-CT scans from 34 patients with isolated M1 occlusions were included from a large prospective multi-center cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Gaussians fitted to the intravascular data yielded the time-to-peak (TTP) and cerebral-blood-volume (CBV). IBV was computed by taking the inverse of the TTP gradient magnitude. Voxels with a CBV of at least 10% of the CBV found in the arterial input function were considered part of a vessel. Mid-sagittal planes were drawn manually and averages of the IBV over all vessel-voxels (arterial and venous) were computed for each hemisphere. Mean-hemisphere IBV differences, mean-hemisphere TTP differences, and hemisphere vessel volume differences were used to differentiate between patients with good and bad outcome (modified Rankin Scale score <3 versus ≥3 at 90 days) using ROC analysis. AUCs from the ROC for IBV, TTP, and vessel volume were 0.80, 0.67 and 0.62 respectively. In conclusion, IBV was found to be a better predictor of patient outcome than the parameters used to compute it and may be a promising new parameter for stroke outcome prediction.

  10. Measurement of temperature decrease caused by blood flow in focused ultrasound irradiation by thermal imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Hatano, Yuichi; Mori, Yashunori; Shen, Rakushin; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to estimate the local temperature changes caused by a thick blood vessel, the temperature distribution in a tissue phantom with a thick blood vessel during focused ultrasound irradiation was measured by a thermal imaging method. The blood flow rate in the simulated blood vessel was varied and the relationship between flow rate and temperature decrease was examined. The phantom using the thermal imaging method is divided into two parts, and the increases in temperature distribution as a function of blood flow rate are measured using a thermocamera under constant ultrasound irradiation. The irradiation conditions of ultrasound waves were a central frequency of 1 MHz, a wave number length of 200 cycles, and a duty ratio of 0.2. The irradiation duration was 5 min, and the ultrasound intensity I SPTA was 36 W/cm2. The amount of temperature decrease caused by the cooling effect of blood flow increased with the blood flow rate and it became constant at a certain threshold of blood flow rate. The threshold of blood flow rate is about 250 ml/min.

  11. Near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of blood oxygenation content and its application in sports practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Gong, Hui; Ge, Xinfa; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    To research the change characteristics of blood oxygenation content in skeletal muscle, the change regularity between blood oxygenation content and exercise intensity as well as HbO2 and blood lactate acid while taking incremental exercises, we took an in vivo, real-time and continuous measurement on the blood oxygenation content of eight sportsmen when they did incremental exercises of five degrees on a power bicycle using a portable tissue oximeter which is based on the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy(NIRS), simultaneously, we detected the blood lactate acid of subjects after each degree of incremental physical load instantly using a blood lactate analysis equipment. The results showed that the content of HbO2 descended regularly while that of Hb ascended; blood volume decreased; and the density of lactate increased as the intensity of exercises was heightened. The statistics analyses showed that the relationship between HbO2 and blood lactate is rather close (correlation coefficient r=-0.918). With this discovery, a theoretical basis in measuring the relative change of blood oxygenation content non-invasively was evidenced, and a novel technology for assessing the physical situation of sportsman, grasping sports density and evaluating the training effect could be imported.

  12. A water-filled body plethysmograph for the measurement of pulmonary capillary blood flow during changes of intrathoracic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yoshikazu; Menkes, Harold A.; DuBois, Arthur B.

    1970-01-01

    A water-filled body plethysmograph was constructed to measure gas exchange in man. As compared to an air-filled plethysmograph, its advantages were greater sensitivity, less thermal drift, and no change from adiabatic to isothermal conditions after a stepwise change of pressure. When five subjects were completely immersed within it and were breathing to the ambient atmosphere, they had a normal heart rate, oxygen consumption, CO2 output, and functional residual capacity. Pulmonary capillary blood flow ([unk]Qc) during and after Valsalva and Mueller maneuvers was calculated from measurements of N2O uptake. Control measurements of [unk]Qc were 2.58 liters/min per m2 at rest and 3.63 liters/min per m2 after moderate exercise. During the Valsalva maneuver at rest (intrapulmonary pressure: 24, SD 3.0, mm Hg), [unk]Qc decreased from a control of 2.58, SD 0.43, liters/min per m2 to 1.62, SD 0.26, liters/min per m2 with a decrease in pulmonary capillary stroke volume from a control of 42.4, SD 8.8, ml/stroke per m2 to 25.2, SD 5.5, ml/stroke per m2. After release of the Valsalva, there was an overshoot in [unk]Qc averaging +0.78, SD 0.41, liter/min per m2 accompanied by a significant increase in heart rate. Similar changes occurred during and after the Valsalva following moderate exercise. During the Mueller maneuver at rest and after exercise, [unk]Qc, heart rate, and central stroke volume did not change significantly. Images PMID:5422025

  13. Breath biomarkers in environmental health science: exploring patterns in the human exposome.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Sobus, Jon R

    2011-12-01

    The human genome is the counterpart to the human exposome with respect to the gene × environment interaction that describes health state and outcome. The genome has already been sequenced and is in the process of being assessed for specific functionality; to similarly decode the exposome will require the measurement and interpretation of suites of biomarker compounds in biological media such as blood, breath and urine. Of these, exhaled breath provides some important advantages for community or population-based studies in that the supply is essentially unlimited, the sampling procedures are non-invasive and can be self-administered, and there are little, if any, infectious wastes generated. The main concerns are to document a variety of compounds in breath, to assess what compounds and concentrations are considered statistically 'normal' in the healthy or unremarkably exposed population, and what graphic and mathematical approaches can be applied to assess outlier measurements as perturbations to the healthy exposome. In this paper, we explore a data set of exhaled breath measurements of exogenous exposures to jet fuel and develop summary statistics and variable clustering methods to establish between-group and intrinsic within-sample patterns that could be used to assess the status of random subjects. PMID:21904020

  14. Measurement of Glucose in Blood with a Phenylboronic Acid Optical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Worsley, Graham J.; Tourniaire, Guilhem A.; Medlock, Kathryn E. S.; Sartain, Felicity K.; Harmer, Hazel E.; Thatcher, Michael; Horgan, Adrian M.; Pritchard, John

    2008-01-01

    Background Current methods of glucose monitoring rely predominantly on enzymes such as glucose oxidase for detection. Phenylboronic acid receptors have been proposed as alternative glucose binders. A unique property of these molecules is their ability to bind glucose in a fully reversible covalent manner that facilitates direct continuous measurements. We examined (1) the ability of a phenylboronic-based sensor to measure glucose in blood and blood plasma and (2) the effect on measurement accuracy of a range of potential interferents. We also showed that the sensor is able to track glucose fluctuations occurring at rates mimicking those experienced in vivo. Method In vitro static measurements of glucose in blood and blood plasma were conducted using holographic sensors containing acrylamide, N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide, 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid, and (3-acrylamidopropyl) trimethylammonium chloride. The same sensors were also used for in vitro measurements performed under flow conditions. Results The opacity of the liquid had no affect on the ability of the optical sensor to measure glucose in blood or blood plasma. The presence of common antibiotics, diabetic drugs, pain killers, and endogenous substances did not affect the measurement accuracy, as shown by error grid analysis. Ex vivo flow experiments showed that the sensor is able to track changes accurately in concentration occurring in real time without lag or evidence of hysteresis. Conclusions The ability of phenylboronic acid sensors to measure glucose in whole blood was demonstrated for the first time. Holographic sensors are ideally suited to continuous blood glucose measurements, being physically and chemically robust and potentially calibration free. PMID:19885345

  15. Study on optical measurement conditions for noninvasive blood glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kexin; Chen, Wenliang; Jiang, Jingying; Qiu, Qingjun

    2004-05-01

    Utilizing Near-infrared Spectroscopy for non-invasive glucose concentration sensing has been a focusing topic in biomedical optics applications. In this paper study on measuring conditions of spectroscopy on human body is carried out and a series of experiments on glucose concentration sensing are conducted. First, Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate and calculate photons" penetration depth within skin tissues at 1600 nm. The simulation results indicate that applying our designed optical probe, the detected photons can penetrate epidermis of the palm and meet the glucose sensing requirements within the dermis. Second, we analyze the influence of the measured position variations and the contact pressure between the optical fiber probe and the measured position on the measured spectrum during spectroscopic measurement of a human body. And, a measurement conditions reproduction system is introduced to enhance the measurement repeatability. Furthermore, through a series of transmittance experiments on glucose aqueous solutions sensing from simple to complex we found that though some absorption variation information of glucose can be obtained from measurements using NIR spectroscopy, while under the same measuring conditions and with the same modeling method, choices toward measured components reduce when complication degree of components increases, and this causes a decreased prediction accuracy. Finally, OGTT experiments were performed, and a PLS (Partial Least Square) mathematical model for a single experiment was built. We can easily get a prediction expressed as RMSEP (Root Mean Square Error of Prediction) with a value of 0.5-0.8mmol/dl. But the model"s extended application and reliability need more investigation.

  16. Ghost Cell Suspensions as Blood Analogue Fluid for Macroscopic Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Sebastian V; Müller, Indra; Nachtsheim, Max; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved measurement of blood flow is of great interest in the development of artificial blood-carrying devices such as blood pumps, heart valve prostheses, and oxygenators. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is able to measure instantaneous velocity fields in a plane with high accuracy and is being used more frequently for the development of such devices. However, as this measurement technique is based on optical access, blood flow at physiological hematocrit values is difficult to measure due to its low transparency and multiscattering properties. So far, only very small dimensions (in the range of 400 μm) can be measured using PIV. A suspension of ghost cells (GCs) offers a higher optical transparency than blood while having a similar rheological behavior. In this study, a procedure for the production of GC suspensions containing a very low intracellular hemoglobin concentration is presented. With the help of multiple rounds of controlled cell lysis, the intracellular hemoglobin concentration could be decreased to a point where a standard macroscopic PIV measurement was possible. A velocity profile of a 44% GC suspension in a circular channel with a diameter of 9.5 mm was measured with high spatial resolution. Meanwhile, the rheological behavior was found to be comparable with blood. PMID:25997837

  17. Changes in cytochrome P4501A activity during development in common tern chicks fed polychlorinated biphenyls, as measured by the caffeine breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Feyk, L.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Van den Berg, M.

    2000-03-01

    Cytochrome P4501A (CYPIA) activity is often used as a biomarker of exposure of wildlife to polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons and is usually measured ex vivo in liver tissue. A caffeine breath test (CBT) with radiolabeled substrate ({sup 14}C-caffeine) was used to measure in vivo CYP1A activity twice during development in 14 common tern (Sterna hirundo) chicks treated with polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons. Tern hatchlings were fed fish spiked with 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153) such that the diet contained an average of 23, 99, or 561 pg of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents per gram of fish for 21 d. Sixteen additional common tern chicks were similarly dosed with polyhalogenated diaromatic hydrocarbons but were not subjected to the CBT procedure. In weeks 1 and 2, caffeine N-demethylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation activity on day 21 were elevated in birds that received the greatest PCB dose. There was less constitutive and greater induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation activity than caffeine N-demethylation. The {sup 14}C-CBT was less invasive than the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay. Only one morphological parameter differed significantly between CBT subjects and no-CBT subjects fed the same level of PCBs. Bursa weight was significantly less in control CBT subjects than in control no-CBT subjects, but bursa weights did not differ among CBT and no-CBT birds from the two PCB treatment groups. No alterations of survival or growth occurred in CBT subjects compared with no-CBT subjects.

  18. Analysis of the use of dried blood spot measurements in disease screening.

    PubMed

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan

    2008-03-01

    The collection of dried blood spots on filter paper offers a powerful tool in screening programs and in large population-based surveys. The method has the advantage of being less invasive and relatively painless and is particularly suitable for collection in neonates and the elderly. Blood can be collected and transported economically without requiring a cold chain. The use of blood spots for the measurement of insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and triglycerides is reported. A good correlation between measurement of these analytes in dried blood and sera suggests that the method is valid and has the potential to be used for the screening of cardiometabolic risk factors. This method of blood collection is particularly suited for developing countries where cost cutting is important. PMID:19885349

  19. Adaptive Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Measurement Devices for Visually Impaired Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzinger, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes devices that people with visual impairments and diabetes can use to monitor blood glucose levels and measure insulin. A table lists devices, their manufacturers (including address and telephone number), and comments about the devices. (DB)

  20. The Role of Suboptimal Home-Measured Blood Pressure Control for Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Yaneva-Sirakova, Teodora; Tarnovska-Kadreva, Rumiana; Traykov, Latchezar

    2012-01-01

    Aim We aim to analyze if there is any correlation between suboptimal home-/self-measured blood pressure values and the results from neuropsychological screening tests for early cognitive impairment. Methods We studied 325 patients with treated hypertension. Mean age was 66.12 (±10.1) years. There were 119 (36.6%) male and 206 (63.4%) female patients, among them 52 (16%) with atrial fibrillation. Neuropsychological tests performed were the Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and Hachinski Ischemic Score; additionally, home-measured blood pressure was used. Results There is a nonlinear age- and risk factor-dependent correlation between early stages of cognitive impairment and suboptimal home-measured blood pressure. Conclusion The use of specific and sensitive neuropsychological tests for early cognitive impairment in patients with suboptimal home-measured blood pressure is effective in the everyday practice. PMID:22590472

  1. Exhaled breath analysis and sleep.

    PubMed

    Carpagnano, Giovanna E

    2011-10-15

    It is currently estimated that the economic burden for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) cases not coming to medical attention is steadily increasing, thus making OSAS a major public health concern. For its increasing incidence among the common population, the interest of researchers and clinicians has been recently directed to the study of pathological mechanisms underlying sleep disorders. Current opinion is that airway inflammation and oxidative stress play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of OSAS. Recently there has been increasing interest in the investigation of lungs by non-invasive means measuring the exhaled breath volatile mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), ethane and pentane and finally the non-volatile substances in the liquid phase of exhalate, termed breath condensate. The non-invasiveness of these techniques for the study of airways affected by different respiratory disorders and among those, the OSAS, makes these ideally suited for the evaluation and serial monitoring of patients. Notwithstanding the increasing number of scientific contributions on the use of the exhaled markers in sleep disorders, at the moment, their use is not completely suitable for clinical application. An important contribution to the increase of our knowledge on exhaled markers and for their possible concrete application in clinical practice may come from future studies using proteomics, genomics and metabolomics. In this review, we focus on exhaled breath analysis giving an update on its general aspects, its application in OSAS, and finally its actual clinical applicability and areas for future direction. PMID:22003329

  2. A simple versatile method for measuring tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Widdop, R E; Li, X C

    1997-09-01

    1. The non-invasive measurement of tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats is routinely used in long-term cardiovascular studies. There are a number of commercially available tail cuff systems, however, these apparatus are generally expensive and are dedicated for single-task operations. In the present study, a simple method for measuring systolic blood pressure, which requires only minor modifications to the existing hardware found in most cardiovascular laboratories, is described. 2. Systolic blood pressure measurements were made in the conventional manner by determining the systolic blood pressure which coincided with the restoration of the caudal artery pulse. This was achieved by using an inexpensive piezo-electric pulse transducer to detect the pulse, and this was coupled to a standard data-acquisition system (MacLab, ADInstruments) normally set up to record blood pressure. This method was compared with another established tail cuff method, as well as with direct intra-arterial recordings. 3. It was found that the results obtained using both tail cuff systems were in good agreement when systolic blood pressure was measured in Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition, systolic blood pressure was measured over 4 weeks in 2K1C rats and sham-operated rats, with both tail cuff methods producing similar results, which were not significantly different from direct intra-arterial recordings in the same animals. 4. Thus, in the present study, with only minor modifications, the same equipment was used for both direct and indirect determinations of systolic blood pressure. This situation differs from other conventional tail cuff systems since these items are designed for a single purpose. Therefore, the current method using piezo-electric sensor/MacLab-technology should be viewed as a relatively simple, flexible and cheap alternative method to measure tail cuff systolic blood pressure in conscious rats. PMID:9337632

  3. Improved blood velocity measurements with a hybrid image filtering and iterative Radon transform algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chhatbar, Pratik Y.; Kara, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity leads to hemodynamic changes which can be detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The determination of blood flow changes in individual vessels is an important aspect of understanding these hemodynamic signals. Blood flow can be calculated from the measurements of vessel diameter and blood velocity. When using line-scan imaging, the movement of blood in the vessel leads to streaks in space-time images, where streak angle is a function of the blood velocity. A variety of methods have been proposed to determine blood velocity from such space-time image sequences. Of these, the Radon transform is relatively easy to implement and has fast data processing. However, the precision of the velocity measurements is dependent on the number of Radon transforms performed, which creates a trade-off between the processing speed and measurement precision. In addition, factors like image contrast, imaging depth, image acquisition speed, and movement artifacts especially in large mammals, can potentially lead to data acquisition that results in erroneous velocity measurements. Here we show that pre-processing the data with a Sobel filter and iterative application of Radon transforms address these issues and provide more accurate blood velocity measurements. Improved signal quality of the image as a result of Sobel filtering increases the accuracy and the iterative Radon transform offers both increased precision and an order of magnitude faster implementation of velocity measurements. This algorithm does not use a priori knowledge of angle information and therefore is sensitive to sudden changes in blood flow. It can be applied on any set of space-time images with red blood cell (RBC) streaks, commonly acquired through line-scan imaging or reconstructed from full-frame, time-lapse images of the vasculature. PMID:23807877

  4. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Mingde; Marshall, Craig T.; Qi, Yi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Badea, Cristian T.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0{+-}5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCO{sub DSA}=CO{sub Fick}. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  5. Simple Radiowave-Based Method For Measuring Peripheral Blood Flow Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Project objective is to design small radio frequency based flow probes for the measurement of blood flow velocity in peripheral arteries such as the femoral artery and middle cerebral artery. The result will be the technological capability to measure peripheral blood flow rates and flow changes during various environmental stressors such as microgravity without contact to the individual being monitored. This technology may also lead to an easier method of detecting venous gas emboli during extravehicular activities.

  6. In-vivo measuring of blood-flow changes using diffusing wave correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, Igor V.; Boas, David A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Chance, Britton

    1997-02-01

    We have non-invasively measured in vivo blood flow changes using photon correlation spectroscopy with a simple correlation diffusion model to study and quantify blood flow in the human arm during cuff ischemia. The method utilizes the Doppler broadening of light that arises in a multiply scattering dynamic media, and is also responsive to changes in absorption and scattering coefficients. Our measurements clearly show blood flow changes with cuff pressures, including the hyperemic overshoot after cuff release, that qualitatively agree with the physiological behavior of the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we present our method, results and discuss the clinical relevance of our findings.

  7. Assessment of microsphere technique for measurement of capillary blood flow in random skin flaps in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, C.Y.; Neligan, P.; Nakatsuka, T.

    1984-10-01

    In this technical paper, we reviewed the theory and methodology of the radioactive microsphere technique for determination of cardiac output and regional blood flow. Furthermore, we described two experiments conducted to assess this technique for measurement of capillary blood flow in skin-flap research. Our experimental data thus far indicated that the radioactive microsphere technique provided highly reproducible measurements for determination of capillary blood flow in 4 X 10 cm acute and delayed random skin flaps constructed in pigs. The advantages and disadvantages of this laboratory technique were also discussed.

  8. Hydrogen breath tests in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen breath tests are widely used to explore pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and carbohydrate malabsorption are disorders detected by these tests that have been proposed to be of great importance for symptoms of GI diseases. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for diagnosis of SIBO whereas lactose and fructose hydrogen breath tests are used for detection of lactose and fructose maldigestion respectively. Lactulose hydrogen breath test is also used widely to measure the orocecal transit time for GI motility. These methods are noninvasive and inexpensive. Many patients with functional gut disorders are unaware of the relationship between diet and GI symptoms they present. In particular, patients with chronic symptoms may regard their condition as normal and may not be aware that their symptoms can be effectively managed following a proper diagnosis. Patients with symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and altered bowel movements (diarrhea and constipation), or with a medical diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome or celiac disease, may have undiagnosed carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO. Hydrogen breath tests are specific and sensitive diagnostic tests that can be used to either confirm or eliminate the possibility of carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO in such patients. Breath tests, though valuable tools, are underutilized in evaluating dyspepsia and functional bloating and diarrhea as well as suspected malabsorption. However, because of their simplicity, reproducibility and safety of procedure they are now being substituted to more uncomfortable and expensive techniques that were traditionally used in gastroenterology. PMID:25298621

  9. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  10. False in vitro and in vivo elevations of uric acid levels in mouse blood.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tamaki; Tomioka, Naoko H; Watanabe, Shigekazu; Tsuchiya, Masao; Hosoyamada, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) levels in mouse blood have been reported to range widely from 0.1 μM to 760 μM. The aim of this study was to demonstrate false in vitro and in vivo elevations of UA levels in mouse blood. Male ICR mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital (breathing mice) or sacrificed with overdose ether (non-breathing mice). Collected blood was dispensed into MiniCollect® tubes and incubated in vitro for 0 or 30 min at room temperature. After separation of plasma or serum, the levels of UA and hypoxanthine were determined using HPLC. From the non-incubated plasma of breathing mice, the true value of UA level in vivo was 13.5±1.4 μM. However, UA levels in mouse blood increased by a factor of 3.9 following incubation in vitro. This "false in vitro elevation" of UA levels in mouse blood after blood sampling was inhibited by allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Xanthine oxidase was converted to UA in mouse serum from hypoxanthine which was released from blood cells during incubation. Plasma UA levels from non-breathing mice were 19 times higher than those from breathing mice. This "false in vivo elevation" of UA levels before blood sampling was inhibited by pre-treatment with phentolamine, an α-antagonist. Over-anesthesia with ether might induce α-vasoconstriction and ischemia and thus degrade intracellular ATP to UA. For the accurate measurement of UA levels in mouse blood, the false in vitro and in vivo elevations of UA level must be avoided by immediate separation of plasma after blood sampling from anesthetized breathing mice. PMID:24940669

  11. Cerebral blood volume measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and radiolabels in the immature lamb brain.

    PubMed

    Barfield, C P; Yu, V Y; Noma, O; Kukita, J; Cussen, L J; Oates, A; Walker, A M

    1999-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a technique that is increasingly being used for the noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood volume (CBV) in newborn infants, but it has not been fully validated against established methods. These experiments in immature lambs (gestation 92+/-1 d, mean+/-SEM) compared CBV measured using NIRS-derived estimates of oxygenated Hb (n = 5) with CBV estimated with radiolabeled indicators (125I-labeled serum albumin and 51Cr-labeled red blood cells, n = 10). Total brain CBV (mL/100 g tissue) measured using NIRS was 2.5+/-0.2 compared with 2.5+/-0.2 using radiolabels (NS). Regional tissue plasma, red blood cells, and whole blood volumes from radiolabels varied significantly (p < or = 0.05) throughout the brain. Whole blood volume (mL/100 g tissue) was largest in choroid plexus (16.2+/-2.1) and least in white matter (0.7+/-0.1) with a significant hierarchy evident among regions: choroid plexus > cerebellum > cortex > brain stem = midbrain > white matter. Regional plasma and red blood cell distributions were similar to whole blood, being highest in choroid plexus (13.0+/-1.6 and 3.2+/-0.9, respectively), and least in white matter (0.8+/-0.1 and 0, respectively). These data from the immature lamb brain indicate that total CBV measured with NIRS is essentially identical with the volumes obtained using intravascular radiolabels. Among cerebral regions, white matter contributes little to the global blood volume measured with NIRS because its red blood cell content is very low. PMID:10400134

  12. Simultaneous blood flow and blood oxygenation measurements using a combination of diffuse speckle contrast analysis and near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Phillips, Zephaniah; Mai, Phuong Minh; Yeo, Chaebeom; Song, Cheol; Lee, Kijoon; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-02-01

    A combined diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA)-near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is proposed to simultaneously measure qualitative blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in human tissue. The system employs an optical switch to alternate two laser sources at two different wavelengths and a CCD camera to capture the speckle image. Therefore, an optical density can be measured from two wavelengths for NIRS measurements and a speckle contrast can be calculated for DSCA measurements. In order to validate the system, a flow phantom test and an arm occlusion protocol for arterial and venous occlusion were performed. Shorter exposure times (<1 ms) show a higher drop (between 50% and 66%) and recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion (approximately 150%), but longer exposure time (3 ms) shows more consistent hemodynamic changes. For four subjects, the 1/KS2 values dropped to an average of 82.1±4.0% during the occlusion period and the average recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion was 109.1±0.8%. There was also an approximately equivalent amplitude change in oxyhemoglobin (OHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (RHb) during arterial occlusion (max RHb=0.0085±0.0024 mM/DPF, min OHb=-0.0057±0.0044 mM/DPF). The sensitivity of the system makes it a suitable modality to observe qualitative hemodynamic trends during induced physiological changes.

  13. A method for modulation transfer function determination from blood vessel profiles measured in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Y.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Moriyama, N.

    2012-03-01

    The recent CT systems yield high spatial resolution in all directions of volumetric images in clinical routine. The quantitative characterization of the performance of CT systems is important for comparing the effects of different scan and reconstruction parameters, for comparing between different CT systems, and for evaluating the accuracy of size and density measurements of fine details in CT images. This paper presents a method to determine the modulation transfer function (MTF) in the scan plane obtained by CT system from profiles of human anatomical structures such as blood vessel measured by clinical measurement conditions without magnified reconstruction. MTF estimations are performed for cylindrical tube phantoms with three different diameters (1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm) injected by solution of contrast material and human blood vessels measured by the clinical measurement conditions. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for estimating the MTF from blood vessel profiles measured in CT systems.

  14. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of gaseous biomarker in simulated breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a photoacoustic detector integrated with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to measure biomarkers in gas samples independently. Simulated exhaled breath samples were created by mixing varying concentrations of acetone, ammonia and ethane. The results of these measurements demonstrate the potential of photoacoustic spectroscopy to detect biomarkers from human breath.

  15. Respiration-induced changes in tissue blood volume distal to occluded artery, measured by photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Faib, Igor; Friedman, Haim

    2006-07-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) measures the cardiac-induced fluctuations and other changes in tissue blood volume by light transmission measurement. In the current study, light transmission was simultaneously measured in the two index fingers of healthy subjects, while the brachial artery in the left arm was occluded by a pressure cuff, so that no PPG signal appeared in the left finger. Correlated respiratory-induced changes in the PPG baseline in the right hand and in the light transmission in the left hand were found, indicating respiratory-induced blood volume changes in the finger distal to the occluded artery. The blood volume changes under the PPG probe distal to the occluded artery are interpreted as transition of blood volume from small arteries into big veins, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system.

  16. Direct force-measuring transducer used in blood pressure research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eige, J. J.; Newgard, P. M.; Pressman, G. L.

    1965-01-01

    Direct force measuring transducer acts as an arterial tonometer, gives a direct readout to instrumentation, and is unaffected by ambient noise. It uses a semiconductor strain gage which is deflected by pressure pulses in the artery. The deflection changes the resistance of the gage and alters the voltage reading on the associated instrumentation.

  17. Effect of Safety Measures on Bacterial Contamination Rates of Blood Components in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Walther-Wenke, Gabriele; Däubener, Walter; Heiden, Margarethe; Hoch, Jochen; Hornei, Britt; Volkers, Peter; von König, Carl Heinz Wirsing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Requirements for bacterial testing of blood components on a defined quantity as part of routine quality control were introduced in Germany by the National Advisory Committee Blood of the German Federal Ministry of Health in 1997. The philosophy was to establish standardized methods for bacterial testing. Numerous measures to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination were implemented into the blood donation and manufacturing processes between 1999 and 2002. German Blood establishments performed culture-based bacterial testing on random samples of platelet concentrates (PCs), red blood cells (RBCs) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and reported data out of the production periods 1998, 2001 and 2005/2006. While the bacterial contamination rate of apheresis PCs remained nearly unchanged, it decreased by 70% for pooled PCs to a rate of 0.158% in the last observation period. Leukocyte-depleted RBCs with diversion of the initial blood volume showed a contamination rate of 0.029% which is significantly lower than that of RBCs without leukocyte depletion and diversion (0.157%). The contamination rate of plasma decreased by 80%. Preventive measures resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial contamination of blood components. Long-term monitoring with standardized methods for bacteria testing supports evaluation of the cumulative effect of contamination reducing measures. PMID:22016691

  18. Measuring bovine mammary gland blood flow using a transit time ultrasonic flow probe.

    PubMed

    Gorewit, R C; Aromando, M C; Bristol, D G

    1989-07-01

    Lactating cattle were used to validate a transit time ultrasonic blood flow metering system for measuring mammary gland arterial blood flow. Blood flow probes were surgically placed around the right external pudic artery. An electromagnetic flow probe was implanted in tandem with the ultrasonic probe in two cows for comparative measurements. The absolute accuracy of the implanted flow probes was assessed in vivo by mechanical means on anesthetized cows after 2 to 3 wk of implantation. The zero offset of the ultrasonic probes ranged from -12 to 8 ml/min. When the ultrasonic probe was properly implanted, the slopes of the calibration curves were linear and ranged from .92 to .95, tracking absolute flow to within 8%. The transit time instrument's performance was examined under a variety of physiological conditions. These included milking and hormone injections. The transit time ultrasonic flow meter accurately measured physiological changes in mammary arterial blood flow in chronically prepared conscious cattle. Blood flow increased 29% during milking. Epinephrine decreased mammary blood flow by 90 to 95%. Oxytocin doses increased mammary blood flow by 15 to 24%. PMID:2674232

  19. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  20. A new method for measuring the yield stress in thin layers of sedimenting blood.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C L; Smith, C M; Blackshear, P L

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented to describe the low shear rate behavior of blood. We observed the response of a thin layer of sedimenting blood to a graded shear stress in a wedge-shaped chamber. The method allows quantitation of the degree of phase separation between red cells and plasma, and extracts the yield stress of the cell phase as a function of hematocrit. Our studies showed that the behavior of normal human blood underwent a transition from a solid-like gel to a Casson fluid. This transition began at the Casson predicted yield stress. The viscoelastic properties of blood were examined at shear stresses below the yield stress. The measured Young's elastic moduli were in good agreement with published data. The yield stress of blood showed a linear dependence on hematocrit up to 60%, and increased more rapidly at higher hematocrit. PMID:3663830

  1. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  2. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labelling and analysis by means of an optical breath test analyser.

    PubMed

    Hood, R C; Khan, M; Haque, A; Khadir, M; Bonetto, J P; Syamsul, R; Mayr, L; Heiling, M

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in optical systems (isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry) for breath testing have provided a robust, low-cost option for undertaking (13)C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have an enormous potential as a soil science research tool. The relatively low cost of the equipment, US$15,000-25,000, is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The simplicity of the mechanisms and optical nature mean that the equipment requires relatively low maintenance and minimal training. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for analysis using the breath test analyser. Results that compare conventional mass spectrometric methods with the breath test analyser will be presented. In combination with simple (13)C-plant-labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This enables assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle, data are required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will enable collection of hard data within a reasonable time. PMID:14963630

  3. Combining transcutaneous blood gas measurement and pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Patrick; Gisiger, P A; Gardaz, J P; Spahn, D R

    2002-01-01

    We are describing the preliminary results of tests performed in adult volunteers and in adult patients during and after general anesthesia with a miniaturized single sensor combining the continuous and non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturaiton by pulse oximetry (SpO2) and transcutaneous PCO2 (OxiCarbo sensor). The sensor is heated to 42 degrees C to arterialize the cutaneous tissue and is applied at the ear lobe with a special low-pressure clip. The results indicate a good agreement between ear lobe PCO2 and arterial PCO2 in the range 35 to 70 mmHg (10 patients, number of measurements 104, regression line TcPCO2 = 1.01 PaCO2 + 0.59 mmHg, bias 1.22 mmHg, SD 3.69 mmHg) and between ear lobe SpO2 and SaO2 (bias 0.44% with SD 0.77% in the range 80% to 100%, bias 1.39% with SD 1.43% in the range 60% to 80%). The ear lobe OxiCarbog sensor detects the SpO2 change 5 to 37 sec faster than a finger sensor and the PCO2 change 9 to 48 sec faster than a transcutaneous sensor fixed at the upper arm. Further improvements versus single sensors are a higher stability of the SpO2 signal and the possibility of performing long term SpO2 and PCO2 measurement at the ear lobe. PMID:11900043

  4. Measurement of cerebral blood flow rate and its relationship with brain function using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Dou, Shidan; Ma, Yushu; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Activity of brain neurons will lead to changes in local blood flow rate (BFR). Thus, it is important to measure the local BFR of cerebral cortex on research of neuron activity in vivo, such as rehabilitation evaluation after stroke, etc. Currently, laser Doppler flowmetry is commonly used for blood flow measurement, however, relatively low resolution limits its application. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful noninvasive 3D imaging modality with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, OCT can provide flow distribution image by calculating Doppler frequency shift which makes it possible for blood flow rate measurement. In this paper, we applied OCT to measure the blood flow rate of the primary motor cortex in rats. The animal was immobilized and anesthetized with isoflurane, an incision was made along the sagittal suture, and bone was exposed. A skull window was opened on the primary motor cortex. Then, blood flow rate changes in the primary motor cortex were monitored by our homemade spectral domain OCT with a stimulation of the passive movement of the front legs. Finally, we established the relationship between blood flow rate and the test design. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of OCT in the evaluation of cerebral cortex function.

  5. Optical microangiography of retina and choroid and measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Yin, Xin; Dziennis, Suzan; Wietecha, Tomasz; Hudkins, Kelly L.; Alpers, Charles E.; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel application of optical microangiography (OMAG) imaging technique for visualization of depth-resolved vascular network within retina and choroid as well as measurement of total retinal blood flow in mice. A fast speed spectral domain OCT imaging system at 820nm with a line scan rate of 140 kHz was developed to image the posterior segment of eyes in mice. By applying an OMAG algorithm to extract the moving blood flow signals out of the background tissue, we are able to provide true capillary level imaging of the retinal and choroidal vasculature. The microvascular patterns within different retinal layers are presented. An en face Doppler OCT approach [Srinivasan et al., Opt Express 18, 2477 (2010)] was adopted for retinal blood flow measurement. The flow is calculated by integrating the axial blood flow velocity over the vessel area measured in an en face plane without knowing the blood vessel angle. Total retinal blood flow can be measured from both retinal arteries and veins. The results indicate that OMAG has the potential for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the microcirculation in posterior eye compartments in mouse models of retinopathy and neovascularization. PMID:23162733

  6. Tunable laser diode system for noninvasive blood glucose measurements.

    PubMed

    Olesberg, Jonathon T; Arnold, Mark A; Mermelstein, Carmen; Schmitz, Johannes; Wagner, Joachim

    2005-12-01

    Optical sensing of glucose would allow more frequent monitoring and tighter glucose control for people with diabetes. The key to a successful optical noninvasive measurement of glucose is the collection of an optical spectrum with a very high signal-to-noise ratio in a spectral region with significant glucose absorption. Unfortunately, the optical throughput of skin is low due to absorption and scattering. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a high-brightness tunable laser system for measurements in the 2.0-2.5 microm wavelength range. The system is based on a 2.3 microm wavelength, strained quantum-well laser diode incorporating GaInAsSb wells and AlGaAsSb barrier and cladding layers. Wavelength control is provided by coupling the laser diode to an external cavity that includes an acousto-optic tunable filter. Tuning ranges of greater than 110 nm have been obtained. Because the tunable filter has no moving parts, scans can be completed very quickly, typically in less than 10 ms. We describe the performance of the present laser system and avenues for extending the tuning range beyond 400 nm. PMID:16390586

  7. Changes in partial pressures of respiratory gases during submerged voluntary breath hold across odontocetes: is body mass important?

    PubMed

    Noren, S R; Williams, T M; Ramirez, K; Boehm, J; Glenn, M; Cornell, L

    2012-02-01

    Odontocetes have an exceptional range in body mass spanning 10(3) kg across species. Because, size influences oxygen utilization and carbon dioxide production rates in mammals, this lineage likely displays an extraordinary variation in oxygen store management compared to other marine mammal groups. To examine this, we measured changes in the partial pressures of respiratory gases ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]), pH, and lactate in the blood during voluntary, quiescent, submerged breath holds in Pacific white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens), bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), and a killer whale (Orcinus orca) representing a mass range of 96-3,850 kg. These measurements provided an empirical determination of the effect of body size on the variability in blood biochemistry during breath hold and experimentally determined aerobic dive limits (ADL) within one taxonomic group (odontocetes). For the species in this study, maximum voluntary breath-hold duration was positively correlated with body mass, ranging from 3.5 min in white-sided dolphins to 13.3 min for the killer whale. Variation in breath-hold duration was associated with differences in the rate of change for [Formula: see text] throughout breath hold; [Formula: see text] decreased twice as fast for the two smaller species (-0.6 mmHg O(2) min(-1)) compared to the largest species (-0.3 mmHg O(2) min(-1)). In contrast, the rate of increase in [Formula: see text] during breath hold was similar across species. These results demonstrate that large body size in odontocetes facilitates increased aerobic breath-hold capacity as mediated by decreased mass-specific metabolic rates (rates of change in [Formula: see text] served as a proxy for oxygen utilization). Indeed the experimentally determined 5 min ADL for bottlenose dolphins was surpassed by the 13.3 min maximum breath hold of the killer whale, which did not end in a rise in lactate. Rather, breath hold ended voluntarily as respiratory

  8. Rapid measurement of fibrinogen concentration in whole blood using a steel ball coagulometer

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Khadem, Anna; Klotz, Anton; Solomon, Cristina; Hochleitner, Gerald; Ponschab, Martin; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen plays a key role in hemostasis and is the first coagulation factor to reach critical levels in bleeding patients. Current European guidelines on the management of traumatic or perioperative bleeding recommend fibrinogen supplementation at specific threshold levels. Whole blood viscoelastic tests provide fast evaluation of fibrin deficits. Fast measurement of plasma fibrinogen concentration is not yet available. We investigated a method to rapidly determine whole blood fibrinogen concentration using standard Clauss assays and a steel ball coagulometer and provide an estimate of the “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen concentration within minutes by adjustment of the measured whole blood fibrinogen concentration with a quickly measureable hemoglobin-derived hematocrit. METHODS The feasibility of this approach was tested with a Clauss assay using multiple porcine fresh blood samples obtained during in vivo bleeding, hemodilution, and after treatment with hemostatic therapy. Two different Clauss assays were then tested using multiple human volunteers’ blood samples diluted in vitro and supplemented with fibrinogen concentrate. Comparative measurements with fibrin-based thromboelastometry tests were performed. RESULTS Regression and Bland-Altman analyses of derived “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen and measured plasma fibrinogen concentration was excellent in porcine and human blood samples, especially in the ranges relevant to traumatic or perioperative bleeding. CONCLUSION Fast whole blood fibrinogen measurements could be considered as an alternative to plasma fibrinogen measurement for acute bleeding management in trauma and perioperative care settings. Further studies are needed to prove this concept and determine the turnaround times for its clinical application in emergency departments and operating theaters. PMID:25742256

  9. Cardiovascular changes during maximal breath-holding in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Pietro; Serra, Maria; Barletta, Giorgio; Pierangeli, Giulia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cialoni, Danilo; Cortelli, Pietro

    2009-12-01

    During maximal breath-holding six healthy elite breath-hold divers, after an initial "easy-going" phase in which cardiovascular changes resembled the so-called "diving response", exhibited a sudden and severe rise in blood pressure during the "struggle" phase of the maneuver. These changes may represent the first tangible expression of a defense reaction, which overrides the classic diving reflex, aiming to reduce the hypoxic damage and to break the apnea before the loss of consciousness. PMID:19655193

  10. Spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in finger blood volume, measured by photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Meir; Babchenko, Anatoly; Milston, Adina; Khanokh, Boris; Turivnenko, Sergei

    1995-01-01

    Several parameters of the cardiovascular system such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure and blood flow fluctuate spontaneously. These fluctuations are related to the autonomic nervous system activity. In particular the low frequency fluctuations are mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. In the cuttent study, the low frequency fluctuations of the tissue blood volume and the blood volume pulse in the fingertips of healthy subjects were investigated using photoplethysmography (PPG). The baseline of the PPG signal (BL) is inversely related to tissue blood volume so that the parameter BV, defined by: BV equals Const. minus BL is directly related to the blood volume. The amplitude (AM) is directly related to the systolic blood volume increase. For most of the examinations BV and AM show positive correlation but in some examinations the two parameters were inversely correlated. PPG measurements performed in near infrared radiation, showed better correlation between BV and AM than for red light PPG. The results show that several mechanisms are involved in the low frequency fluctuations in the tissue blood volume. The analysis of the PPG signal provides, therefore, a potential tool for studying the mechanism of the regulation of the microcirculation by the sympathetic nerves.

  11. Diagnosing lactose malabsorption in children: difficulties in interpreting hydrogen breath test results.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Entenmann, Andreas; Karall, Daniela; Müller, Thomas; Schimkowitsch, Alexander; Amann, Anton; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Lactose malabsorption (LM) is caused by insufficient enzymatic degradation of the disaccharide by intestinal lactase. Although hydrogen (H2) breath tests (HBTs) are routinely applied to diagnose LM, false-negative results are not uncommon. Thirty-two pediatric patients (19 females, 13 males) were included in this prospective study. After oral lactose administration (1 g kg(-1) bodyweight to a maximum of 25 g), breath H2 was measured by electrochemical detection. HBT was considered positive if H2 concentration exceeded an increase of  ⩾20 ppm from baseline. In addition to H2, exhaled methane (CH4), blood glucose concentrations and clinical symptoms (flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea) were monitored. A positive HBT indicating LM was found in 12/32 (37.5%) patients. Only five (41.7%, 5/12) of these had clinical symptoms during HBT indicating lactose intolerance (LI). Decreased blood glucose concentration increments (⩽20 mg dL(-1) (⩽1.1 mmol L(-1))) were found in 3/5 of these patients. CH4 concentrations  ⩾10 ppm at any time during the test were observed in 5/32 (15.6%) patients and in 9/32 (28.1%) between 1 ppm and 9 ppm above baseline after lactose ingestion. In patients with positive HBT 10/12 (83.3%) showed elevated CH4 (>1 ppm) above baseline in breath gas, whereas in patients with negative HBT this figure was only 4/17 (23.5%). In addition to determining H2 in exhaled air, documentation of clinical symptoms, measurement of blood glucose and breath CH4 concentrations may be helpful in deciding whether in a given case an HBT correctly identifies patients with clinically relevant LM. PMID:26934035

  12. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: Part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G; Hall, John E; Appel, Lawrence J; Falkner, Bonita E; Graves, John; Hill, Martha N; Jones, Daniel W; Kurtz, Theodore; Sheps, Sheldon G; Roccella, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain blood pressure-related risk, and to guide management. The auscultatory technique with a trained observer and mercury sphygmomanometer continues to be the method of choice for measurement in the office, using the first and fifth phases of the Korotkoff sounds, including in pregnant women. The use of mercury is declining, and alternatives are needed. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. Hybrid devices that use electronic transducers instead of mercury have promise. The oscillometric method can be used for office measurement, but only devices independently validated according to standard protocols should be used, and individual calibration is recommended. They have the advantage of being able to take multiple measurements. Proper training of observers, positioning of the patient, and selection of cuff size are all essential. It is increasingly recognized that office measurements correlate poorly with blood pressure measured in other settings, and that they can be supplemented by self-measured readings taken with validated devices at home. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring gives a better prediction of risk than office measurements and is useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension. There is increasing evidence that a failure of blood pressure to fall during the night may be associated with increased risk. In obese patients and children, the use of an appropriate cuff size is of paramount importance. PMID:15611362

  13. Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans: a statement for professionals from the Subcommittee of Professional and Public Education of the American Heart Association Council on High Blood Pressure Research.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G; Hall, John E; Appel, Lawrence J; Falkner, Bonita E; Graves, John; Hill, Martha N; Jones, Daniel W; Kurtz, Theodore; Sheps, Sheldon G; Roccella, Edward J

    2005-02-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure is essential to classify individuals, to ascertain blood pressure-related risk, and to guide management. The auscultatory technique with a trained observer and mercury sphygmomanometer continues to be the method of choice for measurement in the office, using the first and fifth phases of the Korotkoff sounds, including in pregnant women. The use of mercury is declining, and alternatives are needed. Aneroid devices are suitable, but they require frequent calibration. Hybrid devices that use electronic transducers instead of mercury have promise. The oscillometric method can be used for office measurement, but only devices independently validated according to standard protocols should be used, and individual calibration is recommended. They have the advantage of being able to take multiple measurements. Proper training of observers, positioning of the patient, and selection of cuff size are all essential. It is increasingly recognized that office measurements correlate poorly with blood pressure measured in other settings, and that they can be supplemented by self-measured readings taken with validated devices at home. There is increasing evidence that home readings predict cardiovascular events and are particularly useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring gives a better prediction of risk than office measurements and is useful for diagnosing white-coat hypertension. There is increasing evidence that a failure of blood pressure to fall during the night may be associated with increased risk. In obese patients and children, the use of an appropriate cuff size is of paramount importance. PMID:15699287

  14. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF. PMID:27239479

  15. Speckle-based measurement of the light scattering by red blood cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A.

    2011-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy approach, using non-coherent light sources, has become an important tool for non-invasive analysis in vivo. It is based on the assumption that biochemical characteristics of biological system can be determined through the optical coefficients of blood and tissue particles. Thus, in the framework of this approach, the major concern is to express the obtained optical signals in terms the optical coefficients of the single particle of blood or tissue. However, since the light propagation in tissue is dominated by the multiple-scattering component, a direct measurement of single scattering characteristics turns to be a very difficult task. Practically, only the relative changes of absorption and scattering coefficients are measured. We suggested to adopt the dynamic light scattering (DLS) or speckle technique for the determination of the light scattering coefficients of the red blood cells under stasis conditions in vivo. We assumed that under zero flow conditions the RBC movement is driven mostly by the Brownian motion. It was shown, that under appropriate measurement geometry, the measured optical signal can be decomposed into a few major components. The most dominant components are ascribed to the single backscattering and forward scattering coefficients of the red blood cells. In-vitro and in vivo experimental tests have shown a good correspondence between the theoretically estimated and experientially measured results. The obtained results indicate that the DLS technique can be adopted for the determination of blood particles scattering characteristics in addition to the movement and effective viscosity parameters measurement in vivo.

  16. Modeling and Measurement of Correlation between Blood and Interstitial Glucose Changes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Li, Dachao; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Yiming; Xu, Kexin; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for continuous blood glucose monitoring is to continuously measure glucose in the interstitial fluid (ISF). However, multiple physiological factors can modulate glucose concentrations and affect the lag phase between blood and ISF glucose changes. This study aims to develop a compensatory tool for measuring the delay in ISF glucose variations in reference to blood glucose changes. A theoretical model was developed based on biophysics and physiology of glucose transport in the microcirculation system. Blood and interstitial fluid glucose changes were measured in mice and rats by fluorescent and isotope methods, respectively. Computer simulation mimicked curves were fitted with data resulting from fluorescent measurements of mice and isotope measurements of rats, indicating that there were lag times for ISF glucose changes. It also showed that there was a required diffusion distance for glucose to travel from center of capillaries to interstitial space in both mouse and rat models. We conclude that it is feasible with the developed model to continuously monitor dynamic changes of blood glucose concentration through measuring glucose changes in ISF with high accuracy, which requires correct parameters for determining and compensating for the delay time of glucose changes in ISF. PMID:27239479

  17. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  18. Brachial artery waveforms for automatic blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Al-Jumaily, A M; Lan, H; Stergiopulos, N

    2013-02-01

    Theoretically the auscultatory method using Korotkoff sounds is more related to the maximum artery closure status, while the oscillometric method is more related to the overall artery closure status under the cuff. Therefore, the latter is less accurate than the former. This work introduces a new method, which is more accurate than the oscillometric method and suitable for automatic devices. To monitor the maximum artery closure status, a piezoelectric film sensor is attached to the skin just above the brachial artery and under the central section of the cuff where maximum cuff pressure is transferred to the arm. Using the waveform features obtained by this sensor, measurement errors of 0.7±2.5 and 1.27±4.53 mmHg were obtained for the systolic and diastolic pressure, respectively. These reflect small deviations from auscultatory clinical data. PMID:23149078

  19. Correlation of Insulin Resistance with Anthropometric Measures and Blood Pressure in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Polyana Resende Silva; Sousa, Ana Luiza Lima; Jardim, Thiago de Souza Veiga; Nascente, Flávia Miquetichuc Nogueira; Mendonça, Karla Lorena; Povoa, Thaís Inácio Rolim; Carneiro, Carolina de Souza; Ferreira, Vanessa Roriz; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood pressure is directly related to body mass index, and individuals with increased waist circumference have higher risk of developing hypertension, insulin resistance, and other metabolic changes, since adolescence. Objective to evaluate the correlation of blood pressure with insulin resistance, waist circumference and body mass index in adolescents. Methods Cross-section study on a representative sample of adolescent students. One group of adolescents with altered blood pressure detected by casual blood pressure and/or home blood pressure monitoring (blood pressure > 90th percentile) and one group of normotensive adolescents were studied. Body mass index, waist circumference were measured, and fasting glucose and plasma insulin levels were determined, using the HOMA-IR index to identify insulin resistance. Results A total of 162 adolescents (35 with normal blood pressure and 127 with altered blood pressure) were studied; 61% (n = 99) of them were boys and the mean age was 14.9 ± 1.62 years. Thirty-eight (23.5%) adolescents had altered HOMA-IR. The group with altered blood pressure had higher values of waist circumference, body mass index and HOMA-IR (p<0.05). Waist circumference was higher among boys in both groups (p<0.05) and girls with altered blood pressure had higher HOMA-IR than boys (p<0.05). There was a significant moderate correlation between body mass index and HOMA-IR in the group with altered blood pressure (ρ = 0.394; p < 0.001), and such correlation was stronger than in the normotensive group. There was also a significant moderate correlation between waist circumference and HOMA-IR in both groups (ρ = 0.345; p < 0.05). Logistic regression showed that HOMA-IR was as predictor of altered blood pressure (odds ratio - OR = 2.0; p = 0.001). Conclusion There was a significant association of insulin resistance with blood pressure and the impact of insulin resistance on blood pressure since childhood. The correlation and association between

  20. Application to Noninvasive Measurement of Blood Components Based on Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Kazuto; Ishizawa, Hiroaki; Fujita, Keiichi; Kaneko, Wataru; Morikawa, Tomotaka; Toba, Eiji; Kobayashi, Hideo

    Recently, lifestyle diseases (diabetics, hyperlipemia etc.) have been steadily increasing, because change of diet, lack of exercise, increase an alcoholic intake, and increase a stress. It is a matter of vital importance to us. About tens of millions of people in Japan have approached the danger of lifestyle diseases. So they have to do a blood test to make sure that they have controlled physical condition themselves. Therefore, they have to measure blood components again and again. So, they are burden too heavy. This paper describes a new noninvasive measurement of blood components based on optical sensing. This uses Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection. In order to study, the influence of individual difference, the internal standard method was introduced. This paper describes the detail of the internal standard method and its effect to the blood components calibration. Significant improvement was obtained by using the internal standard.

  1. [Measurement of blood cholesterol, decentralized, using a Reflotron, or centralized in a laboratory. A comparison].

    PubMed

    Christensen, T E; Agner, E; Jensen, S E; Jacobsen, K; Mahnfeldt, M S; Baastrup, A

    1990-11-01

    In connection with an extensive screening programme for blood cholesterol, the cholesterol values in 105 participants were measured on a sample of capillary blood employing a Reflotron and, simultaneously, samples of venous blood were examined by conventional enzymatic analysis in a laboratory. Whereas the day-to-day variation and the scatter involved were quite limited in the laboratory, the variation scatter between the two methods of measurement was 0.65 mmol/l. This figure was, however, no greater than that described between different laboratories in USA. Nevertheless, it is an important problem with the Reflotron method that even slight deviations from the recommended procedure of withdrawing blood involve a systematic risk for erroneously low cholesterol results. PMID:2238225

  2. Comparison of three methods of sampling trout blood for measurements of hematocrit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steucke, Erwin W., Jr.; Schoettger, Richard A.

    1967-01-01

    Trout blood is frequently collected for hematocrit measurements by excising the caudal fin (Snieszko, 1960), but this technique is impractical if valuable fish are to be sampled or if repeated observations are desired. Schiffman (1959) and Snieszko (1960) collected blood from the dorsal aorta and the heart, but these methods are relatively slow and require the preparation of needles and syringes. The use of pointed capillary tubes for cardiac punctures increases the speed of sampling, but body fluids may dilute the blood (Perkins, 1957; Larsen and Snieszko, 1961; and Normandau, 1962). There is need for methods of sampling which are rapid and which neither influence hematological determinations nor harm the fish.

  3. The switching point from nasal to oronasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Niinimaa, V; Cole, P; Mintz, S; Shephard, R J

    1980-10-01

    The switching point from nasal to oronasal breathing during incrementally graded submaximal exercise was determined in 30 (14 M, 16 F) healthy adult volunteers. Nasal airflow was measured by a pneumotachograph attached to a nasal mask. Oral airflow was determined as the difference between nasal airflow and total pulmonary airflow, the latter being measured by a head-out exercise body plethysmograph. The airflow and pressure signals were sampled every 20 msec by a micropressor, which calculated respiratory volumes and nasal work of breathing, and produced an on-line print-out. Twenty of the 30 subjects (normal augmenters) switched from nasal to oronasal breathing at submaximal exercise of 105.0 W (SD = 30.1), four subjects (mouth breathers) breathed habitually oronasally, five subjects (nose breathers) persistently breathed through the nose only, and one subject showed no consistent nose/mouth breathing pattern. In normal augmenters, the onset of oronasal breathing (VE 35.3 +/- 10.81 . min-1) was quite consistent individually, but varied considerably between inividuals without showing a significant sex difference. The factors most closely related to the switching point were rating of perceived exertion of breathing and nasal work of breathing. PMID:7444224

  4. Repeated Blood Pressure Measurements in Childhood in Prediction of Hypertension in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Oikonen, Mervi; Nuotio, Joel; Magnussen, Costan G; Viikari, Jorma S A; Taittonen, Leena; Laitinen, Tomi; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Jokinen, Eero; Jula, Antti; Cheung, Michael; Sabin, Matthew A; Daniels, Stephen R; Raitakari, Olli T; Juonala, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension may be predicted from childhood risk factors. Repeated observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood may enhance prediction of hypertension and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood compared with a single observation. Participants (1927, 54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements performed when aged 3 to 24 years. Childhood/youth abnormal blood pressure was defined as above 90th or 95th percentile. After a 21- to 31-year follow-up, at the age of 30 to 45 years, hypertension (>140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication) prevalence was found to be 19%. Carotid intima-media thickness was examined, and high-risk intima-media was defined as intima-media thickness >90th percentile or carotid plaques. Prediction of adulthood hypertension and high-risk intima-media was compared between one observation of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth and multiple observations by improved Pearson correlation coefficients and area under the receiver operating curve. When compared with a single measurement, 2 childhood/youth observations improved the correlation for adult systolic (r=0.44 versus 0.35, P<0.001) and diastolic (r=0.35 versus 0.17, P<0.001) blood pressure. In addition, 2 abnormal childhood/youth blood pressure observations increased the prediction of hypertension in adulthood (0.63 for 2 versus 0.60 for 1 observation, P=0.003). When compared with 2 measurements, third observation did not provide any significant improvement for correlation or prediction (P always >0.05). A higher number of childhood/youth observations of abnormal blood pressure did not enhance prediction of adult high-risk intima-media thickness. Compared with a single measurement, the prediction of adult hypertension was enhanced by 2 observations of abnormal blood pressure in childhood/youth. PMID:26553229

  5. Reproducibility of measurements of regional resting and hyperemic myocardial blood flow assessed with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamachi, S.; Czernin, J.; Kim, A.S.

    1996-10-01

    PET with {sup 13}N-ammonia permits the noninvasive quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) in humans. The present study was done to assess the reproducibility of quantitative blood flow measurements at rest and during pharmacologically induced hyperemia in healthy individuals. Thirty healthy volunteers (26 men, 4 women) were studied. Paired measurements of MBF at rest (n = 21), during adenosine (n = 15) and during dipyridamole (n = 7) were performed using a two-compartment model for {sup 13}N-ammonia PET. The mean difference between baseline and follow-up blood flow (% difference) was calculated to assess reproducibility. No significant difference was observed between resting blood flow at baseline or follow-up (15.8% {plus_minus} 15.8%; p = ns). Baseline and follow-up resting blood flow were linearly correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.005). Normalization of resting blood flow to the rate pressure product improved the reproducibility significantly (15.8% {plus_minus} 15.8% versus 10.1% {plus_minus} 10.5%, p < 0.05). Baseline and follow-up hyperemic myocardial blood flow did not differ (11.8% {plus_minus} 9.4%; p = ns) and were linearly correlated (r = 0.69, p < 0.0005). MBF at rest can be measured reproducibly with {sup 13}N-ammonia PET. The individual response to pharmacologic stress appears to be relatively consistent. Thus, serial blood flow measurements with {sup 13}N-ammonia PET can be used to quantify the effect of various interventions on MBF and vasodilatory reserve. 41 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Syllable-Related Breathing in Infants in the Second Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Douglas F.; Buder, Eugene H.; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Boliek, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study explored whether breathing behaviors of infants within the second year of life differ between tidal breathing and breathing supporting single unarticulated syllables and canonical/articulated syllables. Method Vocalizations and breathing kinematics of nine infants between 53 and 90 weeks of age were recorded. A strict selection protocol was used to identify analyzable breath cycles. Syllables were categorized based on consensus coding. Inspiratory and expiratory durations, excursions, and slopes were calculated for the three breath cycle types and normalized using mean tidal breath measures. Results Tidal breathing cycles were significantly different from syllable-related cycles on all breathing measures. There were no significant differences between unarticulated syllable cycles and canonical syllable cycles, even after controlling for utterance duration and sound pressure level. Conclusions Infants in the second year of life exhibit clear differences between tidal breathing and speech-related breathing, but categorically distinct breath support for syllable types with varying articulatory demands was not evident in the current findings. Speech development introduces increasingly complex utterances, so older infants may produce detectable articulation-related adaptations of breathing kinematics. For younger infants, breath support may vary systematically among utterance types, due more to phonatory variations than to articulatory demands. PMID:21173390

  7. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  8. In vivo μPIV measurements of blood velocity in small vessels of a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chia Min; Russell, John; Connor, Nadine; Honkanen, Markus; Wei, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Aging-related muscular changes have been shown to affect voice production. There is correlation between muscular changes and changes in capillary hemodynamics and structure with aging. Alterations in oxygen transport to cells and tissues at the capillary level has been hypothesized as one of the key factors that causes muscular changes thus voice production. Since oxygen transport is related to hemodynamics, we start by measuring blood velocity in capillaries of cremaster muscle of a living rat. The μPIV technique is adapted for measuring blood velocity where red blood cells are used as `seeding particles'. The accuracy of the μPIV measurements are determined by comparison with results obtained using other techniques such as particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Finally, challenges in measuring flow through three-dimensional larynx geometry will be discussed.

  9. Public-use blood pressure measurement: the kiosk quandary.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Bruce S; Dart, Richard A; Sica, Domenic A

    2014-10-01

    It is important to note the opportunity that validated public-use kiosks offer the U.S. healthcare system in terms of ease of public access, reduced cost of screening/monitoring, and the opportunity to support coordinated care between physicians, pharmacists, and patients. It is equally important to recognize that all public-use BP kiosks are not equivalent. Members of the AAMI Sphygmomanometer Committee and other ‘‘concerned citizens’’ are working with FDA officials to try to improve both device validation and cuff range performance of these devices. In reality, regulatory changes will be slow to take effect, and for the foreseeable future, the burden of device accuracy assessment lies with the private sector and the public. There is a device currently available that has undergone full validation testing and offers a wide-range cuff validated for almost all US adult arms. We recognize the importance of innovation in out-of-office BP measurement. Therefore, in the interest of public health, we strongly urge those business professionals buying such devices, and those health professionals advising patients on their use, to become better informed and more discriminant in their device selection. PMID:25418496

  10. Total retinal blood flow measurement by three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Wartak, Andreas; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2016-02-01

    We present measurements of total retinal blood flow in healthy volunteers using a three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) technique. This technology has the advantage of a precise determination of the flow vector without the use of any a-priori information on the vessel geometry. Circular D-OCT scans around the optic disc were recorded and venous as well as arterial total blood flow was determined and compared for each subject. The reproducibility of the method was assessed in 6 subjects by repeated measurements. Only small deviations of around 6% between the measurements were found which indicates the high precision of the proposed method. PMID:26977340

  11. Total retinal blood flow measurement by three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haindl, Richard; Trasischker, Wolfgang; Wartak, Andreas; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of total retinal blood flow in healthy volunteers using a three beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) technique. This technology has the advantage of a precise determination of the flow vector without the use of any a-priori information on the vessel geometry. Circular D-OCT scans around the optic disc were recorded and venous as well as arterial total blood flow was determined and compared for each subject. The reproducibility of the method was assessed in 6 subjects by repeated measurements. Only small deviations of around 6% between the measurements were found which indicates the high precision of the proposed method. PMID:26977340

  12. Impact of manakin motion on particle transport in the breathing zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current experimental investigation is focused on particle measurements using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) in the breathing zone of a seated, breathing, thermal manikin under stationary and rotational conditions. Particle size, concentration, flux, and velocity data were co...

  13. [Accuracy of the oscillometric method to measure blood pressure in children

    PubMed

    Rego Filho, E A; Mello, S F; Silva, C R; Vituri, D W; Bazoni, E; Gordan, L N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to analyze the substitution of the standard auscultatory method by the oscillometric blood pressure monitor, independently of the validity of the intraarterial blood pressure measurement. The accuracy of the automatic oscillometric monitor was compared to the auscultatory mercury manometer blood pressure measurement in apparently healthy school age children. METHODS: A device able to perform 3 simultaneous readings are used: one reading by the monitor and the others by two "blind" observers. We studied 72 school age children with the following characteristics: mean age 9.5 (6.1-16.1) and 39 males (54.2%). RESULTS: The difference for the systolic and diastolic blood pressure obtained by the monitor was in average + 6.2 mmHg and + 10.0 mmHg, respectively, when compared to the observer's readings. There was neither a good correlation nor a good agreement between the two observers and the monitor in the blood pressure determination. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the substitution of the standard auscultatory method for the non-invasive oscillometric method to measure blood pressure in school age children can not be generally recommended. PMID:14685547

  14. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ACTIVE AND PASSIVE SMOKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time breath measurement technology was used to investigate the suitability of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to serve as breath biomarkers for active and passive smoking and to measure actual exposures and resulting breath concentrations for persons exposed to toba...

  15. Endoscopic measurements of canine colonic mucosal blood flow using hydrogen gas clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Soybel, D.I.; Wan, Y.L.; Ashley, S.W.; Yan, Z.Y.; Ordway, F.S.; Cheung, L.Y.

    1987-04-01

    We have examined the feasibility of hydrogen (H/sub 2/) clearance for endoscopic measurements of colonic mucosal blood flow in anesthetized dogs. In 6 animals, measurements of H2 clearance did not differ significantly in different regions of the sigmoid colon and they were highly reproducible on different days. In a total of 12 dogs, measurements of H2 clearance correlated closely with those obtained using radioactive microspheres under resting conditions and, in 4 dogs, during infusion of vasopressin. In 8 dogs, ligation of the major arteries supplying the sigmoid colon resulted in an acute 60% decrease in sigmoid mucosal blood flow; however, in 5 animals that survived the procedure, mucosal blood flow returned nearly to control levels as early as 3 days after operation. Endoscopic H/sub 2/ clearance thus appears to be feasible for measuring mucosal blood flow in the colon. Serial measurements of H/sub 2/ clearance may prove useful in characterizing the role of mucosal blood flow in the pathogenesis of various forms of human colonic disease.

  16. Life and Breath

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Helen D.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a public education program combining the screening process and a follow-up program for teaching victims of emphysema and other respiratory diseases how to better their living condition through proper breathing, avoidance of air pollutants and cigarette smoking, and taking better care of themselves physically. (PD)

  17. Firefighter's Breathing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Giorgini, E. A.; Sullivan, J. L.; Simmonds, M. R.; Beck, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    System, based on open-loop demand-type compressed air concept, is lighter and less bulky than former systems, yet still provides thirty minutes of air supply. Comfort, visibility, donning time, and breathing resistance have been improved. Apparatus is simple to recharge and maintain and is comparable in cost to previously available systems.

  18. INTERMITTENT POSITIVE PRESSURE BREATHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficacy of long-term intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) treatment when used as an adjunct to the overall care of ambulatory outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The evaluation compared the use of IPPB with use of a powered nebulizer.

  19. Breathing Like a Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  20. The Methodology of Doppler-Derived Central Blood Flow Measurements in Newborn Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Koert A.

    2012-01-01

    Central blood flow (CBF) measurements are measurements in and around the heart. It incorporates cardiac output, but also measurements of cardiac input and assessment of intra- and extracardiac shunts. CBF can be measured in the central circulation as right or left ventricular output (RVO or LVO) and/or as cardiac input measured at the superior vena cava (SVC flow). Assessment of shunts incorporates evaluation of the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale. This paper describes the methodology of CBF measurements in newborn infants. It provides a brief overview of the evolution of Doppler ultrasound blood flow measurements, basic principles of Doppler ultrasound, and an overview of all used methodology in the literature. A general guide for interpretation and normal values with suggested cutoffs of CBFs are provided for clinical use. PMID:22291718

  1. Absolute Retinal Blood Flow Measurement With a Dual-Beam Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuixia; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the capability of a novel dual-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique for simultaneous in vivo measurement of the Doppler angle and, thus, the absolute retinal blood velocity and the retinal flow rate, without the influence of motion artifacts. Methods. A novel dual-beam Doppler spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) was developed. The two probing beams are separated with a controllable distance along an arbitrary direction, both of which are controlled by two independent 2D optical scanners. Two sets of optical Doppler tomography (ODT) images are acquired simultaneously. The Doppler angle of each blood vessel segment is calculated from the relative coordinates of the centers of the blood vessel in the two corresponding ODT images. The absolute blood flow velocity and the volumetric blood flow rate can then be calculated. To measure the total retinal blood flow, we used a circular scan pattern centered at the optic disc to obtain two sets of concentric OCT/ODT images simultaneously. Results. We imaged two normal human subjects at ages of 48 and 34 years. The total retinal blood flow rates of the two human subjects were calculated to be 47.01 μL/min (older subject) and 51.37 μL/min (younger subject), respectively. Results showed that the performance of this imaging system is immune to eye movement, since the two sets of ODT images were acquired simultaneously. Conclusions. The dual-beam OCT/ODT system is successful in measuring the absolute retinal blood velocity and the volumetric flow rate. The advantage of the technique is that the two sets of ODT images used for the calculation are acquired simultaneously, which eliminates the influence of eye motion and ensures the accuracy of the calculated hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24222303

  2. Nocturnal periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Baseler, G; Ghofrani, H A; Grimminger, F; Olschewski, H; Seeger, W

    2002-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is frequently observed in congestive heart failure. Among other factors, prolongation of circulation time, hypocapnia and hypoxia are thought to underlie this sleep-related breathing disorder. Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is also characterized by reduced cardiac output and blood gas alterations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether a nocturnal periodic breathing (PB) occurs in PPH. A total of 20 consecutive patients with PPH who had been admitted for pharmacological investigation of pulmonary vasoreactivity were investigated by lung function testing, right heart catheterization and full-night attended polysomnography. PB was detected in six patients (30%) (mean +/- SEM: apnoea/hypopnoea index 37 +/- 5 h(-1); arterial oxygen saturation was <90% during 56 +/- 6.5% of total sleep time). The patients with PB had more severe haemodynamic impairment than those without. They also had a more marked reduction in the pulmonary diffusion capacity and greater arterial hypoxia. PB was markedly improved or even eradicated by nasal oxygen during the night. Periodic breathing occurs in patients with advanced primary pulmonary hypertension and can be reversed by nocturnal nasal oxygen. The clinical and prognostic significance of periodic breathing in primary pulmonary hypertension needs to be determined by further studies. PMID:11998995

  3. Image-guided optical measurement of blood oxygen saturation within capillary vessels (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akons, Kfir; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    Values of blood oxygenation levels are useful for assessing heart and lung conditions, and are frequently monitored during routine patient care. Independent measurement of the oxygen saturation in capillary blood, which is significantly different from that of arterial blood, is important for diagnosing tissue hypoxia and for increasing the accuracy of existing techniques that measure arterial oxygen saturation. Here, we developed a simple, non-invasive technique for measuring the reflected spectra from individual capillary vessels within a human lip, allowing local measurement of the blood oxygen saturation. The optical setup includes a spatially incoherent broadband light that was focused onto a specific vessel below the lip surface. Backscattered light was imaged by a camera for identifying a target vessel and pointing the illumination beam to its cross section. Scattered light from the vessel was then collected by a single-mode fiber and analyzed by a fast spectrometer. Spectra acquired from small capillary vessels within a volunteer lip showed the characteristic oxyhemoglobin absorption bands in real time and with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measuring capillary oxygen saturation using this technique would potentially be more accurate compared to existing pulse oximetry techniques due to its insensitivity to the patient's skin color, pulse rate, motion, and medical condition. It could be used as a standalone endoscopic technique for measuring tissue hypoxia or in conjunction with conventional pulse oximetry for a more accurate measurement of oxygen transport in the body.

  4. Measurement of anisotropic reflection of flowing blood using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jeong, Bosu; Jung, In Oh; Ha, Hojin; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-12-01

    Light reflectance of blood is a complex phenomenon affected by hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation (rouleaux formation). According to the hypothesis that RBC rouleaux are aligned with the direction of blood flow, the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux, as well as their size and quantity in the blood, may also affect light reflectance. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the spatial alignment and distribution of RBC rouleaux on light reflection using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Blood flow velocity and reflectance profiles in a rat jugular-femoral bypass loop were simultaneously measured using a Doppler swept-source OCT system at various incident angles from -30 to +30 deg. The reflectance profiles of flowing blood show nonmonotonous decay with a local negative peak at the center of the tube. The profiles vary depending on the incident angle. This angular dependence is stronger at a higher angle of incidence. The anisotropic reflectance of flowing blood is consistent with the hypothesis on the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux. PMID:22191907

  5. Measurement of anisotropic reflection of flowing blood using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jeong, Bosu; Jung, In Oh; Ha, Hojin; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-12-01

    Light reflectance of blood is a complex phenomenon affected by hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation (rouleaux formation). According to the hypothesis that RBC rouleaux are aligned with the direction of blood flow, the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux, as well as their size and quantity in the blood, may also affect light reflectance. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the spatial alignment and distribution of RBC rouleaux on light reflection using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Blood flow velocity and reflectance profiles in a rat jugular-femoral bypass loop were simultaneously measured using a Doppler swept-source OCT system at various incident angles from -30 to +30 deg. The reflectance profiles of flowing blood show nonmonotonous decay with a local negative peak at the center of the tube. The profiles vary depending on the incident angle. This angular dependence is stronger at a higher angle of incidence. The anisotropic reflectance of flowing blood is consistent with the hypothesis on the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux.

  6. An instrument for measuring endometrial blood flow in the uterus, using two thermistor probes.

    PubMed

    Hansson, G A; Hauksson, A; Strömberg, P; Akerlund, M

    1987-01-01

    An instrument was developed for continuous measurement of thermal conductance reflecting blood flow locally in the endometrium. The probe consists of two small thermistors, one sensing the tissue temperature, and the other working at 5 degrees C elevated temperature, sensing the heat loss caused by thermal conduction mainly due to the blood flow. The power needed to keep this temperature difference was recorded as a measure of flow. When the instrument was tested in model experiments, for measurement of flows at temperatures of 35 to 40 degrees C, stable recordings with high sensitivity were obtained and no influence of the surrounding temperature was observed. Recordings were also made in vivo in non-pregnant women by applying the instrument to the endometrium of the uterine fundus. Intrauterine pressure was recorded simultaneously. The blood flow recordings were stable over long periods in spite of changes in body temperature, but with fluctuations of up to 0.1 mW concomitant with uterine contractions. Pulse-syncronous variations in flow were recorded, indicating a high sensitivity and a short time constant of the instrument. The blood flow effects of vasoactive substances, i.e. vasopressin and a vasopressin antagonist, could readily be distinguished. It is concluded that this instrument can be used for semi-quantitative recordings of blood flow in cavities of the body, for example the uterus, which can be reached by small probes and that changes of body temperature do not effect the measurements. PMID:3585951

  7. Classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration noninvasively using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Li, Gang; Yan, Wen-Juan; Lin, Ling

    2014-11-01

    Developing noninvasive blood glucose monitoring method is an to immense need to alleviate the pain and suffering of diabetics associated with the frequent pricking of skin for taking blood sample. A hybrid algorithm for multivariate calibration is proposed to improve the prediction performance of classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy noninvasively. The algorithm is based on wavelet prism modified uninformative variable elimination approach (WP-mUVE) combined with least squares support vector machine (LSSVM), named as WP-mUVE-LSSVM. The method is successfully applied to diabetic classification experiment (in vivo) and blood glucose concentration measurement experiment (in vivo) respectively. Human tongue is selected as the measuring site in this study. To evaluate effectiveness of pretreatment method and quality of calibration models, several usually used pretreatment methods and kernel functions of LSSVM are introduced comparing with our method. Higher quality data is obtained by our pretreatment method owing to the elimination of varying background and noise of spectra data simultaneously. Better prediction accuracy and adaptability are obtained by LSSVM model with radial basis kernel function. The results indicate that WP-mUVE-LSSVM holds promise for the classification of diabetes and measurement of blood glucose concentration noninvasively based on human tongue using NIR spectroscopy.

  8. MRI-compatible noninvasive continuous blood pressure measurement using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harja, Juha; Myllylä, Teemu S.; Sorvoja, Hannu S. S.; Myllylä, Risto A.; Elseoud, Ahmed A.; Nikkinen, Juha; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tervonen, Osmo

    2009-10-01

    This report focuses on designing and implementing a non-invasive blood pressure measuring device capable of being used during magnetic resonance imaging. This device is based on measuring pulse wave velocity in arterial blood and using the obtained result to estimate diastolic blood pressure. Pulse transit times are measured by two fibre optical accelerometers placed over chest and carotid artery. The fabricated accelerometer contains two static fibres and a cantilever beam. The free end of the beam is angled at 90 degrees to act as a reflecting surface. Optical fibres are used for both illuminating the surface and receiving the reflected light. Acceleration applied to the sensor causes deflection of the beam, whereupon the amount of reflected light changes. The sensor output voltage is proportional to the intensity of the reflected light. Tests conducted on the electronics and sensors inside an MRI room during scanning proved that the device is MR conditional. No artifacts or distortions were detected.

  9. MRI-compatible noninvasive continuous blood pressure measurement using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harja, Juha; Myllylä, Teemu S.; Sorvoja, Hannu S. S.; Myllylä, Risto A.; Elseoud, Ahmed A.; Nikkinen, Juha; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Tervonen, Osmo

    2010-02-01

    This report focuses on designing and implementing a non-invasive blood pressure measuring device capable of being used during magnetic resonance imaging. This device is based on measuring pulse wave velocity in arterial blood and using the obtained result to estimate diastolic blood pressure. Pulse transit times are measured by two fibre optical accelerometers placed over chest and carotid artery. The fabricated accelerometer contains two static fibres and a cantilever beam. The free end of the beam is angled at 90 degrees to act as a reflecting surface. Optical fibres are used for both illuminating the surface and receiving the reflected light. Acceleration applied to the sensor causes deflection of the beam, whereupon the amount of reflected light changes. The sensor output voltage is proportional to the intensity of the reflected light. Tests conducted on the electronics and sensors inside an MRI room during scanning proved that the device is MR conditional. No artifacts or distortions were detected.

  10. The study of some possible measurement errors in clinical blood electrolyte potentiometric (ISE) analysers.

    PubMed

    Rumenjak, Vlatko; Milardović, Stjepan; Kruhak, Ivan; Grabarić, Bozidar S

    2003-09-01

    The understanding of the most important sources of error in potentiometric blood analyser which might contribute to better instruments measurement repeatability is very often marginalized in fabrications and daily operation of some commercial blood analysers. In this paper ISEs-potentiometric measurements were performed and validated in Clinical Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis of the Zagreb University School of Medicine and Clinical Hospital Centre, using a carefully designed and constructed fully automated (computerised) homemade ISE-based blood electrolyte analyser constructed with an in-line five-channel flow-through measuring cell. The influence of electrolyte concentration of the salt bridge is reported. Special attention has been paid to the reference electrode design, and constructions which can operate in open liquid junction and membrane restricted liquid junction modes are described. PMID:12927687

  11. Factors affecting radioactive microsphere measurement of blood flow in pregnant guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.; Sparks, J.W.; Makowski, E.L.

    1986-10-01

    Comparative blood flow studies were performed in pregnant guinea pigs using radioactive microspheres to test the effects of different sphere sizes on blood flow measurements and the relationship between flows obtained intraoperatively and those performed after 5 days of recovery from anesthesia and surgery. We observed that 1.5% of the cardiac output was shunted through the microcirculation of the carcass, gut, skin and endomyometrium when 15 mu microspheres were used. Intraoperative measurements of heart rate, cardiac output and placental blood flow are significantly lower than measurements made after 5 days recovery. These reductions were ameliorated with the addition of a continuous infusion of isoproterenol and the deletion of atropine from the anesthetic.

  12. A Non-Invasive Method for Estimating Cardiopulmonary Variables Using Breath-by-Breath Injection of Two Tracer Gases

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, David A.; Hahn, Clive E. W.; Farmeryy, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional methods for estimating cardiopulmonary variables usually require complex gas analyzers and the active co-operation of the patient. Therefore, they are not compatible with the crowded environment of the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating theatre, where patient co-operation is typically impossible. However, it is these patients that would benefit the most from accurate estimation of cardiopulmonary variables, because of their critical condition. This paper describes the results of a collaborative development between an anesthesiologists and biomedical engineers to create a compact and non-invasive system for the measurement of cardiopulmonary variables such as lung volume, airway dead space volume, and pulmonary blood flow. In contrast with conventional methods, the compact apparatus and non-invasive nature of the proposed method allow it to be used in the ICU, as well as in general clinical settings. We propose the use of a non-invasive method, in which tracer gases are injected into the patient's inspired breath, and the concentration of the tracer gases is subsequently measured. A novel breath-by-breath tidal ventilation model is then used to estimate the value of a patient's cardiopulmonary variables. Experimental results from an artificial lung demonstrate minimal error in the estimation of known parameters using the proposed method. Results from analysis of a cohort of 20 healthy volunteers (within the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust) show that the values of estimated cardiopulmonary variables from these subjects lies within the expected ranges. Advantages of this method are that it is non-invasive, compact, portable, and can perform analysis in real time with less than 1 min of acquired respiratory data. PMID:27170849

  13. Heart rate variability and stroke volume variability to detect central hypovolemia during spontaneous breathing and supported ventilation in young, healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Elstad, Maja; Walløe, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular oscillations exist in many different variables and may give important diagnostic and prognostic information in patients. Variability in cardiac stroke volume (SVV) is used in clinical practice for diagnosis of hypovolemia, but currently is limited to patients on mechanical ventilation. We investigated if SVV and heart rate variability (HRV) could detect central hypovolemia in spontaneously breathing humans: We also compared cardiovascular variability during spontaneous breathing with supported mechanical ventilation.Ten subjects underwent simulated central hypovolemia by lower body negative pressure (LBNP) with >10% reduction of cardiac stroke volume. The subjects breathed spontaneously and with supported mechanical ventilation. Heart rate, respiratory frequency and mean arterial blood pressure were measured. Stroke volume (SV) was estimated by ModelFlow (Finometer). Respiratory SVV was calculated by: 1) SVV% = (SVmax - SVmin)/SVmean during one respiratory cycle, 2) SVIntegral from the power spectra (Fourier transform) at 0.15-0.4 Hz and 3) SVV_norm = (√SVIntegral)/SVmean. HRV was calculated by the same methods.During spontaneous breathing two measures of SVV and all three measures of HRV were reduced during hypovolemia compared to baseline. During spontaneous breathing SVIntegral and HRV% were best to detect hypovolemia (area under receiver operating curve 0.81). HRV% ≤ 11% and SVIntegral ≤ 12 ml(2) differentiated between hypovolemia and baseline during spontaneous breathing.During supported mechanical ventilation, none of the three measures of SVV changed and two of the HRV measures were reduced during hypovolemia. Neither measures of SVV nor HRV were classified as a good detector of hypovolemia.We conclude that HRV% and SVIntegral detect hypovolemia during spontaneous breathing and both are candidates for further clinical testing. PMID:25799094

  14. Blood Outflow from Capillary under Forced Pressure: Comparison between Electric Circuit Analog and Optical Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamanaka, Yohei

    2007-12-01

    An electric circuit analog is proposed for blood outflow from a skin capillary when static pressure higher than the highest blood pressure of the artery is applied to the capillary. The proposed electric circuit analog consists of a capacitor and a variable resistor. The resistance of the variable resistor changes depending on the charge stored in the capacitor, which models the increase in blood flow resistance due to less blood in the capillary. In order to evaluate the electric circuit analog, the analytical solution is compared with in vivo data. In vivo data are measured using an inherent optical sensor, which consists of a light-emitting diode and a photodetector mounted on a mechanical actuator that applies static pressure to the skin surface. The change of the received light during pressurization is recorded. A parameter that is related to blood concentration is estimated from the Lambert-Beer law. In vivo data are measured for fingertips of 30 healthy volunteers, and the square errors of the fitting curves derived using an exponential function model, third-order function model, and the proposed electric circuit analog are compared. It is shown that the proposed electric circuit analog gives the best approximation among the three models. This result confirms that the blood outflow from the capillary under forced pressure can be evaluated using the proposed model.

  15. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  16. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  17. Evaluation of oscillometric and Doppler ultrasonic devices for blood pressure measurements in anesthetized and conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Catherine; Belanger, Marie C; Burns, Patrick M

    2014-08-01

    Two non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) devices (oscillometry and Doppler) were compared to invasive blood pressure using a Bland-Altman analysis, in anesthetized and conscious dogs. When considering the systolic arterial pressure only during general anesthesia, both NIBP devices slightly underestimated the systolic arterial blood pressure however the precision and the limits of agreement for the Doppler were of a greater magnitude. This indicates a worse clinical performance by the Doppler. The performance of both NIBP devices deteriorated as measured in conscious animals. In general, for the oscillometric device, determination of invasive diastolic and mean arterial pressures was better than the invasive systolic arterial pressure. Overall, the oscillometric device satisfied more of the criteria set by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus statement. Based upon these results, the oscillometric device is more reliable than the Doppler in the determination of blood pressure in healthy medium to large breed dogs. PMID:24924217

  18. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    PubMed

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  19. Laser Doppler flowmetry for measurement of laminar capillary blood flow in the horse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Henry S., III

    1998-07-01

    Current methods for in vivo evaluation of digital hemodynamics in the horse include angiography, scintigraphy, Doppler ultrasound, electromagnetic flow and isolated extracorporeal pump perfused digit preparations. These techniques are either non-quantifiable, do not allow for continuous measurement, require destruction of the horse orare invasive, inducing non- physiologic variables. In vitro techniques have also been reported for the evaluation of the effects of vasoactive agents on the digital vessels. The in vitro techniques are non-physiologic and have evaluated the vasculature proximal to the coronary band. Lastly, many of these techniques require general anesthesia or euthanasia of the animal. Laser Doppler flowmetry is a non-invasive, continuous measure of capillary blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry has been used to measure capillary blood flow in many tissues. The principle of this method is to measure the Doppler shift, that is, the frequency change that light undergoes when reflected by moving objects, such as red blood cells. Laser Doppler flowmetry records a continuous measurement of the red cell motion in the outer layer of the tissue under study, with little or no influence on physiologic blood flow. This output value constitutes the flux of red cells and is reported as capillary perfusion units. No direct information concerning oxygen, nutrient or waste metabolite exchange in the surrounding tissue is obtained. The relationship between the flowmeter output signal and the flux of red blood cells is linear. The principles of laser Doppler flowmetry will be discussed and the technique for laminar capillary blood flow measurements will be presented.

  20. Measurement of streaming potentials of mammalian blood vessels, aorta and vena cava, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, P N; Himmelfarb, E; Lustrin, I; Ziskind, H

    1966-09-01

    Attempts to measure streaming potentials in large rabbit blood vessels in vivo have been carried out. Streaming potentials, V(89), were measured by the introduction of microelectrodes through the wall of the blood vessel at separations greater than 1 cm. The outputs from these electrodes fed through calomel cells were amplified and recorded directly by using an Electronics for Medicine photorecorder (White Plains, N. Y.). "Effective streaming currents" were determined by running the output through a low impedence galvanometer while simultaneously measuring the resistance of the circuit V(8) were, therefore, calculated from two measurements and compared. Flow through vessels studied was measured using two different electromagnetic flowmeters. The results indicate that V(8) present in both aorta and vena cava are of the order of 5 to 10 mv. By using the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation into which flow was reintegrated, the numbers yield zeta potentials approximating 0.1 to 0.4 v in both aorta and vena cava. This number approaches the apparent upper limit for zeta (actually "interfacial potentials") potentials in biological systems. The measured "i.f." potential is considered as the interreaction of several physical and metabolic factors operating at the blood intimal interface. The polarity of the potential suggests that the interface is negative with respect to the blood flowing through the vessel. Interfacial potential and related V(8) are discussed in terms of their possible importance as a mechanism for maintaining vascular homeostasis in the living animal. PMID:5970567