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Sample records for breathlessness intervention service

  1. Patients’ experiences of a new integrated breathlessness support service for patients with refractory breathlessness: Results of a postal survey

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Charles C; Bausewein, Claudia; Pannell, Caty; Moxham, John; Jolley, Caroline J; Higginson, Irene J

    2015-01-01

    Background: We developed a new single point of access to integrated palliative care, respiratory medicine and physiotherapy: the breathlessness support service for patients with advanced disease and refractory breathlessness. This study aimed to describe patients’ experiences of the service and identify the aspects valued. Design: We attempted to survey all patients who had attended and completed the 6-week breathlessness support service intervention by sending them a postal questionnaire to self-complete covering experience, composition, effectiveness of the BSS and about participation in research. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of free text comments. Results: Of the 70 postal questionnaires sent out, 25 (36%) returned. A total of 21 (84% (95% confidence interval: 69%–98%)) responding patients reported that they definitely found the breathlessness support service helpful and 13 (52% (95% confidence interval: 32%–72%)) rated the breathlessness support service as excellent. A total of 21 (84% (95% confidence interval: 69%–98%)) patients reported that the breathlessness support service helped with their management of their breathlessness along with additional symptoms and activities (e.g. mood and mobility). Four key themes were identified: (1) personalised care, (2) caring nature of the staff, (3) importance of patient education to empower patients and (4) effectiveness of context-specific breathlessness interventions. These were specific aspects that patients valued. Conclusion: Patients’ satisfaction with the breathlessness support service was high, and identified as important to this was a combination of personalised care, nature of staff, education and empowerment, and use of specific interventions. These components would be important in any future breathlessness service. PMID:26311570

  2. Breathless after bypass

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Simon G; Missouris, Constantinos; Qureshi, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old normotensive, non-athletic man presented to the cardiology clinic with exertional dyspnoea and chest discomfort. Echocardiography revealed mild left ventricular hypertrophy with good systolic function but with regional wall motion abnormalities suggesting ischaemia. Coronary angiography showed significant three-vessel disease. He underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, which was complicated by recurrent pericardial and pleural effusions, requiring a pericardial window procedure. Over the following year he became increasingly oedematous and breathless. On ECG the complexes were low voltage with impaired R wave progression and atrial fibrillation. Echocardiography revealed progression of the left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with a bright myocardium and restrictive filling pattern. MRI scanning confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. He was referred for transplant but was considered unsuitable due to extensive mediastinal scarring. This case demonstrates the importance of a high index of suspicion for amyloidosis, especially in patients with unexplained LVH. Cardiac MRI or biopsy may expedite the diagnosis. PMID:24895396

  3. ‘The COPD breathlessness manual’: a randomised controlled trial to test a cognitive-behavioural manual versus information booklets on health service use, mood and health status, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Claire; Dupont, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a costly long-term condition associated with frequent Accident and Emergency (A&E) and hospital admissions. Psychological difficulties and inadequate self-management can amplify this picture. Aims: To compare a cognitive-behavioural manual versus information booklets (IB) on health service use, mood and health status. Methods: Two hundred and twenty-two COPD patients were randomly allocated to receive either the COPD breathlessness manual (CM) or IB. They were instructed to work through their programme at home, over 5 weeks. Guidance from a facilitator was provided at an initial home visit plus two telephone call follow-ups. Results: After 12 months, total A&E visits had reduced by 42% in the CM group, compared with a 16% rise in the IB group. The odds of people in the IB group attending A&E 12 months post-intervention was 1.9 times higher than for the CM group (CI 1.05–3.53). Reduction in hospital admissions and bed days were greatest in the CM group. At 6 months, there were significantly greater improvements in anxiety (F (2,198)=5.612, P=0.004), depression (F (1.8,176.1)=10.697, P⩽0.001) and dyspnoea (F (2,198)=18.170, P⩽0.001) in the CM group. Estimated savings at 12 months were greatest in the CM group, amounting to £30k or £270 per participant. Conclusion: The COPD manual, which addresses physical and mental health, is a straightforward cost-effective intervention that is worth offering to COPD patients within primary or secondary care. PMID:25322078

  4. Building consensus for provision of breathlessness rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Man, William D-C; Chowdhury, Faiza; Taylor, Rod S; Evans, Rachael A; Doherty, Patrick; Singh, Sally J; Booth, Sara; Thomason, Davey; Andrews, Debbie; Lee, Cassie; Hanna, Jackie; Morgan, Michael D; Bell, Derek; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-08-01

    The study aimed to gain consensus on key priorities for developing breathlessness rehabilitation services for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Seventy-four invited stakeholders attended a 1-day conference to review the evidence base for exercise-based rehabilitation in COPD and CHF. In addition, 47 recorded their views on a series of statements regarding breathlessness rehabilitation tailored to the needs of both patient groups. A total of 75% of stakeholders supported symptom-based rather than disease-based rehabilitation for breathlessness with 89% believing that such services would be attractive for healthcare commissioners. A total of 87% thought patients with CHF could be exercised using COPD training principles and vice versa. A total of 81% felt community-based exercise training was safe for patients with severe CHF or COPD, but only 23% viewed manual-delivered rehabilitation an effective alternative to supervised exercise training. Although there was strong consensus that exercise training was a core component of rehabilitation in CHF and COPD populations, only 36% thought that this was the 'most important' component, highlighting the need for psychological and other non-exercise interventions for breathlessness. Patients with COPD and CHF face similar problems of breathlessness and disability on a background of multi-morbidity. Existing pulmonary and cardiac rehabilitation services should seek synergies to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate all patients with COPD and CHF. Development of new services could consider adopting a patient-focused rather than disease-based approach. Exercise training is a core component, but rehabilitation should include other interventions to address dyspnoea, psychological and education needs of patients and needs of carers. PMID:27072018

  5. Expenditures for Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; Levin, Jesse; Perez, Maria; Lam, Irene; Chambers, Jay G.

    2009-01-01

    What does it cost to provide early intervention services? Data collected as part of the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study were used to determine expenditures for infants, toddlers, and their families receiving services through Part C programs. The study found that the national average total expenditure for early intervention services…

  6. Breathlessness

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen level is low (but it won’t benefit you if your oxygen levels are usually normal). See ATS Patient Information Series pieces on Inhalers, Medicines for COPD and Oxygen Therapy at http: / / patients. thoracic. org/ ...

  7. Neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in COPD.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Luo, Yuanming M; Steier, Joerg; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Polkey, Michael I; Moxham, John

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that neural respiratory drive, measured using diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) activity expressed as a percentage of maximum (EMGdi%max), is closely related to breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We also investigated whether neuroventilatory uncoupling contributes significantly to breathlessness intensity over an awareness of levels of neural respiratory drive alone. EMGdi and ventilation were measured continuously during incremental cycle and treadmill exercise in 12 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 s±sd was 38.7±14.5 % pred). EMGdi was expressed both as EMGdi%max and relative to tidal volume expressed as a percentage of predicted vital capacity to quantify neuroventilatory uncoupling. EMGdi%max was closely related to Borg breathlessness in both cycle (r=0.98, p=0.0001) and treadmill exercise (r=0.94, p=0.005), this relationship being similar to that between neuroventilatory uncoupling and breathlessness (cycling r=0.94, p=0.005; treadmill r=0.91, p=0.01). The relationship between breathlessness and ventilation was poor when expansion of tidal volume became limited. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease the intensity of exertional breathlessness is closely related to EMGdi%max. These data suggest that breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can be largely explained by an awareness of levels of neural respiratory drive, rather than the degree of neuroventilatory uncoupling. EMGdi%max could provide a useful physiological biomarker for breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:25323229

  8. Telerehabilitation: An Adjunct Service Delivery Model For Early Intervention Services

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Early Intervention (EI) services for children birth through two years of age are mandated by Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); however, personnel shortages, particularly in rural areas, limit access for children who qualify. Telerehabilitation has the potential to build capacity among caregivers and local providers as well as promote family-centered services through remote consultation. This article provides an overview of research related to telerehabilitation and early intervention services; discusses the feasibility of telerehabilitation within traditional EI service delivery models; examines telecommunications technology associated with telerehabilitation; and provides hypothetical case examples designed to illustrate potential applications of telerehabilitation in early intervention. PMID:25945179

  9. Breathlessness with pulmonary metastases: a multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M

    2013-11-01

    Case Study  Sarah is a 58-year-old breast cancer survivor, social worker, and health-care administrator at a long-term care facility. She lives with her husband and enjoys gardening and reading. She has two grown children and three grandchildren who live approximately 180 miles away. SECOND CANCER DIAGNOSIS  One morning while showering, Sarah detected a painless quarter-sized lump on her inner thigh. While she thought it was unusual, she felt it would probably go away. One month later, she felt the lump again; she thought that it had grown, so she scheduled a visit with her primary care physician. A CT scan revealed a 6.2-cm soft-tissue mass in the left groin. She was referred to an oncologic surgeon and underwent an excision of the groin mass. Pathology revealed a grade 3 malignant melanoma. She was later tested and found to have BRAF-negative status. Following her recovery from surgery, Sarah was further evaluated with an MRI scan of the brain, which was negative, and a PET scan, which revealed two nodules in the left lung. As Sarah had attended a cancer support group during her breast cancer treatment in the past, she decided to go back to the group when she learned of her melanoma diagnosis. While the treatment options for her lung lesions included interleukin-2, ipilimumab (Yervoy), temozolomide, dacarbazine, a clinical trial, or radiosurgery, Sarah's oncologist felt that ipilimumab or radiosurgery would be the best course of action. She shared with her support group that she was ambivalent about this decision, as she had experienced profound fatigue and nausea with chemotherapy during her past treatment for breast cancer. She eventually opted to undergo stereotactic radiosurgery. DISEASE RECURRENCE  After the radiosurgery, Sarah was followed every 2 months. She complained of shortness of breath about 2 weeks prior to each follow-up visit. Each time her chest x-ray was normal, and she eventually believed that her breathlessness was anxiety

  10. Navajo Caregivers' Perceptions of Early Intervention Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Karen L.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated 52 Navajo family caregiver perceptions about early intervention services and supplemental information was gathered from 15 early interventionists identified by caregivers. Overall, caregivers were satisfied with services. Caregivers' perceptions of program family-centeredness had a strong positive relationship with…

  11. TGF-β can leave you breathless

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Bi-Feng; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a ubiquitous and multifunctional cytokine, is central to the evolution and modulation of host defense. Early on, TGF-β was recognized for its chemotactic and pro-inflammatory properties, but then identification of its powerful suppressive activities focused attention on dissecting its mechanisms of immune inhibition. Just as quickly as TGF-β-mediated regulation of a population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells became the rage, a surprising finding that TGF-β was the impetus behind a subset of pro-inflammatory T helper(Th)17 cells brought back a re-emphasis on its broader ability to dictate inflammatory events. Emerging evidence indicates that much remains to be discovered regarding the complex and intertwined roles of TGF-β in inflammation, T cell lineage commitment, antibody generation, immune suppression and tolerance. While it may appear that TGF-β has multiple, ill-defined, contradictory and overlapping modes of activity that are impossible to unravel, the current excitement for dissecting how TGF-β controls immunity defines a challenge worthy of pursuit. The lung is particularly vulnerable to the influences of TGF-β, which is produced by its immune and non-immune cell populations. In its absence, lung pathology becomes lethal, whereas TGF-β overproduction also has untoward consequences, potentially leaving one breathless, and underscoring the paradoxical, but essential contribution of TGF-β to tissue and immune homeostasis. PMID:19467929

  12. Introducing breathlessness as a significant animal welfare issue.

    PubMed

    Beausoleil, N J; Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Breathlessness is a negative affective experience relating to respiration, the animal welfare significance of which has largely been underestimated in the veterinary and animal welfare sciences. In this review, we draw attention to the negative impact that breathlessness can have on the welfare of individual animals and to the wide range of situations in which mammals may experience breathlessness. At least three qualitatively distinct sensations of breathlessness are recognised in human medicine--respiratory effort, air hunger and chest tightness--and each of these reflects comparison by cerebral cortical processing of some combination of heightened ventilatory drive and/or impaired respiratory function. Each one occurs in a variety of pathological conditions and other situations, and more than one may be experienced simultaneously or in succession. However, the three qualities vary in terms of their unpleasantness, with air hunger reported to be the most unpleasant. We emphasise the important interplay among various primary stimuli to breathlessness and other physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as animal management practices. For example, asphyxia/drowning of healthy mammals or killing those with respiratory disease using gases containing high carbon dioxide tensions is likely to lead to severe air hunger, while brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome in modern dog and cat breeds increases respiratory effort at rest and likely leads to air hunger during exertion. Using this information as a guide, we encourage animal welfare scientists, veterinarians, laboratory scientists, regulatory bodies and others involved in evaluations of animal welfare to consider whether or not breathlessness contributes to any compromise they may observe or wish to avoid or mitigate. PMID:25004795

  13. Inspiring change: humanities and social science insights into the experience and management of breathlessness

    PubMed Central

    Oxley, Rebecca; Macnaughton, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Breathlessness can be debilitating for those with chronic conditions, requiring continual management. Yet, the meaning of breathlessness for those who live with it is poorly understood in respect of its subjective, cultural, and experiential significance. This article discusses a number of current issues in understanding the experience of breathlessness. Recent findings Effective communication concerning the experience of breathlessness is crucial for diagnosis, to identify appropriate treatment, and to provide patients with the capacity to self-manage their condition. However, there is an evident disconnect between the way breathlessness is understood between clinical and lay perspectives, in terms of awareness of breathlessness, the way symptoms are expressed, and acknowledgement of how it affects the daily lives of patients. Summary The review highlights the need for integrated multidisciplinary work on breathlessness, and suggests that effective understanding and management of breathlessness considers its wider subjective and social significance. PMID:27490147

  14. Service Users' Experiences of a Brief Intervention Service for Children and Adolescents: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Jen; Schlösser, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Ten per cent of young people experience mental health difficulties at any one time. Prevention and early intervention leads to better prognosis for young people's mental well-being in the short and long term. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) must be able to provide swift and effective interventions for a range of difficulties to…

  15. 34 CFR 303.13 - Early intervention services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... include— (i) Identification, assessment, and intervention; (ii) Adaptation of the environment, and... environmental adaptation. These services include— (i) Screening, evaluation, and assessment of children...

  16. 34 CFR 303.13 - Early intervention services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... include— (i) Identification, assessment, and intervention; (ii) Adaptation of the environment, and... environmental adaptation. These services include— (i) Screening, evaluation, and assessment of children...

  17. Breathlessness and blood: a combustible combination.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2002-08-01

    Pulmonary complications are increasingly recognized as serous hazards of transfusion. The evidence suggests that transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are underrecognized. Both present with dyspnea but other signs and symptoms assist in determining the proper diagnosis. Males and females are equally affected. Morbidity is significant with both complications and in the case of TRALI, the mortality is in the range of 6-10%. Although the clinical descriptions of both entities are well established, the clinical profile of the at-risk population for both TRALI and TACO is not well understood. Because early intervention can reduce morbidity, it is important that clinicians recognize these disorders and apply appropriate treatment. PMID:12617126

  18. 34 CFR 303.12 - Early intervention services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Early intervention services. 303.12 Section 303.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES General...

  19. 34 CFR 303.12 - Early intervention services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Early intervention services. 303.12 Section 303.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES General...

  20. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Arbitration Program Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathy on Juvenile Diversion program completion for youths involved in a clinical trial, and evaluation of an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines baseline interview data for…

  1. Psychophysical Differences in Ventilatory Awareness and Breathlessness between Athletes and Sedentary Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Faull, Olivia K.; Cox, Pete J.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breathlessness is a complex set of symptoms that are comprised of both sensory and affective (emotional) dimensions. While ventilation is now understood to be a potential limiter to performance in highly-trained individuals, the contribution of breathlessness-anxiety in those nearing maximal ventilation during intense exercise has not yet been considered as a limiter to performance. Methods: In this study, we compared the physiology and psychology of breathlessness in 20 endurance athletes with 20 untrained age- and sex-matched sedentary controls. Subjects completed baseline spirometry and anxiety questionnaires, an incremental exercise test to exhaustion and a steady-state hypercapnic ventilatory response test, with concurrent measures of breathlessness intensity and breathlessness-anxiety. Results: Compared with sedentary subjects, athletes reported equivalent breathlessness intensity but greater breathlessness-anxiety at maximal exercise (athletes vs. sedentary (mean ± SD): breathlessness intensity (0–100%) 80.7 (22.7) vs. 72.5 (17.2), p = 0.21; breathlessness-anxiety (0–100%), 45.3 (36.3) vs. 22.3 (20.0), p = 0.02). Athletes operated at higher proportions of their maximal ventilatory capacity (MVV) (athletes vs. sedentary (mean ventilation ± SD; % MVV): 101.6 (27.2) vs. 73.7 (30.1), p = 0.003). In the athletes there was a positive linear correlation between ventilation and breathlessness score during the hypercapnic challenge that was not observed in the sedentary controls. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that whilst operating at high proportions of maximal ventilation, breathlessness-anxiety becomes increasingly prominent in athletes. Our results suggest that ventilatory perception pathways may be a target for improved athletic performance in some individuals. PMID:27378940

  2. Early Intervention Services: Effectively Supporting Maori Children and their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Mere; Woller, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines Early Intervention (EI) service provision from within one Ministry of Education region in New Zealand. It does this in order to better understand what works well and what needs to change if children from Maori families, of Early Childhood age, are to be provided with the most effective EI services. By engaging with Maori…

  3. Participation Patterns among Families Receiving Part C Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khetani, Mary Alunkal

    2010-01-01

    Participation in the natural settings of home and community is one of four major goals for families receiving Part C early intervention services. While participation has been formally recognized as an important service-related outcome, there is a need to build knowledge about its key features to adequately apply the concept in practice. The need…

  4. Service Provider Combinations and the Delivery of Early Intervention Services to Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Scarborough, Anita A.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the National Early Intervention Longitudinal Study, this study provides a framework for characterizing the delivery of early intervention services based on the combinations of service providers who work with infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families. Five groups of providers were identified. Results showed that the…

  5. Effective Interventions on Service Quality Improvement in a Physiotherapy Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gharibi, Farid; Tabrizi, JafarSadegh; Eteraf Oskouei, MirAli; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Service quality is considered as a main domain of quality associ­ated with non-clinical aspect of healthcare. This study aimed to survey and im­proves service quality of delivered care in the Physiotherapy Clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A quasi experimental interventional study was conducted in the Physiotherapy Clinic, 2010-2011. Data were collected using a validated and reli­able researcher made questionnaire with participation of 324 patients and their coadjutors. The study questionnaire consisted of 7 questions about demographic factors and 38 questions for eleven aspects of service quality. Data were then analyzed using paired samples t-test by SPSS16. Results: In the pre intervention phase, six aspects of service quality including choice of provider, safety, prevention and early detection, dignity, autonomy and availability achieved non-acceptable scores. Following interventions, all aspects of the service quality improved and also total service quality score improved from 8.58 to 9.83 (P<0.001). Conclusion: Service quality can be improved by problem implementation of appropriate interventions. The acquired results can be used in health system fields to create respectful environments for healthcare customers. PMID:25097838

  6. The evidence base for oxygen for chronic refractory breathlessness: issues, gaps, and a future work plan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Miriam J; Abernethy, Amy P; Currow, David C

    2013-04-01

    Breathlessness or "shortness of breath," medically termed dyspnea, is a common and distressing symptom featuring strongly in advanced lung, cardiac, and neuromuscular diseases; its prevalence and intensity increase as death approaches. However, despite the increasing understanding in the genesis of breathlessness, as well as an increasing portfolio of treatment options, breathlessness is still difficult to manage and engenders helplessness in caregivers and health care professionals and fear for patients. Although hypoxemia does not appear to be the dominant driver for breathlessness in advanced disease, the belief that oxygen is important for the relief of acute, chronic, and acute-on-chronic shortness of breath is firmly embedded in the minds of patients, caregivers, and health care professionals. This article presents current understanding of the use of oxygen for treating refractory breathlessness in advanced disease. The objective is to highlight what is still unknown, set a research agenda to resolve these questions, and highlight methodological issues for consideration in planned studies. PMID:23017616

  7. A 35-year old woman with productive cough and breathlessness.

    PubMed

    Kalai, Umasankar; Hadda, Vijay; Madan, Karan; Arava, Sudheer; Ali, Firdaus; Jain, Neetu; Mohan, Anant

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old lady was seen in the outpatient clinic owing to fever, cough with mucopurulent expectoration, and breathlessness for the duration of 1 month. She had history of similar episodes treated with antibiotics four times during last 2 years. There was no history of recurrent sinusitis, diarrhea, and skin or soft tissue infection. She had no history of diabetes mellitus or steroid intake. She denied any history of facial trauma or dental infection in the past. There was no history of tuberculosis in her or in the family. Radiograph and CT scan of the chest revealed right upper lobe consolidation. Flexible fibreoptic bronchoscopy revealed multiple nodules at opening of right upper lobe bronchus. This clinicopathological conference describes the details of differential diagnoses, difficulties in achieving the final diagnosis and management of such patient. PMID:26664183

  8. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  9. Infusing Early Childhood Mental Health into Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabert, John C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of enhancing early childhood mental health awareness and skills in non-mental health staff. The author describes a pilot training model, conducted the U.S. Army's Early Intervention Services, that involved: (a) increasing early childhood mental health knowledge through reflective readings, (b) enhancing…

  10. Service Delivery Complexities: Early Intervention for Children with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziviani, Jenny; Darlington, Yvonne; Feeney, Rachel; Rodger, Sylvia; Watter, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) for children with physical disabilities is advocated as a means of enhancing child outcomes and family functioning. The issues confronted by service providers in delivering this support have received relatively little attention. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the experiences of frontline EI staff…

  11. Response to Intervention (RTI) Services: An Ecobehavioral Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Kim, Joung Min

    2012-01-01

    Schoolwide Response to Intervention (RTI) services are growing in prevalence in U.S. schools. Most advanced are RTI programs in elementary schools, with preschool and secondary education programs beginning to discuss, develop, and experiment with schoolwide RTI. At its heart, RTI seeks to account for individual differences in student learning…

  12. The Provision of Interventional Radiology Services in Europe: CIRSE Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Uberoi, Raman; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Roberston, Iain; Krokidis, Miltiadis; van Delden, Otto; Radeleff, Boris; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Szerbo-Trojanowska, Malgorzata; Lee, Michael; Morgan, Robert; Brountzos, Elias; Belli, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is an essential part of modern medicine, delivering minimally invasive patient-focused care, which has been proven to be safe and effective in both elective and emergency settings. The aim of this document is to outline the core requirements and standards for the provision of Interventional Radiological services, including training, certification, manpower, and accreditation. The ultimate challenge will be the adoption of these recommendations by different countries and health economies around the world, in turn ensuring equal access to IR treatments for all patients, the appropriate distribution of resources for IR service provision as well as the continued development of safe and high-quality IR services in Europe and beyond. PMID:26860717

  13. Knowledge and Use of Intervention Practices by Community-Based Early Intervention Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paynter, Jessica M.; Keen, Deb

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated staff attitudes, knowledge and use of evidence-based practices (EBP) and links to organisational culture in a community-based autism early intervention service. An EBP questionnaire was completed by 99 metropolitan and regionally-based professional and paraprofessional staff. Participants reported greater knowledge and use…

  14. Family Intervention and Services for Persons with Mental Illness in the People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Kam-shing

    2005-01-01

    Family services and intervention for persons with mental illness is crucial in mental health services. In this paper, the writer attempts to describe family intervention and services for persons with mental illness in the People's Republic of China. Family intervention and services like home-based care, guardianship network, family counseling, and…

  15. Narratives of breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kvangarsnes, Marit; Torheim, Henny; Hole, Torstein; Öhlund, Lennart S

    2013-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore patient perceptions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and the patients’ experiences of their relations with health personnel during care and treatment. Background Patients suffering from acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often experience life-threatening situations and undergo noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation via bi-level positive airway pressure in a hospital setting. Theory on trust, which often overlaps with the issue of power, can shed light on patient’s experiences during an acute exacerbation. Design Narrative research design was chosen. Methods Ten in-depth qualitative interviews (n = 10) were conducted with patients who had been admitted to two intensive care units in Western Norway during the autumn of 2009 and the spring of 2010. Narrative analysis and theories on trust and power were used to analyse the interviews. Results Because of their breathlessness, the patients perceived that they were completely dependent on others during the acute phase. Some stated that they had experienced an altered perception of reality and had not understood how serious their situation was. Although the patients trusted the health personnel in helping them breathe, they also told stories about care deficiencies and situations in which they felt neglected. Conclusions This study shows that patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often feel wholly dependent on health personnel during the exacerbation and, as a result, experience extreme vulnerability. Relevance to clinical practice The findings give nurses insight into building trust and a good relationship between patient and caregiver during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:23889291

  16. Rethinking Pull-Out Services in Early Intervention: A Professional Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A., Ed.

    The 13 chapters of this book on early intervention services for young children with disabilities are organized into three sections covering issues in service provision in early intervention, application, and future directions. Chapter titles and authors include: (1) "Service Delivery Issues in Center-Based Early Intervention" (R. A. McWilliam);…

  17. Antagonism of substance P and perception of breathlessness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Donald A; Gifford, Alex H; Gilani, Aamir; Waterman, Laurie A; Hilton, Jennifer; Chang, Andrew S; Kupchak, Brian R; Kraemer, William J

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether substance P, an excitatory neuropeptide, modulates the perception of breathlessness by administering aprepitant, a selective antagonist that blocks neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor signaling. Individual targeted resistive load breathing (RLB) was used to provoke breathlessness. In Study 1, sixteen patients (age, 70±6 years) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reported similar ratings of breathlessness during RLB between oral aprepitant (125mg) and placebo. After aprepitant, but not with placebo, there were significant increases in blood levels of substance P (+54±39%) and beta-endorphin (+27±17%). A similar design was used in Study 2 except that naloxone (10mg) was administered intravenously prior to RLB to block any effect of endogenous opioids. Nine patients with COPD reported comparable breathlessness ratings during RLB between aprepitant and placebo. Our results do not support a role for the substance P-NK-1 pathway in the perception of breathlessness in patients with COPD. With selective antagonism of NK-1 signaling, there was co-transmission of substance P and beta-endorphin neuropeptides. PMID:24582719

  18. Bilingual Text4Walking Food Service Employee Intervention Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Diana; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis; Sandi, Giselle; Moss, Angela; Ocampo, Edith V

    2016-01-01

    Background Half of all adults in the United States do not meet the level of recommended aerobic physical activity. Physical activity interventions are now being conducted in the workplace. Accessible technology, in the form of widespread usage of cell phones and text messaging, is available for promoting physical activity. Objective The purposes of this study, which was conducted in the workplace, were to determine (1) the feasibility of implementing a bilingual 12-week Text4Walking intervention and (2) the effect of the Text4Walking intervention on change in physical activity and health status in a food service employee population. Methods Before conducting the study reported here, the Text4Walking research team developed a database of motivational physical activity text messages in English. Because Hispanic or Latino adults compose one-quarter of all adults employed in the food service industry, the Text4Walking team translated the physical activity text messages into Spanish. This pilot study was guided by the Physical Activity Health Promotion Framework and used a 1-group 12-week pre- and posttest design with food service employees who self-reported as being sedentary. The aim of the study was to increase the number of daily steps over the baseline by 3000 steps. Three physical activity text messages were delivered weekly. In addition, participants received 3 motivational calls during the study. Results SPSS version 19.0 and R 3.0 were used to perform the data analysis. There were 33 employees who participated in the study (57.6% female), with a mean age of 43.7 years (SD 8.4). The study included 11 Hispanic or Latino participants, 8 of whom requested that the study be delivered in Spanish. There was a 100% retention rate in the study. At baseline, the participants walked 102 (SD 138) minutes/day (per self-report). This rate increased significantly (P=.008) to 182 (SD 219) minutes/day over the course of the study. The participants had a baseline mean of 10

  19. Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) Services: Case Management Overlay in a Juvenile Diversion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poythress, Norman G.; Dembo, Richard; DuDell, Gary; Wareham, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In this issue we describe a clinical trials study of the impact of adding specific case manager overlay services to "treatment as usual" services for youths in a Juvenile Arbitration Program. In this first article we describe the experimental intervention, the Arbitration Intervention Worker (AIW) service, which was provided to a randomly selected…

  20. Knowledge and use of intervention practices by community-based early intervention service providers.

    PubMed

    Paynter, Jessica M; Keen, Deb

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated staff attitudes, knowledge and use of evidence-based practices (EBP) and links to organisational culture in a community-based autism early intervention service. An EBP questionnaire was completed by 99 metropolitan and regionally-based professional and paraprofessional staff. Participants reported greater knowledge and use of EBPs compared to emerging and unsupported practices. Knowledge and use of EBPs were linked to each other independent of significant correlations with organisational culture and attitudes. Knowledge and use of EBPs was greater in metropolitan than regional locations and paraprofessionals reported greater use of unsupported practices and lower levels of knowledge and use of EBPs than professionals. The implications of these findings for the facilitation of knowledge transfer are discussed. PMID:25398604

  1. Response to Intervention (RTI) Services: An Ecobehavioral Perspective.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Charles R; Kim, Joung Min

    2012-01-01

    School-wide Response to Intervention (RTI) services are growing in prevalence in U.S. schools. Most advanced are RTI programs in elementary schools, with preschool and secondary education programs beginning to discuss, develop, and experiment with school-wide RTI. At its heart, RTI seeks to account for individual differences in student learning success by discovering the instructional situations in which each student learns best and providing them for all who need them. RTI is an early intervening approach to the prevention of learning and behavior problems before they become disabilities later. The implementation of school-wide RTI approaches reorganizes school ecology at multiple levels and when implemented with fidelity, RTI schools have a distinctive "ecological footprint" that differentiates them from traditional, non-RTI schools. Implementers of RTI need consultation that provides them with information on the structure and function of their programs for use in problem solving and decision making. The purpose of this paper is to describe RTI and illustrate an ecobehavioral approach to providing RTI school staff with information they need. PMID:24851036

  2. Response to Intervention (RTI) Services: An Ecobehavioral Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Kim, Joung Min

    2014-01-01

    School-wide Response to Intervention (RTI) services are growing in prevalence in U.S. schools. Most advanced are RTI programs in elementary schools, with preschool and secondary education programs beginning to discuss, develop, and experiment with school-wide RTI. At its heart, RTI seeks to account for individual differences in student learning success by discovering the instructional situations in which each student learns best and providing them for all who need them. RTI is an early intervening approach to the prevention of learning and behavior problems before they become disabilities later. The implementation of school-wide RTI approaches reorganizes school ecology at multiple levels and when implemented with fidelity, RTI schools have a distinctive “ecological footprint” that differentiates them from traditional, non-RTI schools. Implementers of RTI need consultation that provides them with information on the structure and function of their programs for use in problem solving and decision making. The purpose of this paper is to describe RTI and illustrate an ecobehavioral approach to providing RTI school staff with information they need. PMID:24851036

  3. Fulfilling the Promise of Early Intervention: Factors Related to Rates of Delivered IFSP Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Thomas T.

    2001-01-01

    This response to an article evaluating Indiana's early intervention service delivery (EC 628 669) identifies implications of the study including: service intensity is relatively light; service location and context and the process of Individualized Family Service Plan formulation should be examined; implementation should be treated as an…

  4. Pilot Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention Targeting Sexual Health Service Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, K. E.; Newby, K.; Caley, M.; Danahay, A.; Kehal, I.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among…

  5. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Early intervention services in natural environments. 303... environments. Each system must include policies and procedures to ensure, consistent with §§ 303.13(a)(8) (early intervention services), 303.26 (natural environments), and 303.344(d)(1)(ii) (content of an...

  6. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Early intervention services in natural environments... environments. Each system must include policies and procedures to ensure, consistent with §§ 303.13(a)(8) (early intervention services), 303.26 (natural environments), and 303.344(d)(1)(ii) (content of an...

  7. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Early intervention services in natural environments... environments. Each system must include policies and procedures to ensure, consistent with §§ 303.13(a)(8) (early intervention services), 303.26 (natural environments), and 303.344(d)(1)(ii) (content of an...

  8. The Role of Maternal Depression in Accessing Early Intervention Services for Children with Developmental Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colgan, Siobhan Eileen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between maternal depression and children's access to early intervention services among a sample of children with developmental delay at age two who were determined to be eligible for early intervention services, were full term and of normal birth weight, and were not previously identified with any…

  9. A Crisis Intervention Service: Comparison of Younger and Older Adult Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winogrond, Iris R.; Mirassou, Marlene M.

    1983-01-01

    Compares adult and elderly clients of a Crisis Intervention Service in an urban metropolitan area, which included a telephone counseling/referral service and a mobile intervention team for home assessments. Findings indicated the importance of using a biopsychosocial model, particularly in the assessment of elderly persons. (JAC)

  10. Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention targeting sexual health service access.

    PubMed

    Brown, K E; Newby, K; Caley, M; Danahay, A; Kehal, I

    2016-04-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among 13-19-year olds are reported. A pre-post questionnaire-based design was used. Matched baseline and follow-up data were identified from 148 respondents aged 13-18 years. Outcome measures were self-reported service access, self-reported intention to access services and beliefs about services and service access identified through needs analysis. Objective service access data provided by local sexual health services were also analyzed. Analysis suggests the intervention had a significant positive effect on psychological barriers to and antecedents of service access among females. Males, who reported greater confidence in service access compared with females, significantly increased service access by time 2 follow-up. Available objective service access data support the assertion that the intervention may have led to increases in service access. There is real promise for this novel digital intervention. Further evaluation is planned as the model is licensed to and rolled out by other local authorities in the United Kingdom. PMID:26928566

  11. Slik and the receptor tyrosine kinase Breathless mediate localized activation of Moesin in terminal tracheal cells.

    PubMed

    Ukken, Fiona Paul; Aprill, Imola; JayaNandanan, N; Leptin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A key element in the regulation of subcellular branching and tube morphogenesis of the Drosophila tracheal system is the organization of the actin cytoskeleton by the ERM protein Moesin. Activation of Moesin within specific subdomains of cells, critical for its interaction with actin, is a tightly controlled process and involves regulatory inputs from membrane proteins, kinases and phosphatases. The kinases that activate Moesin in tracheal cells are not known. Here we show that the Sterile-20 like kinase Slik, enriched at the luminal membrane, is necessary for the activation of Moesin at the luminal membrane and regulates branching and subcellular tube morphogenesis of terminal cells. Our results reveal the FGF-receptor Breathless as an additional necessary cue for the activation of Moesin in terminal cells. Breathless-mediated activation of Moesin is independent of the canonical MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25061859

  12. Physical Deconditioning as a Cause of Breathlessness among Obese Adolescents with a Diagnosis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Richard C.; Weltman, Judith; Patrie, James T.; Weltman, Arthur L.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obese children frequently complain of breathlessness. Asthma and obesity can both contribute to the symptoms during exercise, and this symptom can contribute to a diagnosis of asthma in these children. Despite the high prevalence of obesity few studies have investigated the cardiopulmonary physiology of breathlessness in obese children with a diagnosis of asthma. Methods In this case-control study, thirty adolescents between age 12 and 19 were studied with baseline spirometry and a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Ten adolescents were normal controls, ten had obesity without a diagnosis of asthma, and ten had obesity with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. Results Baseline characteristics including complete blood count and spirometry were comparable between obese adolescents with and without a diagnosis of asthma. During exercise, obese asthmatic and obese non-asthmatic adolescents had significantly reduced physical fitness compared to healthy controls as evidenced by decreased peak oxygen uptake after adjusting for actual body weight (21.7±4.5 vs. 21.4±5.4 vs. 35.3±5.8 ml/kg/min, respectively). However, pulmonary capacity at the peak of exercise was comparable among all three groups as evidenced by similar pulmonary reserve. Conclusion In this study, breathlessness was primarily due to cardiopulmonary deconditioning in the majority of obese adolescents with or without a diagnosis of asthma. PMID:23637784

  13. Magnetoencephalography to investigate central perception of exercise-induced breathlessness in people with chronic lung disease: a feasibility pilot

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Miriam J; Simpson, Michael IG; Currow, David C; Millman, Rebecca E; Hart, Simon P; Green, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Neuroimaging in chronic breathlessness is challenging. The study objective was to test the feasibility of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for functional neuroimaging of people with chronic breathlessness. Design Feasibility pilot study. Setting Respiratory clinic out-patients. Participants 8 patients (mean age=62; (range 47–83); 4 men) with chronic non-malignant lung disease; modified MRC breathlessness score ≥3 (median mMRC=4), intensity of exercise-induced breathlessness >3/10; no contraindication to MRI scanning. Methods and measures 4 MEG scans were conducted for each participant: (1) at rest (5 mins), (2) postseated leg exercise-induced breathlessness during recovery (10 mins). Recovery scans (2) were conducted with/without facial airflow in random order; both scans were repeated 1 h later. Participants rated breathlessness intensity (0–10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS)) at baseline, maximal exertion and every minute during recovery, and rated acceptability of study procedures at the end of the study (0–10 NRS). A structural MRI scan was conducted for MEG coregistration and source-space analyses. Rest data were compared with data from healthy volunteers (N=6; 5 men; mean age=30.7 years±3.9 years). Results Exercises and MEG scanning were acceptable to all participants; 7/8 completed the MRI scans. Maximum breathlessness intensity was induced by 5 min’ exercise. The same level was induced for repeat scans (median=8; IQR=7–8). All recovered to baseline by 10 min. Time-frequency profiles of data from the first and last 3 min were analysed in MEG source space based on breathlessness location estimates. Source localisation was performed, but anatomical source inference was limited to the level of the lobe. Differences in areas of activity were seen: during recovery scans; with and without airflow; and between participants/normal volunteers at rest. Conclusions MEG is a feasible method to investigate exercise-induced breathlessness

  14. Treating Female Perpetrators: State Standards for Batterer Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernsmith, Poco; Kernsmith, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Although domestic violence has historically been considered primarily a crime perpetrated by men, increasing numbers of women are being arrested and mandated into batterer intervention programs. This study examined existing state policies to explore the degree to which they address the unique needs of women in batterer intervention programs.…

  15. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Psychosocial Functioning: A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services on drug use and self-reported delinquency for youths involved in a clinical trial of the Juvenile Arbitration program. The project evaluated an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management services to youths and their families. The present study examines interview…

  16. Professionals' Perceptions of the Role of Literacy in Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thatcher, Karen; Fletcher, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine therapists' perceptions about literacy in early intervention services. Little effort has been devoted to the incorporation of literacy into therapy services for very young children with special needs. In an attempt to understand how therapy providers view the role of literacy in their services, 168…

  17. The Preschool Puzzle: A Study of Early Intervention Programs and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, William; And Others

    The New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities initiated a project to produce a description of existing state and local programs and models of service delivery for early intervention services for children aged 0-5. A survey of 72 public and private service providers in 12 New York counties determined that 11,185…

  18. 78 FR 25458 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services...

  19. Improving the Design and Implementation of In-Service Professional Development in Early Childhood Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    A model for designing and implementing evidence-­based in­-service professional development in early childhood intervention as well as the key features of the model are described. The key features include professional development specialist (PDS) description and demonstration of an intervention practice, active and authentic job-­embedded…

  20. Effects of Three Levels of Early Intervention Services on Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claussen, Angelika H.; Scott, Keith G.; Mundy, Peter C.; Katz, Lynne F.

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is a high-risk indicator for adverse developmental outcomes. Three levels of intervention (center, home, and primary care) were compared in a full service, birth to age 3, early intervention program serving children exposed to cocaine prenatally. Data were collected on 130 children from urban, predominantly poor,…

  1. Young Children with Disabilities in Israel: System of Early Intervention Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Cory; Meadan, Hedda; Sandhaus, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to analyze early intervention programs in Israel according to the Developmental Systems Model (Guralnick, 2001), in an attempt to identify strengths and areas for further development for service delivery for young children with disabilities in Israel. Early intervention in Israel is part of a comprehensive healthcare model…

  2. The Missing Link: Self Study Continuing Education for Nutrition Services Awareness in Early Intervention. Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lara; And Others

    This workbook is a companion to an 18-minute instructional video on nutrition services in early intervention programs. Both the workbook and the video are designed to assist early intervention professionals concerning nutrition and feeding concerns of children with special health care needs. The following issues are addressed: importance of…

  3. A Brief Exposure-Based Intervention for Service Members with PTSD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Maria M.; Litz, Brett T.; Gray, Matt J.; Lebowitz, Leslie; Nash, William; Conoscenti, Lauren; Amidon, Amy; Lang, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of service members in need of mental health care requires that empirically based interventions be tailored to the unique demands and exigencies of this population. We discuss a 6-session intervention for combat-related PTSD designed to foster willingness to engage with and disclose difficult deployment memories through a…

  4. The River Street Autism Program: A Case Study of a Regional Service Center Behavioral Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Kathleen; Martino, Gayle M.; Parvenski, Tom

    2006-01-01

    An urgent demand from Connecticut parents for behavioral intervention resulted in the development of the River Street Autism Program (RSAP). This research-to-practice program implements intervention service based on empirical research findings conducted with children diagnosed with autism and pervasive developmental disorders. RSAP is provided…

  5. Positioning the arts for intervention design research in the human services.

    PubMed

    Moxley, David P; Calligan, Holly Feen

    2015-12-01

    The arts have been integral to the human experience fostering innovation in social arrangements, strengthening group cohesion, and merging esthetics with the utilitarian properties of technology. For intervention design research in the human services the arts can harness innovation and creativity in meeting human needs and addressing social issues. Given their capacities to stimulate expression of first person experience through interpretative strategies, the arts can equip people and groups, including researchers, with opportunities to express primary experiential knowledge through creative means, portray useful ways of meeting human needs, educate others about the social issues people experience, and formulate intervention strategies or even models to address the causes and consequences of those issues. In this paper, the authors discuss how the arts can inform and deepen human service intervention design and development and, as a result, advance innovation in the human services. They offer a rationale supporting the inclusion of the arts in the design of human service interventions, examine the contributions of the arts to the formulation of intervention concept and developmental research to further improve interventions, and consider how the arts can advance the reflexivity of intervention designers. The authors draw implications for how researchers can position the arts in the nine steps of intervention design and development the authors offer in this paper. PMID:26262890

  6. The Progression of Early Intervention Disability Services in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Clare; Murphy, Geraldine; Sixsmith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The Republic of Ireland is an island situated in north-west Europe inhabited by 4.6 million people, with 2.8% between 0 and 4 years of age with a disability (Central Statistics Office, 2012). The Irish Government funds the Irish health services, which, in turn, directly and indirectly funds disability services. Education and Disability legislation…

  7. Service and Conservation Corps. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Service and Conservation Corps" engages young adults in full-time community service, job training, and educational activities. The program serves youth who are typically between the ages of 17 and 26 and who have dropped out of school, been involved with the criminal justice system, or face other barriers to success. Participants are organized…

  8. Early Intervention and Prevention--Issues and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopfstein, Rosalind

    This paper reviews the American Association on Mental Retardation's (AAMR's) presentation of issues surrounding the field of early intervention. AAMR's publications are the primary sources of information in the paper. Specific sections address: (1) the impact of public laws on the rights of children and families to a free and appropriate public…

  9. Impact of a Quality Improvement Intervention to Increase Brief Alcohol and Drug Interventions on a Level I Trauma Service.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Princess; Seale, J Paul; Johnson, J Aaron; Dhabliwala, Jason; Kitchens, Debra; Okosun, Ike S; Stokes, Nathan A; Ashley, Dennis

    2016-05-01

    Screening and brief intervention (SBI) decreases alcohol use and related consequences among trauma patients. Although SBI is required in Level I and II trauma centers, implementation often is difficult. This study used the Plan-Do-Study-Act approach to identify and implement measures to increase the number of patients receiving SBI at a Level I trauma center. A multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee with representation from the Trauma Service and SBI Team met monthly during 2011. Stepwise interventions included identifying a resident "champion" responsible for screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment, including an SBI report at monthly trauma conferences, and incorporating SBI into the trauma order set. Outcomes measures were number of patients screened, patients screening positive, and the number of patients receiving SBI. At baseline, 170 of 362 patients (47%) were screened, 68/170 (40%) had positive screens, and 30/68 (44% of those with positive screens) received SBI services. Quarter 2 saw increases in patients screened-275/437 (63%), patients screening positive (106/275; 39%) and those receiving SBI (60/106; 57%). Increases culminated in Quarter 4 with screening 401/466 (86%; P < 0.001) patients, 208/401 (52%; P < 0.001) patients screening positive, and 114 patients (55%; P = 0.296) receiving services. Use of similar quality improvement measures nationwide could improve rates of provision of this important service. PMID:27215730

  10. Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... coordinator to find available services in your state. Technology Many people who are deaf or hard-of- ... of-hearing person has is called "residual hearing". Technology does not "cure" hearing loss, but may help ...

  11. A Model Human Sexuality--HIV/AIDS Prevention and Intervention Service-Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Clarence, M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with a service-learning program focused on human sexuality and HIV/AIDS prevention and intervention at the Howard University Department of Health, Human Performance and Leisure Studies. Topics discussed include how this program was created, an overview of peer education, HIV/AIDS peer education training, and services provided to…

  12. Family Outcomes of Early Intervention: Families' Perceptions of Need, Services, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epley, Pamela H.; Summers, Jean Ann; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2011-01-01

    Relationships between parent ratings of Part C/early intervention (EI) services and family outcomes for families of young children with disabilities were examined--specifically, the early childhood outcomes (ECO)-recommended family outcomes and family quality of life (FQOL). Measures included the Early Childhood Services Survey, the ECO Center…

  13. Collaborative Practice in Early Childhood Intervention from the Perspectives of Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chih-Hung; Hossain, Syeda Zakia; Sitharthan, Gomathi

    2013-01-01

    Effective early childhood intervention (ECI) relies on collaboration among agencies, service providers, and families. Although previous literature has primarily focused on segments of collaboration within ECI service delivery, the actual process and how the adult stakeholders perceive and engage in collaborative practice have important…

  14. Service Coordination Caseloads in State Early Intervention Systems. NECTAS Notes, Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurth, Joicey

    Under the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), service coordination is defined as "the activities carried out by a service coordinator to assist and enable a child eligible under this part and the child's family to receive the rights, procedural…

  15. Predictors of Service-Delivery Models in Center-Based Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A.; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 775 early childhood intervention professionals examined their perceptions toward the integration of special services into regular classrooms. Results showed that special educators were most likely to use and favor integrated services, followed by occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, and physical therapists.…

  16. Perspectives of Therapist's Role in Care Coordination between Medical and Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ideishi, Roger I.; O'Neil, Margaret E.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Nixon-Cave, Kim

    2010-01-01

    This study explored perspectives of therapist's role in care coordination between early intervention (EI) and medical services, and identified strategies for improving service delivery. Fifty adults participated in one of six focus groups. Participants included parents, pediatricians, and therapists working in hospital and EI programs. Structured…

  17. A Model for Developing Pre-Service Teacher Reflection: An Interactive Intervention Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciminelli, Michelle R.

    2011-01-01

    The author describes an interactive intervention strategy to assist pre-service teachers in developing reflective practices in an undergraduate literacy course. The goal of the study was to encourage deeper analysis rather than purely descriptive summaries of field placements in teacher candidates' written reflections, so pre-service teachers may…

  18. The Impact of Arbitration Intervention Services on Youth Recidivism: One-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Wareham, Jennifer; Poythress, Norman G.; Cook, Brittany; Schmeidler, James

    2006-01-01

    We report the impact of case management services and youth psychopathic features on twelve-month recidivism rates for youths involved in a Center for Substance Abuse Treatment funded clinical trial conducted in a juvenile diversion program. The project is evaluating an innovative intervention service providing 16 weeks of intensive case management…

  19. Working Together in Early Intervention: Cultural Considerations in Helping Relationships and Service Utilization. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Deborah; McLean, Mary; Corso, Rob; Bruns, Deborah

    In this report, shifts underway in early intervention (EI) from a professional-centered to a more family-centered model of service delivery are documented. The demographic changes in the past decade of young children and families receiving EI services (e.g., teen parents, children with more complex developmental and medical needs), in addition to…

  20. After Abuse: Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers. FPG Snapshot. Number 54. August 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    By law each state is required to ensure that all substantiated cases of maltreated infants and toddlers are referred to Part C early intervention services. In reality, many children may not be receiving the child development services they need. Researchers have known for some time that children who have been abused are at greater risk for…

  1. Health Care Policy and Part H Services: Early Intervention as a Concept (Not a Separate Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonkoff, Jack P.

    This paper argues that there is a critical need to reframe the fundamental policy questions which fragment early childhood intervention services and health care, in order to construct an integrated system of comprehensive services that includes basic health care and developmental support for all children and their families and that provides…

  2. Perceptions of Early Intervention Services: Adolescent and Adult Mothers in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stacy D.; Bruns, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) provides critical services to families with young children who have diagnosed disabilities, developmental delays, or who are at-risk for developmental delays. Very little is known about the experiences of adolescent mothers who have children who qualify for EI services. The authors investigated the perceptions of adolescent…

  3. Maternity Care Services and Culture: A Systematic Global Mapping of Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Coast, Ernestina; Jones, Eleri; Portela, Anayda; Lattof, Samantha R.

    2014-01-01

    Background A vast body of global research shows that cultural factors affect the use of skilled maternity care services in diverse contexts. While interventions have sought to address this issue, the literature on these efforts has not been synthesised. This paper presents a systematic mapping of interventions that have been implemented to address cultural factors that affect women's use of skilled maternity care. It identifies and develops a map of the literature; describes the range of interventions, types of literature and study designs; and identifies knowledge gaps. Methods and Findings Searches conducted systematically in ten electronic databases and two websites for literature published between 01/01/1990 and 28/02/2013 were combined with expert-recommended references. Potentially eligible literature included journal articles and grey literature published in English, French or Spanish. Items were screened against inclusion and exclusion criteria, yielding 96 items in the final map. Data extracted from the full text documents are presented in tables and a narrative synthesis. The results show that a diverse range of interventions has been implemented in 35 countries to address cultural factors that affect the use of skilled maternity care. Items are classified as follows: (1) service delivery models; (2) service provider interventions; (3) health education interventions; (4) participatory approaches; and (5) mental health interventions. Conclusions The map provides a rich source of information on interventions attempted in diverse settings that might have relevance elsewhere. A range of literature was identified, from narrative descriptions of interventions to studies using randomised controlled trials to evaluate impact. Only 23 items describe studies that aim to measure intervention impact through the use of experimental or observational-analytic designs. Based on the findings, we identify avenues for further research in order to better document and measure

  4. Program- and service-level costs of seven screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment programs

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jeremy W; Mallonee, Erin; Dowd, William; Aldridge, Arnie; Cowell, Alexander J; Vendetti, Janice

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the costs of delivering screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) services within the first seven demonstration programs funded by the US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Service-level costs were estimated and compared across implementation model (contracted specialist, inhouse specialist, inhouse generalist) and service delivery setting (emergency department, hospital inpatient, outpatient). Program-level costs were estimated and compared across grantee recipient programs. Service-level data were collected through timed observations of SBIRT service delivery. Program-level data were collected during key informant interviews using structured cost interview guides. At the service level, support activities that occur before or after engaging the patient comprise a considerable portion of the cost of delivering SBIRT services, especially short duration services. At the program level, average costs decreased as more patients were screened. Comparing across program and service levels, the average annual operating costs calculated at the program level often exceeded the cost of actual service delivery. Provider time spent in support of service provision may comprise a large share of the costs in some cases because of potentially substantial fixed and quasifixed costs associated with program operation. The cost structure of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment is complex and discontinuous of patient flow, causing annual operating costs to exceed the costs of actual service provision for some settings and implementation models. PMID:25114610

  5. 34 CFR 303.13 - Early intervention services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the child and enhancing the child's development. (4) Health services has the meaning given the..., family counseling, consultation on child development, parent training, and education programs. (11... the skill development of the child; and (iv) Working with the infant or toddler with a disability...

  6. 75 FR 68613 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... be transferring Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C funds as a Non-Competitive Replacement Award, to... treatment services and avoid a disruption of HIV/AIDS clinical care to clients in East and Central Harlem... Health will receive $577,174 of fiscal year (FY) 2010 funds to ensure ongoing clinical HIV/ AIDS...

  7. Prospectively Collected Characteristics of Adult Patients, Their Consultations and Outcomes as They Report Breathlessness When Presenting to General Practice in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Currow, David C.; Clark, Katherine; Mitchell, Geoffrey K.; Johnson, Miriam J.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breathlessness is a subjective sensation, so understanding its impacts requires patients’ reports, including prospective patient-defined breathlessness as a reason for presenting to general practitioners (GP).The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of breathlessness as a reason for GP consultations while defining the clinico-demographic factors of these patients and the characteristics and outcomes of those consultations. Methods Using nine years of the Family Medicine Research Centre database of 100 consecutive encounters from 1,000 practices annually, the patient-defined reason for encounter ‘breathlessness’ was explored using prospectively collected data in people ≥18 years with clinical data coded using the International Classification for Primary Care V2. Dichotomous variables were analysed using chi square and 95% confidence intervals calculated using Kish’s formula for a single stage clustered design. Results Of all the 755,729 consultations collected over a nine year period from 1 April, 2000, 7255 included breathlessness as a reason for encounter (0.96%; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.99) most frequently attributed to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Only 48.3% of GPs saw someone reporting breathlessness. The proportion of consultations with breathlessness increased with age. Breathlessness trebled the likelihood that the consultation occurred in the community rather than the consulting room (p<0.0001) and increased 2.5 fold the likelihood of urgent referral to hospital (p<0.0001). Of those with breathlessness, 12% had undiagnosed breathlessness at the end of the consultation (873/7255) with higher likelihood of being younger females. Discussion Breathlessness is a prevalent symptom in general practitioner. Such prevalence enables future research focused on understanding the temporal pattern of breathlessness and the longitudinal care offered to, and outcomes for these patients, including those who leave the consultation without a

  8. Effect of diabetic case management intervention on health service utilization in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Ae; Kim, Hyeongsu; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George

    2015-12-01

    This study is to estimate the effectiveness of a diabetic case management programme on health-care service utilization. The study population included 6007 as the intervention group and 956,766 as the control group. As the indicators of health-care service utilization, numbers of medical ambulatory consultations, days of medication prescribed and medical expenses for one year were used, and we analysed the claim data of the health insurance from 2005 to 2007. The study population was classified into three subgroups based on the number of medical ambulatory consultations per year before this intervention. In the under-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a significant increase in the number of consultations (3.2), days of prescribed medication (66.4) and medical expenses (287,900 KRW) compared with the control group. Conversely, in the over-serviced subgroup, the intervention group showed a less decrease days of prescribed medication (1.6) compared with the control group. This showed that the case management programme led the intervention group to optimize their utilization of health-care services by subgroups. It is necessary to evaluate the appropriateness of health-care usage and clinical outcome to show the direct effectiveness of the case management programme by subgroups. PMID:24821209

  9. A Pilot Telerehabilitation Program: Delivering Early Intervention Services to Rural Families

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program explored the use of telerehabilitation as an alternative service delivery model for early intervention therapy services. Utilizing the Kentucky Telehealth Network, two families living in rural Kentucky received occupational therapy services over a 12-week period. Following program implementation, qualitative data was collected using participant journals and interviews. Data analysis identified three thematic categories related to the program: benefits/strengths, challenges/weaknesses, and recommendations for program improvement. Results of the program evaluation indicated that telerehabilitation has the potential to cost-effectively meet the therapeutic needs of children living in rural areas where provider shortages exist. The enTECH Telerehabilitation Program serves as a model for how telerehabilitation can be used to deliver early intervention services to ameliorate health disparities and improve access to rehabilitation services. PMID:25945160

  10. Is Your Interventional Radiology Service Ready for SARS?: The Singapore Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Te-Neng; Teo, Ngee; Tay, Kiang-Hiong; Chan, Ling-Ling; Wong, Daniel; Lim, Winston E.H.; Tan, Bien-Soo

    2003-09-15

    The recent epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome caught many by surprise. Hitherto, infection control has not been in the forefront of radiological practice. Many interventional radiology (IR) services are therefore not equipped to deal with such a disease. In this review, we share our experience from the interventional radiologist's perspective, report on the acute measures instituted within our departments and explore the long-term effects of such a disease on the practice of IR.

  11. Therapeutic interventions in perinatal and infant mental health services: a mixed methods inquiry.

    PubMed

    Myors, Karen Anne; Schmied, Virginia; Johnson, Maree; Cleary, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Perinatal mental health disorders potentially have long-term negative sequelae for women, their infants and their families. Multidisciplinary perinatal and infant mental health (PIMH) services are an emerging specialty in mental health designed to improve mother-infant outcomes. This mixed methods study explored the characteristics of women referred to a specialist PIMH service and the therapeutic interventions that PIMH clinicians use. Women referred to the service were identified with multiple and complex risk factors. Perinatal and infant mental health clinicians use a range of interventions, dependent upon their training, such as family of origin work/genograms, non-directive counseling, and strategies to manage anxiety and depression. Clinicians also emphasized the therapeutic relationship and the interventions they use within an attachment-based framework, which warrants further research. PMID:24766172

  12. Short message service (SMS) text messaging as an intervention medium for weight loss: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Ryan; Bosworth, Hayden

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 68% of American adults are obese or overweight. Mobile devices such as mobile phones have emerged as a mode of intervention delivery to help people improve their health, particularly in relation to weight loss. This literature review examines the relationship between the use of short message service (SMS) text messaging as an intervention medium and weight loss. Results from this literature review (n = 14) suggest that SMS as an intervention tool for weight loss is still in its infancy. Initial results are promising but continued investigation is needed. We offer several recommendations for future research. PMID:23257055

  13. Service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage, retention and adherence to antiretroviral therapy and HIV care*

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Peter; Munthali, Chigomezgo; Ferguson, Jane; Armstrong, Alice; Kranzer, Katharina; Ferrand, Rashida A; Ross, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adolescents living with HIV face substantial difficulties in accessing HIV care services and have worse treatment outcomes than other age groups. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, retention in HIV care and adherence to ART. Methods We systematically searched the Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Sciences databases and conference abstracts from the International AIDS Conference and International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA). Studies published in English between 1st January 2001 and 9th June 2014 were included. Two authors independently evaluated reports for eligibility, extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results Eleven studies from nine countries were eligible for review. Three studies were randomised controlled trials. Interventions assessed included individual and group counselling and education; peer support; directly observed therapy; financial incentives; and interventions to improve the adolescent-friendliness of clinics. Most studies were of low to moderate methodological quality. Conclusions This review identified limited evidence on the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to support adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to ART initiation, retention on ART and adherence to ART. Although recommendations are qualified because of the small numbers of studies and limited methodological quality, offering individual and group education and counselling, financial incentives, increasing clinic accessibility and provision of specific adolescent-tailored services appear promising interventions and warrant further investigation. PMID:25877007

  14. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... prevent a lapse in comprehensive primary care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS, HRSA will...

  15. 78 FR 18989 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  16. 78 FR 31568 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  17. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... a lapse in comprehensive primary care services for persons living with HIV/AIDS, HRSA will...

  18. 78 FR 10182 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  19. 78 FR 78976 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  20. 78 FR 10183 - Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION: Notice of Ryan White HIV/AIDS...

  1. Protocol of the PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in patients with symptomatic pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rajesh; Azzopardi, Maree; Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Read, Catherine; Murray, Kevin; Eastwood, Peter; Jenkins, Sue; Singh, Bhajan; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pleural effusion is a common clinical problem that can complicate many medical conditions. Breathlessness is the most common symptom of pleural effusion of any cause and the most common reason for pleural drainage. However, improvement in breathlessness following drainage of an effusion is variable; some patients experience either no benefit or a worsening of their breathlessness. The physiological mechanisms underlying breathlessness in patients with a pleural effusion are unclear and likely to be multifactorial with patient-related and effusion-related factors contributing. A comprehensive study of the physiological and symptom responses to drainage of pleural effusions may provide a clearer understanding of these mechanisms, and may identify predictors of benefit from drainage. The ability to identify those patients whose breathlessness will (or will not) improve after pleural fluid drainage can help avoid unnecessary pleural drainage procedures, their associated morbidities and costs. The PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study is a prospective study to comprehensively evaluate factors contributing to pleural effusion-related breathlessness. Methods and analysis The PLEASE study is a single-centre prospective study of 150 patients with symptomatic pleural effusions that require therapeutic drainage. The study aims to identify key factors that underlie breathlessness in patients with pleural effusions and develop predictors of improvement in breathlessness following effusion drainage. Participants will undergo evaluation pre-effusion and post-effusion drainage to assess their level of breathlessness at rest and during exercise, respiratory and other physiological responses as well as respiratory muscle mechanics. Pre-drainage and post-drainage parameters will be collected and compared to identify the key factors and mechanisms that correlate with improvement in breathlessness. Ethics and dissemination Approved by the Sir Charles

  2. Interoceptive fear learning to mild breathlessness as a laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks

    PubMed Central

    Pappens, Meike; Vandenbossche, Evelien; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Fear learning is thought to play an important role in panic disorder. Benign interoceptive sensations can become predictors (conditioned stimuli – CSs) of massive fear when experienced in the context of an initial panic attack (unconditioned stimulus – US). The mere encounter of these CSs on a later moment can induce anxiety and fear, and precipitate a new panic attack. It has been suggested that fear learning to interoceptive cues would result in unpredictable panic. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear learning to an interoceptive CS is possible without declarative knowledge of the CS–US contingency. The CS consisted of mild breathlessness (or: dyspnea), the US was a suffocation experience. During acquisition, the experimental group received six presentations of mild breathlessness immediately followed by suffocation; for the control group both experiences were always separated by an intertrial interval. In the subsequent extinction phase, participants received six unreinforced presentations of the CS. Expectancy of the US was rated continuously and startle eyeblink electromyographic, skin conductance, and respiration were measured. Declarative knowledge of the CS–US relationship was also assessed with a post-experimental questionnaire. At the end of acquisition, both groups displayed the same levels of US expectancy and skin conductance in response to the CS, but the experimental group showed a fear potentiated startle eyeblink and a different respiratory response to the CS compared to the control group. Further analyses on a subgroup of CS–US unaware participants confirmed the presence of startle eyeblink conditioning in the experimental group but not in the control group. Our findings suggest that interoceptive fear learning is not dependent on declarative knowledge of the CS–US relationship. The present interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm may serve as an ecologically valid laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks. PMID

  3. Interoceptive fear learning to mild breathlessness as a laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Pappens, Meike; Vandenbossche, Evelien; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Fear learning is thought to play an important role in panic disorder. Benign interoceptive sensations can become predictors (conditioned stimuli - CSs) of massive fear when experienced in the context of an initial panic attack (unconditioned stimulus - US). The mere encounter of these CSs on a later moment can induce anxiety and fear, and precipitate a new panic attack. It has been suggested that fear learning to interoceptive cues would result in unpredictable panic. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear learning to an interoceptive CS is possible without declarative knowledge of the CS-US contingency. The CS consisted of mild breathlessness (or: dyspnea), the US was a suffocation experience. During acquisition, the experimental group received six presentations of mild breathlessness immediately followed by suffocation; for the control group both experiences were always separated by an intertrial interval. In the subsequent extinction phase, participants received six unreinforced presentations of the CS. Expectancy of the US was rated continuously and startle eyeblink electromyographic, skin conductance, and respiration were measured. Declarative knowledge of the CS-US relationship was also assessed with a post-experimental questionnaire. At the end of acquisition, both groups displayed the same levels of US expectancy and skin conductance in response to the CS, but the experimental group showed a fear potentiated startle eyeblink and a different respiratory response to the CS compared to the control group. Further analyses on a subgroup of CS-US unaware participants confirmed the presence of startle eyeblink conditioning in the experimental group but not in the control group. Our findings suggest that interoceptive fear learning is not dependent on declarative knowledge of the CS-US relationship. The present interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm may serve as an ecologically valid laboratory model for unexpected panic attacks. PMID:26300830

  4. A Retrospective Evaluation of Remote Pharmacist Interventions in a Telepharmacy Service Model Using a Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Murante, Lori J.; Moffett, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This retrospective cross-sectional study evaluated a telepharmacy service model using a conceptual framework to compare documented remote pharmacist interventions by year, hospital, and remote pharmacist and across rural hospitals with or without an on-site rural hospital pharmacist. Materials and Methods: Documented remote pharmacist interventions for patients at eight rural hospitals in the Midwestern United States during prospective prescription order review/entry from 2008 to 2011 were extracted from RxFusion® database (a home-grown system, i.e., internally developed program at The Nebraska Medical Center (TNMC) for capturing remote pharmacist-documented intervention data). The study authors conceptualized an analytical framework, mapping the 37 classes of remote pharmacist interventions to three broader-level definitions: (a) intervention, eight categories (interaction/potential interaction, contraindication, adverse effects, anticoagulation monitoring, drug product selection, drug regimen, summary, and recommendation), (b) patient medication management, two categories (therapy review and action), and (c) health system-centered medication use process, four categories (prescribing, transcribing and documenting, administering, and monitoring). Frequencies of intervention levels were compared by year, hospital, remote pharmacist, and hospital pharmacy status (with a remote pharmacist and on-site pharmacist or with a remote pharmacist only) using chi-squared test and univariate logistic regression analyses, as appropriate. Results: For 450,000 prescription orders 19,222 remote pharmacist interventions were documented. Frequency of interventions significantly increased each year (36% in 2009, 55% in 2010, and 7% in 2011) versus the baseline year (2008, 3%) when service started. The frequency of interventions also differed significantly across the eight hospitals and 16 remote pharmacists for the three defined intervention levels and categories

  5. Nutrition: Intervention Guidance for Service Providers and Families. Connecticut Birth to Three System, Service Guideline 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Birth to Three System, Hartford.

    This guide was developed to assist families and service providers in Connecticut with nutrition services for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual sections provide information about the following topics: laws and regulations related to nutrition services; eligibility for the Connecticut Birth to Three System and nutrition; nutrition…

  6. Radiology. Diagnosis/imaging/intervention. 5 volumes. Annual revision service

    SciTech Connect

    Taveras, J.M.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    This five-volume loose leaf work of approximately 4,500 pages is designed to be used as a clinical reference in modern radiologic practice. It covers all aspects of diagnostic imaging, starting with the physical foundation of each imaging modality. The material is organized according to organ systems and not along technical considerations. Thus, when discussing a disease process in any organ, all imaging modalities that can be brought to bear on the diagnosis of an entity are discussed. The volumes are lavishly illustrated, containing about 7,000 black-and-white illustrations and about 50 tables. The five volumes contain nine sections. The discussions of the organ systems are illustrated using examples from plain film, nuclear medicine, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance, position emission tomography and ultrasound. Wherever possible, each chapter begins with a discussion of anatomy, physiology, and general examination technique, and then proceeds to a discussion of disease categories. The loose leaf approach allows for updating of the contents each year through the annual revision service.

  7. The Integration of Behavioral Health Interventions in Children’s Health Care: Services, Science, and Suggestions

    PubMed Central

    Kolko, David J.; Perrin, Ellen C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Because the integration of mental or behavioral health services in pediatric primary care is a national priority, a description and evaluation of the interventions applied in the healthcare setting is warranted. This paper examines several intervention research studies based on alternative models for delivering behavioral health care in conjunction with comprehensive pediatric care. Method This review describes the diverse methods applied to different clinical problems, such as brief mental health skills, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practices (EBP), and the empirical outcomes of this research literature. Next, several key treatment considerations are discussed to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of these interventions. Some practical suggestions for overcoming key service barriers are provided to enhance the capacity of the practice to deliver behavioral health care. Results There is moderate empirical support for the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of these interventions for treating internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Practical strategies to extend this work and addressing methodological limitations are provided that draw upon recent frameworks designed to simplify the treatment enterprise (e.g., common elements). Discussion Pediatric primary care has become an important venue for providing mental health services to children and adolescents due, in part, to its many desirable features (e.g., no stigma, local setting, familiar providers). Further adaptation of existing delivery models may promote the delivery of effective integrated interventions with primary care providers as partners designed to address mental health problems in pediatric healthcare. PMID:24588366

  8. Ethnicity and Adolescent Depression: Prevalence, Access to Services, and Promising Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Amanda E.; Polo, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is more common among adolescents of ethnic minority backgrounds, who also are less likely to receive professional help. This article presents information about prevalence of depression and service use across ethnic groups, and then outlines several promising intervention programs that are designed for adolescents suffering from…

  9. Accuracy of Knowledge of Child Development in Mothers of Children Receiving Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand, Debra H.; Pierce, Katherine J.; Bultas, Margaret W.; McMillin, Stephen Edward; Gott, Rolanda Maxim; Wilmott, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Parents' involvement in early intervention (EI) services fosters positive developmental trajectories in young children. Although EI research on parenting skills has been abundant, fewer data are available on parents' knowledge of normative child development. Sixty-seven mothers of children participating in a Midwestern city's EI program completed…

  10. Personalized Learning for the At-Risk through Intervention and Referral Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePass Pipkin, Tamika S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methodology study was to examine whether Personalized Student Learning Plans (PSLPs) could reduce at-risk students' academic and social dysfunction. At-risk students were referred to Intervention & Referral Services (I&RS) and PSLPs were used to develop a personal plan for progress. Data sources included…

  11. Care Coordination Practices among Illinois Pediatricians and Early Intervention Service Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the past three decades, largely due to advances in technology, there has been growth in the fields of early intervention (EI) and pediatrics for infants/toddlers with special health care needs (SHCN). This growth has also brought about a change in the relationship between pediatricians and EI service coordinators, creating an…

  12. InReach: Connecting NICU Infants and Their Parents with Community Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akers, Adrienne L.; Boyce, Glenna; Mabey, Vanya; Boyce, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Infants who are born prematurely may experience developmental delays and impairments during infancy and beyond. Those who are born at extremely low birthweight face the greatest challenges. Many families could benefit from early intervention services through their local Part C of Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) programs, but…

  13. School Psychology Services: Community-Based, First-Order Crisis Intervention during the Gulf War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingman, Avigdor

    1992-01-01

    Examines the community-based mental health preventive measures undertaken by the school psychology services in response to the missile attacks on Israel during the Gulf War. Attempts to report and delineate the major assumptions and components of some of the key interventions. (Author/NB)

  14. Service Coordinators' Perceptions of Autism-Specific Screening and Referral Practices in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Muusz, Marta; McKenna, Catherine; O'Connor, Emily; Cutler, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Service coordinators in a statewide early intervention program were surveyed to develop an understanding of screening and referral practices to identify children on the autism spectrum. Quantitative and qualitative data summarizing autism-specific screening and referral practices are reported. More than 50% of the respondents reported that they…

  15. Using Drawing as Intervention with Children for In-Service Preschool Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, I Ju; Liu, Chu Chih

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a basic overview of in-service preschool teachers using drawing as intervention with children. Art therapy is used more often for the smaller children who have more difficulty to describe their emotions and feelings in recognizing words, such as anger, resentment, and different kind of abuses. As a matter of fact, the drawing…

  16. Elder Abuse and Neglect: Assessment Tools, Interventions, and Recommendations for Effective Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imbody, Bethany; Vandsburger, Etty

    2011-01-01

    With our communities rapidly aging, there is always a clear need for greater knowledge on how to serve elders. Professionals must be able to recognize cases of abuse and neglect and provide appropriate follow up services. Through reviewing recent literature, this paper surveys existing assessment tools and interventions, describes characteristics…

  17. Mobile Device Intervention for Student Support Services in Distance Education Context--FRAME Model Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Lalita S.; Jamatia, Biplab; Aggarwal, A. K.; Kannan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study conducted to analyse the effect of mobile device intervention for student support services and to gauge its use for enhancing teaching--learning process as a future study in the context of offer of Distance Education programmes. The study was conducted with the learners of the coveted Post Graduate…

  18. Barriers to the Uptake of Eye Care Services in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review of Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Khadija Nowaira; Al-Sharqi, Omar Zayan; Abdullah, Muhammad Tanweer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This research identifies effective and ineffective interventions for reducing barriers to the uptake of eye care services in developing countries. Design: Systematic literature review. Setting: Only research studies done in developing countries were included. Method: The review is restricted to English-language articles published…

  19. Early Intervention Supports & Services in Everyday Routines, Activities, and Places in Colorado: A Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Larry, Ed.

    The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Act) is a federal program that assists states in operating a system of early intervention supports and services for infants and toddlers with special needs and their families. In Colorado, the Part C initiative is called Early Childhood…

  20. Conceptualizing Child and Family Outcomes of Early Intervention Services for Children with ASD and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes-Grosser, Donna M.; Rosas, Scott R.; Goldman, Alyssa; Elbaum, Batya; Romanczyk, Ray; Callahan, Emily H.

    2013-01-01

    State early intervention programs (EIPs) have been encouraged to develop and implement comprehensive outcomes measurement systems. As the number of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families receiving services in state EIPs increases, disability-specific outcomes data are needed to better understand issues of access, costs,…

  1. Early identification and intervention services for children with autism in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Cong, Tran; Weiss, Bahr; Toan, Khuc Nang; Le Thu, Tran Thi; Trang, Nguyen Thi Nha; Hoa, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thuy, Dao Thi Thu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In high income countries in Europe and North America, early identification and intervention for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been linked to improved long-term outcomes. However, in most low and middle income countries (LMIC) little is known about use or availability of such services, which limits the ability of policy and development planning. The purpose of the present study was assess the use of ASD services in Vietnam, an Asian LMIC, in order to identify areas within the field that should be specifically targeted to improve ASD services in Vietnam. METHODS Surveys were conducted in six different cities across Vietnam with 90 parents/caregivers of children with ASD, 115 professionals working with children with ASD, and 10 directors of agencies providing ASD services. Parents/caregivers’ survey assessed demographics and information regarding their child’s symptoms and services the child received. Professionals’ survey assessed their demographic and professional background, the ASD services they provide, and their perspective on the quality of ASD services at their agency. Directors’ survey included these same questions as well as additional questions regarding the operation of the agency. RESULTS Early identification and intervention ASD services are available in Vietnam, at least in major cities. However, there is a lack of well-trained professionals, the tools used for evaluation and diagnosis are limited, outdated and unstandardized, and the quality of services is questionable. Most importantly, a scientific evidence base for services is absent, and the country lacks an official governmental policy for supporting children with ASD. CONCLUSIONS Research directly assessing the quality of ASD services in Vietnam is needed. Most centrally, efforts at facilitating governmental policy and support advocacy are needed to increase the likelihood that families and children with ASD will receive appropriate and effective services. PMID:27088123

  2. [Interventions to solve overcrowding in hospital emergency services: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Roberto José; Hortale, Virginia Alonso

    2009-07-01

    This review discusses interventions aimed at solving the problem of overcrowding in hospital emergency services (HES), characteristic of low organizational effectiveness. In free-access and restricted-access databases, the target descriptors were 'overcrowding; emergency; medicine; first aid'. The survey identified 66 citations of interventions, grouped in 47 related interventions. The majority of the studies used observational designs that evaluated the results before and after interventions. Of the 47 related interventions, 34 had results for organizational performance. Four were the most frequently cited: implementation of an observation unit for patients already hospitalized and awaiting diagnosis or clinical stabilization; designation of a dedicated nursing station for the patient's admission, discharge, or transfer; establishment of protocols with indicators of operational saturation and implementation of an emergency care unit. Analyzing 21 interventions that were intended to solve overcrowding in HES and with positive results for length-of-stay, 15 were related to patient stream improvement, interfering actively and positively in patient stream. Interventions that increased access barriers or that merely improved the HES structure were ineffective. PMID:19578565

  3. Interventions to increase initial appointment attendance in mental health services: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schauman, Oliver; Aschan, Lisa Ellinor; Arias, Nicole; Beards, Stephanie; Clement, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Although nonattendance at initial appointments in mental health services is a substantial problem, the phenomenon is poorly understood. This review synthesized findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions to increase initial appointment attendance and determined whether theories or models contributed to intervention design. METHODS Six electronic databases were systematically searched, and reference lists of identified studies were also examined. Studies included were RCTs (including "quasi-randomized" controlled trials) that compared standard practice with an intervention to increase attendance at initial appointments in a sample of adults who had a scheduled initial appointment in a mental health or substance abuse service setting. RESULTS Of 144 potentially relevant studies, 21 met inclusion criteria. These studies were reported in 20 different research papers. Of these, 16 studies (N=3,673 participants) were included in the analyses (five were excluded because they reported only nonattendance at the initial appointment). Separate analyses were conducted for each intervention type (opt-in systems, telephone reminders and prompts, orientation and reminder letters, accelerated intake, preappointment completion of psychodynamic questionnaires, and "other"). Narrative synthesis was used for analysis because the high level of heterogeneity between studies precluded a meta-analysis. The results were mixed for all types of intervention. Some isolated high-quality studies of opt-in systems, orientation and reminder letters, and more novel interventions demonstrated a beneficial effect. CONCLUSIONS The synthesized findings indicated that orientation and reminder letters may have a small beneficial effect. Consistent evidence for the efficacy of other types of common interventions is lacking. More novel interventions, such as asking clients to formulate plans to deal with obstacles to attendance and giving clients a choice of therapist style

  4. Assessing Acceptability of Short Message Service Based Interventions towards Becoming Future Voluntary Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Sabih, Sidra; Khan, Ayisha Farooq; Jillani, Umaima Ayesha; Syed, Mujtaba Jamal; Mumtaz, Madiha; Mumtaz, Yasmeen; Dawani, Om; Khan, Saima; Munir, Sheheryar; Asad, Nava; Kazi, Abdul Nafey

    2014-01-01

    All blood bank services, especially those of developing countries, face a major shortfall of blood donations due to lack of voluntary blood donors. Our study aims to evaluate the acceptability of Short Message Service based interventions towards becoming voluntary blood donors among medical university students of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods. A total of 350 medical students were approached in medical universities of Karachi, Pakistan, using a nonprobability convenient sampling technique. Data collectors administered a self-made questionnaire to each participant using an interview based format. All data was recorded and analyzed on SPSS 16. Results. 350 participants, having a mean age of 21.47 ± 1.36, were included in our study with 30.6% (107/350) being males and 69.4% (243/350) being females. 93.4% (327/350) of participants agreed that donating blood was healthy, but only 26% had donated blood in the past with 79.1% donating voluntarily. 65.7% (230/350) of the participants agreed to take part in Short Message Service based behavioral interventions to become voluntary blood donors with 69.7% (244/350) also agreeing that Short Message Service reminders will promote them to donate blood more often. Conclusion. With university students willing to become voluntary blood donors, Pakistani blood banks can carry out Short Message Service based interventions to encourage them to donate blood. PMID:25436175

  5. A Comparison of Service Delivery Models for Special Education Middle School Students Receiving Moderate Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Mason, Keely S.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to improve academic performance for students receiving special education services, a large urban school district in Tennessee has implemented Integrated Service Delivery Model. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of students receiving instruction in self-contained classrooms to the performance of students…

  6. 75 FR 5603 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA),...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services A. Committee Membership The DoD-CC shall meet at least yearly...

  11. Early intensive behavioral intervention: Emergence of a consumer-driven service model

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Parents are becoming influential stimulators and shapers of public policy in regard to educational services for their children. Increasingly, this advocacy has created a controversy about the role of applied behavior analysis as a foundation for early intensive behavioral intervention in autism. Uncertainties exist in policy regarding the role of behavior analysis in early intervention and the capacity of behavior analysis to field a trained work force. Based on contacts with parents of children with autism and information available in a variety of forms on the Internet, there is a rising demand for fundamentally better early intervention services that are available and accessible, provide active intervention, and are based on principles of behavior analysis. Contemporary movements in special and early education, however, appear to be nonconducive to scientifically based treatments, and school districts seem hostile to an increasing role for behavior analysis and to the establishment of services that are responsive to changing parental priorities for the education of their children with autism and related disorders. PMID:22478344

  12. Child Disaster Mental Health Services: a Review of the System of Care, Assessment Approaches, and Evidence Base for Intervention.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Several decades of research have informed our knowledge of children's reactions to disasters and the factors that influence their reactions. This article describes the system of care for child disaster mental health services using population risk to determine needed services and a stepped care approach built on assessment and monitoring to advance children to appropriate services. To assess the evidence base for disaster interventions, recent reviews of numerous child disaster mental health interventions are summarized. PMID:26719308

  13. A Review of Services and Interventions for Runaway and Homeless Youth: Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Dashora, Pushpanjali; Letcher, Amber; Erdem, Gizem; Serovich, Julianne

    2009-01-01

    Research focused on the impact of community-based services and treatment interventions designed to intervene in the lives of runaway and homeless youth has increased in the last two decades in the U.S. and internationally. In light of the tremendous need for identifying effective strategies to end homelessness and its associated problems among youth, this paper summarizes and critiques the findings of the extant literature including U.S., international, and qualitative studies. Thirty-two papers met criteria for inclusion in the review. Among the conclusions are that comprehensive interventions which target the varied and interconnected needs of these youth and families may be worthy of more study than studies that isolate the intervention focus on one problem. Also, more research incorporating design strategies that increase the reliability and validity of study findings is needed. Other preliminary conclusions and future directions are offered. PMID:20161294

  14. Wheelchair Seating Assessment and Intervention: A Comparison Between Telerehabilitation and Face-to-Face Service

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Ingrid G; Liu, Lili; Sekulic, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This study compared outcomes of wheelchair seating and positioning interventions provided by telerehabilitation (n=10) and face-to-face (n=20; 10 in each of two comparison groups, one urban and one rural). Comparison clients were matched to the telerehabilitation clients in age, diagnosis, and type of seating components received. Clients and referring therapists rated their satisfaction and identified if seating intervention goals were met. Clients recorded travel expenses incurred or saved, and all therapists recorded time spent providing service. Wait times and completion times were tracked. Clients seen by telerehabilitation had similar satisfaction ratings and were as likely to have their goals met as clients seen face-to-face; telerehabilitation clients saved travel costs. Rural referring therapists who used telerehabilitation spent more time in preparation and follow-up than the other groups. Clients assessed by telerehabilitation had shorter wait times for assessment than rural face-to-face clients, but their interventions took as long to complete. PMID:25945159

  15. Survey of ENT services in Africa: need for a comprehensive intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Johan J.; Jacobs, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Background Burden of disease (BOD) is greatest in resource-starved regions such as Africa. Even though hearing disability ranks third on the list of non-fatal disabling conditions in low- and middle-income countries, ear, nose, and throat (ENT) disorders are not specifically coded for within the framework governing global BOD estimates, and in discussions about health challenges, non-communicable diseases receive scant attention. Implementing cost-effective interventions to address conditions largely neglected by global estimates of BOD such as hearing loss are important contributors to health and economic development. Objectives Establish a database of ENT, audiology, and speech therapy services in Sub-Saharan Africa; create awareness about the status of these services; propose effective intervention; gather data to lobby African governments, donor countries, and aid organizations; determine need for Developing World Forum for ENT, Audiology, and Speech Therapy services. Design Survey of ENT, audiology, and speech therapy services and training in 18 Sub-Saharan Africa countries. Results There is an alarming paucity of services and training opportunities, and there is a large gap between higher technology, expensive health care in high-income countries and lower technology, low-cost practice in low-income countries. Conclusions Lower technology and lower cost Developing World medical practice should be recognized and fostered as a field of medical practice, teaching, and research. Developing World centers of excellence must be fostered to take a lead in teaching, training, and research. A Developing World Forum for ENT Surgery, Audiology, and Speech Therapy, directed and driven by Africa and the Developing World, supported by the First World, should be established, to develop a comprehensive intervention to turn around the severe shortage of services and expertise in the Developing World. Global health policies and practices should include new norms and standards

  16. Developing an Interventional Pulmonary Service in a Community-Based Private Practice: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    French, Kim D; Desai, Neeraj R; Diamond, Edward; Kovitz, Kevin L

    2016-04-01

    Interventional pulmonology (IP) is a field that uses minimally invasive techniques to diagnose, treat, and palliate advanced lung disease. Technology, formal training, and reimbursement for IP procedures have been slow to catch up with other interventional subspecialty areas. A byproduct of this pattern has been limited IP integration in private practice settings. We describe the key aspects and programmatic challenges of building an IP program in a community-based setting. A philosophical and financial buy-in by stakeholders and a regionalization of services, within and external to a larger practice, are crucial to success. Our experience demonstrates that a successful launch of an IP program increases overall visits as well as procedural volume without cannibalizing existing practice volume. We hope this might encourage others to provide this valuable service to their own communities. PMID:26836941

  17. Pulmonary hypertension and breathlessness: is it a combination we can ignore?

    PubMed

    Strange, G; Williams, T; Kermeen, F; Whyte, K; Keogh, A

    2014-02-01

    On 5 May 2013 it was World Pulmonary Hypertension (PHT) Day marking three decades on from the first reported deaths in an epidemic because of toxic rapeseed (canola) oil. This epidemic provided the impetus to the first World Health Organization to set up a world symposia. World leaders of PHT met for the fifth time in Nice, France in February 2013. Although we wait the official proceedings, this meeting provides us opportunity to reflect on the current situation in Australia and New Zealand, and examine the implications for our two countries. PHT remains difficult to identify, delays in patient diagnosis persist, and breathlessness remains dominant in the diagnosis of all causes of PHT. This review examines some of the recent changes in diagnosis, our understanding of the emerging expanding epidemiology data and the patient's journeys through the healthcare system. We also review the current treatment options on monotherapy and in poly-pharmacy or combination therapy, along with the strategic management implications of the lack of funded combination therapy associated with prognosis. PMID:24383793

  18. Service Delivery Experiences and Intervention Needs of Military Families with Children with ASD.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer M; Finke, Erinn; Hickerson, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of military families with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) specifically as it relates to relocation. Online survey methodology was used to gather information from military spouses with children with ASD. The finalized dataset included 189 cases. Descriptive statistics and frequency analyses were used to examine participant demographics and service delivery questions. Results indicated the larger sample of military spouses largely confirmed the experiences reported qualitatively in previous studies and contributed information that was previously unknown about variables associated with the access, availability, quality, and frequency of intervention services for military families with children with ASD. PMID:26780908

  19. Provision of Early Intervention and Special Education Services to Eligible DoD Dependents. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-25

    This rule reissues the current regulations and: Establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and implements the non-funding and non-reporting provisions in DoD for: Provision of early intervention services (EIS) to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families, as well as special education and related services to children with disabilities entitled under this part to receive education services from the DoD; implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary program of EIS for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families who, but for age, are eligible to be enrolled in DoD schools; provision of a free appropriate public education (FAPE), including special education and related services, for children with disabilities, as specified in their individualized education programs (IEP), who are eligible to enroll in DoD schools; and monitoring of DoD programs providing EIS, and special education and related services for compliance with this part. This rule also establishes a DoD Coordinating Committee to recommend policies and provide compliance oversight for early intervention and special education. PMID:26121770

  20. Outcomes of a Bystander Intervention Community Health Service-Learning Project.

    PubMed

    Decker, Kim; Hensel, Desiree; Fasone, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the integration of a college bystander intervention service-learning project into an entry-level community clinical course in a prelicensure program and its outcomes. Two years of data from 118 students showed that students helped improve campus safety while growing as professionals and gaining leadership and health promotion skills. Approximately one-third of the students described a specific incident in which they intervened in an ambiguous situation. PMID:26633150

  1. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability. PMID:27225898

  2. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch–Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability. PMID:27225898

  3. ‘Stand still … , and move on’, a new early intervention service for cardiac arrest survivors and their caregivers: rationale and description of the intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moulaert, Véronique RMP; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Bakx, Wilbert GM; Gorgels, Anton PM; de Krom, Marc CFTM; Heuts, Peter HTG; Wade, Derick T; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    This series of articles for rehabilitation in practice aims to cover a knowledge element of the rehabilitation medicine curriculum. Nevertheless they are intended to be of interest to a multidisciplinary audience. The competency addressed in this article is ‘The trainee demonstrates a knowledge of diagnostic approaches for specific impairments including cognitive dysfunction as a result of cardiac arrest.’ Abstract Objective: To describe a new early intervention service for survivors of cardiac arrest and their caregivers, and to explain the evidence and rationale behind it. Rationale: A cardiac arrest may cause hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury, which often results in cognitive impairments. Survivors of cardiac arrest can also encounter emotional problems, limitations in daily life, reduced participation in society and a decreased quality of life. A new early intervention service was designed based on literature study, expert opinion and patient experiences. Description of the intervention: The early intervention service is an individualized programme, consisting of one to six consultations by a specialized nurse for the patient and their caregiver. The intervention starts soon after discharge from the hospital and can last up to three months. The intervention consists of screening for cognitive and emotional problems, provision of information and support, promotion of self-management strategies and can include referral to further specialized care if indicated. Discussion: This intervention is assumed to reduce future problems related to hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury in the patient and caregiver, and its effectiveness is currently being investigated in a randomized controlled multicentre trial. PMID:21565869

  4. Longitudinal Analyses of Geographic Differences in Utilization Rates of Children with Developmental Delays Who Participation in Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Yong-Chen; Chou, Yu-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to describe the longitudinal utilization rates of participation in early intervention services of children with developmental delays, and to examine the geographical difference of services in this vulnerable population. We analyzed service utilization of the developmentally delayed children based on data of…

  5. Individual breathlessness trajectories do not match summary trajectories in advanced cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bausewein, Claudia; Booth, Sara; Gysels, Marjolein; Kühnbach, Robert; Haberland, Birgit; Higginson, Irene J

    2010-12-01

    Breathlessness is a distressing symptom in advanced disease. Little is known about the trajectories of this symptom over time and towards death. This study aimed to describe and compare the summary and individual trajectories of breathlessness and overall symptom burden over time and towards the end of life following patients with advanced cancer or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in inpatient and outpatient health care settings in Germany. The modified Borg Scale, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form and Palliative Outcome Scale were used as outcome measures. Data were collected at baseline and then monthly over six months or until death. Forty-nine cancer and 60 COPD patients were included. Both groups had similar demographics. Thirty out of the 49 cancer and 6/60 COPD patients died, 7/49 cancer and 20/60 COPD patients dropped out due to physical deterioration or questionnaire fatigue. In cancer patients, breathlessness increased towards death. In COPD patients, breathlessness increased over time. Twenty-one cancer and 43 COPD patients provided data for individual breathlessness trajectories. These revealed wide individual variations with four different patterns: fluctuation, increasing, stable and decreasing breathlessness. Symptom trajectories on the population level reflecting the whole group mask individual variation, which is reflected in distinct symptom trajectories with different patterns. PMID:20847087

  6. Maternal depressive symptoms and participation in early intervention services for young children.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Emily; Donahue, Sara; Bliss, Robin; Silverstein, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Many young children with developmental delay who are eligible for early intervention (EI) services fail to receive them. We assessed the relationship between depressive symptoms in mothers, a potentially modifiable risk, and receipt of EI services by their eligible children. We conducted multivariable analyses of a nationally representative sample of children eligible for EI services at 24 months using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed at 9 and 24 months. Birthweight <1,000 g, genetic and medical conditions associated with developmental delay, or low scores on measures of developmental performance defined EI eligibility. Service receipt was ascertained from parental self-report. Models were adjusted for sociodemographic and child risk. Among the 650 children who were eligible to receive EI services as infants, 33.2% of children whose mothers were depressed received services compared to 27.0% whose mothers were not depressed (aOR 1.8; 95% CI 0.8, 4.0). Among the 650 children who became eligible to receive services as toddlers, 13.0% of children whose mothers were depressed received services compared to 2.6% whose mothers were not depressed (aOR 4.6, 95% CI 1.5, 14.6). Among children receiving EI services, prevalence of depressive symptoms was 23.0% for mothers whose children became eligible as infants and 57.5% for mothers whose children became eligible as toddlers. Depressive symptoms in mothers of children eligible to receive EI services did not appear to limit participation. EI programs may be an appropriate setting in which to address maternal depressive symptoms. PMID:21140201

  7. Level and Intensity of Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities: The Impact of Child, Family, System, and Community-Level Factors on Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Rena A.; Rous, Beth; Grove, Jaime; LoBianco, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Data from a statewide billing and information system for early intervention are used to examine the influence of multiple factors on the level and intensity of services provided in a state early intervention system. Results indicate that child and family factors including entry age, gestational age, Medicaid eligibility, access to third party…

  8. Do Interventions that Promote Awareness of Rights Increase Use of Maternity Care Services? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    George, Asha S.; Branchini, Casey; Portela, Anayda

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years after the rights of women to go through pregnancy and childbirth safely were recognized by governments, we assessed the effects of interventions that promote awareness of these rights to increase use of maternity care services. Using inclusion and exclusion criteria defined in a peer-reviewed protocol, we searched published and grey literature from one database of studies on maternal health, two search engines, an internet search and contact with experts. From the 707 unique documents found, 219 made reference to rights, with 22 detailing interventions promoting awareness of rights for maternal and newborn health. Only four of these evaluated effects on health outcomes. While all four interventions promoted awareness of rights, they did so in different ways. Interventions included highly-scripted dissemination meetings with educational materials and other visual aids, participatory approaches that combined raising awareness of rights with improving accountability of services, and broader multi-stakeholder efforts to improve maternal health. Study quality ranged from weak to strong. Measured health outcomes included increased antenatal care and facility birth. Improvements in human rights outcomes such as availability, acceptability, accessibility, quality of care, as well as the capacity of rights holders and duty bearers were also reported to varying extents. Very little information on costs and almost no information on harms or risks were described. Despite searching multiple sources of information, while some studies did report on activities to raise awareness of rights, few detailed how they did so and very few measured effects on health outcomes. Promoting awareness of rights is one element of increasing demand for and use of quality maternity care services for women during pregnancy, birth and after birth. To date efforts have not been well documented in the literature and the program theories, processes and costs, let alone health effects have

  9. Do Interventions that Promote Awareness of Rights Increase Use of Maternity Care Services? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    George, Asha S; Branchini, Casey; Portela, Anayda

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years after the rights of women to go through pregnancy and childbirth safely were recognized by governments, we assessed the effects of interventions that promote awareness of these rights to increase use of maternity care services. Using inclusion and exclusion criteria defined in a peer-reviewed protocol, we searched published and grey literature from one database of studies on maternal health, two search engines, an internet search and contact with experts. From the 707 unique documents found, 219 made reference to rights, with 22 detailing interventions promoting awareness of rights for maternal and newborn health. Only four of these evaluated effects on health outcomes. While all four interventions promoted awareness of rights, they did so in different ways. Interventions included highly-scripted dissemination meetings with educational materials and other visual aids, participatory approaches that combined raising awareness of rights with improving accountability of services, and broader multi-stakeholder efforts to improve maternal health. Study quality ranged from weak to strong. Measured health outcomes included increased antenatal care and facility birth. Improvements in human rights outcomes such as availability, acceptability, accessibility, quality of care, as well as the capacity of rights holders and duty bearers were also reported to varying extents. Very little information on costs and almost no information on harms or risks were described. Despite searching multiple sources of information, while some studies did report on activities to raise awareness of rights, few detailed how they did so and very few measured effects on health outcomes. Promoting awareness of rights is one element of increasing demand for and use of quality maternity care services for women during pregnancy, birth and after birth. To date efforts have not been well documented in the literature and the program theories, processes and costs, let alone health effects have

  10. Identification of factors that affect the adoption of an ergonomic intervention among Emergency Medical Service workers.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Monica R; Lavender, Steven A; Crawford, J Mac; Reichelt, Paul A; Conrad, Karen M; Browne, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    This study explored factors contributing to intervention adoption decisions among Emergency Medical Service (EMS) workers. Emergency Medical Service workers (n = 190), from six different organisations, participated in a two-month longitudinal study following the introduction of a patient transfer-board (also known as slide-board) designed to ease lateral transfers of patients to and from ambulance cots. Surveys administered at baseline, after one month and after two months sampled factors potentially influencing the EMS providers' decision process. 'Ergonomics Advantage' and 'Patient Advantage' entered into a stepwise regression model predicting 'intention to use' at the end of month one (R (2 )= 0.78). After the second month, the stepwise regression indicated only two factors were predictive of intention to use: 'Ergonomics Advantage,' and 'Endorsed by Champions' (R (2 )= 0.58). Actual use was predicted by: 'Ergonomics Advantage' and 'Previous Tool Experience.' These results relate to key concepts identified in the diffusion of innovation literature and have the potential to further ergonomics intervention adoption efforts. Practitioner Summary. This study explored factors that potentially facilitate the adoption of voluntarily used ergonomics interventions. EMS workers were provided with foldable transfer-boards (slideboards) designed to reduce the physical demands when laterally transferring patients. Factors predictive of adoption measures included perceived ergonomics advantage, the endorsement by champions, and prior tool experience. PMID:22928550

  11. Identifying the common elements of treatment engagement interventions in children's mental health services.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Michael A; Brandt, Nicole E; Becker, Kimberly D; Lee, Bethany R; Barth, Richard P; Daleiden, Eric L; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2014-09-01

    Difficulty engaging families in mental health treatment is seen as an underlying reason for the disparity between child mental health need and service use. Interpretation of the literature on how best to engage families is complicated by a diversity of operational definitions of engagement outcomes and related interventions. Thus, we sought to review studies of engagement interventions using a structured methodology allowing for an aggregate summary of the most common practices associated with effective engagement interventions. We identified 344 articles through a combination of database search methods and recommendations from engagement research experts; 38 articles describing 40 studies met our inclusion criteria. Following coding methods described by Chorpita and Daleiden (J Consul Clin Psychol 77(3):566-579, 2009, doi: 10.1037/a0014565 ), we identified 22 engagement practice elements from 89 study groups that examined or implemented family engagement strategies. Most frequently identified engagement practice elements included assessment, accessibility promotion, psychoeducation about services, homework assignment, and appointment reminders. Assessment and accessibility promotion were two practice elements present in at least 50 % of treatment groups that outperformed a control group in a randomized controlled trial. With the exception of appointment reminders, these frequently identified engagement practice elements had a high likelihood of being associated with winning treatments when they were used. This approach offers a novel way of summarizing the engagement literature and provides the foundation for enhancing clinical decision-making around treatment engagement. PMID:24379129

  12. Dyspnea-related anxiety: The Dutch version of the Breathlessness Beliefs Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    De Peuter, Steven; Janssens, Thomas; Van Diest, Ilse; Stans, Linda; Troosters, Thierry; Decramer, Marc; Van den Bergh, Omer; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2011-01-01

    Dyspnea-related anxiety may lead to reduced quality of life and functional disability through fearful avoidance of dyspnea-evoking activity. We describe the validation of a generic - diagnosis-independent - instrument assessing dyspnea-related anxiety. A total of 187 patients with respiratory diseases completed the Breathlessness Beliefs Questionnaire (BBQ), a 17-item questionnaire adapted from the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), a measure of how harmful pain patients think painful movement is and to what extent they think activity should be avoided. Measures of negative and positive affectivity (PANAS), anxiety and depression (HADS), functional status (PFSDQ), and health-related quality of life (CRDQ) were also completed. Principal component analysis and item-total correlations suggested a reliable (reduced) 11-item BBQ (Cronbach's alpha = .85) with two factors converging with the TSK factors: a 'somatic focus' factor assessing the harmfulness of dyspnea and the underlying pathology and an 'activity avoidance' factor assessing beliefs that activity should be avoided. Correlational analyses support the construct validity of the BBQ: higher scores on the BBQ are associated with reduced health-related quality of life and functional status. Associations between 'somatic focus' and negative affectivity and anxiety and between 'activity avoidance' and positive affectivity and depression further supported the validity of the BBQ and its subscales. The BBQ is a valid, short, and useful instrument to assess respiratory patients' beliefs about the harmfulness of their disease and physical activities. Further research is needed to document to what extent BBQ scores are related to daily life activities and symptoms. PMID:21172990

  13. Lepidopteran Ortholog of Drosophila Breathless Is a Receptor for the Baculovirus Fibroblast Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Katsuma, Susumu; Daimon, Takaaki; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2006-01-01

    The Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) encodes a gene homologous to the mammalian fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. We report the cloning of B. mori and Spodoptera frugiperda orthologous genes (Bmbtl and Sfbtl, respectively) of Drosophila melanogaster breathless (btl) encoding a receptor for Branchless/FGF and show that these genes encode the receptor for a baculovirus-encoded FGF (vFGF). Sequence analysis showed that BmBtl is composed of 856 amino acid residues, which potentially encodes a 97.3-kDa polypeptide and shares structural features and sequence similarities with the FGF receptor family. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that Bmbtl was abundantly expressed in the trachea and midgut in B. mori larvae, with moderate expression observed in the hemocytes and the B. mori cultured cell line BmN. We generated Sf-9 cells that stably expressed His-tagged BmBtl. Western blot analysis revealed that BmBtl was an ∼110-kDa protein. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that BmNPV vFGF markedly phosphorylated BmBtl in Sf-9 cells. In addition, we found that BmBtl overexpression enhanced the migration activity for BmNPV vFGF. Furthermore, we generated Sf-9 cells in which Sfbtl was knocked down by transfection with double-strand RNA-expressing plasmids. In these cells, cell motility triggered by vFGF was markedly reduced. These results strongly suggest that the Btl orthologs, BmBtl and SfBtl, are the receptors for vFGF, which mediate vFGF-induced host cell chemotaxis. PMID:16699027

  14. Designing a theory-informed, contextually appropriate intervention strategy to improve delivery of paediatric services in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background District hospital services in Kenya and many low-income countries should deliver proven, effective interventions that could substantially reduce child and newborn mortality. However such services are often of poor quality. Researchers have therefore been challenged to identify intervention strategies that go beyond addressing knowledge, skill, or resource inadequacies to support health systems to deliver better services at scale. An effort to develop a system-oriented intervention tailored to local needs and context and drawing on theory is described. Methods An intervention was designed to improve district hospital services for children based on four main strategies: a reflective process to distill root causes for the observed problems with service delivery; developing a set of possible intervention approaches to address these problems; a search of literature for theory that provided the most appropriate basis for intervention design; and repeatedly moving backwards and forwards between identified causes, proposed interventions, identified theory, and knowledge of the existing context to develop an overarching intervention that seemed feasible and likely to be acceptable and potentially sustainable. Results and discussion In addition to human and resource constraints key problems included failures of relevant professionals to take responsibility for or ownership of the challenge of pediatric service delivery; inadequately prepared, poorly supported leaders of service units (mid-level managers) who are often professionally and geographically isolated and an almost complete lack of useful information for routinely monitoring or understanding service delivery practice or outcomes. A system-oriented intervention recognizing the pivotal role of leaders of service units but addressing the outer and inner setting of hospitals was designed to help shape and support an appropriate role for these professionals. It aims to foster a sense of ownership while

  15. Development and Initial Validation of a Professional Development Intervention to Enhance the Quality of Individualized Family Service Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgley, Robyn; Snyder, Patricia A.; McWilliam, R. A.; Davis, Jacqueline E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a targeted professional development (PD) intervention designed to improve the quality of individualized family service plans (IFSPs) and to support IFSP planning, development, and decision making. The theoretical and empirical foundations for the PD intervention and its key components are reviewed. Building on an established online…

  16. Response to Intervention: Empirically Based Special Service Decisions From Single-Case Designs of Increasing and Decreasing Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, David W.; Daly, Edward, J.; Jones, Kevin M.; Lentz, Edward F.

    2004-01-01

    There have been several proposals to the effect that special service decisions could be based, at least in part, on the construct of response to intervention and not necessarily on traditional child measures. Single-case designs that focus on intervention response and intensity are reviewed as a potential evaluation framework for interdisciplinary…

  17. The Student Profile, Service Delivery Model, and Support Practices of Four Early Childhood Intervention Environments in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kenneth K.; Yang, Xueyan

    2016-01-01

    The student profile, model of service delivery, and support practices for young children with disabilities receiving early childhood intervention (ECI) in Singapore is reported and contrasted in this study. The supervisors/managers/principals of eight Early Intervention Programme for Infants and Children (EIPIC) centres, eight Integrated Child…

  18. Considering Identification and Service Provision for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders within the Context of Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Rachel K.; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Ruble, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The Response to Intervention (RTI) framework, a preventive model of universal screening, tiered interventions, and ongoing progress monitoring, poses an interesting consideration for identification and service delivery for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Upon examination of the existing literature, paucity exists regarding how RTI…

  19. Internet-Based Intervention Training for Parents of Young Children with Disabilities: A Promising Service-Delivery Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadan, Hedda; Daczewitz, Marcus E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient early intervention (EI) services are required to serve the needs of young children with disabilities and the needs of their families. Effective EI includes family-centred practices, evidence-based interventions, parent involvement/training, and delivery in children's natural environments. Due to the challenges of providing…

  20. Efficacy of a Process Improvement Intervention on Delivery of HIV Services to Offenders: A Multisite Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Michael S.; Dembo, Richard; del Mar Vega-Debién, Graciela; Pankow, Jennifer; Duvall, Jamieson L.; Belenko, Steven; Frisman, Linda K.; Visher, Christy A.; Pich, Michele; Patterson, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested a modified Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) process improvement model to implement improved HIV services (prevention, testing, and linkage to treatment) for offenders under correctional supervision. Methods. As part of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies, Phase 2, the HIV Services and Treatment Implementation in Corrections study conducted 14 cluster-randomized trials in 2011 to 2013 at 9 US sites, where one correctional facility received training in HIV services and coaching in a modified NIATx model and the other received only HIV training. The outcome measure was the odds of successful delivery of an HIV service. Results. The results were significant at the .05 level, and the point estimate for the odds ratio was 2.14. Although overall the results were heterogeneous, the experiments that focused on implementing HIV prevention interventions had a 95% confidence interval that exceeded the no-difference point. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that a modified NIATx process improvement model can effectively implement improved rates of delivery of some types of HIV services in correctional environments. PMID:25322311

  1. Delivering interventions to reduce the global burden of stillbirths: improving service supply and community demand

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Haws, Rachel A; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lawn, Joy E

    2009-01-01

    Background Although a number of antenatal and intrapartum interventions have shown some evidence of impact on stillbirth incidence, much confusion surrounds ideal strategies for delivering these interventions within health systems, particularly in low-/middle-income countries where 98% of the world's stillbirths occur. Improving the uptake of quality antenatal and intrapartum care is critical for evidence-based interventions to generate an impact at the population level. This concluding paper of a series of papers reviewing the evidence for stillbirth interventions examines the evidence for community and health systems approaches to improve uptake and quality of antenatal and intrapartum care, and synthesises programme and policy recommendations for how best to deliver evidence-based interventions at community and facility levels, across the continuum of care, to reduce stillbirths. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library for abstracts pertaining to community-based and health-systems strategies to increase uptake and quality of antenatal and intrapartum care services. We also sought abstracts which reported impact on stillbirths or perinatal mortality. Searches used multiple combinations of broad and specific search terms and prioritised rigorous randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses where available. Wherever eligible randomised controlled trials were identified after a Cochrane review had been published, we conducted new meta-analyses based on the original Cochrane criteria. Results In low-resource settings, cost, distance and the time needed to access care are major barriers for effective uptake of antenatal and particularly intrapartum services. A number of innovative strategies to surmount cost, distance, and time barriers to accessing care were identified and evaluated; of these, community financial incentives, loan/insurance schemes, and maternity waiting homes seem promising, but few studies have reported or evaluated the

  2. Implementing outside the box: Community-based social service provider experiences with using an alcohol screening and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya), David A.; Ramsey, Alex T.; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is better understand perceptions of front-line social service workers who are not addiction specialists, but have to address addiction-related issues during their standard services. Method Six social service organizations implemented a validated alcohol assessment and brief education intervention. After a 3-month trial implementation period, a convenience sample of 64 front-line providers participated in six focus groups to examine barriers and facilitators to the implementation of an alcohol screening and brief intervention. Results Three themes emerged: (1) usefulness of the intervention, (2) intervention being an appropriate fit with the agency and client population, and (3) worker commitment and proper utilization during the implementation process. Conclusions A cross-cutting theme that emerged was the context in which the intervention was implemented, as this was central to each of the three primary themes identified from the focus groups (i.e., the usefulness and appropriateness of the intervention and the implementation process overall). Practitioner buy-in concerns also indicate the need for better addiction service training opportunities for those without addiction-specific educational backgrounds. Future research should assess whether targeted trainings increase addiction screening and education in social services settings. PMID:25798019

  3. Community Involvement in Early Intervention. A Report on the Planning and Development of "Families First": An Early Intervention Program for Coordinated Family Support Services for Marin City Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, J. Ronald

    This report documents the planning and development of Families First, an early intervention program to be implemented in Marin City, California. The program has been designed to integrate and coordinate the provision of a wide range of services to families of children from the third trimester of pregnancy to the age of 8 years who live in a…

  4. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed revolutionary changes to the delivery of health services, ushered in to a great extent by the introduction of electronic health record systems. More recently, a new class of technological advancements—technology-based behavioral health interventions, which involve the delivery of evidence-informed practices via computers, web-based applications, mobile phones, wearable sensors, or other technological platforms—has emerged and is primed to once again radically shift current models for behavioral healthcare. Despite the promise and potential of these new therapeutic approaches, a greater understanding of the impact of technology-based interventions on cornerstone issues of mental health and addiction services—namely access, quality, and cost—is needed. The current review highlights 1) relevant conceptual frameworks that guide this area of research, 2) key studies that inform the relevance of technology-based interventions for behavioral healthcare access, quality, and cost, 3) pressing methodological issues that require attention, 4) unresolved questions that warrant further investigation, and 5) practical implications that underscore important new directions for this emerging area of research. PMID:26161047

  5. A Food Service Intervention Improves Whole Grain Access at Lunch in Rural Elementary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Juliana F. W.; Rimm, Eric B.; Austin, S. Bryn; Hyatt, Raymond R.; Kraak, Vivica I.; Economos, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole grain (WG) options are often limited in schools, which may impact rural, low-income students who rely on school meals for a substantial portion of their food intake. This study examined the changes in the availability and quantity of WG and refined grain foods offered in schools participating in the Creating Healthy, Active and Nurturing Growing-up Environments (CHANGE) study, a randomized, controlled intervention among rural communities (4 intervention and 4 control). Methods Foods were assessed using production records, recipes, and nutrition labels from breakfast and lunch over 1week during fall 2008 and spring 2009. Key informant interviews were conducted with school food service directors in the spring 2009. Results The CHANGE intervention schools significantly increased the average percent of school days WGs were offered (p =.047) and the amount of WGs offered/food item (ounces) at lunch compared with control schools (p = .02). There was a significant decrease in the percent of students with access to refined grains at lunch compared with control schools (p =.049), although there were no significant differences in WG availability during breakfast. Conclusions The CHANGE schools improved WG availability, enabling student's WG consumption to be closer to national recommendations. PMID:24443783

  6. Implementing a Statewide Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Service in Rural Health Settings: New Mexico SBIRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Arturo; Westerberg, Verner S.; Peterson, Thomas R.; Moseley, Ana; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Buff, Gary; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    This is a report on the New Mexico Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) project conducted over 5 years as part of a national initiative launched by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration with the aim of increasing integration of substance use services and medical care. Throughout the state, 53,238…

  7. Bridges and Barriers: An Examination of Service Coordinator and Provider Roles and Perceptions of Engagement in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Denise Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) early intervention service provision in a Midwestern state. The study sought to gain insight into levels of child and family engagement in Part C (Early On) programs and services and provide an understanding of Early On procedures,…

  8. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services E Appendix E to Part 57 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early...

  9. Quality of Antenatal care services in eastern Uganda: implications for interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tetui, Moses; Ekirapa, Elizabeth Kiracho; Bua, John; Mutebi, Aloysius; Tweheyo, Raymond; Waiswa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction More efforts need to be directed to improving the quality of maternal health in developing countries if we are to keep on track with meeting the fifth millennium development goal. The World Health Organization says developing countries account for over 90% of maternal deaths of which three fifths occur in Sub-Saharan African countries like Uganda. Abortion, obstetric complications such as hemorrhage, dystocia, eclampsia, and sepsis are major causes of maternal deaths here. Good quality Antenatal Care (ANC) provides opportunity to detect and respond to risky maternal conditions. This study assessed quality of ANC services in eastern Uganda with a goal of benchmarking implications for interventions. Methods Data was collected from 15 health facilities in Eastern Uganda to establish capacity of delivering ANC services. Observation checklists were used to assess structural components and completeness of the ANC consultation process among 291 women attending it. Lastly, structured exit-interviews were conducted to assess satisfaction of patients. Data analysis was done in STATA Version 10. Results There was an overall staffing gap of over 40%, while infection control facilities, drugs and supplies were inadequate. However, there was good existence of physical infrastructure and diagnostic equipment for ANC services. It was observed that counseling for risk factors and birth preparedness was poorly done; in addition essential tests were not done for the majority of clients. Conclusion To improve the quality of ANC, interventions need to improve staffing, infection control facilities and drug-supplies. In addition to better counseling for risk factor-recognition and birth preparedness. PMID:23308332

  10. Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention in Workplace Settings and Social Services: A Comparison of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Bernd; O’Donnell, Amy Jane; Kastner, Sinja; Schmidt, Christiane Sybille; Schäfer, Ingo; Reimer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: The robust evidence base for the effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief interventions (ASBIs) in primary health care (PHC) suggests that a widespread expansion of ASBI in non-medical settings could be beneficial. Social service and criminal justice settings work frequently with persons with alcohol use disorders, and workplace settings can be an appropriate setting for the implementation of alcohol prevention programs, as a considerable part of their social interactions takes place in this context. Methods: Update of two systematic reviews on ASBI effectiveness in workplaces, social service, and criminal justice settings. Review to identify implementation barriers and facilitators and future research needs of ASBI in non-medical settings. Results: We found a limited number of randomized controlled trials in non-medical settings with an equivocal evidence of effectiveness of ASBI. In terms of barriers and facilitators to implementation, the heterogeneity of non-medical settings makes it challenging to draw overarching conclusions. In the workplace, employee concerns with regard to the consequences of self-disclosure appear to be key. For social services, the complexity of certain client needs suggest that a stepped and carefully tailored approach is likely to be required. Discussion: Compared to PHC, the reviewed settings are far more heterogeneous in terms of client groups, external conditions, and the focus on substance use disorders. Thus, future research should try to systematize these differences, and consider their implications for the deliverability, acceptance, and potential effectiveness of ASBI for different target groups, organizational frameworks, and professionals. PMID:25339914

  11. Development of an intervention program to increase effective behaviours by patients and clinicians in psychiatric services: Intervention Mapping study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health clinicians perceive certain patients as 'difficult' across all settings, including mental health care. In this area, patients with non-psychotic disorders that become long-term care users may be perceived as obstructing their own recovery or seeking secondary gain. This negative perception of patients results in ineffective responses and low-quality care by health clinicians. Using the concept of illness behaviour, this paper describes the development, implementation, and planned evaluation of a structured intervention aimed at prevention and management of ineffective behaviours by long-term non-psychotic patients and their treating clinicians. Methods The principles of Intervention Mapping were applied to guide the development, implementation, and planned evaluation of the intervention. Qualitative (individual and group interviews), quantitative (survey), and mixed methods (Delphi-procedure) research was used to gain a broad perspective of the problem. Empirical findings, theoretical models, and existing evidence were combined to construct a program tailored to the needs of the target groups. Results A structured program to increase effective illness behaviour in long-term non-psychotic patients and effective professional behaviour in their treating clinicians was developed, consisting of three subsequent stages and four substantial components, that is described in detail. Implementation took place and evaluation of the intervention is being carried out. Conclusions Intervention Mapping proved to be a suitable method to develop a structured intervention for a multi-faceted problem in mental health care. PMID:20973985

  12. Communication Services and Supports for Individuals with Severe Disabilities: Guidance for Assessment and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nancy C.; Bruce, Susan; Goldman, Amy; Erickson, Karen; Mineo, Beth; Ogletree, Bill T.; Paul, Diane; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose; Siegel, Ellin; Schoonover, Judith; Snell, Marti; Sylvester, Lorraine; Wilkinson, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of People with Severe Disabilities (NJC) reviewed literature regarding practices for people with severe disabilities in order to update guidance provided in documents originally published in 1992. Changes in laws, definitions, and policies that affect communication attainments by persons with severe disabilities are presented, along with guidance regarding assessment and intervention practices. A revised version of the Communication Bill of Rights, a powerful document that describes the communication rights of all individuals, including those with severe disabilities is included in this article. The information contained within this article is intended to be used by professionals, family members, and individuals with severe disabilities to inform and advocate for effective communication services and opportunities. PMID:26914467

  13. Communication Services and Supports for Individuals With Severe Disabilities: Guidance for Assessment and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nancy C; Bruce, Susan; Goldman, Amy; Erickson, Karen; Mineo, Beth; Ogletree, Bill T; Paul, Diane; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose; Siegel, Ellin; Schoonover, Judith; Snell, Marti; Sylvester, Lorraine; Wilkinson, Krista

    2016-03-01

    The National Joint Committee for the Communication Needs of People With Severe Disabilities (NJC) reviewed literature regarding practices for people with severe disabilities in order to update guidance provided in documents originally published in 1992. Changes in laws, definitions, and policies that affect communication attainments by persons with severe disabilities are presented, along with guidance regarding assessment and intervention practices. A revised version of the Communication Bill of Rights, a powerful document that describes the communication rights of all individuals, including those with severe disabilities is included in this article. The information contained within this article is intended to be used by professionals, family members, and individuals with severe disabilities to inform and advocate for effective communication services and opportunities. PMID:26914467

  14. Concussion treatment after combat trauma: development of a telephone based, problem solving intervention for service members.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kathleen R; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R; Cole, Wesley R; St De Lore, Jef; Bush, Nigel; Lang, Ariel J; Hart, Tessa; Warren, Michael; Dikmen, Sureyya; Temkin, Nancy; Jain, Sonia; Raman, Rema; Stein, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    Military service members (SMs) and veterans who sustain mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) during combat deployments often have co-morbid conditions but are reluctant to seek out therapy in medical or mental health settings. Efficacious methods of intervention that are patient-centered and adaptable to a mobile and often difficult-to-reach population would be useful in improving quality of life. This article describes a new protocol developed as part of a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-mediated program for SMs with mTBI. The 12-session program combines problem solving training (PST) with embedded modules targeting depression, anxiety, insomnia, and headache. The rationale and development of this behavioral intervention for implementation with persons with multiple co-morbidities is described along with the proposed analysis of results. In particular, we provide details regarding the creation of a treatment that is manualized yet flexible enough to address a wide variety of problems and symptoms within a standard framework. The methods involved in enrolling and retaining an often hard-to-study population are also highlighted. PMID:25460344

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of a Short Message Service Intervention to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes from Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carlos K. H.; Jiao, Fang-Fang; Siu, Shing-Chung; Fung, Colman S. C.; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Wong, Ka-Wai; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Lo, Yvonne Y. C.; Lam, Cindy L. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the costs and cost-effectiveness of a short message service (SMS) intervention to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods. A Markov model was developed to simulate the cost and effectiveness outcomes of the SMS intervention and usual clinical practice from the health provider's perspective. The direct programme costs and the two-year SMS intervention costs were evaluated in subjects with IGT. All costs were expressed in 2011 US dollars. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated as cost per T2DM onset prevented, cost per life year gained, and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results. Within the two-year trial period, the net intervention cost of the SMS group was $42.03 per subject. The SMS intervention managed to reduce 5.05% onset of diabetes, resulting in saving $118.39 per subject over two years. In the lifetime model, the SMS intervention dominated the control by gaining an additional 0.071 QALY and saving $1020.35 per person. The SMS intervention remained dominant in all sensitivity analyses. Conclusions. The SMS intervention for IGT subjects had the superiority of lower monetary cost and a considerable improvement in preventing or delaying the T2DM onset. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01556880. PMID:26798647

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of a Short Message Service Intervention to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes from Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carlos K H; Jiao, Fang-Fang; Siu, Shing-Chung; Fung, Colman S C; Fong, Daniel Y T; Wong, Ka-Wai; Yu, Esther Y T; Lo, Yvonne Y C; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the costs and cost-effectiveness of a short message service (SMS) intervention to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Methods. A Markov model was developed to simulate the cost and effectiveness outcomes of the SMS intervention and usual clinical practice from the health provider's perspective. The direct programme costs and the two-year SMS intervention costs were evaluated in subjects with IGT. All costs were expressed in 2011 US dollars. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated as cost per T2DM onset prevented, cost per life year gained, and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results. Within the two-year trial period, the net intervention cost of the SMS group was $42.03 per subject. The SMS intervention managed to reduce 5.05% onset of diabetes, resulting in saving $118.39 per subject over two years. In the lifetime model, the SMS intervention dominated the control by gaining an additional 0.071 QALY and saving $1020.35 per person. The SMS intervention remained dominant in all sensitivity analyses. Conclusions. The SMS intervention for IGT subjects had the superiority of lower monetary cost and a considerable improvement in preventing or delaying the T2DM onset. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01556880. PMID:26798647

  17. Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of the Effectiveness of Contraceptive Service Interventions for Young People, Delivered in Health Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan K.; Payne, Nick; Guillaume, Louise R.; Squires, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review and narrative synthesis to determine the effectiveness of contraception service interventions for young people delivered in health care premises was undertaken. We searched 12 key health and medical databases, reference lists of included papers and systematic reviews and cited reference searches on included articles. All…

  18. Registry to Referral: A Promising Means for Identifying and Referring Infants and Toddlers for Early Intervention Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farel, Anita M.; Meyer, Robert E.; Hicken, Margaret; Edmonds, Larry

    2003-01-01

    This article proposes use of birth defects registries in facilitating early intervention. It reports results of a survey to identify state programs that are using, or planning to use, birth defects surveillance systems to identify and refer children and families for services. It provides four case examples and recommended steps to encourage use of…

  19. Characterizing the Use of Research-Community Partnerships in Studies of Evidence-Based Interventions in Children's Community Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazee-Brookman, Lauren; Stahmer, Aubyn; Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Herschel, Amy; Garland, Ann F.

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized the use of research community partnerships (RCPs) to tailor evidence-based intervention, training, and implementation models for delivery across different childhood problems and service contexts using a survey completed by project principal investigators and community partners. To build on previous RCP research and to…

  20. A Comparison of Speech Sound Intervention Delivered by Telepractice and Side-by-Side Service Delivery Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan-Johnson, Sue; Schmidt, Anna Marie; Schenker, Jason; Alvares, Robin; Rowan, Lynne E.; Taylor, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    Telepractice has the potential to provide greater access to speech-language intervention services for children with communication impairments. Substantiation of this delivery model is necessary for telepractice to become an accepted alternative delivery model. This study investigated the progress made by school-age children with speech sound…

  1. Cultural and Linguistic Alchemy: Mining the Resources of Spanish-Speaking Children and Families Receiving Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puig, Victoria I.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to gain insight into how early intervention (EI) services incorporate the cultural and linguistic resources of families and how EI professionals and families build partnerships with each other. Through observation and interview, the author looked deeply at the experiences of a small group of culturally and linguistically…

  2. Parental Level of Satisfaction Regarding Early Intervention Services for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Barbara Smith

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the level of satisfaction of parents regarding early identification/intervention services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). The purpose of this study is to compare the progress of children who are D/HH with their hearing peers on elements used to measure the readiness of students to enter the…

  3. Translation of a Dementia Caregiver Intervention for Delivery in Homecare as a Reimbursable Medicare Service: Outcomes and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Jacobs, Mimi; Earland, Tracey Vause

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Families of dementia patients receiving skilled homecare do not receive supportive services. We evaluated whether a proven intervention, Environmental Skill-building Program (ESP), which reduces caregiver burden and enhances skills managing patient functioning, can be integrated into homecare practices of occupational therapists (OTs) and…

  4. Parent Concern and Enrollment in Intervention Services for Young Children with Developmental Delays: 2007 National Survey of Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jennifer; Kirby, Russell S.; Gorski, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to address underenrollment and late entry to early intervention by identifying factors associated with parental concern and services for developmental delays. The authors analyzed responses from 27,566 parents of children from birth to age 5 from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health to quantify and to identify factors…

  5. Self-reported symptoms of chronic cough and breathlessness in working-age men in the city of Izhevsk, Russia: associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors and comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sarah; Quint, Jennifer K; Vasiljev, Maxim; Leon, David A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Very little is known about the prevalence of respiratory symptoms or their associations with other health conditions in Russia. Methods Between 2008 and 2010, a sample of 983 men resident in Izhevsk, Russia, took part in a cross-sectional survey. Presence of respiratory symptoms was determined from self-report of chronic productive cough and breathlessness assessed using the British Medical Research Council (MRC) breathlessness scale. Self-reported physical and mental health were measured using the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). Hypertension was assessed from mean blood pressure measured at the health check and/or self-reported use of antihypertensive medication. Other comorbidities were assessed from self-report. Logistic regression models were fitted assessing the association between respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. Linear regression models were fitted to investigate the association between respiratory symptoms and self-reported health scores. All models were adjusted for age, education and smoking status. Results The age-standardised prevalence of cough and breathlessness was 20.9% (prevalence with breathlessness MRC grade 3 or above 3.7%). The majority of men with respiratory symptoms (87.3%) were current smokers. Cough and breathlessness were associated with substantially worse self-reported physical and mental health (test for trend with severity of breathlessness p<0.001). Those with chronic cough and grade 3 or above breathlessness had higher odds of having hypertension (OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.36 to 6.74), diabetes (OR 10.55; 95% CI 2.69 to 41.37), angina pectoris (OR 7.54; 95% CI 3.61 to 15.73), previous myocardial infarction (OR 7.61; 95% CI 2.10 to 27.4) and previous stroke (OR 6.61; 95% CI 1.75 to 23.34) compared with those without respiratory symptoms. Conclusions The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was high. Strong associations were found between respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular comorbidities. These are of

  6. Contracting and Procurement for Evidence-Based Interventions in Public-Sector Human Services: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Willging, Cathleen E; Aarons, Gregory A; Trott, Elise M; Green, Amy E; Finn, Natalie; Ehrhart, Mark G; Hecht, Debra B

    2016-09-01

    Sustainment of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) in human services depends on the inner context of community-based organizations (CBOs) that provide services and the outer context of their broader environment. Increasingly, public officials are experimenting with contracting models from for-profit industries to procure human services. In this case study, we conducted qualitative interviews with key government and CBO stakeholders to examine implementation of the Best Value-Performance Information Procurement System to contract for EBIs in a child welfare system. Findings suggest that stakeholder relationships may be compromised when procurement disregards local knowledge, communication, collaboration, and other factors supporting EBIs and public health initiatives. PMID:26386977

  7. Ethnic variations in compulsory detention and hospital admission for psychosis across four UK Early Intervention Services.

    PubMed

    Mann, Farhana; Fisher, Helen L; Major, Barnaby; Lawrence, Jo; Tapfumaneyi, Andrew; Joyce, John; Hinton, Mark F; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    BackgroundSubstantial ethnic variations have been found in incidence, pathways to care and outcomes in psychosis. It is unknown whether these remain as marked in the presence of specialist Early Intervention Services (EIS) for psychosis. We present the first UK study exploring ethnic differences in compulsory detention and hospitalization rates for EIS patients. We investigated whether the excess rates of compulsory admission for people from Black groups have persisted following nationwide introduction of EIS. We also explored variations in compulsory admission for other ethnic groups, and differences by gender and diagnosis.MethodsFour inner-city London EIS teams gathered data from first-presentation psychosis patients between 2004¿2009 using the MiData audit tool. Clinical, sociodemographic and pathways to care data were recorded regarding adult patients from eight different ethnic groups at entry to EIS and one year later.ResultsBlack African EIS service users had odds of being detained and of being hospitalised three times greater than White British patients, even after adjustment for confounders. This was most marked in Black African women (seven to eight times greater odds than White British women). A post-hoc analysis showed that pathways to care and help-seeking behaviour partially explained these differences.ConclusionThese findings suggest EIS input in its current form has little impact on higher admission and detention rates in certain Black and minority groups. There is a need to tackle these differences and engage patients earlier, focusing on the needs of men and women from the most persistently affected groups. PMID:25214411

  8. Priority interventions to reduce HIV transmission in sex work settings in sub-Saharan Africa and delivery of these services

    PubMed Central

    Chersich, Matthew F; Luchters, Stanley; Ntaganira, Innocent; Gerbase, Antonio; Lo, Ying-Ru; Scorgie, Fiona; Steen, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Virtually no African country provides HIV prevention services in sex work settings with an adequate scale and intensity. Uncertainty remains about the optimal set of interventions and mode of delivery. Methods We systematically reviewed studies reporting interventions for reducing HIV transmission among female sex workers in sub-Saharan Africa between January 2000 and July 2011. Medline (PubMed) and non-indexed journals were searched for studies with quantitative study outcomes. Results We located 26 studies, including seven randomized trials. Evidence supports implementation of the following interventions to reduce unprotected sex among female sex workers: peer-mediated condom promotion, risk-reduction counselling and skills-building for safer sex. One study found that interventions to counter hazardous alcohol-use lowered unprotected sex. Data also show effectiveness of screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and syndromic STI treatment, but experience with periodic presumptive treatment is limited. HIV testing and counselling is essential for facilitating sex workers’ access to care and antiretroviral treatment (ART), but testing models for sex workers and indeed for ART access are little studied, as are structural interventions, which create conditions conducive for risk reduction. With the exception of Senegal, persistent criminalization of sex work across Africa reduces sex workers’ control over working conditions and impedes their access to health services. It also obstructs health-service provision and legal protection. Conclusions There is sufficient evidence of effectiveness of targeted interventions with female sex workers in Africa to inform delivery of services for this population. With improved planning and political will, services – including peer interventions, condom promotion and STI screening – would act at multiple levels to reduce HIV exposure and transmission efficiency among sex workers. Initiatives are

  9. Intensive, integrated, in-home psychiatric services. The catalyst to enhancing outpatient intervention.

    PubMed

    Woolston, J L; Berkowitz, S J; Schaefer, M C; Adnopoz, J A

    1998-07-01

    The authors introduce the Yale Intensive In-Home Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, a model of home-based care for children with severe psychiatric disturbances. This model synthesizes the principles and method of the wrap-around paradigm and in-patient child psychiatric practice within the reality of the managed care system. A clinical team, under the direct supervision of a child psychiatrist, works directly within the family to understand and address the multilevel transactions that have affected the child's ability to function in various domains and resulted in recommendations for intensive intervention, including psychiatric hospitalization. This article suggests that if the psychiatrist is to provide the highest level of care, cognizance of and involvement in the child's ecology are as essential for the child and adolescent psychiatrist as other aspects of the child's world and life. In the days of ever shortening patient lengths of stay, this model of care offers promise for both clinical and fiscal effectiveness. PMID:9894058

  10. Communication Disorders and Use of Intervention Services among Children Aged 3-17 Years: United States, 2012. NCHS Data Brief. Number 205

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Lindsey I.; Vahratian, Anjel; Hoffman, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the proportion of children with voice, swallowing, speech, or language disorders who receive intervention services is a Healthy People 2020 goal (1). Timely receipt of intervention services is shown to be effective for treatment of communication disorders (2-5). Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), this…

  11. Preventing and controlling foodborne disease in commercial and institutional food service settings: a systematic review of published intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Viator, Catherine; Blitstein, Jonathan; Brophy, Jenna E; Fraser, Angela

    2015-02-01

    This study reviews the current literature on behavioral and environmental food safety interventions conducted in commercial and institutional food service settings. A systematic search of the published literature yielded 268 candidate articles, from which a set of 23 articles reporting intervention outcomes was retained for evaluation. A categorization of measured outcomes is reported; studies addressed multiple outcomes ranging from knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of personal hygiene and food safety to management practices and disease rates and outbreaks. This study also investigates the quality of reported research methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions, using a nine-point quality index adapted by the authors. The observed scores suggest that there are opportunities to improve the design and reporting of research in the field of foodborne disease prevention as it applies to food safety interventions that target the food service industry. The aim is to aid researchers in this area to design higher quality studies and to produce clearer and more useful reports of their research. In turn, this can help to create a more complete evidence base that can be used to continually improve interventions in this domain. PMID:25710165

  12. Evaluation of a Community Health Service Center-Based Intervention Program for Managing Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Moli; Ma, Yanlan; Zhou, Ti; Xia, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the role of primary care for the management of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been highly recommended, structural involvement of primary care in heart failure (HF) management programs is extremely limited. Aims: To examine the feasibility and applicability of two most recommended forms of care delivery mode, home visit and telephone support, for CHF management in the setting of community health service center (CHSC). Study Design: Prospective study. Methods: This study was conducted in two CHSCs in Beijing, China. Care delivery was led by trained general practitioners or community nurses via home visits in one CHSC and telephone support in the other. Data regarding the change in mortality and hospitalization rate during 12 months and self-care level at 6 months were prospectively collected and compared across the intervention groups. Results: A total of 329 patients were included, with 142 in the home visit group and 187 in the telephone support group. Patients in both groups had frequent visits to CHSC (8.1±5.9 in the home visit and 7.7±4.1 in the telephone support group, p=0.45) during the follow-up period. Compared to the telephone support group, patients in the home visit group showed a reduction in all-cause mortality (14.1% versus 20.3%, p=0.14), one or more hospitalizations due to any cause (33.8% versus 44.2%, p=0.12) and one or more hospitalizations due to cardiac cause (17.6% versus 24.6%, p=0.13) in the home visit group. The absolute differences were 6.2% (95% CI: 1.9%, 14.3%), 8.4% (95% CI: 2.1%, 18.9%) and 7.3% (95% CI: 1.5%, 16.1%), respectively, although the results were not statistically significant. After 6 months of intervention, patients in both groups achieved marked improvement in self-care with reference to their own baseline values. Conclusion: Although no statistical difference was observed between the two care delivery approaches regarding the clinical outcomes of interest, given the high participation

  13. Parents seek early intervention services for a two-year-old without autism.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Arathi; Graves, Crista; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2011-10-01

    increasingly challenging because he does not like the sensation of soap and the water temperature must be "just right." You refer the child to a Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician for evaluation and at 28 months he is seen. During his testing visit, he had decreased eye contact and followed his own agenda but improved significantly as testing progressed. As he got more comfortable, he began making good eye contact, social referenced, and exhibited joint attention with his parents and the examiner. He did not meet criteria for an autism spectrum disorder or specifically pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). He was given a diagnosis of mixed receptive and expressive language delay and disruptive behavior disorder with sensory processing problems.The parents come to you a month after their evaluation visit asking you to give him a "listed diagnosis of PDD-NOS" that could be removed when he turns 3 years so that he may qualify for increased hours of services-up to 15 hours per week-as well as applied behavioral analysis therapy. A behavioral therapist through early intervention has told the family that he would benefit from this increased intervention, specifically applied behavioral analysis but the only way he can receive it is with a "medical diagnosis" on the autism spectrum. What do you do next? PMID:21904210

  14. The Impact of a Telenovela Intervention on Use of Home Health Care Services and Mexican American Elder and Caregiver Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pasvogel, Alice; Hepworth, Joseph T.; Koerner, Kari

    2015-01-01

    A two-group randomized controlled trial tested a telenovela intervention (a culturally congruent videotaped dramatization with guided dialogue) to increase Mexican American elders’ and family caregivers’ awareness of and confidence in home health care services (HHCS), thereby increasing use of HHCS and improving elders’ and caregivers’ outcomes. Both groups had significant increases in awareness of and confidence in HHCS. The intervention group used HHCS more than the control group (91.1% versus 71.2% of total visits authorized) although this was not a statistically significant difference (p=.18). Use of HHCS was associated with increased elders’ and caregivers’ mutuality (the quality of the elder-caregiver relationship), and decreased caregiving burden and caregiver depression. The predictive role and measurement of awareness and ways to improve the intervention are discussed. Findings are especially important with today’s focus on transitional care to keep elders at home and prevent unnecessary readmissions. PMID:25594360

  15. Factors influencing the implementation of a brief alcohol screening and educational intervention in social settings not specializing in addiction services.

    PubMed

    Patterson Silver Wolf Adelv Unegv Waya, David A

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol use continues to be a major problem, when high-risk users enter social services, they are not provided with empirically supported treatments (ESTs). This study investigates predictors of successful implementation in agencies not specializing in addiction services. Fifty-four frontline workers in six organizations were enrolled in the study. After completing self-administered surveys of organizational culture and climate and attitudes toward ESTs, workers were trained to implement a brief intervention. The results indicate that organizational factors and attitudes may not be related to implementation. Although high implementers had similar traits, further research is needed to characterize successful EST implementers. PMID:25905766

  16. Factors influencing the implementation of a brief alcohol screening and educational intervention in social settings not specializing in addiction services

    PubMed Central

    Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya), David A. Patterson

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol use continues to be a major problem, when high-risk users enter social services, they are not provided with empirically supported treatments (ESTs). This study investigates predictors of successful implementation in agencies not specializing in addiction services. Fifty-four frontline workers in six organizations were enrolled in the study. After completing self-administered surveys of organizational culture and climate and attitudes toward ESTs, workers were trained to implement a brief intervention. The results indicate that organizational factors and attitudes may not be related to implementation. Although high implementers had similar traits, further research is needed to characterize successful EST implementers. PMID:25905766

  17. Infant Mental Health Assessment and Intervention Guidance for Service Providers and Families of Young Children. Service Guideline 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Birth to Three System, Hartford.

    This guide offers assessment and intervention guidelines for the Connecticut Birth to Three system concerning the emotional and psychological well-being of infants and toddlers in the system. Emphasis is on infants and toddlers who exhibit symptoms of traumatic stress disorder, depression or other affective disorders, regulatory disorders, sleep…

  18. Applying a Total Market Lens: Increased IUD Service Delivery Through Complementary Public- and Private-Sector Interventions in 4 Countries.

    PubMed

    White, Julia N; Corker, Jamaica

    2016-08-11

    Increasing access to the intrauterine device (IUD), as part of a comprehensive method mix, is a key strategy for reducing unintended pregnancy and maternal mortality in low-income countries. To expand access to IUDs within the framework of informed choice, Population Services International (PSI) has historically supported increased IUD service delivery through private providers. In applying a total market lens to better understand the family planning market and address major market gaps, PSI identified a lack of high-quality public provision of IUDs. In 2013, PSI started a pilot in 4 countries (Guatemala, Laos, Mali, and Uganda) to grow public-provider IUD service delivery through increased public-sector engagement while maintaining its ongoing focus on private providers. In collaboration with country governments, PSI affiliates carried out family planning market analyses in the 4 pilot countries to identify gaps in IUD service delivery and create sustainable strategies for scaling up IUD services in the public sector. Country-specific interventions to increase service delivery were implemented across all levels of the public health system, including targeted advocacy at the national level to promote government ownership and program sustainability. Mechanisms to ensure government ownership were built into the program design, including a proof-of-concept approach to convince governments of the feasibility and value of taking over and scaling up interventions. In the first 2 years of the pilot (2013-2014), 102,055 IUD services were provided to women at 417 targeted public-sector facilities. These preliminary results suggest that there is untapped demand for IUD service delivery in the public sector that can be met in part through greater participation of the public sector in family planning and IUD provision. PMID:27540122

  19. Applying a Total Market Lens: Increased IUD Service Delivery Through Complementary Public- and Private-Sector Interventions in 4 Countries

    PubMed Central

    White, Julia N; Corker, Jamaica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing access to the intrauterine device (IUD), as part of a comprehensive method mix, is a key strategy for reducing unintended pregnancy and maternal mortality in low-income countries. To expand access to IUDs within the framework of informed choice, Population Services International (PSI) has historically supported increased IUD service delivery through private providers. In applying a total market lens to better understand the family planning market and address major market gaps, PSI identified a lack of high-quality public provision of IUDs. In 2013, PSI started a pilot in 4 countries (Guatemala, Laos, Mali, and Uganda) to grow public-provider IUD service delivery through increased public-sector engagement while maintaining its ongoing focus on private providers. In collaboration with country governments, PSI affiliates carried out family planning market analyses in the 4 pilot countries to identify gaps in IUD service delivery and create sustainable strategies for scaling up IUD services in the public sector. Country-specific interventions to increase service delivery were implemented across all levels of the public health system, including targeted advocacy at the national level to promote government ownership and program sustainability. Mechanisms to ensure government ownership were built into the program design, including a proof-of-concept approach to convince governments of the feasibility and value of taking over and scaling up interventions. In the first 2 years of the pilot (2013–2014), 102,055 IUD services were provided to women at 417 targeted public-sector facilities. These preliminary results suggest that there is untapped demand for IUD service delivery in the public sector that can be met in part through greater participation of the public sector in family planning and IUD provision. PMID:27540122

  20. The Use of Sensory Integration Therapy by Intervention Service Providers in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Han Ming; Stephenson, Jennifer; Carter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Sensory integration (SI) therapy is a controversial intervention used in intervention for children with disabilities that is popular in the United States. Little is known about the use of SI therapy for children with disabilities in educational centres in developing nations such as Malaysia. Supervisors and teachers from seven educational…

  1. Enrolling and Engaging High-Risk Youths and Families in Community-Based, Brief Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Gulledge, Laura; Robinson, Rhissa Briones; Winters, Ken C.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing interest has been shown in brief interventions for troubled persons, including those with substance abuse problems. Most of the published literature on this topic has focused on adults, and on the efficacy of these interventions. Few of these studies have examined the critical issues of enrollment and engagement in brief intervention…

  2. 29 CFR 25.4 - Contents of requests; service on other parties; answer; intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; intervention. 25.4 Section 25.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS...; intervention. (a) Requests for nominations 1 shall be in triplicate and contain the following information: 1... nomination filed with the Secretary, the agency or any employee organization may file a response thereto...

  3. 29 CFR 25.4 - Contents of requests; service on other parties; answer; intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; intervention. 25.4 Section 25.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS...; intervention. (a) Requests for nominations 1 shall be in triplicate and contain the following information: 1... nomination filed with the Secretary, the agency or any employee organization may file a response thereto...

  4. 29 CFR 25.4 - Contents of requests; service on other parties; answer; intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; intervention. 25.4 Section 25.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS...; intervention. (a) Requests for nominations 1 shall be in triplicate and contain the following information: 1... nomination filed with the Secretary, the agency or any employee organization may file a response thereto...

  5. 29 CFR 25.4 - Contents of requests; service on other parties; answer; intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; intervention. 25.4 Section 25.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS...; intervention. (a) Requests for nominations 1 shall be in triplicate and contain the following information: 1... nomination filed with the Secretary, the agency or any employee organization may file a response thereto...

  6. 29 CFR 25.4 - Contents of requests; service on other parties; answer; intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; intervention. 25.4 Section 25.4 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES FOR THE NOMINATION OF ARBITRATORS...; intervention. (a) Requests for nominations 1 shall be in triplicate and contain the following information: 1... nomination filed with the Secretary, the agency or any employee organization may file a response thereto...

  7. 78 FR 56910 - Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Impact of Housing and Services Interventions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ..., was launched by HUD in 2008 in response to Senate Report 109-109 for the FY 2006 Transportation... understanding how families fare after an intervention ends, and whether the same interventions that are.... ] HUD encourages interested parties to submit comment in response to these questions. Authority:...

  8. Family Empowerment Intervention: An Innovative Service for High-Risk Youths and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Schmeidler, James

    This book provides a detailed review of a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded, long-term clinical trial of the Family Empowerment Intervention (FEI). FEI is a systems-oriented, low-cost intervention delivered in the home by trained nontherapists for high-risk youths who have been arrested and their families. The subjects were a group of over…

  9. Impact of Brief Intervention Services on Drug Using Truant Youth Arrest Charges over Time

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, Richard; Briones-Robinson, Rhissa; Wareham, Jennifer; Schmeidler, James; Winters, Ken C.; Barrett, Kimberly; Ungaro, Rocio; Karas, Lora M.; Belenko, Steven

    2012-01-01

    School truancy is a serious concern in the U.S., with far-reaching negative consequences. Truancy has been positively associated with substance use and delinquent behavior; however, research is limited. Consequently, the Truancy Brief Intervention Project was established to treat and prevent substance use and other risky behaviors among truants. This article examines whether the Brief Intervention program is more effective in preventing future delinquency over a 12-month follow-up period, than the standard truancy program. Results indicate the Brief Intervention was marginally significant in effecting future delinquency among truants, compared to the standard truancy program. Future implications of this study are discussed. PMID:25382960

  10. A Systematic Review of the Effect of Early Interventions for Psychosis on the Usage of Inpatient Services

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Jason R.; Vokey, Sherri; Loewen, Hal; Martens, Patricia J.; Brownell, Marni; Katz, Alan; Nickel, Nathan C.; Burland, Elaine; Chateau, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To review and synthesize the currently available research on whether early intervention for psychosis programs reduce the use of inpatient services. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using keywords searches on PubMed, Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (ProQuest), Scopus, CINAHL (EBSCO), Social Work Abstracts (EBSCO), Social Science Citations Index (Web of Science), Sociological Abstracts (ProQuest), and Child Development & Adolescent Studies (EBSCO). To be included, studies had to be peer-reviewed publications in English, examining early intervention programs using a variant of assertive community treatment, with a control/comparison group, and reporting inpatient service use outcomes. The primary outcome extracted number hospitalized and total N. Secondary outcome extracted means and standard deviations. Data were pooled using random effects models. Primary outcome was the occurrence of any hospitalization during treatment. A secondary outcome was the average bed-days used during treatment period. Results: Fifteen projects were identified and included in the study. Results of meta-analysis supported the occurrence of a positive effect for intervention for both outcome measures (any hospitalization OR: 0.33; 95% CI 0.18–0.63, bed-days usage SMD: −0.38, 95% CI −0.53 to −0.24). There was significant heterogeneity of effect across the studies. This heterogeneity is due to a handful of studies with unusually positive responses. Conclusion: These results suggest that early intervention programs are superior to standard of care, with respect to reducing inpatient service usage. Wider use of these programs may prevent the occurrence of admission for patients experiencing the onset of psychotic symptoms. PMID:25745034

  11. The existing therapeutic interventions for orgasmic disorders: recommendations for culturally competent services, narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Salmani, Zahra; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Salehi, Mehrdad; K.Killeen, Therese; Merghati-Khoei, Effat

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, a growing number of interventions for treatment of female orgasmic problems (FODs) have emerged. Whereas orgasm is a extra biologically and learnable experience, there is a need for practitioners that to be able to select which therapy is the most appropriate to their context. Objective: In this critical literature review, we aimed to assess areas of controversy in the existing therapeutic interventions in FOD with taking into accounted the Iranian cultural models. Materials and Methods: For the present study, we conducted an extensive search of electronic databases using a comprehensive search strategy from 1970 till 2014. This strategy was using Google Scholar search, “pearl-growing” techniques and by hand-searching key guidelines, to identify distinct interventions to women's orgasmic problem therapy. We utilized various key combinations of words such as:" orgasm" OR "orgasmic "," female orgasmic dysfunction" OR Female anorgasmia OR Female Orgasmic Disorder ", orgasmic dysfunction AND treatment, “orgasm AND intervention”. Selection criteria in order to be included in this review, studies were required to: 1 employ clinical-based interventions, 2 focus on FOD. Results: The majority of interventions (90%) related to non-pharmacological and other were about pharmacological interventions. Self-direct masturbation is suggested as the most privilege treatment in FOD. Reviewing all therapies indicates couple therapy, sexual skill training and sex therapy seem to be more appropriate to be applied in Iranian clinical settings. Conclusion: Since many therapeutic interventions are introduced to inform sexually-related practices, it is important to select an intervention that will be culturally appropriate and sensitive to norms and values. Professionals working in the fields of health and sexuality need to be sensitive and apply culturally appropriate therapies for Iranian population. We further suggest community well defined protocols

  12. Quality Services Management: A Consumer-Oriented Model for Systems Audit and Strategic Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Pamela C.

    The paper describes Quality Service Management (QSM) as applied to the provision of services to disabled and other special needs persons. QSM is defined as a systems approach to consumer relations based on the belief that quality care may be achieved only within the context of overall services management. Differences among "quality accountability"…

  13. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  14. Developmental Status and Early Intervention Service Needs of Maltreated Children. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.; Scarborough, Anita A.; Lloyd, E. Christopher; Losby, Jan L.; Casanueva, Cecilia; Mann, Tammy

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the extent to which maltreated children have developmental problems or are subject to factors associated with poor developmental outcomes, what services these children might be eligible to receive, what factors influence service receipt, and what solutions have been devised to address barriers to service provision. This final…

  15. A systematic review of interventions to improve prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission service delivery and promote retention

    PubMed Central

    Ambia, Julie; Mandala, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The success of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is dependent upon high retention of mother-infant pairs within these programmes. This is a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions that aim to improve PMTCT service delivery and promote retention throughout the PMTCT steps. Methods Selected databases were searched for studies published in English (up to September 2015). Outcomes of interest included antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among HIV-positive pregnant and/or breastfeeding women and their infants, retention into PMTCT programs, the uptake of early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV and infant HIV status. Risk ratios and random-effect meta-analysis were used in the analysis. Results Interventions assessed in the 34 identified studies included male partner involvement in PMTCT, peer mentoring, the use of community health workers (CHWs), mobile phone-based reminders, conditional cash transfer, training of midwives, integration of PMTCT services and enhanced referral. Five studies (two randomized) that evaluated mobile phone-based interventions showed a statistically significant increase (pooled RR 1.18; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.32, I2=83%) in uptake of EID of HIV at around six weeks postpartum. Male partner involvement in PMTCT was associated with reductions in infant HIV transmission (pooled RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.94, I2=0%) in four studies (one randomized). Four studies (three randomized) that were grounded on psychological interventions reported non-significant results (pooled RR 1.01; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.09, I2=69%) in increasing ARV/ART uptake among HIV-positive pregnant and/or breastfeeding women and infant HIV testing (pooled RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.94 to 1.07, I2=45%). The effect of the other interventions on the effectiveness of improving PMTCT uptake was unclear. Heterogeneity of interventions limits these findings. Conclusions Our findings indicate that mobile phone

  16. Assessing the Impact of a Quality Improvement Intervention on Diabetes Self- Management Education Services Provided by Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Dearinger, Angela T.; Ingram, Richard C.; Pendley, Robin P.; Wilding, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background As the burden of diabetes continues to overwhelm the public health system, there is increased demand on local health departments (LHDs) to improve public health services. Quality improvement (QI) techniques have been shown to be an effective means to improve the delivery of services by LHDs. Purpose To evaluate the extent to which the adoption of organizational quality improvement (QI) strategies influences the delivery and outreach of Diabetes Self- Management Education (DSME) services provided by LHDs. Methods A change facilitation model which included QI team development and on- site QI training and facilitation was delivered to 6 LHDs who provide DSME during 2010-2011. After training, each LHD developed and implemented a QI project to improve the outreach and delivery of DSME services. Pre- and post- intervention surveys were administered to evaluate the extent of change in DSME outreach and delivery. Results The number of individuals who completed an entire course of DSME increased by > 100%, and 14% more diabetics attended DSME on a monthly basis. Half of LHDs reported receiving increased numbers of referrals per month, and 15% more healthcare providers referred diabetic patients to the LHD for DSME. Conclusions Participation in COACH 4 DM led to improvements in the LHD QI infrastructure, and in the outreach and delivery of services to diabetic patients. The techniques used during COACH-4 DM are applicable to a wide variety of contexts and may be an effective tool to improve the delivery of other clinical and community preventive services. PMID:24237923

  17. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-15

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  18. Early Intervention Services for Children with Physical Disability: Parents' Perceptions of Family-Centeredness and Service Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziviani, Jenny; Feeney, Rachel B.; Khan, Asad

    2011-01-01

    Family-centered early childhood services for children with physical disability and their families can afford developmental advantage for children and avert unnecessary stress for families. This study aimed to determine how characteristics of children and families and perceptions of family-centered practice (FCP) relate to satisfaction with early…

  19. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abery, Brian, Ed.; McConnell, Scott, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on early intervention with handicapped children, with an emphasis on: Project EDGE (Expanding Developmental Growth through Education), an early intervention research project initiated in 1968; strategies for developing family-friendly early intervention services; and progress reports from various states and programs.…

  20. [Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on the theme of early intervention which infants and young children with special needs in nine brief articles: "Early Intervention: A Matter of Context" (Samuel J. Meisels); "Early Intervention Research: Asking and Answering Meaningful Questions" (Jack P. Shonkoff); "From Case Management to Service Coordination: Families,…

  1. Prospects of using community directed intervention strategy in delivering health services among Fulani Nomads in Enugu State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Community Directed Interventions (CDI) strategy has proven effective in increasing access to health services in sedentary populations. It remains to be seen if CDI strategy is feasible among nomads given the dearth of demographic and medical data on the nomads. This study thus characterized the nomadic populations in Enugu State, Nigeria and outlined the potentials of implementing CDI among nomads. Study design and methods This exploratory study adopted qualitative methods. Forty focus group discussions (FGD) were held with members of 10 nomadic camps in 2 LGAs in Enugu State, as well as their host communities. Thirty in-depth interviews (IDIs) were held with leaders of nomadic camps and sedentary populations. Ten IDIs with traditional healers in the nomadic camps and 14 key informant interviews with health workers and programme officers were also conducted. Documents and maps were reviewed to ascertain the grazing routes of the nomads as well as existing health interventions in the area. Results Like sedentary populations, nomads have definable community structures with leaders and followers, which is amenable to implementation of CDI. Nomads move their cattle, in a definite pattern, in search of grass and water. In this movement, the old and vulnerable are left in the camps. The nomads suffer from immunization preventable health problems as their host communities. The priority health problems in relation to CDI include malaria, measles, anemia, and other vaccine preventable infections. However, unlike the sedentary populations, the nomads lack access to health interventions, due to the mutual avoidance between the nomads and the sedentary populations in terms of health services. The later consider the services as mainly theirs. The nomads, however, are desirous of the modern health services and often task themselves to access these modern health services in private for profit health facilities when the need arises. Conclusion Given the definable

  2. The Use of Physical Interventions with People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour--The Experiences of Service Users and Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Sarah; Allen, David; Jenkins, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    Background: The views of both service users with intellectual disability and their support staff on the use of physical interventions are largely unknown. The research that does exist describes a largely negative pattern of responses. The present study aimed to explore the personal impact of receiving and implementing physical interventions, and…

  3. Service Engagement in Interventions for Street-Connected Children and Young People: A Summary of Evidence Supplementing a Recent Cochrane-Campbell Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Rosa; Coren, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background: This paper builds on a Cochrane-Campbell systematic review of interventions that reduce harms and promote reintegration in street-connected children and young people focusing on intervention outcomes. The aim of the present analysis is to explore questions raised in the systematic review over the potential role of service engagement in…

  4. Multidimensional Measurement Within Adult Protective Services: Design and Initial Testing of the Tool for Risk, Interventions, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfeld, David H.; Henderson, Linda B.; Snider, Marcy A.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development, field utility, reliability, and validity of the multidimensional Tool for Risk, Interventions, and Outcomes (TRIO) for use in Adult Protective Services (APS). The TRIO is designed to facilitate consistent APS practice and collect data related to multiple dimensions of typical interactions with APS clients, including the investigation and assessment of risks, the provision of APS interventions, and associated health and safety outcomes. Initial tests of the TRIO indicated high field utility, social worker “relevance and buy-in,” and inter-rater reliability. TRIO concurrent validity was demonstrated via appropriate patterns of TRIO item differentiation based on the type of observed confirmed abuse or neglect; and predictive validity was demonstrated by prediction of the risk of actual APS recurrence. The TRIO is a promising new tool that can help meet the challenges of providing and documenting effective APS practices and identifying those at high risk for future APS recurrence. PMID:24848994

  5. Characterizing the Use of Research-Community Partnerships in Studies of Evidence-Based Interventions in Children's Community Services.

    PubMed

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Stahmer, Aubyn; Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Herschell, Amy; Garland, Ann F

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the use of research community partnerships (RCPs) to tailor evidence-based intervention, training, and implementation models for delivery across different childhood problems and service contexts using a survey completed by project principal investigators and community partners. To build on previous RCP research and to explicate the tacit knowledge gained through collaborative efforts, the following were examined: (1) characteristics of studies using RCP models; (2) RCP functioning, processes, and products; (3) processes of tailoring evidence-based practices for community implementation; and (4) perceptions of the benefits and challenges of collaborating with community providers and consumers. Results indicated that researchers were solely or jointly involved in the formation of almost all of the RCPs; interpersonal and operational processes were perceived as primary challenges; community partners' roles included greater involvement in implementation and participant recruitment than more traditional research activities; and the partnership process was perceived to increase the relevance and "fit" of interventions and research. PMID:25578512

  6. Supporting students with brain tumors in obtaining school intervention services: the clinician's role from an educator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Grandinette, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of pediatric patients surviving the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors, many children are returning to school with an alteration in their physical, cognitive, and social-emotional functioning and thus requiring school intervention or services. Physicians and clinicians in hospital and rehabilitation settings serving this population can play a key role in communicating the medical and functional needs these children present as a result of diagnosis and treatment as they transition to an educational setting. Medical and allied health personnel can best support successful school transition when they are aware of the information schools require in order to open the door for students to easily access the interventions, supports, and services available through 504 Accommodation Plans and special education supports and services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Clear communication between medical and school personnel is vital in improving educational, social, and vocational outcomes for students with brain tumors. A streamlined approach to accomplish this task is offered for consideration. PMID:25547883

  7. Efficacy of a Process Improvement Intervention on Inmate Awareness of HIV Services: A Multi-Site Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Matthew L.; Albizu-García, Carmen E.; Pich, Michele; Patterson, Yvonne; O’Connell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV among U.S. inmates is much greater than in the general population, creating public health concerns and cost issues for the criminal justice system. The HIV Services and Treatment Implementation in Corrections protocol of the NIDA funded Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies cooperative tested the efficacy of an organizational process improvement strategy on improving HIV services in correctional facilities. For this paper, we analyzed efficacy of this strategy on improving inmate awareness and perceptions of HIV services. The study used a multi-site (n=28) clustered randomized trial approach. Facilities randomized to the experimental condition used a coach-driven local change team approach to improve HIV services at their facility. Facilities in the control condition were given a directive to improve HIV services on their own. Surveys about awareness and perceptions of HIV services were administered anonymously to inmates who were incarcerated in study facilities at baseline (n=1253) and follow-up (n=1048). A series of one-way ANOVAs were run to test whether there were differences between inmates in the experimental and control facilities at baseline and follow-up. Differences were observed at baseline, with the experimental group having significantly lower scores than the control group on key variables. But, at post-test, following the intervention, these differences were no longer significant. Taken in context of the findings from the main study, these results suggest that the change team approach to improving HIV services in correctional facilities is efficacious for improving inmates’ awareness and perceptions of HIV services. PMID:26203411

  8. The Components of Early Intervention Services for Families Living in Poverty: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corr, Catherine; Santos, Rosa Milagros; Fowler, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act mandates that very young children with disabilities be served through Part C services. Families of young children with disabilities who are also living in poverty are often the primary recipients of these services. To better understand the experiences of families, particularly those living in…

  9. Project ASSIST: A Support System of Intervention Strategies for Teachers. Psychological Services in a Rural Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulter, W. Alan; And Others

    The provision of ongoing psychological services to small rural schools has been a continuing problem to administrators for some time. With the advent of Plan A Comprehensive Special Education in Texas, small districts with less than 3,000 average daily attendance were encouraged to form cooperatives for special education services. The challenge to…

  10. Caregiver Factors Predicting Service Utilization among Youth Participating in a School-Based Mental Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett-Zeigler, Inger; Lyons, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Large numbers of children and adolescents experience diagnosable psychiatric disturbances; however, the majority of those with need do not utilize mental health services. Characteristics of caregivers are important predictors of which youth will access and continue to use services over time. In recent years school-based mental health intervention…

  11. Evaluating Crisis Intervention Services for Youth within an Emergency Department: A View from within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Jacinthe; Kennedy, Allison; Cloutier, Paula; Gray, Clare

    2010-01-01

    An innovative crisis intervention programme was created at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Canada in order to provide emergency assessments for youth presenting with mental health crises. The current investigation presents an overview of the programme and examines the emergency staff's perception and satisfaction with it.…

  12. DEC Position on Early Intervention Services for Children Birth to Age Eight. Adopted: December 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Early Childhood.

    This brief (two page) official position statement of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children addresses the issue of early intervention for young (ages birth to 8) children with disabilities, developmental delays, or who are at-risk for future developmental problems. DEC supports identification and service…

  13. Are Early Intervention Services Placing Home Languages and Cultures "At Risk"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puig, Victoria I.

    2010-01-01

    This position statement considers family languages, family cultures, and partnerships between family members and early intervention (EI) professionals as intimately interconnected and resources to be accessed when serving young children with special needs and their families. It presents theory and an overview of works that examine the impact of…

  14. Providing Services for Students with Gifts and Talents within a Response-to-Intervention Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsen, Susan K.; Parker, Sonia L.; Farah, Yara N.

    2015-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) was included in the 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), specifically as part of an assessment process to determine if a child has a disability. Although IDEA's focus is on students with disabilities, 10 states have developed policies that attend to students with gifts and…

  15. Psychological Intervention: Case Studies in School Psychological Services. Volume 2, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Jeff, Ed.

    The 16 case studies illustrate the nature and scope of psychological intervention with emotionally disturbed and otherwise handicapped students. Included are papers with the following titles and authors: "Reducing Math Anxiety while Increasing Independent Work Habits in a Learning Disabled Elementary School Boy" (K. Hoogeveen); "Coping with…

  16. Alternative Service Delivery by Speech Language Hearing Professionals in Rural Schools: Classroom Based Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    This paper describes an intervention model used by speech language pathologists (SLP) in rural schools. The model involves whole-class instruction for children with communication disorders. Whole-class instruction uses the curriculum content and expectations of children's regular classrooms for the content of speech language therapy. The SLPs…

  17. Psychological Intervention: Case Studies in School Psychological Services, Volume 3, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines. Div. of Pupil Personnel Services.

    The book presents 27 case studies illustrating psychological interventions with behavior problem school children. Studies ususally introduce the target population, describe the method of psychological evaluation, report the results of treatment, and discuss the case's implications. Among cases reported are investigations of stimulant medication on…

  18. Student Placement Service: An Exploratory Investigation of Employer Retention and a "Priority Partner" Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Francis D.; Byrne, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution. Design/methodology/approach: An action research methodology involving problem diagnosis, intervention planning, action and evaluation is employed. The diagnosis involved a…

  19. Evidence Based Interventions: An Examination of Pre-Service Training, Professional Development, and Classroom Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Kristin Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between EBI training for special education teachers and their practice of classroom interventions for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Evaluating the usage of EBIs in the classroom is imperative because of the many obligations educators have to uphold federal compliances…

  20. Battered Women’s Profiles Associated with Service Help-Seeking Efforts: Illuminating Opportunities for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Rebecca J.; Nurius, Paula S.; Kernic, Mary A.; Holt, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about where battered women present for services and the violence, biopsychosocial, and demographic factors associated with their help seeking can provide social workers with guidance in anticipating needs among this portion of their clientele. The authors examined the service contact patterns of a sample of battered women (N = 448) following an incident of partner violence that triggered legal involvement. Significant group differences, tested with t tests and chi squares, between women who sought compared with those who did not seek services were found on partner violence exposure and biopsychosocial factors. Correlations and regression analyses of relationships among partner violence and biopsychosocial and demographic factors with help-seeking indices show how battered women’s needs differentially relate across a range of service types. Results show distinctive profiles of needs and resources among battered women who seek violence, legal, health, economic, substance abuse, and religious helping services. PMID:25705104

  1. Optimizing eHealth breast cancer interventions: which types of eHealth services are effective?

    PubMed

    Baker, Timothy B; Hawkins, Robert; Pingree, Suzanne; Roberts, Linda J; McDowell, Helene E; Shaw, Bret R; Serlin, Ron; Dillenburg, Lisa; Swoboda, Christopher M; Han, Jeong-Yeob; Stewart, James A; Carmack-Taylor, Cindy L; Salner, Andrew; Schlam, Tanya R; McTavish, Fiona; Gustafson, David H

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the effective elements of Interactive Cancer Communication Systems (ICCSs). A randomized trial explored which types of services of a multifaceted ICCS benefited patients and the nature of the benefit. Women with breast cancer (N=450) were randomized to different types of ICCS services or to a control condition that provided internet access. The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS), served as the ICCS. ICCS services providing information and support, but not coaching such as cognitive behavior therapy, produced significant benefits in health information competence and emotional processing. Provision of Information and Support ICCS services significantly benefited women with breast cancer. More complex and interactive services designed to train the user had negligible effects. PMID:21709810

  2. Assessing the effects of regional payment for watershed services program on water quality using an intervention analysis model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; He, Tian

    2014-09-15

    Much attention has been recently paid to ex-post assessments of socioeconomic and environmental benefits of payment for ecosystem services (PES) programs on poverty reduction, water quality, and forest protection. To evaluate the effects of a regional PES program on water quality, we selected chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N) as indicators of water quality. Statistical methods and an intervention analysis model were employed to assess whether the PES program produced substantial changes in water quality at 10 water-quality sampling stations in the Shaying River watershed, China during 2006-2011. Statistical results from paired-sample t-tests and box plots of COD and NH3-N concentrations at the 10 stations showed that the PES program has played a positive role in improving water quality and reducing trans-boundary water pollution in the Shaying River watershed. Using the intervention analysis model, we quantitatively evaluated the effects of the intervention policy, i.e., the watershed PES program, on water quality at the 10 stations. The results suggest that this method could be used to assess the environmental benefits of watershed or water-related PES programs, such as improvements in water quality, seasonal flow regulation, erosion and sedimentation, and aquatic habitat. PMID:25016470

  3. Interventions in Organizational and Community Context: A Framework for Building Evidence on Dissemination and Implementation in Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Peter; Meredith, Lisa S.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The effective dissemination and implementation of evidence-based health interventions within community settings is an important cornerstone to expanding the availability of quality health and mental health services. Yet it has proven a challenging task for both research and community stakeholders. This paper presents the current framework developed by the UCLA/RAND NIMH Center to address this research-to-practice gap by: 1) providing a theoretically-grounded understanding of the multi-layered nature of community and healthcare contexts and the mechanisms by which new practices and programs diffuse within these settings; 2) distinguishing among key components of the diffusion process—including contextual factors, adoption, implementation, and sustainment of interventions—showing how evaluation of each is necessary to explain the course of dissemination and outcomes for individual and organizational stakeholders; 3) facilitating the identification of new strategies for adapting, disseminating, and implementing relatively complex, evidence-based healthcare and improvement interventions, particularly using a community-based, participatory approach; and 4) enhancing the ability to meaningfully generalize findings across varied interventions and settings to build an evidence base on successful dissemination and implementation strategies. PMID:17990095

  4. An Examination of an Alternative Early Intervention Service Delivery Model for Latino Families Whose Children Are English Language Learners. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    The purpose of this study was to describe a research project that investigated an alternative service delivery model for infants, toddlers, and their families who were eligible for early intervention services under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). These families were of Latino heritage and had Spanish as their…

  5. Improving Science and Literacy Learning for English Language Learners: Evidence from a Pre-service Teacher Preparation Intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jerome M.; Lyon, Edward G.; Stoddart, Trish; Mosqueda, Eduardo; Menon, Preetha

    2014-08-01

    This paper present findings from a pre-service teacher development project that prepared novice teachers to promote English language and literacy development with inquiry-based science through a modified elementary science methods course and professional development for cooperating teachers. To study the project's impact on student learning, we administered a pre and post assessment to students (N = 191) of nine first year elementary teachers (grades 3 through 6) who experienced the intervention and who taught a common science unit. Preliminary results indicate that (1) student learning improved across all categories (science concepts, writing, and vocabulary)—although the effect varied by category, and (2) English Language Learner (ELL) learning gains were on par with non-ELLs, with differences across proficiency levels for vocabulary gain scores. These results warrant further analyses to understand the extent to which the intervention improved teacher practice and student learning. This study confirms the findings of previous research that the integration of science language and literacy practices can improve ELL achievement in science concepts, writing and vocabulary. In addition, the study indicates that it is possible to begin to link the practices taught in pre-service teacher preparation to novice teacher practice and student learning outcomes.

  6. Automated personnel-assets-consumables-drug tracking in ambulance services for more effective and efficient medical emergency interventions.

    PubMed

    Utku, Semih; Özcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Unluturk, Mehmet Suleyman

    2016-04-01

    Patient delivery time is no longer considered as the only critical factor, in ambulatory services. Presently, five clinical performance indicators are used to decide patient satisfaction. Unfortunately, the emergency ambulance services in rapidly growing metropolitan areas do not meet current satisfaction expectations; because of human errors in the management of the objects onboard the ambulances. But, human involvement in the information management of emergency interventions can be reduced by electronic tracking of personnel, assets, consumables and drugs (PACD) carried in the ambulances. Electronic tracking needs the support of automation software, which should be integrated to the overall hospital information system. Our work presents a complete solution based on a centralized database supported by radio frequency identification (RFID) and bluetooth low energy (BLE) identification and tracking technologies. Each object in an ambulance is identified and tracked by the best suited technology. The automated identification and tracking reduces manual paper documentation and frees the personnel to better focus on medical activities. The presence and amounts of the PACD are automatically monitored, warning about their depletion, non-presence or maintenance dates. The computerized two way hospital-ambulance communication link provides information sharing and instantaneous feedback for better and faster diagnosis decisions. A fully implemented system is presented, with detailed hardware and software descriptions. The benefits and the clinical outcomes of the proposed system are discussed, which lead to improved personnel efficiency and more effective interventions. PMID:26777434

  7. A realist synthesis of the effect of social accountability interventions on health service providers’ and policymakers’ responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accountability has center stage in the current post-Millennium Development Goals (MDG) debate. One of the effective strategies for building equitable health systems and providing quality health services is the strengthening of citizen-driven or social accountability processes. The monitoring of actions and decisions of policymakers and providers by citizens is regarded as a right in itself but also as an alternative to weak administrative accountability mechanisms, in particular in settings with poor governance. The effects of social accountability interventions are often based on assumptions and are difficult to evaluate because of their complex nature and context sensitivity. This study aims to review and assess the available evidence for the effect of social accountability interventions on policymakers’ and providers’ responsiveness in countries with medium to low levels of governance capacity and quality. For policymakers and practitioners engaged in health system strengthening, social accountability initiatives and rights-based approaches to health, the findings of this review may help when reflecting on the assumptions and theories of change behind their policies and interventions. Methods/Design Little is known about social accountability interventions, their outcomes and the circumstances under which they produce outcomes for particular groups or issues. In this study, social accountability interventions are conceptualized as complex social interventions for which a realist synthesis is considered the most appropriate method of systematic review. The synthesis is based on a preliminary program theory of social accountability that will be tested through an iterative process of primary study searches, data extraction, analysis and synthesis. Published and non-published (grey) quantitative and qualitative studies in English, French and Spanish will be included. Quality and validity will be enhanced by continuous peer review and team reflection

  8. HIV prevention and care services for female sex workers: efficacy of a targeted community-based intervention in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Isidore T; Meda, Nicolas; Hema, Noelie M; Ouedraogo, Djeneba; Some, Felicien; Some, Roselyne; Niessougou, Josiane; Sanon, Anselme; Konate, Issouf; Van De Perre, Philippe; Mayaud, Philippe; Nagot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although interventions to control HIV among high-risk groups such as female sex workers (FSW) are highly recommended in Africa, the contents and efficacy of these interventions are unclear. We therefore designed a comprehensive dedicated intervention targeting young FSW and assessed its impact on HIV incidence in Burkina Faso. Methods Between September 2009 and September 2011 we conducted a prospective, interventional cohort study of FSW aged 18 to 25 years in Ouagadougou, with quarterly follow-up for a maximum of 21 months. The intervention combined prevention and care within the same setting, consisting of peer-led education sessions, psychological support, sexually transmitted infections and HIV care, general routine health care and reproductive health services. At each visit, behavioural characteristics were collected and HIV, HSV-2 and pregnancy were tested. We compared the cohort HIV incidence with a modelled expected incidence in the study population in the absence of intervention, using data collected at the same time from FSW clients. Results The 321 HIV-uninfected FSW enrolled in the cohort completed 409 person-years of follow-up. No participant seroconverted for HIV during the study (0/409 person-years), whereas the expected modelled number of HIV infections were 5.05/409 person-years (95% CI, 5.01–5.08) or 1.23 infections per 100 person-years (p=0.005). This null incidence was related to a reduction in the number of regular partners and regular clients, and by an increase in consistent condom use with casual clients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.19; 95% CI, 1.16–4.14, p=0.01) and with regular clients (aOR=2.18; 95% CI, 1.26–3.76, p=0.005). Conclusions Combining peer-based prevention and care within the same setting markedly reduced the HIV incidence among young FSW in Burkina Faso, through reduced risky behaviours. PMID:26374604

  9. Dietary intake of isoflavones and polyunsaturated fatty acids associated with lung function, breathlessness and the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: possible protective effect of traditional Japanese diet.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumi; Lee, Andy H; Binns, Colin W; Hiramatsu, Naoko; Mori, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Koichi

    2010-07-01

    The Japanese diet is high in soy products and fish. A case-control study was conducted in Japan to investigate the relationship between dietary intake of isoflavones and fatty acids and lung function, breathlessness and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 278 referred patients aged 50-75 years with COPD diagnosed within the past 4 years, and 340 community-based controls were assessed for respiratory symptoms and undertook spirometric measurements of lung function. A validated food frequency questionnaire was administered face-to-face to obtain information on habitual food consumption. Dietary intakes of isoflavones and fatty acids were derived from the Japanese food composition tables. The COPD patients had significantly lower habitual intakes of isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; both omega-3 and omega-6) than control subjects. Lung function measures were found to be positively associated with isoflavones and PUFA intake. Substantial reductions in prevalence of COPD and breathlessness were observed for isoflavones, the respective adjusted odds ratio being 0.36 (95% confidence interval 0.19-0.68) and 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.33-1.10) for the highest versus lowest levels of total isoflavone intake. The corresponding tests for linear trend were significant. High intakes of PUFA and omega-6 fatty acids (derived from foods excluding oils and fats as seasonings) also appeared to reduce the risks of COPD and breathlessness symptom, but no evidence of association was found for other types of fatty acids. The study provided evidence of possible protective effect of traditional Japanese diet against tobacco carcinogens. PMID:20112297

  10. Effects of an Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health Intervention on Health Service Usage by Young People in Northern Ghana: A Community-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aninanya, Gifty Apiung; Debpuur, Cornelius Y.; Awine, Timothy; Williams, John E.; Hodgson, Abraham; Howard, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Background While many Ghanaian adolescents encounter sexual and reproductive health problems, their usage of services remains low. A social learning intervention, incorporating environment, motivation, education, and self-efficacy to change behaviour, was implemented in a low-income district of northern Ghana to increase adolescent services usage. This study aimed to assess the impact of this intervention on usage of sexual and reproductive health services by young people. Methods Twenty-six communities were randomly allocated to (i) an intervention consisting of school-based curriculum, out-of-school outreach, community mobilisation, and health-worker training in youth-friendly health services, or (ii) comparison consisting of community mobilisation and youth-friendly health services training only. Outcome measures were usage of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) management, HIV counselling and testing, antenatal care or perinatal services in the past year and reported service satisfaction. Data was collected, at baseline and three years after, from a cohort of 2,664 adolescents aged 15–17 at baseline. Results Exposure was associated with over twice the odds of using STI services (AOR 2.47; 95%CI 1.78–3.42), 89% greater odds of using perinatal services (AOR 1.89; 95%CI 1.37–2.60) and 56% greater odds of using antenatal services (AOR 1.56; 95%CI 1.10–2.20) among participants in intervention versus comparison communities, after adjustment for baseline differences. Conclusions The addition of targeted school-based and outreach activities increased service usage by young people more than community mobilisation and training providers in youth-friendly services provision alone. PMID:25928562