Science.gov

Sample records for bright x-ray pulsars

  1. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; D'Aì, A.; Segreto, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-07-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ˜1.7 × 1011 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma on to the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore, the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previously estimated, unless the field is able to restore its original configuration on a time-scale comparable with the outbursts recurrence time.

  2. High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) are interesting objects that provide a wide range of observational probes to the nature of the two stellar components, accretion process, stellar wind and orbital parameters of the systems. Most of the transient HMXBs are found to Be/X-ray binaries (~67%), consisting of a compact object (neutron star) in orbit around the companion Be star. The orbit of the compact object around the Be star is wide and highly eccentric. Be/X-ray binaries are generally quiescent in X-ray emission. The transient X-ray outbursts seen in these objects are known to be due to interaction between the compact object and the circumstellar disk surrounding the Be star. In the recent years, another class of transient HMXBs have been found which have supergiant companions and show shorter X-ray outbursts. X-ray, infrared and optical observations of these HMXBs provide vital information regarding these systems. The timing and broad-band X-ray spectral properties of a few HMXB pulsars, mainly Be/X-ray binary pulsars during regular X-ray outbursts will be discussed.

  3. X-RAY EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Anada, Takayasu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Yamazaki, Ryo; Vink, Jacco

    2010-08-20

    During the search for counterparts of very high energy gamma-ray sources, we serendipitously discovered large, extended, low surface brightness emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around pulsars with the ages up to {approx}100 kyr, a discovery made possible by the low and stable background of the Suzaku X-ray satellite. A systematic study of a sample of eight of these PWNe, together with Chandra data sets, has revealed that the nebulae keep expanding up to {approx}100 kyr, although the timescale of the synchrotron X-ray emission is only {approx}60 yr for typical magnetic fields of 100 {mu}G. Our result suggests that the accelerated electrons up to {approx}80 TeV can escape from the PWNe without losing most energies. Moreover, in order to explain the observed correlation between the X-ray size and the pulsar spin-down age, the magnetic field strength in the PWNe must decrease with time.

  4. X-Ray Pulsar Studies With RXTE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul

    2004-01-01

    Our activities here at MIT have largely concentrated on four different binary X-ray pulsars: LMC X-4; 4UO352+3O/XPer; 4U0115+63; and X1908+075. We have also recently initiated a search for millisecond X-ray pulsations in RXTE archival data for several bright LMXBs using a new technique. Since this study is just getting under way, we will not report any results here. Using RXTE timing observations of LMC X-4 we have definitively measured, for the first time, the orbital decay of this high-mass X-ray binary. The e-folding decay time scale is very close to lo6 years, comparable to, but somewhat longer than, the corresponding orbital decay times for SMC X-1 and Cen X-3. We find that the orbital decay in LMC X-4 is likely driven by tidal interactions, where the asynchronism between the orbital motion and the rotation of the companion star is maintained by the evolutionary expansion of the companion. Under NASA grant NAGS7479 we carried out RXTE observations of X Per/4U0352+30 in order to track the pulse phase over a one year interval. This effort was successful in tentatively identifying a N 250-day orbital period. However, due to the fact that the observing interval was only somewhat longer than the orbital period, we asked for the observations of X Per to continue as public, or non-proprietary observations. Dr. Jean Swank kindly agreed to the continuation of the observations and they were carried out on a less frequent basis over the next year and a half. After 72 separate observations of X Per, we have the orbital period and semimajor axis firmly determined. In addition, we were able to measure the orbital eccentricity-which turns out to be remarkably small (e = 0.10) for such a wide binary orbit. This has led us establish the birth of a neutron star with a very small (or zero) natal kick.

  5. X-rays from the eclipsing pulsar 1957+20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruchter, A. S.; Bookbinder, J.; Garcia, M. R.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The detection of soft X-rays of about 1 keV energy from the eclipsing pulsar PSR1957+20 is reported. This high-energy radiation should be a valuable diagnostic of the wind in this recycled pulsar system. Possible sources of the X-ray emission are the interstellar nebula driven by the pulsar wind, the interaction between the pulsar and its evaporating companion, and the pulsar itself. The small apparent size of the X-ray object argues against the first of these possibilities and suggests that the X-rays are produced within the binary.

  6. EXTINCTION AND DISTANCE TO ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS FROM X-RAY SCATTERING HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Van Kerkwijk, M. H. E-mail: mhvk@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-02-10

    We analyze the X-ray scattering halos around three Galactic Anomalous X-ray Pulsars in order to constrain the distance and the optical extinction of each source. We obtain surface brightness distributions from EPIC-pn data obtained with XMM-Newton, compare the profiles of different sources, and fit them with a model based on the standard theory of X-ray scattering by dust grains, both for a uniform distribution of dust along the line of sight, and for dust distributions constrained by previous measurements. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that for all three sources, the uniform distribution reproduces the observed surface brightness as well as or better than the distributions that are informed by previous constraints. Nevertheless, the inferred total dust columns are robust, and serve to confirm that previous measurements based on interstellar edges in high-resolution X-ray spectra and on modeling of broadband X-ray spectra were reliable. Specifically, we find A{sub V} {approx_equal} 4, 6, and 8 mag for 4U 0142+61, 1E 1048.1 - 5937, and 1RXS J170849.0 - 400910, respectively. For 1E 1048.1 - 5937, this is well in excess of the extinction expected toward an H I bubble along the line of sight, thus casting further doubt on the suggested association with the source.

  7. Accretion powered X-ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Swank, J. H.; Holt, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    A unified description of the properties of 14 X-ray pulsars is presented and compared with the current theoretical understanding of these systems. The sample extends over six orders of magnitude in luminosity, with the only trend in the phase averaged spectra being that the lower luminosity systems appear to have less abrupt high energy cutoffs. There is no correlation of luminosity with power law index, high energy cutoff energy or iron line EW. Detailed pulse phase spectroscopy is given for five systems.

  8. The X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dongdong; Li, Wenbin; Lian, Jian; Shi, Yufeng; Song, Juan; Wang, Wencong; Sun, Shukun

    2016-01-01

    The effective X-ray optics is a key premise for X-ray pulsar detection and navigation. However, it is very difficult to focus the X-ray photons through refraction for the reason that the X-ray photon is very easy to be absorbed by the materials. The most effective ways for the X-ray focusing is reflection. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction of the theory of the grazing incidence and the corresponding optical systems. By comparing the design parameters of main X-ray astronomical telescope in NASA and ESA, we will give the development trend of the X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation and introduce several new technology for the manufacture of the micro-pore optics (MPO).

  9. Synchronous x-ray and radio mode switches: a rapid global transformation of the pulsar magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, W; Hessels, J W T; Kuiper, L; van Leeuwen, J; Mitra, D; de Plaa, J; Rankin, J M; Stappers, B W; Wright, G A E; Basu, R; Alexov, A; Coenen, T; Grießmeier, J-M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Serylak, M; Pilia, M; Sobey, C; Weltevrede, P; Zagkouris, K; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Batejat, F; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Orrú, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rawlings, S; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schoenmakers, A; Shulevski, A; Sluman, J; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van de Brink, R H; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2013-01-25

    Pulsars emit from low-frequency radio waves up to high-energy gamma-rays, generated anywhere from the stellar surface out to the edge of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes across the electromagnetic spectrum is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship among the emission sites. Through simultaneous observations, we detected synchronous switching in the radio and x-ray emission properties of PSR B0943+10. When the pulsar is in a sustained radio-"bright" mode, the x-rays show only an unpulsed, nonthermal component. Conversely, when the pulsar is in a radio-"quiet" mode, the x-ray luminosity more than doubles and a 100% pulsed thermal component is observed along with the nonthermal component. This indicates rapid, global changes to the conditions in the magnetosphere, which challenge all proposed pulsar emission theories. PMID:23349288

  10. X-ray emission from two nearby millisecond pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsett, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    This grant, titled 'X-Ray Emission from Two Nearby Millisecond Pulsars,' included ROSAT observations of the nearby pulsars PSR J2322+20 and PSR J2019+24. Neither was detected, although the observations were among the most sensitive ever made towards millisecond pulsars, reaching 1.5 x 10(exp 29) and 2.7 x 10(exp 29) erg s(exp -1) (0.1-2.4 keV), respectively. This is about, or slightly below, the predicted level of emission from the Seward and Wang empirical prediction, based on an extrapolation from slower pulsars. To understand the significance of this result, we have compared these limits with observations of four other millisecond pulsars, taken from the ROSAT archives. Except for the case of PSR B1821-21, where we identified a possible x-ray counterpart, only upper limits on x-ray flux were obtained. From these results, we conclude that x-ray emission beaming does not follow the same dependence on pulsar period as that of radio emission: while millisecond pulsars have beaming fractions near unity in the radio, x-ray emission is observed only for favorable viewing geometries.

  11. The superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    There exists a special class of X-ray pulsars that exhibit very slow pulsation of P spin > 1000 s in the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We have studied the temporal and spectral properties of these superslow pulsation neutron star binaries in hard X-ray bands with INTEGRAL observations. Long-term monitoring observations find spin period evolution of two sources: spin-down trend for 4U 2206+54 (P spin ~ 5560 s with Ṗ spin ~ 4.9 × 10-7 s s-1) and long-term spin-up trend for 2S 0114+65 (P spin ~ 9600 s with Ṗ spin ~ -1 × 10-6 s s-1) in the last 20 years. A Be X-ray transient, SXP 1062 (P spin ~ 1062 s), also showed a fast spin-down rate of Ṗ spin ~ 3 × 10-6 s s-1 during an outburst. These superslow pulsation neutron stars cannot be produced in the standard X-ray binary evolution model unless the neutron star has a much stronger surface magnetic field (B > 1014 G). The physical origin of the superslow spin period is still unclear. The possible origin and evolution channels of the superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars are discussed. Superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars could be younger X-ray binary systems, still in the fast evolution phase preceding the final equilibrium state. Alternatively, they could be a new class of neutron star system - accreting magnetars.

  12. New Energetic Radio Pulsars: An Archival X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This ADP grant was to analyze archival X-ray data obtained in the direction of radio pulsars that were recently discovered as part of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Search, which was done using the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The survey discovered nearly 700 pulsars, of which roughly three dozen were possible candidates for the detection of X-ray emission. Our team looked at 30 of the most interesting candidates. In most cases, there was insufficient data in the archive to conclude anything. However in several cases, there were interesting archival observations. In three cases, a detailed analysis proved scientifically interesting, and two publications have resulted.

  13. X-Ray States of Redback Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as "redbacks," constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L X), between (6-9) × 1032 erg s-1 (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 1033 erg s-1 (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L X in the pulsar state (>1032 erg s-1).

  14. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Esposito, Paolo; Crawford III, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  15. X-ray Pulsar Navigation Algorithms and Testbed for SEXTANT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hasouneh, Monther A.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Grendreau, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a NASA funded technologydemonstration. SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar-based Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper describes the basic design of the SEXTANT system with a focus on core models and algorithms, and the design and continued development of the GSFC X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) with its dynamic pulsar emulation capability. We also present early results from GXLT modeling of the combined NICER X-ray timing instrument hardware and SEXTANT flight software algorithms.

  16. X-ray observations of black widow pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, P. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Camilo, F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Stairs, I. H.

    2014-03-10

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period (P{sub B} < 1 day), γ-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Four of these—PSRs J0023+0923, J1124–3653, J1810+1744, and J2256–1024—are 'black-widow' pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass <<0.1 M {sub ☉}, three of which exhibit radio eclipses. The fifth source, PSR J2215+5135, is an eclipsing 'redback' with a near Roche-lobe filling ∼0.2 solar mass non-degenerate companion. Data were taken using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256–1024, show significant orbital variability while PSR J1124–3653 shows marginal orbital variability. The lightcurves for these three pulsars have X-ray flux minima coinciding with the phases of the radio eclipses. This phenomenon is consistent with an intrabinary shock emission interpretation for the X-rays. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, are fainter and do not demonstrate variability at a level we can detect in these data. All five spectra are fit with three separate models: a power-law model, a blackbody model, and a combined model with both power-law and blackbody components. The preferred spectral fits yield power-law indices that range from 1.3 to 3.2 and blackbody temperatures in the hundreds of eV. The spectrum for PSR J2215+5135 shows a significant hard X-ray component, with a large number of counts above 2 keV, which is additional evidence for the presence of intrabinary shock emission. This is similar to what has been detected in the low-mass X-ray binary to MSP transition object PSR J1023+0038.

  17. X-ray states of redback millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, M.

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as 'redbacks', constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L {sub X}), between (6-9) × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1} (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L {sub X} in the pulsar state (>10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}).

  18. Chandra Imaging of the X-Ray Nebula Powered by Pulsar B1509-58

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Arons, J.; Kaspi, V. M.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Kawai, N.; Tamura, K.

    2002-04-01

    We present observations with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the energetic young pulsar B1509-58. These data confirm the complicated morphology of the system indicated by previous observations, and in addition reveal several new components to the nebula. The overall PWN shows a clear symmetry axis oriented at a position angle 150deg+/-5deg (north through east), which we argue corresponds to the pulsar spin axis. We show that a previously identified radio feature matches well with the overall extent of the X-ray PWN, and propose the former as the long-sought radio nebula powered by the pulsar. We further identify a bright collimated feature, at least 4' long, lying along the nebula's main symmetry axis; we interpret this feature as a physical outflow from the pulsar, and infer a velocity for this jet of greater than 0.2c. The lack of any observed counterjet implies that the pulsar spin axis is inclined at ~30° to the line of sight, contrary to previous estimates made from lower resolution data. We also identify a variety of compact features close to the pulsar. A pair of semicircular X-ray arcs lie 17" and 30" to the north of the pulsar; the latter arc shows a highly polarized radio counterpart. We show that these features can be interpreted as ion-compression wisps in a particle-dominated equatorial flow, and use their properties to infer a ratio of electromagnetic to particle energy in pairs at the wind shock σ~0.005, similar to that seen in the Crab Nebula. We further identify several compact knots seen very close to the pulsar; we use these to infer σ<0.003 at a separation from the pulsar of 0.1 pc.

  19. X-ray observations of Fermi LAT gamma-ray pulsars and pulsar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saz Parkinson, P.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.

    2014-07-01

    Since the launch of Fermi, in 2008, the population of known gamma-ray pulsars has exploded from just a handful, to over 150. X-ray observations have been crucial in both the discovery and the understanding of this new pulsar population. I will discuss our ongoing program of XMM, Chandra, and Swift observations of Fermi-LAT pulsars and pulsar candidates and present some of the latest results we have obtained.

  20. Profile bias' influence in x-ray pulsar based navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dapeng; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Yidi; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsar-based navigation is a novel autonomous navigation method. The pulsar is a kind of neutron star rotating with high speed. Its angle position is stationary in space and its rotation period is extremely stable. In space, the signal with extremely stable period could be detected. Its long-term stability is higher than the atomic clock in state-of-the-art. Therefore, the signal of the pulsars in X-ray waveband could be used for the autonomous navigation of the spacecrafts. The signal's profile is a necessary parameter to estimate the navigation information. In this paper, the impact on the navigation precision caused by the flux bias of the signal's profile is analyzed. The impact is not severely proved in theory and simulation.

  1. New micro pore optics for x-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge; Zhang, Qindong; Xu, Zhao; Zhang, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xu, Wei; Li, Jingwen; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Solutions of focusing pulsars X-ray is a key factor in improving the accuracy of pulsar navigation. Based on the focusing principle of lobster eye grazing incidence, new micro pore optics (MPO) for pulsar navigation which is glass-substrated X-ray MPO is researched and developed. The effective areas on MPO when single grazing incidence or double grazing incidence happens are analyzed in detail and the first generation of MPO is produced. By illumination of parallel X-ray beam with 1.49keV and 8.05keV on the MPO, it is found that the crossing focusing image can be clearly visible, and the arm of cross image of 1.49keV and 8.05keV are is respectively 30mm and 17mm in length. Moreover, the center intensity was significantly higher than the cross arm which is consistent with theoretical calculation. Besides, the angular resolution of first generation of MPO with 8.05keV parallel X-ray beam illuminated is 4.19'.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray emission from old pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Shota; Tanaka, Shuta J.

    2014-09-01

    We study the synchrotron radiation as the observed non-thermal emission by the X-ray satellites from old pulsars (≳1-10 Myr) to investigate the particle acceleration in their magnetospheres. We assume that the power-law component of the observed X-ray spectra is caused by the synchrotron radiation from electrons and positrons in the magnetosphere. We consider two pair-production mechanisms of X-ray emitting particles, the magnetic and the photon-photon pair productions. High-energy photons, which ignite the pair production, are emitted via the curvature radiation of the accelerated particles. We use the analytical description for the radiative transfer and estimate the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation. We find that for pulsars with the spin-down luminosity Lsd ≲ 1033 erg s-1, the locations of the particle acceleration and the non-thermal X-ray emission are within ≲107 cm from the centre of the neutron star, where the magnetic pair production occurs. For pulsars with the spin-down luminosity Lsd ≲ 1031 erg s-1 such as J0108-1431, the synchrotron radiation is difficult to explain the observed non-thermal component even if we consider the existence of the strong and small-scale surface magnetic field structures.

  3. Period clustering of anomalous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2015-06-01

    The question of why the observed periods of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) cluster in the range 2-12 s is discussed. The possibility that AXPs and SGRs are the descendants of high-mass X-ray binaries that have disintegrated in core-collapse supernova explosions is investigated. The spin periods of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries evolve towards the equilibrium period, which is a few seconds, on average. After the explosion of its massive companion, the neutron star becomes embedded in a dense gaseous envelope, and accretion from this envelope leads to the formation of a residual magnetically levitating disk. It is shown that the expected mass of the disk in this case is 10-7-10-8 M⊙, which is sufficient to support accretion at the rate 1014-1015 g/s over a few thousand years. During this period, the star manifests itself as an isolated X-ray pulsar with a number of parameters similar to those of AXPs and SGRs. The periods of such pulsars can cluster if the lifetime of the residual disk does not exceed the spin-down timescale of the neutron star.

  4. Soft-X-Ray Prefilter for Hot, Bright Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ortendahl, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Prefilters consisting of beryllium foil supported on conductive silver mesh transmit soft x-rays but are nearly opaque to visible and infrared light. New Be/AG filters protect imaging X-ray detectors from damage by visible and longer wavelength radiation when viewing such hot, bright emitters as Sun or possibly certain industrial processes.

  5. Models for X-Ray Emission from Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, F. Y.-H.; Ruderman, M.; Halpern, Jules P.; Zhu, T.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for the observed combination of power-law and thermal X-rays from rotationally powered pulsars. For gamma-ray pulsars with accelerators very many stellar radii above the neutron star surface, 100 MeV curvature gamma-rays from e(-) or e(+) flowing starward out of such accelerators are converted to e1 pairs on closed field lines all around the star. These pairs strongly affect X-ray emission from near the star in two ways. (1) The pairs are a source of synchrotron emission immediately following their creation in regions where B approx. 10(exp 10) G. This emission, in the photon energy range 0.1 keV less than E(sub X) less than 5 MeV, has a power-law spectrum with energy index 0.5 and X-ray luminosity that depends on the back-flow current, and is typically approx. 10(exp 33) ergs/ s. (2) The pairs ultimately a cyclotron resonance "blanket" surrounding the star except for two holes along the open field line bundles which pass through it. In such a blanket the gravitational pull on e(+,-) pairs toward the star is balanced by the hugely amplified push of outflowing surface emitted X-rays wherever cyclotron resonance occurs. Because of it the neutron star is surrounded by a leaky "hohlraum" of hot blackbody radiation with two small holes, which prevents direct X-ray observation of a heated polar cap of a gamma-ray pulsar. Weakly spin modulated radiation from the blanket together with more strongly spin-modulated radiation from the holes through it would then dominate observed low energy (0.1-10 keV) emission. For non-y-ray pulsars, in which no such accelerators with their accompanying extreme relativistic back-flow toward the star are expected, optically thick e1 resonance blankets should not form (except in special cases very close to the open field line bundle). From such pulsars blackbody radiation from both the warm stellar surface and the heated polar caps should be directly observable. In these pulsars, details of the surface magnetic field

  6. Anomalous X-ray Pulsars and Soft Gamma Repeaters as Magnetars: The RXTE Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the launch of RXTE, the hypothesis by Thompson and Duncan that there exists a class of ultra-highly magnetized young neutron stars whose emission is powered by the decay of their magnetic field -- the so-called `magnetar' model -- was beautiful, yet unproven. The magnetar model was motivated the existence of Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), which had been observed to exhibit dramatic X-ray and soft gamma ray bursts and in one case, 8-s pulsations in the tail of a major flare. Meanwhile, there was recognized another puzzling group of seemingly very different objects, the 'Anomalous X-ray Pulsars' (AXPs), so-called due to their bright, several-second X-ray pulsations, steady spin down, low spin-down power and absence of any binary companion from which mass could be accreted. AXPs had also been suggested to be magnetars by Thompson and Duncan, though this too was unproven. Today, thanks to multiple landmark RXTE results, these two groups of object have been united into a single source class, which is now nearly universally identified with magnetars. Specifically, the discovery from SGRs of regular X-ray pulsations and steady spin-down (as had been observed in AXPs), as well as the discovery of bright X-ray bursts from AXPs (as had been observed in SGRs) has demonstrated unambiguously the common nature of AXPs and SGRs, as was predicted uniquely in the magnetar model. Moreover, RXTE discoveries of several observational links between AXPs, SGRs and rotation-powered pulsars, specifically the detection of spin-up glitches in AXPs, as well as the observation of a temporary metamorphosis of one rotation-powered pulsar into a magnetar-like source, hint at a broader unification of the magnetars with the general radio pulsar population, with the observational differences attributable to a combination of age and magnetic field.

  7. Observations of x ray pulsars from the Kvant module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilfanov, M.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Churazov, E.; Loznikov, V.; Efremov, V. V.; Kaniovskiy, A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Yamburenko, N.; Melioranskiy, A.; Skinner, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The Roentgen international x ray observatory on the Kvant module of the Mir space station has been successfully operating since the beginning of June 1987. Many x ray sources were observed and among them were several x ray pulsars. Four telescopes mounted on board the Kvant module cover a wide energy range with good timing resolution. Timing analysis of the Kvant module data suffers from the presence of only short continuous intervals of source observations, separated by 90 min gaps (90 min is the orbital period of the Mir space station around the Earth). The presence of 90 min gaps leads to the appearance of beat frequencies v=v sub 0 + or - n/90 min (n = 1, 2, 3). Special analysis was applied to avoid this difficulty. Results are presented of the pulsation period measurements of the x ray pulsars Her X-1, Cen X-3, SMC X-1, Vela X-1, A0535 + 26 by the instruments on board the Kvant module in 1987 to 1989. The values of the periods are reduced to the solar system barycenter and to the binary system barycenter (excluding A0535 + 26).

  8. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  9. A new look at anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2014-04-01

    We explore the possibility of explaining Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gammaray Repeaters (SGRs) in a scenario with fall-back magnetic accretion onto a young isolated neutron star. The X-ray emission of the pulsar in this case originates due to the accretion of matter onto the surface of the neutron star from a magnetic slab surrounding its magnetosphere. The spin-down rate of the neutron star expected in this picture is close to the observed value. We show that such neutron stars are relatively young and are going through the transition from the propeller state to the accretor state. The pulsar's activity in gamma-rays is connected with its relative youth, and is enabled by energy stored in a non-equilibrium layer located in the crust of the low-mass neutron star. This energy can be released due to the mixing of matter in the neutron star crust with super heavy nuclei approaching its surface and becoming unstable. The fission of nuclei in the low-density region initiates chain reactions leading to a nuclear explosion. Outbursts are probably triggered by instability developing in the region where the matter accreted by the neutron star accumulates in the magnetic polar regions.

  10. Quasispherical subsonic accretion in X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, Nikolai I.; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is considered for quasispherical subsonic accretion onto slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars. In this regime, the accreting matter settles down subsonically onto the rotating magnetosphere, forming an extended quasistatic shell. Angular momentum transfer in the shell occurs via large-scale convective motions resulting, for observed pulsars, in an almost iso-angular-momentum \\omega \\sim 1/R^2 rotation law inside the shell. The accretion rate through the shell is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, with allowance for cooling. A settling accretion regime is possible for moderate accretion rates \\dot M \\lesssim \\dot M_* \\simeq 4\\times 10^{16} g s ^{-1}. At higher accretion rates, a free-fall gap above the neutron star magnetosphere appears due to rapid Compton cooling, and the accretion becomes highly nonstationary. Observations of spin-up/spin-down rates of quasispherically wind accreting equilibrium X-ray pulsars with known orbital periods (e.g., GX 301-2 and Vela X-1) enable us to determine the main dimensionless parameters of the model, as well as to estimate surface magnetic field of the neutron star. For equilibrium pulsars, the independent measurements of the neutron star magnetic field allow for an estimate of the stellar wind velocity of the optical companion without using complicated spectroscopic measurements. For nonequilibrium pulsars, a maximum value is shown to exist for the spin-down rate of the accreting neutron star. From observations of the spin-down rate and the X-ray luminosity in such pulsars (e.g., GX 1+4, SXP 1062, and 4U 2206+54), a lower limit can be put on the neutron star magnetic field, which in all cases turns out to be close to the standard value and which agrees with cyclotron line measurements. Furthermore, both explains the spin-up/spin-down of the pulsar frequency on large time-scales and also accounts for the irregular short

  11. X-ray flares from postmerger millisecond pulsars.

    PubMed

    Dai, Z G; Wang, X Y; Wu, X F; Zhang, B

    2006-02-24

    Recent observations support the suggestion that short-duration gamma-ray bursts are produced by compact star mergers. The x-ray flares discovered in two short gamma-ray bursts last much longer than the previously proposed postmerger energy-release time scales. Here, we show that they can be produced by differentially rotating, millisecond pulsars after the mergers of binary neutron stars. The differential rotation leads to windup of interior poloidal magnetic fields and the resulting toroidal fields are strong enough to float up and break through the stellar surface. Magnetic reconnection-driven explosive events then occur, leading to multiple x-ray flares minutes after the original gamma-ray burst. PMID:16497927

  12. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  13. Soft x ray properties of the Geminga pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Ruderman, M.

    1993-01-01

    The ROSAT soft x ray spectrum and pulse profile of the Geminga pulsar are analyzed and interpreted in terms of thermal emission from the surface of the neutron star. The x ray spectrum appears to consist of two blackbody components with T(sub 1) = (5.2 +/- 1.0) x 10 (exp 5) K and T(sub 2) approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) K, respectively. The inferred ratio of surface areas, A(sub 2)/A(sub 1), is approximately 3 x 10(exp -5). Both components are highly modulated at the pulsar rotation period, but the harder x ray pulse is narrower, and leads the main (soft) x ray pulse by about 105 deg of phase. The soft x ray component is interpreted as photospheric cooling of much of the neutron star's surface area, while the small, hot region could be part of the much smaller polar cap heated by energetic particles flowing inward from the magnetospheric accelerator which is responsible for the production of Geminga's gamma rays. Geminga's gamma ray emission is consistent with outer-magnetosphere accelerator models for highly inclined dipoles. These predict the beaming of energetic gamma rays close enough to the star to give copious e(+/-) production in the stellar magnetic field and a large circumstellar pair density from pair inflow toward the surface. These pairs may quench radio emission, and also reflect most of the hard polar cap x rays back to the stellar surface by cyclotron resonance scattering. They are then reemitted from that much larger area at the lower temperature T(sub 1). The single-peaked nature of the x ray pulse and its energy-dependent phase suggest an off-center dipole geometry for the surface magnetic field. Under the assumption that the soft x ray emission comes from the full surface of a neutron star of radius R = 10 km, a distance estimate of (150-400) pc is derived. This range is consistent with the fit interstellar column density of (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Distances less than 150 pc are probably ruled out both by the lower limit on the column

  14. Automatic Identification of Solar X-Ray Bright Points in Hinode X-Ray Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    We have automated a method that is used to find point sources in Chandra X-ray telescope data, to identify solar bright points in Hinode X-ray data. This tool, called lextrct, first identifies candidate sources that are brighter than the surrounding background. The algorithm also allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions) to be ignored. We then use lextrct to fit the sources to two-dimensional, elliptical Gaussians. The size and orientation give an approximation of the shape of the bright points. We are in the process of analyzing observations through the Al_poly filter with a four-second exposure time, to obtain a catalogue of bright points, which will include their sizes, lifetimes, intensities, and position on the solar disk

  15. Automatic Identification of Solar X-ray Bright Points in Hinode X-ray Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mitzi; Tennant, A. F.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2010-05-01

    We have automated a method that is used to find point sources in Chandra X-ray telescope data, to identify solar bright points in Hinode X-ray data. This tool, called lextrct, first identifies candidate sources that are brighter than the surrounding background. The algorithm also allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions) to be ignored. We then use lextrct to fit the sources to two-dimensional, elliptical Gaussians. The size and orientation give an approximaton of the shape of the bright points. We are in the process of analyzing observations through the Al_poly filter with a four-second exposure time, to obtain a catalogue of bright points, which will include their sizes, lifetimes, intensities, and position on the solar disk.

  16. Fast microtomography using bright monochromatic x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. W.; Lee, J. S.; Kwon, N.; Park, S. J.; Chang, S.; Kim, J.; Pyo, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Je, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    A fast microtomography system for high-resolution high-speed imaging has been developed using bright monochromatic x-rays at the BL29XU beamline of SPring-8. The shortest scan time for microtomography we attained was 0.25 s in 1.25 μm effective pixel size by combining the bright monochromatic x-rays, a fast rotating sample stage, and a high performance x-ray imaging detector. The feasibility of the tomography system was successfully demonstrated by visualization of rising bubbles in a viscous liquid, an interesting issue in multiphase flow physics. This system also provides a high spatial (a measurable feature size of 300 nm) or a very high temporal (9.8 μs) resolution in radiographs.

  17. Fast microtomography using bright monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J. W.; Lee, J. S.; Park, S. J.; Chang, S.; Pyo, J.; Kwon, N.; Kim, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-09-15

    A fast microtomography system for high-resolution high-speed imaging has been developed using bright monochromatic x-rays at the BL29XU beamline of SPring-8. The shortest scan time for microtomography we attained was 0.25 s in 1.25 {mu}m effective pixel size by combining the bright monochromatic x-rays, a fast rotating sample stage, and a high performance x-ray imaging detector. The feasibility of the tomography system was successfully demonstrated by visualization of rising bubbles in a viscous liquid, an interesting issue in multiphase flow physics. This system also provides a high spatial (a measurable feature size of 300 nm) or a very high temporal (9.8 {mu}s) resolution in radiographs.

  18. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  19. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  20. Optical Variability of X-Ray Bright Southern Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, C.; Sokoloski, J.

    2004-12-01

    We performed weekly B- and V-band observations of four X-ray bright southern symbiotic binary stars -- CD-43 14304, Hen 3-1591, LMC S63, and SMC LN 358 -- using the 1.3-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We began optical monitoring in August 2003 for two of the objects (LMC S63 and SMC LN 358) and in January 2004 for the other two objects (CD-43 14304 and Hen 3-1591). None of the four survey objects experienced a major outburst during the monitoring period. We did, however, detect small-amplitude ( 0.1 mag) optical variability on a time scale of tens of days, for the first time, in each of the four systems. Both the structure and amplitude of the variations are roughly the same in the B band and V band in all of the symbiotics in our sample except one (LMC S63), and is most consistent with the idea that the week-time-scale variability originates with the hot component (most likely an accreting white dwarf) rather than the red giant. We compare the variability properties of our small sample of X-ray-bright symbiotic stars to those of samples of both X-ray-bright and X-ray-dim symbiotic stars from the database of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  1. PSR J0357+3205: A FAST-MOVING PULSAR WITH A VERY UNUSUAL X-RAY TRAIL

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Mignani, R. P.; Marelli, M.; Salvetti, D.; Sartore, N.; Caraveo, P. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P.

    2013-03-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright {gamma}-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission originating at the pulsar position and extending for >9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.''165 {+-} 0.''030 yr{sup -1} at a position angle (P.A.) of 314 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign . At a distance of {approx}500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of {approx}390 km s{sup -1} assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is aligned very well with the main axis of the X-ray nebula (P.A. = 315. Degree-Sign 5 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 5), pointing to a physical, yet elusive, link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H{alpha} line is seen in a deep image collected at the Gemini telescope, which implies that the interstellar medium into which the pulsar is moving is fully ionized.

  2. Suzaku observations of cyclotron resonances in binary X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Mihara, T.; Nagase, F.; Angelini, L.; Dotani, T.; Enoto, T.; Kitamoto, S.; Kohmura, T.; Kokubun, M.; Kotani, T.; Makishima, K.; Naik, S.; Nakajima, M.; Sugita, S.; Sudoh, K.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, H.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, A.

    Since the typical magnetic field strengths of neutron stars reach 10 12 Gauss, the cyclotron resonance produced by a transition between Landau levels appears in the X-ray band. Systematic measurements of cyclotron absorption features in bright sources have been carried out extensively with Ginga, RXTE, BeppoSAX, and INTEGRAL. The cyclotron resonance phenomena can now be studied with a higher sensitivity over a wider hard X-ray band than before, thanks to the Hard X-ray Detector onboard the fifth Japanese X-ray satellite, Suzaku, launched in July, 2005. Suzaku observed Hercules X-1 mainly for calibration purposes, and successfully confirmed its well-known cyclotron absorption feature. Furthermore, the transient pulsar A0535+262 was observed with Suzaku on 14 September, 2005, in the decay phase of its minor outburst (Finger, M.F. Renewed Activity from A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 595, 2005). The cyclotron resonance of A0535+262 was successfully detected in absorption at about 45 keV (Inoue, H., Kunieda, H., White, N., Kelley, R., Mihara, T., Terada, Y., Takahashi, H., Kokubun, M., Makishima, K. Suzaku detection of cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram vol. 595, 2005; Terada, Y., Mihara, T., Nakajima, M., et al. Cyclotron resonance energies at a low X-ray luminosity: A0535+262 observed with Suzaku. ApJL 648, L139-L142, 2006), even though the object was as dim as 30 mCrab at 20 keV. Compared with previous measurements of the same feature achieved at much brighter phases (e.g., Kretschmar, P., Kreykenbohm, I., Pottschmidt, et al. Integral observes possible cyclotron line at 47 keV for 1A0535+262. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 601, 2005; Wilson, C.A., Finger, M.H. RXTE confirms cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram 605, 2005), the Suzaku results give a new constraint to luminosity-related changes in the resonance energy that are observed in other binary pulsars (Nakajima, M., Mihara, T., Makishima

  3. Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Radiography with x rays is a long-established method to see inside objects, from human limbs to weapon parts. Livermore scientists have a continuing need for powerful x rays for such applications as backlighting, or illuminating, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and imaging still or exploding materials for the nation's Stockpile Stewardship Program. X-radiography is one of the prime diagnostics for ICF experiments because it captures the fine detail needed to determine what happens to nearly microscopic targets when they are compressed by laser light. For example, Livermore scientists participating in the National Ignition Facility's (NIF's) 18-month-long Early Light experimental campaign, which ended in 2004, used x rays to examine hydrodynamic instabilities in jets of plasma. In these experiments, one laser beam irradiated a solid target of titanium, causing it to form a high-temperature plasma that generated x rays of about 4.65 kiloelectronvolts (keV). These x rays backlit a jet of plasma formed when two other laser beams hit a plastic ablator and sent a shock to an aluminum washer. Livermore physicist Kevin Fournier of the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate leads a team that is working to increase the efficiency of converting laser energy into x rays so the resulting images provide more information about the object being illuminated. The main characteristics of x-ray sources are energy and brightness. ''As experimental targets get larger and as compression of the targets increases, the backlighter sources must be brighter and more energetic'', says Fournier. The more energetic the x rays, the further they penetrate an object. The brighter the source--that is, the more photons it has--the clearer the image. historically, researchers have used solid targets such as thin metal foils to generate x rays. however, when photon energies are greater than a few kiloelectronvolts, the conversion efficiency of solid targets is only a fraction of 1

  4. A REFLECTION MODEL FOR THE CYCLOTRON LINES IN THE SPECTRA OF X-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Poutanen, Juri; Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Nagirner, Dmitrij I.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Doroshenko, Victor; Lutovinov, Alexander A.

    2013-11-10

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars show significant changes of the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. At high luminosities, these variations are often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and of the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies a large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, which makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue here that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface, where the gradient of the magnetic field strength is significantly smaller. Here we develop a reflection model and apply it to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.

  5. Generation of High Brightness X-rays with the PLEIADES Thomson X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LeSage, G P; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M; Rosenzweig, J B; Gibson, D J

    2003-05-28

    The use of short laser pulses to generate high peak intensity, ultra-short x-ray pulses enables exciting new experimental capabilities, such as femtosecond pump-probe experiments used to temporally resolve material structural dynamics on atomic time scales. PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron InterAction for Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) is a next generation Thomson scattering x-ray source being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Ultra-fast picosecond x-rays (10-200 keV) are generated by colliding an energetic electron beam (20-100 MeV) with a high intensity, sub-ps, 800 nm laser pulse. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm2/mrad2. Simulations of the electron beam production, transport, and final focus are presented. Electron beam measurements, including emittance and final focus spot size are also presented and compared to simulation results. Measurements of x-ray production are also reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  6. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  7. Bright flares in supergiant fast X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N.; Postnov, K.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2014-08-01

    At steady low-luminosity states, supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) can be at the stage of quasi-spherical settling accretion on to slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars from the OB-companion winds. At this stage, a hot quasi-static shell is formed above the magnetosphere, the plasma entry rate into magnetosphere is controlled by (inefficient) radiative plasma cooling, and the accretion rate on to the neutron star is suppressed by a factor of ˜30 relative to the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton value. Changes in the local wind velocity and density due to, e.g. clumps, can only slightly increase the mass accretion rate (a factor of ˜10) bringing the system into the Compton-cooling-dominated regime and led to the production of moderately bright flares (Lx ≲ 1036 erg s-1). To interpret the brightest flares (Lx > 1036 erg s-1) displayed by the SFXTs within the quasi-spherical settling accretion regimes, we propose that a larger increase in the mass accretion rate can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time-scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass of the shell. This view is consistent with the energy released in SFXT bright flares (˜1038-1040 erg), their typical dynamic range (˜100) and with the observed dependence of these characteristics on the average unflaring X-ray luminosity of SFXTs. Thus, the flaring behaviour of SFXTs, as opposed to steady HMXBs, may be primarily related to their low X-ray luminosity allowing sporadic magnetic reconnection to occur during magnetized plasma entry into the magnetosphere.

  8. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BURSTING PULSAR GRO J1744-28

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Younes, G.

    2014-11-20

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E {sub l} ≅ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ≅ 52° and an inner disk radius of R {sub in} ≅ 85 GM/c {sup 2}, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ≅ (2-6) × 10{sup 10} G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature near ≅ 6.85 keV that could correspond to blue-shifted Fe XXV and point to a fast disk wind with an outflow velocity of v {sub out} ≅ (7.5-8.2) × 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (≅ 0.025c-0.027c). If the covering fraction and filling factor are large, this wind could be energetically important and perhaps account for the fact that the companion star lost significant mass while the magnetic field of the neutron star remained strong.

  10. An X-ray survey of variable radio bright quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, M. J.; Marshall, F. E.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    A sample consisting primarily of radio bright quasars was observed in X-rays with the Einstein Observatory for times ranging from 1500 to 5000 seconds. Detected sources had luminosities ranging from 0.2 to 41.0 x 10 to the 45th power ergs/sec in the 0.5 to 4.5 keV band. Three of the fourteen objects which were reobserved showed flux increases greater than a factor of two on a time scale greater than six months. No variability was detected during the individual observations. The optical and X-ray luminosities are correlated, which suggests a common origin. However, the relationship (L sub x is approximately L sub op to the (.89 + or - .15)) found for historic radio variables may be significantly different than that reported for other radio bright sources. Some of the observed X-ray fluxes were substantially below the predicted self-Compton flux, assuming incoherent synchrotron emission and using VLBI results to constrain the size of the emission region, which suggests relativistic expansion in these sources. Normal CIV emission in two of the sources with an overpredicted Compton component suggests that although they, like BL Lac objects, have highly relativistic material apparently moving at small angle to the line of sight, they have a smaller fraction of the continuum component in the beam.

  11. Magnetic properties of X-ray bright points. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Harvey, J. W.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Using high-resolution Kitt Peak National Observatory magnetograms and sequences of simultaneous S-054 soft X-ray solar images, the properties of X-ray bright points (XBP) and ephemeral active regions (ER) are compared. All XBP appear on the magnetograms as bipolar features, except for very recently emerged or old and decayed XBP. The separation of the magnetic bipoles is found to increase with the age of the XBP, with an average emergence growth rate of 2.2 plus or minus 0.4 km per sec. The total magnetic flux in a typical XBP living about 8 hr is found to be about two times ten to the nineteenth power Mx. A proportionality is found between XBP lifetime and total magnetic flux, equivalent to about ten to the twentieth power Mx per day of lifetime.

  12. Stellar kinematics of X-ray bright massive elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyskova, N.; Churazov, E.; Moiseev, A.; Sil'chenko, O.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss a simple and fast method for estimating masses of early-type galaxies from optical data and compare the results with X-ray derived masses. The optical method relies only on the most basic observables such as the surface brightness I(R) and the line-of-sight velocity dispersion σp(R) profiles and provides an anisotropy-independent estimate of the galaxy circular speed Vc. The mass-anisotropy degeneracy is effectively overcome by evaluating Vc at a characteristic radius Rsweet defined from local properties of observed profiles. The sweet radius Rsweet is expected to lie close to R2, where I(R) ∝ R-2, and not far from the effective radius Reff. We apply the method to a sample of five X-ray bright elliptical galaxies observed with the 6 m telescope BTA-6 in Russia. We then compare the optical Vc estimate with the X-ray derived value, and discuss possible constraints on the non-thermal pressure in the hot gas and configuration of stellar orbits. We find that the average ratio of the optical Vc estimate to the X-ray one is equal to ≈0.98 with 11 per cent scatter, i.e. there is no evidence for the large non-thermal pressure contribution in the gas at ˜Rsweet. From analysis of the Lick indices Hβ, Mgb, Fe5270 and Fe5335, we calculate the mass of the stellar component within the sweet radius. We conclude that a typical dark matter fraction inside Rsweet in the sample galaxies is ˜60 per cent for the Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) and ˜75 per cent for the Kroupa IMF.

  13. THE RADIATIVE X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY EFFICIENCIES OF ROTATION-POWERED PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco; Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2011-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars and their surrounding nebulae using the sample of Kargaltsev and Pavlov, and we complement this with an analysis of the {gamma}-ray emission of Fermi-detected pulsars. We report a strong trend in the efficiency with which spin-down power is converted to X-ray and {gamma}-ray emission with characteristic age: young pulsars and their surrounding nebulae are efficient X-ray emitters, whereas in contrast old pulsars are efficient {gamma}-ray emitters. We divided the X-ray sample in a young ({tau}{sub c} < 1.7 x 10{sup 4} yr) and old sample and used linear regression to search for correlations between the logarithm of the X-ray and {gamma}-ray luminosities and the logarithms of the periods and period derivatives. The X-ray emission from young pulsars and their nebulae are both consistent with L{sub X}{proportional_to} P-dot{sup 3}/P{sup 6}. For old pulsars and their nebulae the X-ray luminosity is consistent with a more or less constant efficiency {eta}{identical_to}L{sub X}/ E-dot{sub rot}{approx}8x10{sup -5}. For the {gamma}-ray luminosity we confirm that L{sub {gamma}} {proportional_to} {radical}E-dot{sub rot}. We discuss these findings in the context of pair production inside pulsar magnetospheres and the striped wind model. We suggest that the striped wind model may explain the similarity between the X-ray properties of the pulsar wind nebulae and the pulsars themselves, which according to the striped wind model may both find their origin outside the light cylinder, in the pulsar wind zone.

  14. Distance Estimation for Eclipsing X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Paul, B.; Raichur, H.

    2006-06-01

    Recent interest in eclipsing binaries as distance indicators leads naturally into direct distance estimation for X-ray pulsars by combination of pulse arrival times, radial velocities, X-ray eclipse duration, and spectra. Optical light curves may help in some cases by measuring tides and irradiation, although dynamical tides in eccentric systems limit light curve usefulness. Pulse arrivals give an absolute scale and also orbit shape and orientation, which may be poorly known from radial velocities. For example, orbital eccentricity of 0.09 is known from Vela X1 pulse arrivals, although optical velocities are too noisy to measure eccentricity accurately. Combined pulse and optical velocity data give mass information. A lower limit to sin i from eclipse duration sets a lower limit to R2, and for the general eccentric case. A mass ratio sets lobe size and thus an upper limit to R2, so boxing R2 within a narrow range may be possible. T2 can be assessed from spectra so EB distance estimation can work if magnitude is known in one or more standard bands such as B or V. Realistic distance uncertainties are explored. In regard to new observations, Vela X-1 was observed by RXTE over about nine days in January 2005, including an eclipse of about 3.5 days. We extracted the light curves with time resolution 0.125 s. Spin period measurements by the Chi square criterion show Doppler variation with orbital phase and mean spin period 283.5 s. Pulse profiles of that period were averaged in sets of 10 at 138 phases. Cross correlation for the first 40 pulses show the expected Doppler arrival time variation. As the Vela X-1 pulse period is large compared to light travel time across the orbit, the pulses are already phase connected. Support is by U.S. National Science Foundation grant 0307561.

  15. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-ray Emission. 1; Curvature Radiation Pair Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pulsar polar cap (PC) heating produced by positrons returning from the upper pair formation front. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent treatment of the pair dynamics and the effect of electric field screening by the returning positrons. We calculate the resultant X-ray luminosities and discuss the dependence of the PC heating efficiencies on pulsar parameters, such as characteristic spin-down age, spin period, and surface magnetic field strength. In this study we concentrate on the regime where the pairs are produced in a magnetic field by curvature photons emitted by accelerating electrons. Our theoretical results are not in conflict with the available observational x-ray data and suggest that the effect of PC heating should significantly contribute to the thermal x-ray fluxes from middle-aged and old pulsars. The implications for current and future x-ray observations of pulsars are briefly outlined.

  16. The young pulsar PSR B0540-69.3 and its synchrotron nebula in the optical and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, N. I.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Sollerman, J.

    2004-10-01

    The young PSR B0540-69.3 in the LMC is the only pulsar (except the Crab pulsar) for which a near-UV spectrum has been obtained. However, the absolute flux and spectral index of the HST/FOS spectrum are significantly higher than suggested by previous broad-band time-resolved groundbased UBVRI photometry. To investigate this difference, observations with ESO/VLT/FORS1 and analysis of HST/WFPC2 archival data were done. We show that the HST and VLT spectral data for the pulsar have ⪆50% nebular contamination and that this is the reason for the above-mentioned difference. The broadband HST spectrum for the range 3300-8000 Å is clearly nonthermal and has a negative spectral index, Fν ∝ ν-α with αν = 1.07+0.20-0.19. This is different from the almost flat spectrum of the Crab pulsar, and also steeper than for the previously published broadband photometry of PSR B0540-69.3. We have also studied the spatial variations of the brightness and spectral index of the Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) around the pulsar, and find no significant spectral index variation over the PWN. The HST data show a clear asymmetry of the surface brightness distribution along the major axis of the torus-like structure of the PWN with respect to the pulsar position, also seen in Chandra/HRC X-ray images. This is different from the Crab PWN and likely linked to the asymmetry of the surrounding SN ejecta. The HST/WFPC2 archival data have an epoch separation of 4 years, and this allows us to estimate the proper motion of the pulsar. We find a motion of 4.9±2.3 mas yr-1 (corresponding to a transverse velocity of 1190±560 km s-1) along the southern jet of the PWN. If this is confirmed at a higher significance level by future observations, this makes PSR B0540-69.3 the third pulsar with a proper motion aligned with the jet axis of its PWN, which poses constraints on pulsar kick models. To establish the multiwavelength spectrum of the pulsar and its PWN, we have included recent Chandra X-ray data, and

  17. Analysis and design of grazing incidence x-ray optics for pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fuchang; Chen, Jianwu; Li, Liansheng; Mei, Zhiwu

    2013-10-01

    As a promising new technology for deep space exploration due to autonomous capability, pulsar navigation has attracted extensive attentions from academy and engineering domains. The pulsar navigation accuracy is determined by the measurement accuracy of Time of Arrival (TOA) of X-ray photon, which can be enhanced through design of appropriate optics. The energy band of X-ray suitable for pulsar navigation is 0.1-10keV, the effective focusing of which can be primely and effectively realized by the grazing incidence reflective optics. The Wolter-I optics, originally proposed based on a paraboloid mirror and a hyperboloid mirror for X-ray imaging, has long been widely developed and employed in X-ray observatory. Some differences, however, remain in the requirements on optics between astronomical X-ray observation and pulsar navigation. X-ray concentrator, the simplified Wolter-I optics, providing single reflection by a paraboloid mirror, is more suitable for pulsar navigation. In this paper, therefore, the requirements on aperture, effective area and focal length of the grazing incidence reflective optics were firstly analyzed based on the characteristics, such as high time resolution, large effective area and low angular resolution, of the pulsar navigation. Furthermore, the preliminary design of optical system and overall structure, as well as the diaphragm, was implemented for the X-ray concentrator. Through optical and FEA simulation, system engineering analysis on the X-ray concentrator was finally performed to analyze the effects of environmental factors on the performance, providing basis and guidance for fabrication of the X-ray concentrator grazing incidence optics.

  18. Detection of cyclotron resonance scattering feature in high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-09-01

    We report broad-band spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2 by using three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations during its 2015 outburst. The pulsar was significantly bright, reaching a luminosity up to as high as ˜5.5 × 1038 erg s-1 in 1-70 keV range. Spin period of the pulsar was estimated to be 2.37 s. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly luminosity dependent. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with three different continuum models such as (i) negative and positive power law with exponential cutoff, (ii) Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law and (iii) cutoff power-law models. Apart from the presence of an iron line at ˜6.4 keV, a model independent absorption like feature at ˜27 keV was detected in the pulsar spectrum. This feature was identified as a cyclotron absorption line and detected for the first time in this pulsar. Corresponding magnetic field of the neutron star was estimated to be ˜2.3 × 1012 G. The cyclotron line energy showed a marginal negative dependence on the luminosity. The cyclotron line parameters were found to be variable with pulse phase and interpreted as due to the effect of emission geometry or complicated structure of the pulsar magnetic field.

  19. High energy X-ray observations of the 38-second pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, P. F.; Levine, A. M.; Bautz, M.; Howe, S. K.; Lang, F. L.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Gruber, D. E.; Knight, F. K.; Nolan, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of observations of the 38-second pulsar obtained at high X-ray energies (13-180 keV) with the UCSD/MIT instrument aboard HEAO 1 are reported. The results include a measurement of the source location, measurement of the pulse profile, and determination of the average intensity and spectrum during each of three time intervals spanning a baseline of 1 year. The total intensity of the pulsar is seen to vary on a 6-month time scale. The spectrum is hard but, like other X-ray pulsars, steepens at energies above 20 keV.

  20. A Study of the X-Ray Emission from Three Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The subject grant is for work on a study of x-ray emission from isolated pulsars. The purpose of the study was to: determine whether the pulsars were x-ray sources; and, if so, search for evidence of pulsations at the known radio period; and study the nature of the x-ray emission. Observation of the pulsar PSR 0355+54 were obtained, and the analysis of these data is complete. These results were reported at the 183rd AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'X-Ray Emission from PSR 0355+54' which as published in the The Astrophysical Journal. Also obtained an approx. 3 ks PSPC observations of PSR 1642-03. A summary of the results from these data were reported in a Conference Proceedings for the 'New Horizon of X-ray Astronomy' symposium. In addition, as part of a study with a student from the SAO Summer Intern Program, I incorporated ROSAT archival data in an extended study of pulsar emission. These results were reported at the 185th AAS Meeting, and in a paper entitled 'Soft X-ray Emission from Selected Isolated Pulsars' which was published in The Astrophysical Journal (Letters).

  1. X-RAY STUDIES OF THE BLACK WIDOW PULSAR PSR B1957+20

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R. H. H.; Kong, A. K. H.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Lin, L. C. C.

    2012-11-20

    We report on Chandra observations of the black widow pulsar, PSR B1957+20. Evidence for a binary-phase dependence of the X-ray emission from the pulsar is found with a deep observation. The binary-phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals non-thermal X-ray emission of PSR B1957+20, confirming the results of previous studies. This suggests that the X-rays are mostly due to intra-binary shock emission, which is strongest when the pulsar wind interacts with the ablated material from the companion star. The geometry of the peak emission is determined in our study. The marginal softening of the spectrum of the non-thermal X-ray tail may indicate that particles injected at the termination shock are dominated by synchrotron cooling.

  2. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  3. Disentangling X-Ray Emission Processes in Vela-Like Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaensler, Bryan; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present a deep observation with the X-Ray Multimirror Mission of PSR B1823-13, a young pulsar with similar properties to the Vela pulsar. We detect two components to the X-ray emission associated with PSR B1823-13: an elongated core of extent 30 min immediately surrounding the pulsar embedded in a fainter, diffuse component of emission 5 sec in extent, seen only on the southern side of the pulsar. The pulsar itself is not detected, either as a point source or through its pulsations. Both components of the X-ray emission are well fitted by a power-law spectrum, with photon index Gamma approx. 1.6 and X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV) L(sub X) approx. 9 x 10(exp 32) ergs/s for the core and Gamma approx. 2.3 and L(sub X) approx. 3 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s for the diffuse emission, for a distance of 4 kpc. We interpret both components of emission as corresponding to a pulsar wind nebula, which we designate G18.0-0.7. We argue that the core region represents the wind termination shock of this nebula, while the diffuse component indicates the shocked downstream wind. We propose that the asymmetric morphology of the diffuse emission with respect to the pulsar is the result of a reverse shock from an associated supernova remnant, which has compressed and distorted the pulsar-powered nebula. Such an interaction might be typical for pulsars at this stage in their evolution. The associated supernova remnant is not detected directly, most likely being too faint to be seen in existing X-ray and radio observations.

  4. The effect of vacuum birefringence on the polarization of X-ray binaries and pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Angel, J. R. P.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    In a strong magnetic field the vacuum becomes birefringent. This effect is especially important for pulsars at X-ray wavelengths. Any polarized X-ray emission from the surface of a magnetic neutron star becomes depolarized as it propagates through the magnetic field. The soft X-ray emission from AM Her, believed to be a magnetic white dwarf, may show about one radian of phase retardation. In this case, circular polarization of the X-ray flux would be a characteristic signature of vacuum birefringence.

  5. Spectral variability in the X-ray pulsar GX 1+4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the galactic center region, hard X-ray source GX 1+4 by the GSFC X-ray spectroscopy experiment on OSO-8 confirm that GX 1+4 is a slow X-ray pulsar. The amount of absorption by cold matter in the spectrum of GX 1+4 varies significantly within a 24 hour period, behavior typical of many X-ray binary systems. The light curve for the pulsations from GX 1+4 appears to be energy dependent.

  6. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal

    2012-10-20

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  7. Soft x-ray properties of the binary millisecond pulsar J0437-4715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.

    1995-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0. 27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2-1.5, intervening column density NH = (5-8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1-2. 4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.3 deg from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = lES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, NH less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50-600 m and temperature (1.0-3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4-12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma-ray pulsars may have.

  8. Soft X-Ray Properties of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J0437-4715

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman, L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0.27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2 - 1.5, intervening column density N(sub H) = (5 - 8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1 - 2.4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.2 min. from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = IES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, N(sub H) less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50 - 600 m and temperature (1.0 - 3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4 - 12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma

  9. X-rays from radio pulsars - The detection of PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Helfand, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The short-period pulsar PSR 1055-52 has been detected as a soft X-ray source in the course of an Einstein Observatory survey of radio pulsars. Its X-ray to radio luminosity ratio is about 10,000, although the X-rays are not modulated at the neutron star's rotation frequency. High spatial resolution observations suggest that a significant fraction of the emission comes from an extended region surrounding the pulsar. Several possible scenarios for the origin of both point and extended X-ray emission from isolated neutron stars are investigated: radiation from the hot stellar surface, from hot polar caps, and from an optically thick atmosphere, as well as from a circumstellar nebula emitting thermal bremsstrahlung or synchrotron radiation. It is concluded that the spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of this source are most consistent with a model in which relativistic particles generated by the pulsar are radiating synchrotron X-rays in the surrounding magnetic field; i.e., that PSR 1055 is embedded in a mini-Crab nebula. Observational tests of this hypothesis are suggested, and the implications of this result for pulsar evolution are briefly discussed.

  10. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Johnson, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars, though typically not aged ones, are believed to be an important source of energetic cosmic rays. Therefore, it may not be too surprising to detect an X-ray jet associated with the middle-aged radio/X-ray pulsar B2224+65, which is well known for its very high proper motion and its trailing ``Guitar Nebula''. Most unexpected, however, is that this jet is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, an X-ray counter jet and a faint X-ray trail associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' are now identified in the combined data set of three epoch Chandra observations with a total exposure of 200 ks. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the jets and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic phenomenon. The study should have strong implications for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, as well as similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that are associated with more distant pulsars, especially pulsar wind nebula candidates in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  11. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  12. A search for outflows from X-ray bright points in coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Waldron, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Properties of X-ray bright points using two of the instruments on Solar Maximum Mission were investigated. The mass outflows from magnetic regions were modeled using a two dimensional MHD code. It was concluded that mass can be detected from X-ray bright points provided that the magnetic topology is favorable.

  13. On the dependence of the X-ray continuum variations with luminosity in accreting X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Gornostaev, M. I.; Klochkov, D.; Laplace, E.; Lukin, V. V.; Shakura, N. I.

    2015-09-01

    Using RXTE/ASM archival data, we investigate the behaviour of the spectral hardness ratio as a function of X-ray luminosity in a sample of six transient X-ray pulsars (EXO 2030+375, GX 304-1, 4U 0115+63, V 0332+63, A 0535+26 and MXB 0656-072). In all sources we find that the spectral hardness ratio defined as F5-12 keV/F1.33-3 keV increases with the ASM flux (1.33-12 keV) at low luminosities and then saturates or even slightly decreases above some critical X-ray luminosity falling into the range ˜(3-7) × 1037 erg s-1. Two-dimensional structure of accretion columns in the radiation-diffusion limit is calculated for two possible geometries (filled and hollow cylinder) for mass accretion rates dot{M} ranging from 1017 to 1.2 × 1018 g s-1. The observed spectral behaviour in the transient X-ray pulsars with increasing dot{M} can be reproduced by a Compton-saturated sidewall emission from optically thick magnetized accretion columns with taking into account the emission reflected from the neutron star atmosphere. At dot{M} above some critical value dot{M}_cr˜ (6-8)× 10^{17} g s-1, the height of the column becomes such that the contribution of the reflected component to the total emission starts decreasing, which leads to the saturation and even slight decrease of the spectral hardness. Hollow-cylinder columns have a smaller height than the filled-cylinder ones, and the contribution of the reflected component in the total emission does not virtually change with dot{M} (and hence the hardness of the continuum monotonically increases) up to higher mass accretion rates than dot{M}_cr for the filled columns.

  14. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar at Pulse Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, Allyn F.; Becker, Werner; Juda, Michael; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Murray, Stephen S.; ODell, Stephen L.; Paerels, Frits; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab pulsar using the Low-Energy Transmission Grating with the High-Resolution Camera. Time-resolved zeroth-order images reveal that the pulsar emits X-rays at all pulse phases. Analysis of the flux at minimum - most likely non-thermal in origin - places an upper limit (T(sub infinity) < 2.1 MK) on the surface temperature of the underlying neutron star. In addition, analysis of the pulse profile establishes that the error in the Chandra-determined absolute time is quite small, -0.2 +/- 0.1 ms.

  15. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar at Pulse Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennant, Allyn F.; Becker, Werner; Juda, Michael X.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Murray, Stephen S.; ODell, Stephen L.; Paerels, Frits; Swartz, Douglas A.; Shibazaki, Noriaki; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and Pulsar using the Low-Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) with the High-Resolution Camera (HRC). Time-resolved zeroth-order images reveal that the pulsar emits x rays at all pulse phases. Analysis of the flux at minimum -- most likely nonthermal in origin -- places an upper limit (T(sub infinity) < 2.1 MK) on the surface temperature of the underlying neutron star. In addition, analysis of the pulse profile appears to confirm the absolute timing of the Observatory to within about 0.2 ms.

  16. Faint X-Ray Structure in the Crab Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, F. D.; Tucker, W. H.; Fesen, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    We report on a Chandra observation of the Crab Nebula that gives the first clear view of the faint boundary of the Crab's X-ray-emitting pulsar wind nebula. There is structure in all directions. Fingers, loops, bays, and the south pulsar jet all indicate that either filamentary material or the magnetic field is controlling the relativistic electrons. In general, spectra soften as distance from the pulsar increases but do not change rapidly along linear features. This is particularly true for the pulsar jet. The termination of the jet is abrupt; the east side is close to an [O III] optical filament, which may be blocking propagation on this side. We argue that linear features have ordered magnetic fields and that the structure is determined by the synchrotron lifetime of particles diffusing perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. We find no significant evidence for thermal X-rays inside the filamentary envelope.

  17. X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR IN CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Kanbach, G.

    2010-12-10

    Prompted by the Fermi-LAT discovery of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar inside the CTA 1 supernova remnant, we obtained a 130 ks XMM-Newton observation to assess the timing behavior of this pulsar. Exploiting both the unprecedented photon harvest and the contemporary Fermi-LAT timing measurements, a 4.7{sigma} single-peak pulsation is detected, making PSR J0007+7303 the second example, after Geminga, of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar also seen to pulsate in X-rays. Phase-resolved spectroscopy shows that the off-pulse portion of the light curve is dominated by a power-law, non-thermal spectrum, while the X-ray peak emission appears to be mainly of thermal origin, probably from a polar cap heated by magnetospheric return currents, pointing to a hot spot varying throughout the pulsar rotation.

  18. THE DUST-SCATTERING X-RAY RINGS OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1547.0-5408

    SciTech Connect

    Tiengo, A.; Vianello, G.; Esposito, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Giuliani, A.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Bernardini, F.; Zane, S.; Rea, N.; Goetz, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-02-10

    On 2009 January 22 numerous strong bursts were detected from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408. Swift/XRT and XMM-Newton/EPIC observations carried out in the following two weeks led to the discovery of three X-ray rings centered on this source. The ring radii increased with time following the expansion law expected for a short impulse of X-rays scattered by three dust clouds. Assuming different models for the dust composition and grain size distribution, we fit the intensity decay of each ring as a function of time at different energies, obtaining tight constraints on the distance of the X-ray source. Although the distance strongly depends on the adopted dust model, we find that some models are incompatible with our X-ray data, restricting to 4-8 kpc the range of possible distances for 1E 1547.0-5408. The best-fitting dust model provides a source distance of 3.91 +- 0.07 kpc, which is compatible with the proposed association with the supernova remnant G327.24-0.13, and implies distances of 2.2 kpc, 2.6 kpc and 3.4 kpc for the dust clouds, in good agreement with the dust distribution inferred by CO line observations toward 1E 1547.0-5408. However, dust distances in agreement with CO data are also obtained for a set of similarly well-fitting models that imply a source distance of {approx}5 kpc. A distance of {approx}4-5 kpc is also favored by the fact that these dust models are already known to provide good fits to the dust-scattering halos of bright X-ray binaries. Assuming N{sub H} = 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the dust cloud responsible for the brightest ring and a bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 100 keV, we estimate that the burst producing the X-ray ring released an energy of 10{sup 44}-10{sup 45} erg in the 1-100 keV band, suggesting that this burst was the brightest flare without any long-lasting pulsating tail ever detected from a magnetar.

  19. Spectral Modeling of the Comptonized Continua of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Becker, Peter A.; Marcu, Diana; Wilms, Jörn; Wood, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    We are undertaking a program to analyze the X-ray spectra of the accretion flows onto strongly magnetic neutron stars in high mass binary systems such as Cen X-3, and XTE J1946+274. These accreting pulsars typically have X-ray spectra consisting of broad Comptonized cutoff power-laws. Current theory suggests these X-ray spectra result from radiation-dominated shocks that develop in the high-velocity magnetically channeled plasma accretion flows onto the surfaces of the neutron stars. These X-ray pulsars often, but not always, show cyclotron resonant scattering features implying neutron star surface magnetic field strengths above 1012 G. Proper fitting of cyclotron line centroids (for example, to investigate how the line centroid varies with X-ray luminosity) requires a robust model for the Comptonized X-ray continuum upon which the cyclotron lines are superposed, and this can be provided by a continuum model based on the physics of the accretion column.We discuss in this presentation our ongoing program for the analysis of the X-ray spectra formed in these systems. Our program consists of two parts. First, we are modeling the X-ray spectra from the Suzaku X-ray satellite of accreting X-ray pulsars Cen X-3 and XTE J1946+274 utilizing the best currently existing empirical models. The second part of our program is building a new analysis tool based on the analytical model of Becker and Wolff (2007). In the high temperature optically thick plasma flows, the processes of bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma, black body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface, and cyclotron emission from electrons in the first Landau excited state, all contribute to the total observed X-ray spectrum. We show recent results from our new implementation and its comparison with the Suzaku data for these X-ray pulsars.This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  20. Swift Observations of the X-Ray-Bright GRB 050315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, S.; Goad, M. R.; Beardmore, A. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Hill, J. E.; Kobayashi, S.; Kumar, P.; La Parola, V.; Levan, A.; Mangano, V.; Mészáros, P.; Moretti, A.; Morris, D. C.; Nousek, J. A.; Pagani, C.; Palmer, D. M.; Racusin, J. L.; Romano, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zhang, B.; Gehrels, N.

    2006-02-01

    This paper discusses Swift observations of the γ-ray burst GRB 050315 (z=1.949) from 80 s to 10 days after the onset of the burst. The X-ray light curve displayed a steep early decay (t-5) for ~200 s and several breaks. However, both the prompt hard X-ray/γ-ray emission (observed by the BAT) and the first ~300 s of X-ray emission (observed by the XRT) can be explained by exponential decays, with similar decay constants. Extrapolating the BAT light curve into the XRT band suggests that the rapidly decaying, early X-ray emission was simply a continuation of the fading prompt emission; this strong similarity between the prompt γ-ray and early X-ray emission may be related to the simple temporal and spectral character of this X-ray-rich GRB. The prompt (BAT) spectrum was steep down to ~15 keV and appeared to continue through the XRT bandpass, implying a low peak energy, inconsistent with the Amati relation. Following the initial steep decline, the X-ray afterglow did not fade for ~1.2×104 s, after which time it decayed with a temporal index of α~0.7, followed by a second break at ~2.5×105 s to a slope of α~2. The apparent ``plateau'' in the X-ray light curve, after the early rapid decay, makes this one of the most extreme examples of the steep-flat-steep X-ray light curves revealed by Swift. If the second afterglow break is identified with a jet break, then the jet opening angle was θ0~5deg, implying Eγ>~1050 ergs.

  1. Discovery of an 11-s X-Ray Pulsar in the Galactic-Plane Section of the Scorpius Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Nagase, Fumiaki; Torii, Ken'ichi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Asanuma, Tatsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Keiichi; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    1997-10-01

    During a galactic-plane survey with ASCA in 1996 September, we detected a relatively bright, soft source at R.A.=17() h8() m46. s6, DEC.=-40(deg) 9'27'' (J2000), and discovered an 11-s X-ray pulsation from the source. This source has been identified with the ROSAT source 1RXS J170849.0-400910. >From a timing analysis of the source, we obtained a barycentric pulse period of P = 10.99759 +/- 0.00005 s with a broad sinusoidal shape of a pulse fraction of ~ 30%. The energy spectrum in the 0.8--10 keV region is very soft, and can be fitted by a power-law model with a photon index of 3.5 and an absorption column density of 1.8times 10(22) cm(-2) . The observed pulse-phase-averaged flux in the range 0.8--10 keV is 4.3*E(-11) erg cm(-2) s(-1) , which corresponds to 1.7*E(-10) erg cm(-2) s(-1) after correcting for soft X-ray absorption. During an observation interval of about 14 hr, neither a significant change in the pulsation period, nor a significant variation in the phase-averaged flux was detected. >From these X-ray properties, we suggest that this newly discovered X-ray pulsar might be a member of a small subgroup of ``anomalous'' X-ray pulsars with a period close to 6--9 s.

  2. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  3. On the maximum accretion luminosity of magnetized neutron stars: connecting X-ray pulsars and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    We study properties of luminous X-ray pulsars using a simplified model of the accretion column. The maximal possible luminosity is calculated as a function of the neutron star (NS) magnetic field and spin period. It is shown that the luminosity can reach values of the order of 1040 erg s-1 for the magnetar-like magnetic field (B ≳ 1014 G) and long spin periods (P ≳ 1.5 s). The relative narrowness of an area of feasible NS parameters which are able to provide higher luminosities leads to the conclusion that L ≃ 1040 erg s-1 is a good estimate for the limiting accretion luminosity of an NS. Because this luminosity coincides with the cut-off observed in the high-mass X-ray binaries luminosity function which otherwise does not show any features at lower luminosities, we can conclude that a substantial part of ultraluminous X-ray sources are accreting neutron stars in binary systems.

  4. Spectral and temporal properties of the X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, M.; Gruber, D. E.; Kendziorra, E .; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Mony, B.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.

    1993-01-01

    The binary X-ray pulsar SMC X- 1 has been observed at hard X-rays with the High Energy X-Ray Experiment (HEXE) on nine occasions between Nov. 1987 and March 1989. A thin thermal bremsstrahlung fit to the phase averaged spectrum yields a plasma temperature (14.4 +/- 1.3) keV and a luminosity above (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10 exp 38 erg/s in the 20-80 keV band. Pulse period values have been established for three observations, confirming the remarkably stable spin-up trend of SMC X-1. In one of the three observations the pulse profile was seen to deviate from a dominant double pulsation, while at the same time the pulsed fraction was unusually large. For one observation we determined for the first time the pulsed fraction in narrow energy bands. It increases with photon energy from about 20 percent up to over 60 percent in the energy range from 20 to 80 keV.

  5. X-ray observations of PSR B0355+54 and its pulsar wind nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Katherine E.; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Kennea, Jamie A.; Zane, Silvia; Cropper, Mark; Córdova, France A.

    2007-04-01

    We present X-ray data of the middle-aged radio pulsar PSR B0355+54. The XMM-Newton and Chandra observations show not only emission from the pulsar itself, but also compact diffuse emission extending ˜50″ in the opposite direction to the pulsar’s proper motion. Our analysis also indicates the presence of fainter diffuse emission extending ˜5‧ from the point source. The morphology of the diffuse component is similar to the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebulae detected for other sources. We find that the compact diffuse component is well-fitted with a power-law, with an index that is consistent with the values found for other pulsar wind nebulae. The core emission from the pulsar can be characterized with a thermal plus power-law fit, with the thermal emission most likely originating in a hot polar cap.

  6. The pulsar B2224+65 and its jets: a two epoch X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wang, Q. D.

    2010-10-01

    We present an X-ray morphological and spectroscopic study of the pulsar B2224+65 and its apparent jet-like X-ray features based on two epoch Chandra observations. The main X-ray feature, which shows a large directional offset from the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula (Guitar nebula), is broader in apparent width and shows evidence for spectral hardening (at 95 per cent confidence) in the second epoch compared to the first. Furthermore, the sharp leading edge of the feature is found to have a proper motion consistent with that of the pulsar (~180 mas yr-1). The combined data set also provides evidence for the presence of a counter feature, albeit substantially fainter and shorter than the main one. Additional spectral trends along the major and minor axes of the feature are only marginally detected in the two epoch data, including softening counter to the direction of proper motion. Possible explanations for the X-ray features include diffuse energetic particles being confined by an organized ambient magnetic field as well as a simple ballistic jet interpretation; however, the former may have difficulty in explaining observed spectral trends between epochs and along the feature's major axis, whereas the latter may struggle to elucidate its linearity. Given the low counting statistics available in the two epoch observations, it remains difficult to determine a physical production scenario for these enigmatic X-ray emitting features with any certainty.

  7. SEXTANT X-Ray Pulsar Navigation Demonstration: Flight System and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.

    2016-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper gives an overview of the SEXTANT system architecture and describes progress prior to environmental testing of the NICER flight instrument. It provides descriptions and development status of the SEXTANT flight software and ground system, as well as detailed description and results from the flight software functional and performance testing within the highfidelity Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) software and hardware simulation environment. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation results are presented, using the engineering model of the NICER timing electronics and the GXLT pulsar simulator-the GXLT precisely controls NASA GSFC's unique Modulated X-ray Source to produce X-rays that make the NICER detector electronics appear as if they were aboard the ISS viewing a sequence of millisecond pulsars.

  8. SEXTANT X-Ray Pulsar Navigation Demonstration: Flight System and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke; Mitchell, Jason W.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith C.

    2016-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper gives an overview of the SEXTANT system architecture and describes progress prior to environmental testing of the NICER flight instrument. It provides descriptions and development status of the SEXTANT flight software and ground system, as well as detailed description and results from the flight software functional and performance testing within the high-fidelity Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) software and hardware simulation environment. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation results are presented, using the engineering model of the NICER timing electronics and the GXLT pulsar simulator-the GXLT precisely controls NASA GSFC's unique Modulated X-ray Source to produce X-rays that make the NICER detector electronics appear as if they were aboard the ISS viewing a sequence of millisecond pulsars

  9. Denoising of X-ray pulsar observed profile in the undecimated wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Meng-fan; Li, Xiao-ping; Fu, Ling-zhong; Liu, Xiu-ping; Sun, Hai-feng; Shen, Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    The low intensity of the X-ray pulsar signal and the strong X-ray background radiation lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the X-ray pulsar observed profile obtained through epoch folding, especially when the observation time is not long enough. This signifies the necessity of denoising of the observed profile. In this paper, the statistical characteristics of the X-ray pulsar signal are studied, and a signal-dependent noise model is established for the observed profile. Based on this, a profile noise reduction method by performing a local linear minimum mean square error filtering in the un-decimated wavelet domain is developed. The detail wavelet coefficients are rescaled by multiplying their amplitudes by a locally adaptive factor, which is the local variance ratio of the noiseless coefficients to the noisy ones. All the nonstationary statistics needed in the algorithm are calculated from the observed profile, without a priori information. The results of experim! ents, carried out on simulated data obtained by the ground-based simulation system and real data obtained by Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite, indicate that the proposed method is excellent in both noise suppression and preservation of peak sharpness, and it also clearly outperforms four widely accepted and used wavelet denoising methods, in terms of SNR, Pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error.

  10. Application of X-Ray Pulsar Navigation: A Characterization of the Earth Orbit Trade Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The potential for pulsars as a navigation source has been studied since their discovery in 1967. X-ray pulsar navigation (XNAV) is a celestial navigation system that uses the consistent timing nature of x-ray photons from milli-second pulsars (MSP) to perform space navigation. By comparing the detected arrival of x-ray photons to a reference database of expected pulsar lightcurve timing models, one can infer a range and range rate measurement based on light time delay. Much of the challenge of XNAV comes from the faint signal, availability, and distant nature of pulsars. This is a study of potential pulsar XNAV measurements to measure extended Kalman filter (EKF) tracking performance with a wide trade space of bounded Earth orbits, using a simulation of existing x-ray detector space hardware. An example of an x-ray detector for XNAV is the NASA Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation (SEXTANT) mission, a technology demonstration of XNAV set to perform on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2016early 2017. XNAV hardware implementation is driven by trajectory and environmental influences which add noise to the x-ray pulse signal. In a closed Earth orbit, the radiation environment can exponentially increase the signal noise from x-ray pulsar sources, decreasing the quality and frequency of measurements. The SEXTANT mission in particular improves on the signal to noise ratio by focusing an array of 56 x-ray silicon drift detectors at one pulsar target at a time. This reduces timing glitches and other timing noise contributions from ambient x-ray sources to within a 100 nanosecond resolution. This study also considers the SEXTANT scheduling challenges inherent in a single target observation. Finally, as the navigation sources are now relatively inertial targets, XNAV measurements are also subject to periods of occultation from various celestial bodies. This study focuses on the characterization of these drivers in closed Earth orbits and is not a

  11. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; ODell, Stephen L.; Paerels, Frits; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner E.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    We present here the first phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar that covers all pulse phases. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. Analysis of the pulse-averaged spectrum measures interstellar photoelectric absorption and scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase measures the low-energy X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with large statistical uncertainty. The data are used to set a new upper limit to any thermal component.

  12. The dynamic X-ray nebula powered by the pulsar B1259-63

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Volkov, Igor; Hare, Jeremy; Pavlov, George G.; Durant, Martin

    2014-04-01

    We present observations of the eccentric γ-ray binary B1259-63/LS 2883 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The images reveal a variable, extended (about 4'', or ∼1000 times the binary orbit size) structure, which appears to be moving away from the binary with the velocity of 0.05 of the speed of light. The observed emission is interpreted as synchrotron radiation from relativistic particles supplied by the pulsar. However, the fast motion through the circumbinary medium would require the emitting cloud to be loaded with a large amount of baryonic matter. Alternatively, the extended emission can be interpreted as a variable extrabinary shock in the pulsar wind outflow launched near binary apastron. The resolved variable X-ray nebula provides an opportunity to probe pulsar winds and their interaction with stellar winds in a previously inaccessible way.

  13. Magnetospheric Geometry in Pulsar B1929+10 from Radio/X-ray Phase Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somer, A. L.; Backer, D. C.; Halpern, J. P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.

    1998-05-01

    We have conducted a study of two rotation-powered pulsars that emit at both radio and x-ray wavelengths, PSR B0531+21 and PSR B1929+10. Using absolute phase information, we have phase-aligned x-ray and radio profiles from these pulsars. Observations were done using the Green Bank 140ft telescope, and ASCA. The 0531+21 x-ray profile is sharp and lines up well with the radio profile confirming that the x-ray emission from this pulsar is magnetospheric in origin. The 1929+10 profile is approximately sinusoidal (Wang & Halpern, ApJ 4 82, L159) with the peak of the emission arriving 67+/- 23 degrees after the maximum in the radio emission. The controversy to which the PSR B1929+10 result adds fuel, is whether this ``inter"-pulsar, is an ``aligned" or ``orthogonal" rotator - describing the alignment of the magnetic axis to the rotation axis. Do the two peaks in the radio profile (the pulse and interpulse) come from a double crossing of a thin hollow cone nearly aligned with rotation axis (as in Lyne & Manchester, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 477; Phillips, 1990, ApJL, 361, L57; Blaskiewicz et al, 1991, ApJ 370, 643), or alternatively (as in Rankin and Rathnasree, 1998 preprint) do they come from from opposite poles of an ``orthogonal" rotator where the spin axis is perpendicular to the magnetic axis? The radio to x-ray alignment we find favors the former explanation: if the x-ray hot spot is the result of return currents to the surface from the outward current that generates radio emission, then in the ``double-crossing" model, the hot spot phase is expected to lie between the main pulse and interpulse as observed.

  14. Bright X-Ray Sources in M31 Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Kong, A. K. H.; Garcia, M. R.; Barmby, P.; Greiner, J.; Murray, S. S.; Primini, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    We have conducted Chandra observations of ~2560 arcmin2 (~131 kpc2) of M31 and find that the most luminous X-ray sources in most of our fields are in globular clusters. Of the 28 globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields, 15 are newly discovered. Approximately one-third of all the sources have LX([0.5-7] keV)>1037 ergs s-1, and approximately one-tenth of all the sources have LX([0.5-7] keV) close to or above 1038 ergs s-1. The most luminous source, in the globular cluster Bo 375, is consistently observed to have LX greater than 2×1038 ergs s-1. (1) We present data on the spectra and/or light curves of the five most luminous M31 globular cluster sources. (2) We explore possible explanations for the high X-ray luminosities of the brightest sources. These include that the X-ray sources may be composites, the radiation we receive may be beamed, metallicity effects could be at work, or the sources may be accreting black holes. We weigh each of these possibilities against the data. In addition, we introduce a neutron star model in which mass transfer proceeds on the thermal timescale of the donor star. Our model can produce luminosities of several times 1038 ergs s-1 and leads to a set of well-defined predictions. (3) We compute the X-ray luminosity function and the distribution of counts in wavebands that span the range of energies to which Chandra is sensitive. We find the peak X-ray luminosity is higher and that systems with LX>1037 ergs s-1 constitute a larger fraction of all GC sources than in our Galaxy. (4) We study the possible reasons for this difference between M31 and Galactic globular cluster X-ray sources and identify three promising explanations.

  15. The 1997 event in the Crab Pulsar in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanand, M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. In October 1997, radio pulses from the Crab Pulsar underwent abnormal delay. This was reported by two radio observatories, both of which explained this frequency dependent and time varying delay as being due to refractive effects of ionized shells in the Crab Nebula. Both groups also noted that, curiously and confusingly coincident with the frequency dependent delay, the Crab Pulsar also underwent an unusual slowing down, which they believed to be unrelated to the Crab Nebula and instead intrinsic to the Crab Pulsar, resulting in an additional delay that was frequency independent. However, it now appears that one of the groups attributes the frequency independent delay also to refractive effects. Aims: This work aims to verify whether at least a part of the frequency independent delay is indeed due to intrinsic slowing down of the Crab Pulsar. Methods: Timing analysis of the Crab Pulsar's October 1997 event has been done in X-rays, which are not delayed by the refractive and diffractive effects that affect radio waves; at X-rays only the intrinsic slowing down should contribute to any observed delay. Data mainly from the PCA instrument aboard the RXTE satellite have been used, along with a small amount of data from the PDS instrument aboard the BeppoSAX satellite. Results: Analysis of the X-ray data, using the very accurate reference timing model derived at radio frequencies, strongly supports the intrinsic slowing down hypothesis. Analysis using the reference timing model derived self-consistently from the limited X-ray data, which is less accurate, is not completely unambiguous regarding the above two hypotheses, but provides reasonable support for the intrinsic slowing down hypothesis. Conclusions: A significant fraction of the frequency independent delay during the October 1997 event is indeed due to intrinsic slowing down of the Crab Pulsar.

  16. A CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATION OF THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5{sigma}) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the five consecutive orbits covered by the observation, with a pronounced decline in the flux at all energies at superior conjunction. This can be naturally explained by a partial geometric occultation by the secondary star of an X-ray-emitting intrabinary shock, produced by the interaction of outflows from the two stars. The depth and duration of the eclipse imply that the intrabinary shock is localized near or at the surface of the companion star and close to the inner Lagrangian point. The energetics of the shock favor a magnetically dominated pulsar wind that is focused into the orbital plane, requiring close alignment of the pulsar spin and orbital angular momentum axes. The X-ray spectrum consists of a dominant non-thermal component and at least one thermal component, likely originating from the heated pulsar polar caps, although a portion of this emission may be from an optically thin 'corona'. We find no evidence for extended emission due to a pulsar wind nebula or bow shock down to a limiting luminosity of L{sub X} {approx}< 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg s{sup -1} (0.3-8 keV), {approx}< 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} of the pulsar spin-down luminosity, for a distance of 1.3 kpc and an assumed power-law spectrum with photon index {Gamma} = 1.5.

  17. X-ray bright points and He I lambda 10830 dark points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Harvey, K. L.; Herant, M.; Webb, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Using near-simultaneous full disk Solar X-ray images and He I 10830 lambda, spectroheliograms from three recent rocket flights, dark points identified on the He I maps were compared with X-ray bright points identified on the X-ray images. It was found that for the largest and most obvious features there is a strong correlation: most He I dark points correspond to X-ray bright points. However, about 2/3 of the X-ray bright points were not identified on the basis of the helium data alone. Once an X-ray feature is identified it is almost always possible to find an underlying dark patch of enhanced He I absorption which, however, would not a priori have been selected as a dark point. Therefore, the He I dark points, using current selection criteria, cannot be used as a one-to-one proxy for the X-ray data. He I dark points do, however, identify the locations of the stronger X-ray bright points.

  18. X-ray bright points and He I lambda 10830 dark points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Harvey, K. L.; Herant, M.; Webb, D. F.

    1989-01-01

    Using near-simultaneous full disk Solar X-ray images and He I 10830 lambda, spectroheliograms from three recent rocket flights, dark points identified on the He I maps were compared with x-ray bright points identified on the X-ray images. It was found that for the largest and most obvious features there is a strong correlation: most He I dark points correspond to X-ray bright points. However, about 2/3 of the X-ray bright points were not identified on the basis of the helium data alone. Once an X-ray feature is identified it is almost always possible to find an underlying dark patch of enhanced He I absorption which, however, would not a priori have been selected as a dark point. Therefore, the He I dark points, using current selection criteria, cannot be used as a one-to-one proxy for the X-ray data. He I dark points do, however, identify the locations of the stronger X-ray bright points.

  19. The Bright Gamma-Ray Transient GRO J1838-0145: Multiwavelength Studies of X-Ray Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1999-01-01

    We completed the observational work regarding the bright gamma-ray transient GRO J1838-014 that might be a representative of a new class of gamma-ray sources in our Galaxy. A bright gamma-ray flare was detected by EGRET in June 1996. Its time variability (approx. weeks) and the absence of a clearly identified radio-loud (-approx. 1 Jy) blazar in its error box are crucial for our interpretation of GRO J1838-014 as an object different from gamma-ray blazars or isolated pulsars. We also observed the error box with ASCA and SAX pointings without identifying obvious candidate counterparts. The X-ray flux in quiescence, if any, is quite low, and canonical X-ray binary systems are also excluded. GRO J1838-014 is not the only non-blazar gamma-ray transients detected by EGRET in the Galactic plane. An analysis of CGRO Cycle 4 data is being completed in collaboration with R. Mukherjee and J. Mattox with the discussion of other interesting unidentified sources. Pulsars embedded in transient gaseous surroundings (maybe in binary systems) or compact objects in special systems are plausible candidates. A theoretical analysis is being developed. We also continued the study of Galactic X-ray novae, in particular of systems producing radio jets such as GRS 1915+10. The use of Green Bank Interferometer data (of which the MT is the chair of the executive committee) has been of great use to GRO and other satellite missions. We completed a study of X-ray/radio outbursts of GRS 1915+10 with BSAX and Ryle radiotelescope data and CGRO/BATSE simultaneous data. We also continued our theoretical work on gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Bright Semiconductor Scintillator for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Ovechkina, Olena E.; Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Irving, Thomas

    2011-08-16

    We report on a novel approach to produce oxygen-doped zinc telluride (ZnTe:O), a remarkable group II-VI semiconductor scintillator, fabricated in the columnar-structured or polycrystalline forms needed to fulfill the needs of many demanding X-ray and {gamma}-ray imaging applications. ZnTe:O has one of the highest conversion efficiencies among known scintillators, emission around 680 nm (which is ideally suited for CCD sensors), high density of 6.4 g/cm{sup 3}, fast decay time of {approx}1 {micro}s with negligible afterglow, and orders of magnitude higher radiation resistance compared to commonly used scintillators. These properties allow the use of ZnTe:O in numerous applications, including X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine (particularly SPECT), room temperature radioisotope identification, and homeland security. Additionally, ZnTe:O offers distinct advantages for synchrotron-based high resolution imaging due to the absence of atomic absorption edges in the low energy range, which otherwise reduce resolution due to secondary X-ray formations. We have fabricated films of ZnTe:O using a vapor deposition technique that allows large-area structured scintillator fabrication in a time- and cost-efficient manner, and evaluated its performance for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at an Argonne National Laboratory synchrotron beamline. Details of the fabrication and characterization of the optical, scintillation and imaging properties of the ZnTe:O films are presented in this paper.

  1. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  2. A Possible X-Ray Detection of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J1012+5307

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A possible X-ray detection of the newly discovered binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1012+5307 was obtained from an archival ROSAT observation. The 80 +/- 24 photons detected correspond to a 0.1 - 2.4 keV luminosity of approx. = 2.5 x 10(exp 30) erg/s at the nominal dispersion-measure distance of 520 pc. This luminosity is a factor of 2 less than that of PSR J0437-4715, a near twin of PSR J1012+5307 in its spin parameters and energetics, and the only millisecond pulsar from which pulsed X-rays have definitely been detected. PSR J1012+5307 is also within 6 deg of the "HI hole" in Ursa Major, providing a new estimate of the electron column density through this region which confirms that the ionized column density is also low. The small neutral column density to PSR J1012+5307, N(sub H) less than 7.5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, will facilitate future soft X-ray study, which will help to discriminate between thermal and nonthermal origins of the X-ray emission in millisecond pulsars.

  3. Heating Before Eating: X-Ray Observations of Redback Millisecond Pulsar Systems in the Ablation State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mallory; McLaughlin, Maura; Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Hessels, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Redbacks are eclipsing millisecond radio pulsars in close orbits around companions which are non-degenerate and nearly Roche-lobe filling. Several have been observed to transition between a state where the radio pulsar is visible and there is X-ray emission from a shock between the pulsar wind and the ablated material off of the companion, and a state where there appears to be an accretion disk and the radio pulsations are not visible. Here we present X-Ray studies of two recently discovered systems. A Chandra observation of PSR J1628-3205 over its entire 5 hour orbit with Chandra shows little evidence for X-Ray variability. An XMM-Newton observation of PSR J2129-0429 over its 15.2 hour orbit shows strong orbital variability with an intriguing two peaked light curve. We compare these systems' X-Ray properties to other redbacks and comment on the differences between their properities and those of black widows.

  4. Simultaneous observations of coronal bright points in X-ray and radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bastian, Timothy S.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Harvey, Karen L.; Strong, Keith T.

    1992-01-01

    We present a first explicit comparison of coronal bright points in soft X-ray and radio wavelengths, using the Soft X-ray Telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft and the Very Large Array. About half of the 33 compact sources identified in a 20-cm full-disk map appear as X-ray bright points in the X-ray data. The other half apparently corresponds to unipolar regions with enhanced magnetic fields. Thus, the identification of radio bright points alone cannot reliably serve as a proxy for X-ray bright points. A preliminary analysis reveals that bright points commonly observed at 20 cm and in X-rays have temperatures of (1.4-2.9) x 10 exp 6 K and emission measures of (0.4-2.5) x 10 exp 45/cu cm. The observed brightness temperatures at 20 cm (1-2.5) x 10 exp 5 K can be explained in terms of optically thin free-free emission from a plasma with these parameters.

  5. SPECTRAL SURVEY OF X-RAY BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-03-15

    Using long-term monitoring data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we have selected 23 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with sufficient brightness and overall observation time to derive broadband X-ray spectra from 3 to {approx}>100 keV. Our sample includes mainly radio-quiet Seyferts, as well as seven radio-loud sources. Given the longevity of the RXTE mission, the greater part of our data is spread out over more than a decade, providing truly long-term average spectra and eliminating inconsistencies arising from variability. We present long-term average values of absorption, Fe line parameters, Compton reflection strengths, and photon indices, as well as fluxes and luminosities for the hard and very hard energy bands, 2-10 keV and 20-100 keV, respectively. We find tentative evidence for high-energy rollovers in three of our objects. We improve upon previous surveys of the very hard X-ray energy band in terms of accuracy and sensitivity, particularly with respect to confirming and quantifying the Compton reflection component. This survey is meant to provide a baseline for future analysis with respect to the long-term averages for these sources and to cement the legacy of RXTE, and especially its High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment, as a contributor to AGN spectral science.

  6. X-ray observations of XSS J12270-4859 in a new low state: A transformation to a disk-free rotation-powered pulsar binary

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Stappers, Ben W.

    2014-07-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859, which experienced a dramatic decline in optical/X-ray brightness at the end of 2012, indicative of the disappearance of its accretion disk. In this new state, the system exhibits previously absent orbital-phase-dependent, large-amplitude X-ray modulations with a decline in flux at superior conjunction. The X-ray emission remains predominantly non-thermal but with an order of magnitude lower mean luminosity and significantly harder spectrum relative to the previous high flux state. This phenomenology is identical to the behavior of the radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 in the absence of an accretion disk, where the X-ray emission is produced in an intra-binary shock driven by the pulsar wind. This further demonstrates that XSS J12270-4859 no longer has an accretion disk and has transformed to a full-fledged eclipsing 'redback' system that hosts an active rotation-powered MSP. There is no evidence for diffuse X-ray emission associated with the binary that may arise due to outflows or a wind nebula. An extended source situated 1.'5 from XSS J12270-4859 is unlikely to be associated, and is probably a previously uncataloged galaxy cluster.

  7. Period Clustering of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars and Magnetic Field Decay in Magnetars.

    PubMed

    Colpi; Geppert; Page

    2000-01-20

    We confront theoretical models for the rotational, magnetic, and thermal evolution of an ultramagnetized neutron star, or magnetar, with available data on the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We argue that, if the AXPs are interpreted as magnetars, their clustering of spin periods between 6 and 12 s (observed at present in this class of objects), their period derivatives, their thermal X-ray luminosities, and the association of two of them with young supernova remnants can only be understood globally if the magnetic field in magnetars decays significantly on a timescale of the order of 104 yr. PMID:10615029

  8. Coordinated observations of X-ray bright BL lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of the BL Lac object Mkn421 covering radio through X-ray wavelengths were performed. Composite multifrequency spectra of the central nonthermal component were obtained at the two epochs after subtracting the optical and infrared light of the underlying galaxy. Physical parameters of Mkn421 are discussed in terms of the synchrotron self-Compton model. Taking the spectral turnover between infrared and radio for synchrotrom self absorption, the radio emmision originates in a more extended region than the infrared to X-ray emission, the source size of which should be less than .01 milliarcseconds. Relativistic beaming is required if the angular size is smaller than a few times .001 milliarcseconds. A possible explanation of the spectral change during the two epochs is also discussed.

  9. First X-ray Observations of the Young Pulsar J1357-6429

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2007-01-01

    The first short Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the young and energetic pulsar J1357-6429 provided strong indications of a tail-like pulsar-wind nebula associated with this object, as well as strong pulsations of its X-ray flux with a pulsed fraction above 40% and a thermal component dominating at lower photon energies (below 2 keV). The elongated nebular is very compact in size. about 1" x 1.5" and might be interpreted as a pulsar jet. The thermal radiation is most plausibly emitted from the entire neutron star surface of an effective temperature about 1 MK covered with a magnetized hydrogen atmosphere At higher energies the pulsar's emission is of a nonthermal (magnetospheric) origin, with a power-law spectrum of a photon index Gamma approx. equals 1.1. This makes the X-ray properties of PSR J1357-6429 very similar to those of the youngest pulsars J1119-6127 and Vela with a detected thermal radiation.

  10. High Time Resolution Studies of Binary X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.

    1996-05-01

    The work for this project was substantially more than anticipated, and involved recreating an analysis system for all the HEAO A-1 scanning data which had been converted to the ELE format. As a result of this work, a complete software analysis package was first created at Sonoma State University using Fortran, that can extract the data for any given X-ray source, and produce light curves from the scanning data. A second complete software analysis package was also created, this time in IDL, which can also display all the data in a timely manner, allowing data screening without the generation of hardcopy plots. The creation of the software systems was not the original goal of the project; rather this was a necessary result when the NRL computers became inoperable due to old age and could not be used to support the project, as originally planned. There were 6 sources originally proposed for analysis: SMC X-1, A0538-66, LMC X-1, LMC X-3, (these 3 sources are all located in the Large Magellanic Cloud region), 4UO115+63 and 4U1626-67. Results on these sources are summarized.

  11. X-Ray Emission from the Millisecond Pulsar J1012+5307

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recently discovered 5.3 ms pulsar J1012+5307 at a distance of 520 pc is in an area of the sky which is particularly deficient in absorbing gas. The column density along the line of sight is less than 7.5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, which facilitates soft X-ray observations. Halpern reported a possible ROSAT PSPC detection of the pulsar in a serendipitous, off-axis observation. We have now confirmed the X-ray emission of PSR J1012+5307 in a 23 ksec observation with the ROSAT HRI. A point source is detected within 3 sec. of the radio position. Its count rate of 1.6 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -3)/s corresponds to an unabsorbed 0.1 - 2.4 keV flux of 6.4 x 10(exp -14) ergs/sq cm s, similar to that reported previously. This counts-to-flux conversion is valid for N(sub H) = 5 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and either a power-law spectrum of photon index 2.5 or a blackbody of kT = 0.1 keV. The implied X-ray luminosity of 2.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/ s is 5 x 10(exp -4) of the pulsar's spin-down power E, and similar to that of the nearest millisecond pulsar J0437-4715, which is nearly a twin of J1012+5307 in P and E. We subjected the 37 photons (and 13 background counts) within the source region to a pulsar search, but no evidence for pulsation was found. The pulsar apparently emits over a large fraction of its rotation cycle, and the absence of sharp modulation can be taken as evidence for surface thermal emission, as favored for PSR J0437-4715, rather than magnetospheric X-ray emission which is apparent in the sharp pulses of the much more energetic millisecond pulsar B1821-24. A further test of of the interpretation will be made with a longer ROSAT observation, which will increase the number of photons collected by a factor of 5, and permit a more sensitive examination of the light curve for modulation due to emission from heated polar caps. If found, such modulation will be further evidence that surface reheating by the impact of particles accelerated along open field lines operates in these approx

  12. X-ray observations of the Vela pulsar: Statistics and spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Vela pulsar was observed in the range 2-60 keV by the GSFC proportional counter experiment onboard OSO-8 with temporal resolution sufficient to make possible a sensitive search for pulsed X-rays at the radio pulsar period. A statistical analysis yielded 8 per cent as the 3 sigma upper limit on the pulsed fraction. The energy spectrum is fit well by a structureless power law with number index 2.21 + or - 0.2 and absorption by a hydrogen column density of N sub H equals 2.9 + or - 2.0 times ten to the twenty-second power per sq.cm.

  13. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2011-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in AO13, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  14. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in AO12, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  15. Energy-dependent effects of scattering atmospheres on X-ray pulsar pulse profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, Steven J.; Dermer, Charles D.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that radiation-supported scattering atmospheres near accreting X-ray pulsars (XRPs) can explain energy-dependent features observed in the pulse profiles of 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, 4U 1907+09 and Vela X-1. These atmospheres provide a physical model for the phenomenological annular emitting regions employed by Leahy to fit X-ray pulsar pulse profiles. We examine the effects of the scattering atmospheres under the assumptions that stable, optically thick atmospheres exist in a region where the optically thin resonant radiation force exceeds the force of gravity on ionized hydrogen. We predict that less complex pulse profiles will be observed at higher photon energies because the scattering atmospheres, which are supported by resonant Compton radiation pressure, become transparent to photons with energies greater than the cyclotron energy at the neutron star surface.

  16. X-Ray Observations of the Young Pulsar J1357—6429 and Its Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chulhoon; Pavlov, George G.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Shibanov, Yurii A.

    2012-01-01

    We observed the young pulsar J1357—6429 with the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. The pulsar spectrum fits well a combination of an absorbed power-law model (Γ = 1.7 ± 0.6) and a blackbody model (kT = 140+60 - 40 eV, R ~ 2 km at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Strong pulsations with pulsed fraction of 42% ± 5%, apparently associated with the thermal component, were detected in 0.3-1.1 keV. Surprisingly, the pulsed fraction at higher energies, 1.1-10 keV, appears to be smaller, 23% ± 4%. The small emitting area of the thermal component either corresponds to a hotter fraction of the neutron star surface or indicates inapplicability of the simplistic blackbody description. The X-ray images also reveal a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) with complex, asymmetric morphology comprised of a brighter, compact PWN surrounded by the fainter, much more extended PWN whose spectral slopes are Γ = 1.3 ± 0.3 and Γ = 1.7 ± 0.2, respectively. The extended PWN with the observed flux of ~7.5 × 10-13 erg s-1 cm-2 is a factor of 10 more luminous then the compact PWN. The pulsar and its PWN are located close to the center of the extended TeV source HESS J1356-645, which strongly suggests that the very high energy emission is powered by electrons injected by the pulsar long ago. The X-ray to TeV flux ratio, ~0.1, is similar to those of other relic PWNe. We found no other viable candidates to power the TeV source. A region of diffuse radio emission, offset from the pulsar toward the center of the TeV source, could be synchrotron emission from the same relic PWN rather than from the supernova remnant.

  17. A scenario of the formation of isolated X-ray pulsars with anomalously long period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Kim, V. Yu.; Beskrovnaya, N. G.

    2015-01-01

    A scenario of the formation of isolated X-ray pulsars is discussed with an application to one of the best studied objects of this class 1E 161348-5055. This moderately luminous, 1033-1035 erg s-1, pulsar with a relatively soft spectrum, kT ˜ 0.6-0.8 keV, is associated with an isolated neutron star, which is located near the center of the young (˜2000 yr) compact supernova remnant RCW 103 and rotates steadily ( Hz s-1) with the period of 6.7 h. We show that in the current epoch the neutron star is in the accretor state. The parameters of the source emission can be explained in terms of the magnetic-levitation accretion scenario in which the star with the surface magnetic field of 1012 G accretes material onto its surface from a non-Keplerian magnetic fossil disk at the rate 1014 g s-1. A neutron star could evolve to this state in a High-Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB), which had disintegrated during the supernova explosion powered by the core-collapse of its massive component. The life-time of an isolated X-ray pulsar formed this way can be as long as a few thousand years.

  18. Optical pulsations from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    PubMed

    Kern, B; Martin, C

    2002-05-30

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) differ from ordinary radio pulsars in that their X-ray luminosity is orders of magnitude greater than their rate of rotational energy loss, and so they require an additional energy source. One possibility is that AXPs are highly magnetized neuron stars or 'magnetars' having surface magnetic fields greater than 10(14) G. This would make them similar to the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), but alternative models that do not require extreme magnetic fields also exist. An optical counterpart to the AXP 4U0142+61 was recently discovered, consistent with emission from a magnetar, but also from a magnetized hot white dwarf, or an accreting isolated neutron star. Here we report the detection of optical pulsations from 4U0142+61. The pulsed fraction of optical light (27 per cent) is five to ten times greater than that of soft X-rays, from which we conclude that 4U0142+61 is a magnetar. Although this establishes a direct relationship between AXPs and the soft gamma-ray repeaters, the evolutionary connection between AXPs, SGRs and radio pulsars remains controversial. PMID:12037561

  19. On the magnetic fields of Be/X-ray pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Mereghetti, S.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the possibility of explaining the properties of the Be/X-ray pulsars observed in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) within the magnetic levitation accretion scenario. This implies that their X-ray emission is powered by a wind-fed accretion on to a neutron star (NS) which captures matter from a magnetized stellar wind. The NS in this case is accreting matter from a non-Keplerian magnetically levitating disc which is surrounding its magnetosphere. This allows us to explain the observed periods of the pulsars in terms of spin equilibrium without the need of invoking dipole magnetic fields outside the usual range ˜1011-1013 G inferred from cyclotron features of Galactic high-mass X-ray binaries. We find that the equilibrium period of a NS, under certain conditions, depends strongly on the magnetization of the stellar wind of its massive companion and, correspondingly, on the magnetic field of the massive companion itself. This may help to explain why similar NSs in binaries with similar properties rotate with different periods yielding a large scatter of periods of the accretion-powered pulsar observed in SMC and our galaxy.

  20. X-ray pulsars/Doppler integrated navigation for Mars final approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pingyuan; Wang, Shuo; Gao, Ai; Yu, Zhengshi

    2016-05-01

    The performance of the navigation system during the Mars final approach phase determines the initial accuracy of Mars entry phase, which is critical for a pin-point landing. An X-ray pulsars/Doppler integrated navigation strategy is proposed to improve the estimation accuracy of the spacecraft's entry state, as well as to enhance the autonomy, real-time and reliability. The navigation system uses the X-ray pulsar measurements and Doppler velocity measurements which are complementary to each other. The performance degradation in velocity estimation at the end of the final approach phase for X-ray pulsar based navigation can thus be eliminated. The nonlinearity of the system and the performance of Extended Kalman Filter are analyzed in this paper. Furthermore, in order to optimize the navigation scheme, a principle for navigation beacons selection based on the Fisher information matrix is used. Finally, a navigation scenario based on the 2012 encounter at Mars of Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is considered to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed scheme. Simulation results also indicate that the proposed navigation scheme has reference value for the design of the future Mars explorations.

  1. SEXTANT: A Demonstration of X-ray Pulsar-Based Navigation Using NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Mitchell, Jason W; Winternitz, Luke M; Hasouneh, Monther A; Price, Samuel R; Valdez, Jennifer; Yu, Wayne H; Semper, Sean R; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Litchford, Ronald J; Gendreau, Keith

    2014-08-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology-demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. The SEXTANT XNAV demonstration will exploit the large collecting area (>1800 cm^2), low background (<0.2 counts/s), and precise timing (<300 ns) of the NICER X-ray Timing Instrument (XTE). Taking advantage of NICER’s science observations of X-ray emitting millisecond pulsars, which are nature’s most stable clocks, the SEXTANT flight software will demonstrate real-time orbit determination with error less than 10 km in any direction, through measurements made over 2 weeks or less in the highly dynamic low-Earth ISS orbit. The completed technology demonstration will bring the XNAV concept and algorithms to a Technology Readiness Level of 8 and will inform the design and configuration of future practical XNAV implementations.

  2. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  3. Interstellar X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar with the LETGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerels, Frits; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; ODell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kahn, Steven M.; Behar, Ehud; Becker, Werner; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We study the interstellar X-ray absorption along the line of sight to the Crab Pulsar. The Crab was observed with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the pulsar, a point source, produces a full resolution spectrum. The continuum spectrum appears smooth, and we compare its parameters with other measurements of the pulsar spectrum. The spectrum clearly shows absorption edges due to interstellar Ne, Fe, and O. The O edge shows spectral structure that is probably due to O bound in molecules or dust. We search for near-edge structure (EXAFS) in the O absorption spectrum. The Fe L absorption spectrum is largely due to a set of unresolved discrete n=2-3 transitions in neutral or near-neutral Fe, and we analyze it using a new set of dedicated atomic structure calculations, which provide absolute cross sections. In addition to being interesting in its own right, the ISM absorption needs to be understood in quantitative detail in order to derive spectroscopic constraints on possible soft thermal radiation from the pulsar.

  4. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far. PMID:22923576

  5. Ordinary X-Rays from Three Extraordinary Millisecond Pulsars: XMM-Newton Observations of PSRs J0337+1715, J0636+5129, and J0645+5158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Kaplan, David L.; Archibald, Anne; Gentile, Peter; Hessels, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott; Stairs, Ingrid; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of three recently discovered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with interesting characteristics: PSR J0337+1715, PSR J0636+5129, and PSR J0645+5158. PSR J0337+1715 is a fast-spinning, bright, and so-far unique MSP in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarf companions. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very tight 96-minute orbit with a low-mass, 8 M J companion. PSR J0645+5158 is a nearby, isolated MSP with a very small duty cycle (1%–2%), which has led to its inclusion in high-precision pulsar timing programs. Using data from XMM-Newton, we have analyzed X-ray spectroscopy for these three objects, as well as optical/ultraviolet photometry for PSR J0337+1715. The X-ray data for each are largely consistent with expectations for most MSPs with regards to the ratios of thermal and non-thermal emission. We discuss the implications of these data on the pulsar population, and prospects for future observations of these pulsars.

  6. Long-term variability in bright hard X-ray sources: 5+ years of BATSE data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, C. R.; Harmon, B. A.; McCollough, M. L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Sahi, M.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Deal, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    The operation of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO)/burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) continues to provide data for inclusion into a data base for the analysis of long term variability in bright, hard X-ray sources. The all-sky capability of BATSE provides up to 30 flux measurements/day for each source. The long baseline and the various rising and setting occultation flux measurements allow searches for periodic and quasi-periodic signals with periods of between several hours to hundreds of days to be conducted. The preliminary results from an analysis of the hard X-ray variability in 24 of the brightest BATSE sources are presented. Power density spectra are computed for each source and profiles are presented of the hard X-ray orbital modulations in some X-ray binaries, together with amplitude modulations and variations in outburst durations and intensities in recurrent X-ray transients.

  7. A Future NICER Observation of Pulsar J0437-4715 from the Perspective of the X-ray Concentators’ Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Erin; Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2014-08-01

    While on-board the International Space Station, the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) will perform high accuracy X-ray timing measurements of neutron stars. The X-ray Timing Instrument (XTI), consisting of 56, high effective area, X-ray Concentrators (XRCs) co-aligned with silicon drift detectors, provides absolute GPS-based photon time-tagging. This allows for high-quality lightcurves from long exposures compiled over many brief observation segments. Through energy-dependent lightcurve analysis of millisecond pulsar observations we can infer neutron star radii within 5% and further constrain the equations of state. One of NICER’s key targets to perform a radius measurement is PSR J0437-4715, the closest known MSP. However, the observation of this pulsar will not be as straight forward as pointing the XTI in the pulsar’s direction. One of the main reasons the XRCs have such a high effective area is the same reason this observation poses a unique challenge, concentrators cannot discriminate photons from different sources. With the XRCs’ field of view of 6 arcminutes and a bright AGN (RX J0437.4-4711) located less than 4.3’ from PSR J0437-4715, we must minimize the AGN photon contribution in order to minimize the uncertainty in the radius measurement. Even though the AGN is approximately one order of magnitude brighter than the pulsar, the XRCs’ effective area depends greatly on the photons’ incident angles. The fact that the efficiency of a source observed off-axis is much lower than one observed on-axis can be used to our advantage. Using a comprehensive analysis and thorough understanding of the XRC performance from X-ray testing at NASA Goddard’s beamlines and NICER’s raytrace code, I am developing a method for observing PSR J0437-4715. The simulations for this work include considering NICER’s pointing budget and the timing and spectral properties of these sources from previous research found in the literature.

  8. Experimental Validation of Pulse Phase Tracking for X-Ray Pulsar Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are a form of variable celestial source that have shown to be usable as aids for autonomous, deep space navigation. Particularly those sources emitting in the X-ray band are ideal for navigation due to smaller detector sizes. In this paper X-ray photons arriving from a pulsar are modeled as a non-homogeneous Poisson process. The method of pulse phase tracking is then investigated as a technique to measure the radial distance traveled by a spacecraft over an observation interval. A maximum-likelihood phase estimator (MLE) is used for the case where the observed frequency signal is constant. For the varying signal frequency case, an algorithm is used in which the observation window is broken up into smaller blocks over which an MLE is used. The outputs of this phase estimation process were then looped through a digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) in order to reduce the errors and produce estimates of the doppler frequency. These phase tracking algorithms were tested both in a computer simulation environment and using the NASA Goddard Space flight Center X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT). This provided an experimental validation with photons being emitted by a modulated X-ray source and detected by a silicon-drift detector. Models of the Crab pulsar and the pulsar B1821-24 were used in order to generate test scenarios. Three different simulated detector trajectories were used to be tracked by the phase tracking algorithm: a stationary case, one with constant velocity, and one with constant acceleration. All three were performed in one-dimension along the line of sight to the pulsar. The first two had a constant signal frequency and the third had a time varying frequency. All of the constant frequency cases were processed using the MLE, and it was shown that they tracked the initial phase within 0.15% for the simulations and 2.5% in the experiments, based on an average of ten runs. The MLE-DPLL cascade version of the phase tracking algorithm was used in

  9. A new model for the X-ray continuum of the magnetized accreting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Ferrigno, Carlo; Bozzo, Enrico; Becker, Peter A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Accreting highly magnetized pulsars in binary systems are among the brightest X-ray emitters in our Galaxy. Although a number of high-quality broad-band (0.1-100 keV) X-ray observations are available, the spectral energy distribution of these sources is usually investigated by adopting pure phenomenological models rather than models linked to the physics of accretion. Aims: In this paper, a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission recorded from the high-mass X-ray binary pulsars Cen X-3, 4U 0115+63, and Her X-1 is carried out by using BeppoSAX and joined Suzaku +NuStar data, together with an advanced version of the compmag model, which provides a physical description of the high-energy emission from accreting pulsars, including the thermal and bulk Comptonization of cyclotron and bremsstrahlung seed photons along the neutron star accretion column. Methods: The compmag model is based on an iterative method for solving second-order partial differential equations, whose convergence algorithm has been improved and consolidated during the preparation of this paper. Results: Our analysis shows that the broad-band X-ray continuum of all considered sources can be self-consistently described by the compmag model. The cyclotron absorption features (not included in the model) can be accounted for by using Gaussian components. From the fits of the compmag model to the data we inferred the physical properties of the accretion columns in all sources, finding values reasonably close to those theoretically expected according to our current understanding of accretion in highly magnetized neutron stars. Conclusions: The updated version of the compmag model has been tailored to the physical processes that are known to occur in the columns of highly magnetized accreting neutron stars and it can thus provide a better understanding of the high-energy radiation from these sources. The availability of broad-band high-quality X-ray data, such as those provided by BeppoSAX in

  10. Quasiperiodic oscillations in bright galactic-bulge X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Shibazaki, N.; Alpar, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasiperiodic oscillations with frequencies in the range 5-50 Hz have recently been discovered in X-rays from two bright galactic-bulge sources and Sco X-1. These sources are weakly magnetic neutron stars accreting from disks which the plasma is clumped. The interaction of the magnetosphere with clumps in the inner disk causes oscillations in the X-ray flux with many of the properties observed.

  11. Evolution of the X-Ray Profile of the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, M. Y.; Yan, L. L.; Lu, F. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Yuan, J. P.; Tong, H.; Zhang, S. N.; Lu, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using the archival data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we study the evolution of the Crab pulsar’s X-ray profile in a time span of 11 years. The X-ray profiles, as characterized by a few parameters, changed slightly, but with high statistical significance in these years: the separation of the two peaks increased with a rate of 0.°88 ± 0.°20 per century, the flux ratio of the second pulse to the first pulse decreased by (3.64+/- 0.86)× {10}-2 per century, and the pulse widths of the two pulses represented by their full widths at half maxima decreased by 1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 44+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 15 and 1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 09+/- 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 73 per century, respectively. The evolutionary trends of the X-ray profile are similar to that observed in radio, but with quantitative differences. Finally, we briefly discuss the constraints of these X-ray properties on the geometry of the emission region of this pulsar.

  12. Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar: X-ray, Radio, and Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Lovellette, M. N.; Sheikh, S.; Moon, D.-S.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Roberts, M.; Bloom, E. D.; Tournear, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Reilly, K.

    2002-12-01

    We report on multiwavelength observations of the Crab Pulsar and compare the pulse arrival time at radio, IR, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. Comparing absolute arrival times at multiple energies can provide clues to the magnetospheric structure and emission region geometry. Absolute time calibration of each observing system is of paramount importance for these observations and we describe how this is done for each system. We directly compare arrival time determinations for 2--10 keV X-ray observations made contemporaneously with the PCA on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the USA Experiment on ARGOS. These two X-ray measurements employ very different means of measuring time and satellite position and thus have different systematic error budgets. The comparison with other wavelengths requires additional steps such as dispersion measure corrections and a precise definition of the ``peak'' of the light curve since the light curve shape varies with observing wavelength. We will describe each of these effects and quantify the magnitude of the systematic error that each may contribute. Basic research on X-ray Astronomy at NRL is funded by NRL/ONR.

  13. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  14. X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSIONS FROM ROTATION POWERED MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: hrspksc@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-01-20

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope has revealed that rotation powered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a major contributor to the Galactic {gamma}-ray source population. Such pulsars may also be important in modeling the quiescent state of several low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), where optical observations of the companion star suggest the possible existence of rotation powered MSPs. To understand the observational properties of the different evolutionary stages of MSPs, the X-ray and {gamma}-ray emissions associated with the outer gap model are investigated. For rotation powered MSPs, the size of the outer gap and the properties of the high-energy emission are controlled by either the photon-photon pair-creation process or magnetic pair-creation process near the surface. For these pulsars, we find that the outer gap model controlled by the magnetic pair-creation process is preferable in explaining the possible correlations between the {gamma}-ray luminosity or non-thermal X-ray luminosity versus the spin-down power. For the accreting MSPs in quiescent LMXBs, the thermal X-ray emission at the neutron star (NS) surface resulting from deep crustal heating can control the conditions in the outer gap. We argue that the optical modulation observed in the quiescent state of several LMXBs originates from the irradiation of the donor star by {gamma}-rays from the outer gap. In these systems, the irradiation luminosity required for the optical modulation of the source such as SAX J1808.4-3658 can be achieved for a NS of high mass. Finally, we discuss the high-energy emission associated with an intra-binary shock in black widow systems, e.g., PSR B1957+20.

  15. Chandra and Swift X-Ray Observations of the X-Ray Pulsar SMC X-2 During the Outburst of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. L.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2016-09-01

    We report the Chandra/HRC-S and Swift/XRT observations for the 2015 outburst of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SMC X-2. While previous studies suggested that either an O star or a Be star in the field is the high-mass companion of SMC X-2, our Chandra/HRC-S image unambiguously confirms the O-type star as the true optical counterpart. Using the Swift/XRT observations, we extracted accurate orbital parameters of the pulsar binary through a time of arrivals analysis. In addition, there were two X-ray dips near the inferior conjunction, which are possibly caused by eclipses or an ionized high-density shadow wind near the companion’s surface. Finally, we propose that an outflow driven by the radiation pressure from day ∼10 played an important role in the X-ray/optical evolution of the outburst.

  16. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  17. Outburst of the 2 s Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F.; Reynolds, J.; Ransom, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Following our discovery of radio pulsations from the newly recognized anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1547.0-5408, we initiated X-ray monitoring with the Swift X-ray telescope and obtained a single target-of-opportunity observation with the Newton X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). In comparison with its historic minimum flux of 3 x 10(exp -l3)ergs/sq cm/s, the source was found to be in a record high state, f(sub x)(1-8 keV) = 5 x 10(exp -12)ergs/sq cm/s, or L(sub x) = 1.7 x 10(exp 35)(d/9 kpc )(sup 2)ergs/s, and declining by 25% in 1 month. Extrapolating the decay, we bound the total energy in this outburst to 1042 ergs < E < ergs. The spectra (fitted with a Comptonized blackbody) show that an increase in the temperature and area of a hot region, to 0.5 keV and -16% of the surface area of the neutron star, respectively, are primarily responsible for its increase in luminosity. The energy, spectrum, and timescale of decay are consistent with a deep crustal heating event, similar to an interpretation of the X-ray turn-on of the transient AXP XTE J18 10- 197. Simultaneous with the 4.6 hr ATdA4-Newton observation, we observed at 6.4 GHz with the Parkes telescope, measuring the phase relationship of the radio and X-ray pulse. The X-ray pulsed fraction of 1E 1547.0-5408 is only approx. 7 %, while its radio pulse is relatively broad for such a slow pulsar, which may indicate a nearly aligned rotator. As also inferred from the transient behavior of XTE J18 10-197, the only other AXP known to emit in the radio, the magnetic field rearrangement responsible for this X-ray outburst of 1E 1547.0-5408 is probably the cause of its radio turn-on.

  18. Signs of magnetic accretion in the young Be/X-ray pulsar SXP 1062

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2012-07-01

    The spin behaviour of the neutron star in the newly discovered young Be/X-ray long-period pulsar SXP 1062 is discussed. The star is observed to rotate with the period of 1062 s, and spin down at the rate ˜-2.6 × 10-12 Hz s-1. I show that all of the conventional accretion scenarios encounter major difficulties in explaining the rapid spin-down of the pulsar. These difficulties can be, however, avoided within the magnetic accretion scenario in which the neutron star is assumed to accrete from a magnetized wind. The spin-down rate of the pulsar can be explained within this scenario provided the surface magnetic field of the neutron star is B*˜ 4 × 1013 G. I show that the age of the pulsar in this case lies in the range (2-4) × 104 yr, which is consistent with observations. The spin evolution of the pulsar is briefly discussed.

  19. Spectral formation in accreting X-ray pulsars: bimodal variation of the cyclotron energy with luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, P. A.; Klochkov, D.; Schönherr, G.; Nishimura, O.; Ferrigno, C.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Wolff, M. T.; Wilms, J.; Staubert, R.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars exhibit significant variability of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) centroid energy on pulse-to-pulse timescales, and also on much longer timescales. Two types of spectral variability are observed. For sources in group 1, the CRSF energy is negatively correlated with the variable source luminosity, and for sources in group 2, the opposite behavior is observed. The physical basis for this bimodal behavior is currently not well understood. Aims: We explore the hypothesis that the accretion dynamics in the group 1 sources is dominated by radiation pressure near the stellar surface, and that Coulomb interactions decelerate the gas to rest in the group 2 sources. Methods: We derive a new expression for the critical luminosity, Lcrit, such that radiation pressure decelerates the matter to rest in sources with X-ray luminosity LX > Lcrit. The formula for Lcrit is based on a simple physical model for the structure of the accretion column in luminous X-ray pulsars that takes into account radiative deceleration, the energy dependence of the cyclotron cross section, the thermodynamics of the accreting gas, the dipole structure of the pulsar magnetosphere, and the diffusive escape of radiation through the column walls. We show that for typical neutron star parameters, Lcrit = 1.5 × 1037 B1216/15 erg s-1, where B12 is the surface magnetic field strength in units of 1012 G. Results: The formula for the critical luminosity is evaluated for five sources, using the maximum value of the CRSF centroid energy to estimate the surface magnetic field strength B12. The results confirm that the group 1 sources are supercritical (LX > Lcrit) and the group 2 sources are subcritical (LX < Lcrit), although the situation is less clear for those highly variable sources that cross over the line LX = Lcrit. We also explain the variation of the CRSF energy with luminosity as a consequence of the variation of the characteristic emission

  20. A new transient pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud with an unusual x-ray spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    This article reports the discovery of a luminous (3.5 x 10(exp 37) ergs/sec over the 0.2 to 2 keV band) transient X-ray pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with an extremely soft component to its X-ray spectrum. This is the first time that a spectrum of this type has been seen in this class of X-ray source. The pulse period is 2.7632 s, and the pulse modulation appears to vary with energy from nearly unpulsed in the low-energy band of the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) (0.07 to 0.4 keV) to about 50% in the high-energy band (1.0 to 2.4 keV). The object, RX J0059.2-7138, also shows flickering variability in its X-ray emission on timescales of 50 to 100s. The pulse-phase-averaged PSPC X-ray spectrum can be well described by a two-component source model seen through an absorbing column density of approximately 10(exp 21) atoms cm(exp -2). One spectral component is a power law with photon index 2.4. The other component is significantly softer and can be described by either a steeply falling power law or a blackbody with a temperature KT(sub BB) approximately 35 eV. Ths component is transient, but evidently upulsed, and, for the blackbody model fits, requires a large bolometric luminosity: near, or even several times greater than, the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 solar mass object. When these characteristics of its soft emission are considered, RX J0059.2-7138 appears quite similar to other X-ray sources in the magellanic Clouds, such as CAL 83, CAL 87, and RX J0527.8-6954, which show only extreme ultrasoft (EUS) X-ray spectra. The discovery of RX J0059.2-7138, a probably high-mass X-ray binary, clearly indicates that EUS spectra may arise from accretion-powered neutron-star X-ray sources. This result lends support to the idea that some of the 'pure' EUS sources may be shrouded low-mass X-ray binaries rather than accreting white dwarfs.

  1. Partial accretion in the propeller stage of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Can; Gogus, Ersin; Eksi, Kazim Yavuz; Guver, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    Accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs) are very important objects for studying the stages of disk - magnetosphere interaction as these objects may show different stages in an observable duration. A typical X-ray light curve of an outburst of AMXP has a fast rise and an exponential decay phases. Most of the outbursts have a knee where the flux goes from the slow decay stage to the rapid decay stage. This knee may be linked to the transition from accretion to propeller stage. Since, after the knee, the X-ray luminosity of the source is still higher than its quiescent level, the accretion from inner disc must be continuing in the propeller stage with a lower fraction than in the accretion stage. The X-ray does not only come from accretion onto the poles but the inner parts of the disk may also contribute to the total X-ray luminosity. To infer what fraction (f) of the inflowing matter accretes onto the star the light curve in the propeller stage, one should first separate the emission originating from the disk and obtain a light curve of X-ray emission only from the magnetic poles. We provide a new method to infer from the observational data the fraction of accreting matter onto the neutron star pole to the mass transferring from outer layers of the disc to the inner disc (f), as a function of the fastness parameter (ω_{*}), assuming the knee is due to the transition from accretion to the propeller stage. We transform X-ray luminosities to the mass fraction, f, and the time scale of outburst to fastness parameter, ω_*. It allows us to compare different types of outbursts of an AMXP in f - ω_* space which is universal for a unique system. We analysed the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array (RXTE/PCA) observations of the 2000 and the 2011 outbursts and the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission/X-ray Telescope (SWIFT/XRT) data of the 2013 outburst of the most known AMXP, Aql X-1 using a combination of blackbody representing hot spot, disk blackbody

  2. Towards practical autonomous deep-space navigation using X-Ray pulsar timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemar, Setnam; Fraser, George; Heil, Lucy; Hindley, David; Martindale, Adrian; Molyneux, Philippa; Pye, John; Warwick, Robert; Lamb, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of deep-space navigation using the highly stable periodic signals from X-ray pulsars in combination with dedicated instrumentation on the spacecraft: a technique often referred to as `XNAV'. The results presented are based on the outputs from a study undertaken for the European Space Agency. The potential advantages of this technique include increased spacecraft autonomy and lower mission operating costs. Estimations of navigation uncertainties have been obtained using simulations of different pulsar combinations and navigation strategies. We find that the pulsar PSR B1937 + 21 has potential to allow spacecraft positioning uncertainties of ~2 and ~5 km in the direction of the pulsar after observation times of 10 and 1 h respectively, for ranges up to 30 AU. This could be achieved autonomously on the spacecraft using a focussing X-ray instrument of effective area ~50 cm2 together with a high performance atomic clock. The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) instrument, due to be launched on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury in 2018, is an example of an instrument that may be further developed as a practical telescope for XNAV. For a manned mission to Mars, where an XNAV system could provide valuable redundancy, observations of the three pulsars PSR B1937 + 21, B1821-24 and J0437-4715 would enable a three-dimensional positioning uncertainty of ~30 km for up to 3 months without the need to contact Earth-based systems. A lower uncertainty may be achieved, for example, by use of extended observations or, if feasible, by use of a larger instrument. X-ray instrumentation suitable for use in an operational XNAV subsystem must be designed to require only modest resources, especially in terms of size, mass and power. A system with a focussing optic is required in order to reduce the sky and particle background against which the source must be measured. We examine possible options for future developments in terms of simpler, lower

  3. CHANDRA PHASE-RESOLVED X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Becker, Werner

    2011-12-20

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 {+-} 0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} (4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find {tau}{sub scat} = 0.147 {+-} 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum-albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat

  4. Constraining compactness and magnetic field geometry of X-ray pulsars using pulse profile statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Marja; Poutanen, Juri

    2010-07-15

    We use the statistics of 131 X-ray pulsar light curves in order to constrain the neutron star compactness and the inclination of the magnetic dipole. The X-ray pulse profiles are classified according to the number of pulses seen during one period, dividing them into two classes, single- and double-peaked. The relative fraction of pulsars in these classes is compared with the probabilities predicted by a theoretical model for different types of pencil-beam patterns. Our results show that a statistic of pulse profiles does not constrain compactness of the neutron stars. In contrast to the previous claim, the data do not require the magnetic inclination to be confined in a narrow interval but instead the magnetic dipole can have arbitrary inclinations to the rotational axis. The observed fractions of different types of light curves can be explained by taking into account the X-ray detector sensitivity (i.e. detection threshold for weak pulses), which decreases the fraction of the observed double-peaked light curves.

  5. Discovery of Radio Emission From Transient Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J P; Gotthelf, E V; Becker, R H; Helfand, D J; White, R L

    2005-10-25

    We report the first detection of radio emission from any anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP). Data from the Very Large Array (VLA) MAGPIS survey with angular resolution 6'' reveals a point-source of flux density 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mJy at 1.4 GHz at the precise location of the 5.54 s pulsar XTE J1810-197. This is greater than upper limits from all other AXPs and from quiescent states of soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). The detection was made in 2004 January, 1 year after the discovery of XTE J1810-197 during its only known outburst. Additional VLA observations both before and after the outburst yield only upper limits that are comparable to or larger than the single detection, neither supporting nor ruling out a decaying radio afterglow related to the X-ray turn-on. Another hypothesis is that, unlike the other AXPs and SGRs, XTE J1810-197 may power a radio synchrotron nebula by the interaction of its particle wind with a moderately dense environment that was not evacuated by previous activity from this least luminous, in X-rays, of the known magnetars.

  6. Bright Points and Subflares in UV Lines and in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovira, M.; Schmieder, B.; Demoulin, P.; Simnett, G. M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Reichmann, E.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed an active region which was observed in Halpha (MSDP), UV lines (SMM/UVSP), and in X rays (SMM/HXIS). In this active region there were only a few subflares and many small bright points visible in UV and in X rays. Using an extrapolation based on the Fourier transform we have computed magnetic field lines connecting different photospheric magnetic polarities from ground-based magnetograms. Along the magnetic inversion lines we find 2 different zones: 1. a high shear region (less than 70 degrees) where subflares occur 2. a low shear region along the magnetic inversion line where UV bright points are observed.

  7. The soft X-ray spectrum of transient pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Palombara, N.; Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Pintore, F.; Tiengo, A.; Mereghetti, S.

    2016-06-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud is characterized by a high number of transient accreting pulsars, which can reach luminosities up to 10^{38} erg s^{-1} during their outbursts. Due to the low Galactic interstellar absorption in the SMC direction, these sources offer a unique opportunity to investigate the soft end of the X-ray spectrum in accreting pulsars. In the last two years we observed with XMM-Newton the large outburst of two of these transient pulsars (RX J0059.2-7138 and SMC X-2). Thanks to the high throughput and spectral resolution of XMM, these observations allowed us to investigate at an unprecedented level of detail their spectral and timing properties at soft X-ray energies. We found that both sources show a pulsed emission also at low energies, and that they are characterized by a thermal component which dominates the source spectrum below 0.5 keV; moreover, we discovered several emission and absorption features, which are very likely produced by photoionization of plasma located above the inner regions of the accretion disc.

  8. A re-consideration of the HEAO-1 A2 Measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background Surface Brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahoda, K.

    2005-12-01

    The HEAO-1 A2 experiment was designed to make high precision and low systematics measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background from 0.1 - 60 keV. No subsequent experiment has been capable of similarly clean separation of cosmic and instrumental background. Most more recent measurements of the 2-10 keV surface brightness are 20% higher than values derived from the spectral parameterization of the 3-50 keV spectrum given in the original A2 analysis of Marshall et al. (1980, ApJ 235, 4 (M80)). A recent analysis of archival A2 data by Revnivtsev et al. (astro-ph/0412304 (R05)) finds a surface brightness 15-20% higher than M80, an uncomfortably large discrepancy for data taken from a single experiment. We present a third analysis of the A2 data and identify two effects neglected in the comparison of previous A2 results: (a) the extrapolation of the M80 parameterization below 3 keV fails to describe the data; (b) R05 uses an unabsorbed, and high, value for the flux from the Crab nebula plus pulsar which results in a high value for the inferred count rate to CXB surface brightness conversion. Correcting for these effects, our best estimate of the 2-10 keV surface brightness is 1.84 × 10-11 ergs cm-2 s-1 deg-2 on a flux scale where the (absorbed) 2-10 Crab flux is 2.32 × 10-8 ergs cm-2 s-1. This value is only about 10% below the average compiled by Moretti et al. (2003, ApJ, 588, 696). We discuss how well the X-ray brightness of the Crab, to which this measurement is normalized, is known. This research made use of data from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  9. A Broad-Band X-Ray Study of the Geminga Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the Geminga pulsar at energies 0.1-10 keV using data from the ASCA, ROSAT, and EUVE satellites. The bulk of the soft X-ray flux can be parameterized as a blackbody of T = (5.6 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp 5) K, occupying a fraction 0. 10 - 0.64 of the surface area of the neutron star at the parallax distance of 160 pc. The ASCA detection of Geminga resolves the nature of the harder X-ray component previously discovered by ROSAT in favor of nonthermal emission, rather than thermal emission from a heated polar cap. The hard X-ray spectrum can be fitted by a power-law of energy index 1.0 +/- 0.5. The hard X-ray light curve has a strong main peak and a weak secondary peak; its total pulsed fraction is = 55%. Three ROSAT PSPC observations show significant variability of Geminga's light curve. In particular, a peculiar energy dependence of the modulation in the soft X-ray component, dubbed the "Geminga effect" in the original PSPC data, is not present in later observations. In addition, fine structure in the soft X-ray light curve, interpreted as eclipses due to cyclotron resonance scattering by a plasma screen on the closed magnetic field lines, almost disappeared in the most recent observations. All of the variable properties of Geminga can probably be associated with the nonthermal process that supplies e(sup +, sup -) pairs to its inner magnetosphere.

  10. Pulse-to-pulse variations in accreting X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmar, Peter; Marcu, Diana; Kühnel, Matthias; Klochkov, Dmitry; Pottschmidt, Katja; Staubert, Rüdiger; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Jenke, Peter A.; Caballero, Isabel; Fürst, Felix

    2014-01-01

    In most accreting X-ray pulsars, the periodic signal is very clear and easily shows up as soon as data covering sufficient pulse periods (a few ten) are available. The mean pulse profile is often quite typical for a given source and with minor variations repeated and recognisable across observations done years or even decades apart. At the time scale of individual pulses, significant pulse-to-pulse variations are commonly observed. While at low energies some of these variations might be explained by absorption, in the hard X-rays they will reflect changes in the accretion and subsequent emission. The amount of these variations appears to be quite different between sources and contains information about the surrounding material as well ass possibly interactions at the magnetosphere. We investigate such variations for a sample of well-known sources.

  11. Timing analysis of binary X ray pulsars observed by HEAO 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Y.; Swank, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    Timing analysis of the pointed observations of 5 selected binary X ray pulsars, in two categories of disk-fed and wind-fed sources, by HEAO 1 A-2 is reported. The power spectral analysis was performed on the data in the frequency range from approx. 1 MHz to 6.25 Hz. The coherent signal of the pulsation, the continuum of the power spectrum, varies in time and differs among sources. Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) is probably related to a fast spinning but weakly magnetized neutron star in the low mass X ray binaries. QPO was searched for in this frequency range to see if scaling laws exist among these two systems which may have possessed different order of magnitude of magnetic field strengths and the inner disk radii. One possible QPO is found centering at 0.062 Hz in 4U0115+63 during a flare.

  12. Cooler and Hotter X-ray Bright Points from Hinode/XRT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyappa, R.; DeLuca, E. E.; Saar, S. H.; Golub, L.; Damé, L.; Varghese, B. A.

    2012-08-01

    We use a 7-hour (17:00 UT - 24:00 UT) time sequence of soft X-ray images observed almost simultaneously in two filters (Ti_poly and Al_mesh) on April 14, 2007 with X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on-board the Hinode mission to determine the temperature of X-ray bright points (XBPs). A sample of 14 XBPs and 2 background coronal regions have been identified and selected on both the images for detailed analysis. The temperature of XBPs is determined by filter ratio method. We find that the XBPs show temperature fluctuations and that the average temperature ranges from 1.1 MK to 3.4 MK which may correspond to different X-ray fluxes. These results suggest the existence of cooler and hotter XBPs and that the heating rate of XBPs is highly variable on short time scales.

  13. 41. 5 day binary x-ray pulsar 4U 1223-62 (GX 301-2)

    SciTech Connect

    White, N.E.; Swank, J.H.

    1984-12-15

    The orbital period of the 700 s X-ray pulsar 4U 1223-62 (GX 301-2) has been determined to be 41.5 days from regular X-ray outbursts reported by Watson, Warwick, and Corbet in 1982. We reexamine Ariel 5 and SAS 3 X-ray pulse timing data to deduce the orbital elements of this system assuming a 41.5 day orbital period. The correction of an error in an earlier pulse timing analysis has reduced a previously reported inconsistency between the X-ray photometric ephemeris and the orbital solution deduced from the pulse timings.

  14. X-ray studies of the termination shock of the pulsar wind in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Burrows, D.; Shibata, S.; Pavlov, G.; Hester, J.; Tsunemi, H.

    Chandra observations have discovered a long-sought termination shock of the pulsar wind in the Crab Nebula. The shock is barely seen in the optical wavelengths in contrast with the wisps, which emerge from the shock but can be seen in both the X-ray and optical. We present spectral and spatial analysis of the shock with Chandra. Especially, spectral information is obtained for the first time without being bothered by pile-up. Spectral analysis of other fine structures including "arcs" which are seen in north-eastern part of the torus is also shown. We discuss those results along with large scale spectral variations over the nebula.

  15. Evidence of pulsed X-ray emission from radio pulsar PSR1951+32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lingxiang; Li, Tipei; Sun, Xuejun; Ma, Yugian; Wu, Mei

    1994-03-01

    Evidence of X-ray pulsations from PSR1951+32 have been obtained in both EINSTEIN IPC (Image Proportional Counter) and HRI (High Resolution Imager) data in our analysis of Einstein Observatory data on CTB 80 area. The phase light curves of these two datasets show similar single peak structure. The period values are significantly different from those predicted by radio observations processed about 7 years later, and shows the spin rate of the pulsar in April 1980 is higher than that in October 1979. Possible explanations for this phenomenon are discussed.

  16. A Optical Synchrotron Nebula around the X-Ray Pulsar 0540-693

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanan, G.; Helfand, D.; Reynolds, S.

    The authors report the discovery of extended optical continuum emission around the recently discovered 50 ms X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant 0540-693. Exposures in blue and red broadband filters made with the CTIO 4 m telescope and prime focus CCD show a center-brightened but clearly extended nebula about 4arcsec in diameter (FWHM), while an image in an [O III] filter shows an 8arcsec diameter shell (as reported earlier) which encloses the continuum source. 0540-693 is a system very similar to the Crab nebula and represents the second detection of optical synchrotron radiation in a supernova remnant.

  17. On the Extended Emission of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar IE 1547.0-5408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C. -Y.; Zhu, W. W.; Gavriil, F. P.; Woods, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the extended emission around the anomalous X-ray pulsar IE 1547.0-5408 using four XMM-Newton observations taken with the source in varying states of outburst as well as in quiescence. We find that the extended emission flux is highly variable and strongly correlated with the flux of the magnetar. Based on this result, as well as on spectral and energetic considerations, we conclude that the extended emission is dominated by a dust-scattering halo and not a pulsar wind nebula (P-VVN), as has been previously argued. We obtain an upper limit on the 2-10 keV flux of a possible PWN of 4.7 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm, three times less than the previously claimed value, implying an efficiency for conversion of spin-down energy into nebular luminosity of <9 x 10(exp -4) .

  18. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG PULSAR J1357-6429 AND ITS PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chulhoon; Pavlov, George G.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Shibanov, Yurii A. E-mail: pavlov@astro.psu.edu E-mail: shib@astro.ioffe.rssi.ru

    2012-01-10

    We observed the young pulsar J1357-6429 with the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. The pulsar spectrum fits well a combination of an absorbed power-law model ({Gamma} = 1.7 {+-} 0.6) and a blackbody model (kT = 140{sup +60}{sub -40} eV, R {approx} 2 km at the distance of 2.5 kpc). Strong pulsations with pulsed fraction of 42% {+-} 5%, apparently associated with the thermal component, were detected in 0.3-1.1 keV. Surprisingly, the pulsed fraction at higher energies, 1.1-10 keV, appears to be smaller, 23% {+-} 4%. The small emitting area of the thermal component either corresponds to a hotter fraction of the neutron star surface or indicates inapplicability of the simplistic blackbody description. The X-ray images also reveal a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) with complex, asymmetric morphology comprised of a brighter, compact PWN surrounded by the fainter, much more extended PWN whose spectral slopes are {Gamma} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 and {Gamma} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2, respectively. The extended PWN with the observed flux of {approx}7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} is a factor of 10 more luminous then the compact PWN. The pulsar and its PWN are located close to the center of the extended TeV source HESS J1356-645, which strongly suggests that the very high energy emission is powered by electrons injected by the pulsar long ago. The X-ray to TeV flux ratio, {approx}0.1, is similar to those of other relic PWNe. We found no other viable candidates to power the TeV source. A region of diffuse radio emission, offset from the pulsar toward the center of the TeV source, could be synchrotron emission from the same relic PWN rather than from the supernova remnant.

  19. The three-dimensional structures of X-ray bright points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Golub, L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the Convergin Flux Model has been proposed for X-ray bright points and cancelling magnetic features. The aim of this piece of work is to try and model theoretically specific X-ray bright points in the framework of the Converging Flux Model. The observational data used includes a magnetogram showing the normal component of the magnetic field at the photosphere and a high-resolution soft X-ray image from NIXT showing the brightenings in the lower solar corona. By approximating the flux concentrations in the magnetograms with poles of the appropriate sign and sense, the overlying three-dimensional potential field structure is calculated. Deduction of plausible motions of the flux sources are made which produce brightenings of the observed shape due to reconnection between neighbouring flux regions. Also the three-dimensional separatrix and separator structure and the way the magnetic field lines reconnect in three dimensions is deduced.

  20. COMMISSIONING OF A HIGH-BRIGHTNESS PHOTOINJECTOR FOR COMPTON SCATTERING X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Messerly, M; Shverdin, M; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J; Badakov, H; Frigola, P; Fukasawa, A; OShea, B; Rosenzweig, J B

    2007-06-21

    Compton scattering of intense laser pulses with ultrarelativistic electron beams has proven to be an attractive source of high-brightness x-rays with keV to MeV energies. This type of x-ray source requires the electron beam brightness to be comparable with that used in x-ray free-electron lasers and laser and plasma based advanced accelerators. We describe the development and commissioning of a 1.6 cell RF photoinjector for use in Compton scattering experiments at LLNL. Injector development issues such as RF cavity design, beam dynamics simulations, emittance diagnostic development, results of sputtered magnesium photo-cathode experiments, and UV laser pulse shaping are discussed. Initial operation of the photoinjector is described.

  1. Flares from Galactic Centre pulsars: a new class of X-ray transients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2016-06-01

    Despite intensive searches, the only pulsar within 0.1 pc of the central black hole in our Galaxy, Sgr A*, is a radio-loud magnetar. Since magnetars are rare among the Galactic neutron star population, and a large number of massive stars are already known in this region, the Galactic Centre (GC) should harbour a large number of neutron stars. Population syntheses suggest several thousand neutron stars may be present in the GC. Many of these could be highly energetic millisecond pulsars which are also proposed to be responsible for the GC gamma-ray excess. We propose that the presence of a neutron star within 0.03 pc from Sgr A* can be revealed by the shock interactions with the disc around the central black hole. As we demonstrate, these interactions result in observable transient non-thermal X-ray and gamma-ray emission over time-scales of months, provided that the spin-down luminosity of the neutron star is Lsd ˜ 1035 erg s-1. Current limits on the population of normal and millisecond pulsars in the GC region suggest that a number of such pulsars are present with such luminosities.

  2. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  3. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  4. Application of a physical continuum model to recent X-ray observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana Monica; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Wood, Kent S.; Wilms, Joern; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Gottlieb, Amy; Fuerst, Felix; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Ballhausen, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a uniform spectral analysis in the 0.5-50 keV energy range of a sample of accreting pulsars by applying an empirical broad-band continuum cut-off power-law model. We also apply the newly implemented physical continuum model developed by Becker and Wolff (2007, ApJ 654, 435) to a number of high-luminosity sources. The X-ray spectral formation process in this model consists of the Comptonization of bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and black body photons emitted by the hot, magnetically channeled, accreting plasma near the neutron star surface. This model describes the spectral formation in high-luminosity accreting pulsars, where the dominant deceleration mechanism is via a radiation-dominated radiative shock. The resulting spectra depend on five physical parameters: the mass accretion rate, the radius of the accretion column, the electron temperature and electron scattering cross-sections inside the column, and the magnetic field strength. The empirical model is fitted to Suzaku data of a sample of high-mass X-ray binaries covering a broad luminosity range (0.3-5 x 10 37 erg/s). The physical model is fitted to Suzaku data from luminous sources: LMC X-4, Cen X-3, GX 304-1. We compare the results of the two types of modeling and summarize how they can provide new insight into the process of accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.

  5. Exploring the Time Evolution of Luminosity and Pulse Profile in X-Ray Pulsars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Cappallo, Rigel; Ho, Wynn; Coe, Malcolm; Corbet, Robin; Klus, Helen; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Galache, Jose Luis; Fingerman, Samuel; Yang, Jun; Norton, Scott

    2015-01-01

    We report progress in our effort to analyze and model the large collection of observations made by RXTE, XMM-Newton and Chandra of X-ray Binary Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds. There are >2000 individual RXTE PCA, and > 200 XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Magellanic clouds. Each observation covers a large fraction of the whole SMC (or LMC) population, and we are able to deconvolve the often simultaneous signals to create a 20 year record of individual pulsar's activity. Together, these datasets cover the entire range of variability timescales and accretion regimes in High Mass X-ray Binaries. We are compiling a library of energy-resolved pulse profiles covering the entire luminosity and spin-period parameter space. In parallel we are developing a suite of computational models to parameterize the pulse profile morphology. We begin with a pair of isotropically emitting poles with general relativity, and then add complexity in the form of fan and pencil beam components. The initial goal is to discover the ratio of the beam components as a function of accretion rate and luminosity, and ultimately the distribution of offsets between magnetic and spin axes. These products are needed for the next generation of advances in neutron star theory and modeling. This unique dataset enables us to determine the upper and lower limits of accretion powered luminosity in a large statistically complete sample of neutron stars, and hence make several direct tests of fundamental NS parameters and accretion physics.

  6. Bright betatron X-ray radiation from a laser-driven-clustering gas target

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L. M.; Yan, W. C.; Li, D. Z.; Hu, Z. D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, W. M.; Hafz, N.; Mao, J. Y.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Lu, X.; Sheng, Z. M.; Wei, Z. Y.; Gao, J.; Zhang, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray sources from femtosecond (fs) laser-produced plasmas, including the betatron X-rays from laser wakefield-accelerated electrons, have compact sizes, fs pulse duration and fs pump-probe capability, making it promising for wide use in material and biological sciences. Currently the main problem with such betatron X-ray sources is the limited average flux even with ultra-intense laser pulses. Here, we report ultra-bright betatron X-rays can be generated using a clustering gas jet target irradiated with a small size laser, where a ten-fold enhancement of the X-ray yield is achieved compared to the results obtained using a gas target. We suggest the increased X-ray photon is due to the existence of clusters in the gas, which results in increased total electron charge trapped for acceleration and larger wiggling amplitudes during the acceleration. This observation opens a route to produce high betatron average flux using small but high repetition rate laser facilities for applications. PMID:23715033

  7. Bright betatron X-ray radiation from a laser-driven-clustering gas target.

    PubMed

    Chen, L M; Yan, W C; Li, D Z; Hu, Z D; Zhang, L; Wang, W M; Hafz, N; Mao, J Y; Huang, K; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Ma, J L; Li, Y T; Lu, X; Sheng, Z M; Wei, Z Y; Gao, J; Zhang, J

    2013-01-01

    Hard X-ray sources from femtosecond (fs) laser-produced plasmas, including the betatron X-rays from laser wakefield-accelerated electrons, have compact sizes, fs pulse duration and fs pump-probe capability, making it promising for wide use in material and biological sciences. Currently the main problem with such betatron X-ray sources is the limited average flux even with ultra-intense laser pulses. Here, we report ultra-bright betatron X-rays can be generated using a clustering gas jet target irradiated with a small size laser, where a ten-fold enhancement of the X-ray yield is achieved compared to the results obtained using a gas target. We suggest the increased X-ray photon is due to the existence of clusters in the gas, which results in increased total electron charge trapped for acceleration and larger wiggling amplitudes during the acceleration. This observation opens a route to produce high betatron average flux using small but high repetition rate laser facilities for applications. PMID:23715033

  8. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tong-Pu Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Luo, Wen; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-09-15

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1 keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  9. What dominates the X-ray emission of Andromeda at E>20 keV? New constraints from NuSTAR and Swift on a very bright, hard X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Antoniou, Vallia; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Patricia T.; Kennea, Jamie; Page, Kim L.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to its better sensitivity and spatial resolution, NuSTAR allows us to investigate the E>10 keV properties of nearby galaxies. We now know that starburst galaxies, containing very young stellar populations, have X-ray spectra which drop quickly above 10 keV. We extend our investigation of hard X-ray properties to an older stellar population system, the bulge of M31. The NuSTAR and Swift simultaneous observations reveal a bright hard source dominating the M31 bulge above 20 keV, which is likely to be a counterpart of Swift J0042.6+4112 previously detected (but not classified) in the Swift BAT All-sky Hard X-ray Survey. This source had been classified as an XRB candidate in various Chandra and XMM-Newton studies; however, since it was not clear that it is the counterpart to the strong Swift J0042.6+4112 source at higher energies, the previous E < 10 keV observations did not generate much attention. The NuSTAR and Swift spectra of this source drop quickly at harder energies as observed in sources in starburst galaxies. The X-ray spectral properties of this source are very similar to those of an accreting pulsar; yet, we do not find a pulsation in the NuSTAR data. The existing deep HST images indicate no high mass donors at the location of this source, further suggesting that this source has an intermediate or low mass companion. The most likely scenario for the nature of this source is an X-ray pulsar with an intermediate/low mass companion similar to the Galactic Her X-1 system. We will also discuss other possibilities in more detail.

  10. An Investigation of Luminous X-Ray Pulsars: Exploring Accretion Onto the Magnetized Neutron Star LMC X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumback, McKinley

    2016-04-01

    X-ray pulsars are neutron stars in which magnetic forces dominate accretion within the magnetosphere. These systems offer unique laboratories to study magnetic accretion and the behavior of matter under extreme densities, magnetic fields, and gravitational forces. Using joint observations with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, we observe the complete precession of the warped accretion disk around the X-ray pulsar LMC X-4, and measure the relative phase between the pulsar beam and the softer X-ray photons reprocessed by the disk. This allows us to perform tomography to explore the inner magnetized accretion flow. Additionally, we investigate the unusual flaring events observed from LMC X-4 during October and November of 2015.

  11. PLEIADES: High Peak Brightness, Subpicosecond Thomson Hard-X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuba, J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Harteman, F V; Le Sage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-12-15

    The Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) facility, is a unique, novel, tunable (10-200 keV), ultrafast (ps-fs), hard x-ray source that greatly extends the parameter range reached by existing 3rd generation sources, both in terms of x-ray energy range, pulse duration, and peak brightness at high energies. First light was observed at 70 keV early in 2003, and the experimental data agrees with 3D codes developed at LLNL. The x-rays are generated by the interaction of a 50 fs Fourier-transform-limited laser pulse produced by the TW-class FALCON CPA laser and a highly focused, relativistic (20-100 MeV), high brightness (1 nC, 0.3-5 ps, 5 mm.mrad, 0.2% energy spread) photo-electron bunch. The resulting x-ray brightness is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} ph/mm{sup 2}/s/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW. The beam is well-collimated (10 mrad divergence over the full spectrum, 1 mrad for a single color), and the source is a unique tool for time-resolved dynamic measurements in matter, including high-Z materials.

  12. Long-term evolution of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, O.; Ertan, Ü.

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the long-term evolution of individual anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) with relatively well constrained X-ray luminosity and rotational properties. In the frame of the fallback disc model, we have obtained the ranges of disc mass and dipole field strength that can produce the observed source properties. We have compared our results with those obtained earlier for dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs). Our results show that (1) the X-ray luminosity, period and period derivative of the individual AXP/SGR sources can be produced self-consistently in the fallback disc model with very similar basic disc parameters to those used earlier in the same model to explain the long-term evolution of XDINs, (2) except two sources, AXP/SGRs are evolving in the accretion phase; these two exceptional sources, like XDINs, completed their accretion phase in the past and are now evolving in the final propeller phase and still slowing down with the disc torques, (3) the dipole field strengths (at the poles) of XDINs are in the 1011-1012 G range, while AXP/SGRs have relatively strong dipole fields between 1 and 6 × 1012 G, and (4) the source properties can be obtained with large ranges of disc masses which do not allow a clear test of correlation between disc masses and the magnetic dipole fields for the whole AXP/SGRs and XDIN population.

  13. Testing Models of Resonant Compton Scattering in X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, Jerome J.

    2000-01-01

    Over the performance period covered by the grant, the principal investigator modified a Monte Carlo Compton scattering code to model the propagation of x-rays through the magnetosphere of accreting neutron stars. These modifications were made to enable the author to compare the observations of x-ray pulsars to theoretical models of the system. The original code was designed to study relativistic plasmas with one of two geometries: a plane parallel plasma with a differential relativistic bulk velocity, and a static spherically symmetric plasma.- This code did not treat gravitational bending or bulk motion in the magnetosphere of a neutron star. Under the grant, the author incorporated code to trace light paths in a Schwarzschild metric. The code was modified to keep track of the photon polarization during propagati on. The investigator also modified the code so that bulk motion in an axisymmetric system is treated properly. An approximate treatment for resonant Compton scattering was added to the code. Finally, code was added that creates model observables that can be compared to observations, such as projected x-ray emission maps and energy-dependent light curves. Comparison to observations is now commencing.

  14. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY PULSATION FROM THE GEMINGA-LIKE PULSAR PSR J2021+4026

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L. C. C.; Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A.; Hu, C. P.; Chou, Y.; Wu, J. H. K.; Huang, R. H. H.; Trepl, L.; Takata, J.; Wang, Y.; Cheng, K. S.

    2013-06-10

    We report the discovery of an X-ray periodicity of {approx}265.3 ms from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-quiet {gamma}-ray pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, located at the edge of the supernova remnant G78.2+2.1 ({gamma}-Cygni). The detected frequency is consistent with the {gamma}-ray pulsation determined by the observation of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope at the same epoch. The X-ray pulse profile resembles the modulation of a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. The phase-averaged spectral analysis also suggests that the majority of the observed X-rays have thermal origins. This is the third member in the class of radio-quiet pulsars with significant pulsations detected from both X-ray and {gamma}-ray regimes.

  15. EXTENDED HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE VELA PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Mattana, F.; Terrier, R.; Zurita Heras, J. A.; Goetz, D.; Caballero, I.; Soldi, S.; Schanne, S.; Ponti, G.; Falanga, M.; Renaud, M.

    2011-12-10

    The nebula powered by the Vela pulsar is one of the best examples of an evolved pulsar wind nebula, allowing access to the particle injection history and the interaction with the supernova ejecta. We report on the INTEGRAL discovery of extended emission above 18 keV from the Vela nebula. The northern side has no known counterparts and it appears larger and more significant than the southern one, which is in turn partially coincident with the cocoon, the soft X-ray, and TeV filament toward the center of the remnant. We also present the spectrum of the Vela nebula in the 18-400 keV energy range as measured by IBIS/ISGRI and SPI on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The apparent discrepancy between IBIS/ISGRI, SPI, and previous measurements is understood in terms of the point-spread function, supporting the hypothesis of a nebula more diffuse than previously thought. A break at {approx}25 keV is found in the spectrum within 6' from the pulsar after including the Suzaku XIS data. Interpreted as a cooling break, this points out that the inner nebula is composed of electrons injected in the last {approx}2000 years. Broadband modeling also implies a magnetic field higher than 10 {mu}G in this region. Finally, we discuss the nature of the northern emission, which might be due to fresh particles injected after the passage of the reverse shock.

  16. X-Ray Observations of Parsec-scale Tails behind Two Middle-Aged Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, O.; Misanovic, Z.; Pavlov, G. G.; Wong, J. A.; Garmire, G. P.

    2008-09-01

    Chandra and XMM-Newton resolved extremely long tails behind two middle-aged pulsars, J1509-5850 and J1740+1000. The tail of PSR J1509-5850 is discernible up to 5.6' from the pulsar, which corresponds to the projected length l⊥ = 6.5d4 pc, where d = 4d4 kpc is the distance to the pulsar. The observed tail flux is 2 × 10-13 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-8 keV band. The tail spectrum fits an absorbed power law (PL) with the photon index Γ = 2.3 +/- 0.2 and 0.5-8 keV luminosity of 1 × 1033d42 ergs s-1, for nH = 2.1 × 1022 cm-2. The tail of PSR J1740+1000 is firmly detected up to 5' (l⊥ ~ 2d1.4 pc), with a flux of 6 × 10-14 ergs cm-2 s-1 in the 0.4-10 keV band. The PL fit yields Γ = 1.4-1.5, nH ≈ 1 × 1021 cm-2, and an 0.4-10 keV luminosity of ~2 × 1031d1.42 ergs s-1. The large extent of the tails suggests that the bulk flow in the tails starts as mildly relativistic downstream of the termination shock and then gradually decelerates. Within the observed extent of the J1509-5850 tail, the average flow speed exceeds 5000 km s-1, and the equipartition magnetic field is a few × 10-5 G. For the J1740+1000 tail, the equipartition field is a factor of a few lower. For the high-latitude PSR J1740+1000, the orientation of the tail suggests that the pulsar was born from a halo-star progenitor. The X-ray efficiencies of the ram pressure-confined pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) correlate poorly with the pulsar spin-down luminosities or ages. The efficiencies are systematically higher than those of PWNe around slowly moving pulsars with similar spin-down parameters.

  17. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE BURSTING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR IGR J17511-3057

    SciTech Connect

    Paizis, A.; Nowak, M. A.; Rodriguez, J.; Chaty, S.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P. E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu

    2012-08-10

    IGR J17511-3057 is a low-mass X-ray binary hosting a neutron star and is one of the few accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars with X-ray bursts. We report on a 20 ks Chandra grating observation of IGR J17511-3057, performed on 2009 September 22. We determine the most accurate X-ray position of IGR J17511-3057, {alpha}{sub J2000} = 17{sup h}51{sup m}08.{sup s}66, {delta}{sub J2000} = -30 Degree-Sign 57'41.''0 (90% uncertainty of 0.''6). During the observation, a {approx}54 s long type-I X-ray burst is detected. The persistent (non-burst) emission has an absorbed 0.5-8 keV luminosity of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} (at 6.9 kpc) and can be well described by a thermal Comptonization model of soft, {approx}0.6 keV, seed photons upscattered by a hot corona. The type-I X-ray burst spectrum, with average luminosity over the 54 s duration L{sub 0.5-8{sub keV}} = 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, can be well described by a blackbody with kT{sub bb} {approx} 1.6 keV and R{sub bb} {approx} 5 km. While an evolution in temperature of the blackbody can be appreciated throughout the burst (average peak kT{sub bb} = 2.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.4} keV to tail kT{sub bb} = 1.3{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} keV), the relative emitting surface shows no evolution. The overall persistent and type-I burst properties observed during the Chandra observation are consistent with what was previously reported during the 2009 outburst of IGR J17511-3057.

  18. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  19. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10−18 s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum. PMID:24850866

  20. Discovery of a 105-ms X-ray Pulsar in Kesteven-79: On the Nature of Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Seward, F. D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of 105-ms X-ray pulsations from the compact central object (CCO) in the supernova remnant \\snr\\ using data acquired with the {\\it Newton X-Ray Multi-Mirror Mission). Using two observations of the pulsar taken 6-days apart we derive an upper limit on its spin-down rate of $\\dot P < 9 \\times 10"{-14}$-s-${-l)$,a nd find no evidence for binary orbital motion. The implied energy loss rate is $\\dot E < 3 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-s$A{-1)$, polar magnetic field strength is $B-{\\rm p) < 3 \\times 10A{12)$-G, and spin-down age is $\\tau > 18.5$-kyr. The latter exceeds the remnant's estimated age, suggesting that the pulsar was born spinning near its current period. The X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ is best characterized as a blackbody of temperature $kT {BB) =, 0.43\\pm0.02$ keV, radius $R-{BB) \\approx 1.3$-km, and $I{\\rm bol) = 5.2 \\times 10A{33)$ ergs-sSA{-1)$ at $d = 7.1$-kpc. The sinusoidal light curve is modulated with a pulsed fraction of $>45\\%$, suggestive of a small hot spot on the surface of the rotating neutron star. The lack of a discernible pulsar wind nebula is consistent with an interpretation of \\psr\\ as a rotation-powered pulsar whose spin-down luminosity falls below the empirical threshold for generating bright wind nebulae, $\\dot E-{\\rm c) = 4 \\times 10A{36)$-ergs-sSA{-I)$. The age discrepancy suggests that its $\\dot E$ has always been below $\\dot E c$, perhaps a distinguishing property of the CCOs. Alternatively, the X-ray spectrum of \\psr\\ suggests a low-luminosity AXP, but the weak inferred $B-{\\rm p)$ field is incompatible with a magnetar theory of its X-ray luminosity. The ordinary spin parameters discovered from \\psr\\ highlight the inability of existing theories to explain the high luminosities and temperatures of CCO thermal X-ray spectra.

  1. HOW TO LIGHT IT UP: SIMULATING RAM-PRESSURE STRIPPED X-RAY BRIGHT TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Bryan, Greg L.; Chen, Rena

    2011-04-20

    Some tails of ram-pressure stripped galaxies are detected in H I, some in H{alpha}, and some in X-ray (but never in all three so far). We use numerical simulations to probe the conditions for the production of X-ray bright tails, demonstrating that the primary requirement is a high-pressure intracluster medium (ICM). This is because the stripped tail is mostly in pressure equilibrium with the ICM, but mixing leaves it with densities and temperatures intermediate between the cold gas in the disk and the hot ICM. Given a high enough ICM pressure, this mixed gas lies in the X-ray bright region of the phase diagram. We compare the simulations to observations of the ram-pressure stripped tail of ESO 137-001, showing excellent agreement in the total measured X-ray and H{alpha} emission and non-flaring morphology of the tail, and consistent H I measurements. Using these comparisons, we constrain the level of mixing and efficiency of heat conduction in the ICM.

  2. Suzaku view of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-04-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ˜275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During the 2010 observation, the prominent dips seen in soft X-ray (≤10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during the 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex as a result of the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies (>35 keV). A phase shift of ˜0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of the main dip in the pulse profiles below and above ˜35 keV. The broad-band energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed negative and positive power law with exponential cut-off (NPEX) model with 6.4-keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. The energy of the cyclotron absorption line was found to be ˜53 and 50 keV for the 2010 and 2012 observations, respectively, indicating a marginal positive dependence on source luminosity. Based on the results obtained from phase-resolved spectroscopy, the absorption dips in the pulse profiles can be interpreted as due to the presence of additional matter at same phases. Observed positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity, and the significant pulse-phase variation of cyclotron parameters are discussed from the perspective of theoretical models on the cyclotron absorption line in X-ray pulsars.

  3. THE QUIESCENT X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR AND ECLIPSING BINARY SWIFT J1749.4-2807

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2012-09-10

    Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a {approx_equal} 105 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed when Swift J1749.4-2807 was in quiescence. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of {approx_equal}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33}(D/6.7 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The X-ray light curve displays three eclipses that are consistent in orbital phase and duration with the ephemeris derived during outburst. Unlike most quiescent neutron stars, the X-ray spectrum can be adequately described with a simple power law, while a pure-hydrogen atmosphere model does not fit the data. We place an upper limit on the 0.01-100 keV thermal luminosity of the cooling neutron star of {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} and constrain its temperature to be {approx}< 0.1 keV (for an observer at infinity). Timing analysis does not reveal evidence for X-ray pulsations near the known spin frequency of the neutron star or its first overtone with a fractional rms of {approx}< 34% and {approx}< 28%, respectively. We discuss the implications of our findings for dynamical mass measurements, the thermal state of the neutron star, and the origin of the quiescent X-ray emission.

  4. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-ray Emission. 2; Inverse Compton Radiation Pair Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the production of electron-positron pairs by inverse Compton scattered (ICS) photons above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and calculate surface heating by returning positrons. This paper is a continuation of our self-consistent treatment of acceleration, pair dynamics, and electric field screening above pulsar PCs. We calculate the altitude of the inverse Compton pair-formation fronts, the flux of returning positrons, and present the heating efficiencies and X-ray luminosities. We revise pulsar death lines implying cessation of pair formation, and present them in surface magnetic field-period space. We find that virtually all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs by resonant and nonresonant ICS photons radiated by particles accelerated above the PC in a pure star-centered dipole field, so that our ICS pair death line coincides with empirical radio pulsar death. Our calculations show that ICS pairs are able to screen the accelerating electric field only for high PC surface temperatures and magnetic fields. We argue that such screening at ICS pair fronts occurs locally, slowing but not turning off acceleration of particles until screening can occur at a curvature radiation (CR) pair front at higher altitude. In the case where no screening occurs above the PC surface, we anticipate that the pulsar gamma-ray luminosity will be a substantial fraction of its spin-down luminosity. The X-ray luminosity resulting from PC heating by ICS pair fronts is significantly lower than the PC heating luminosity from CR pair fronts, which dominates for most pulsars. PC heating from ICS pair fronts is highest in millisecond pulsars, which cannot produce CR pairs, and may account for observed thermal X-ray components in the spectra of these old pulsars.

  5. INTEGRAL detects a new outburst from the millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Kuulkers, E.; Bazzano, A.; Beckmann, V.; Bird, T.; Bodaghee, A.; Chenevez, J.; Del Santo, M.; Domingo, A.; Jonker, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Markwardt, C.; Paizis, A.; Pottschmidt, K.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Wijnands, R.; Ferrigno, C.; Tuerler, M.

    2015-03-01

    During the observations performed in the direction of the Galactic Bulge on 2015 March 23 from 02:49 to 07:26 (UTC), the instruments on-board INTEGRAL detected a new outburst from the millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057 (ATel #2196, #2197; Papitto et al., 2010, MNRAS, 407, 2575).

  6. Can the Subsonic Accretion Model Explain the Spin Period Distribution of Wind-fed X-Ray Pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-01

    Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) generally accrete from the wind matter of their massive companion stars. Recently, Shakura et al. suggested a subsonic accretion model for low-luminosity (<4 × 1036 erg s‑1), wind-fed X-ray pulsars. To test the feasibility of this model, we investigate the spin period distribution of wind-fed X-ray pulsars with a supergiant companion star, using a population synthesis method. We find that the modeled distribution of supergiant HMXBs in the spin period–orbital period diagram is consistent with observations, provided that the winds from the donor stars have relatively low terminal velocities (≲1000 km s‑1). The measured wind velocities in several supergiant HMXBs seem to favor this viewpoint. The predicted number ratio of wind-fed X-ray pulsars with persistent X-ray luminosities that are higher and lower than 4 × 1036 erg s‑1 is about 1:10.

  7. Disentangling X-Ray Emission Processes In Vela-Like Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaensler, Bryan; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant is to support analysis of data from the X-ray Multi-mirror Mission (XMM). Specifically, we have been awarded time to observe two young neutron stars, B1823-13 and B1046-58, whose X-ray emission is expected to be a complicated combination of emission from an associated supernova remnant, from a wind-powered synchrotron nebula, from magnetospheric pulsations, and from the surface of the neutron star itself. It is only with XMM's unique combination of spectral, temporal and angular resolution that all these different processes can be separated and studied. Observations of B1823-13 have been conducted and analyzed. We interpret the data as follows: The unpulsed extended non-thermal nature of the central core argues that the extended source of emission corresponds to synchrotron emission from a nebula powered by the pulsar. The temperature of the diffuse component is too high to be interpreted as thermal emission; we rather argue that this extended component is non-thermal emission from a surrounding supernova remnant shell.

  8. The Geminga Pulsar: Soft X-Ray Variability and an EUVE Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We observed the Geminga pulsar with the EUVE satellite, detecting pulsed emission in the Deep Survey imager. Joint spectral fits of the EUVE flux with ROSAT PSPC data are consistent with thermal plus power-law models in which the thermal component makes the dominant contribution to the soft X-ray flux seen by EUVE and ROSAT. The data are consistent with blackbody emission of T = (4 - 6) x 10(exp 5) K over most of the surface of the star at the measured parallax distance of 160 pc. Although model atmospheres are more realistic, and can fit the data with effective temperatures a factor of 2 lower, current data would not discriminate between these and blackbody models. We also find evidence for variability of Geminga's soft X-ray pulse shape. Narrow dips in the light curve that were present in 1991 had largely disappeared in 1993/1994, causing the pulsed fraction to decline from 32% to 18%. If the dips are attributed to cyclotron resonance scattering by an e1 plasma on closed magnetic field lines, then the process that resupplies that plasma must be variable.

  9. The Geminga Pulsar: Soft X-Ray Variability and an EUVE Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.

    1996-01-01

    We observed the Geminga pulsar with the EUVE satellite, detecting pulsed emission in the Deep Survey imager. Joint spectral fits of the EUVE flux with ROSAT PSPC data are consistent with thermal plus power-law models in which the thermal component makes the dominant contribution to the soft X-ray flux seen by EUVE and ROSAT. The data are consistent with blackbody emission of T = (4-6) x 10(exp 5) K over most of the surface of the star at the measured parallax distance of 160 pc. Although model atmospheres are more realistic, and can fit the data with effective temperatures a factor of 2 lower, current data would not discriminate between these and blackbody models. We also find evidence for variability of Geminga's soft X-ray pulse shape. Narrow dips in the light curve that were present in 1991 had largely disappeared in 1993/1994, causing the pulsed fraction to decline from 32% to 18%. If the dips are attributed to cyclotron resonance scattering by an e(+/-) plasma on closed magnetic field lines, then the process that resupplies that plasma must be variable.

  10. The Chandra Deep Field North Survey. XV. Optically Bright, X-Ray-Faint Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Bauer, F. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Bautz, M. W.; Conselice, C.; Garmire, G. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Wilson, G.

    2003-08-01

    We have analyzed optically bright, X-ray-faint [OBXF; i.e., log(fX/fR)<~-2] sources identified in an 178.9 arcmin2 area having high exposure (greater than 1500 ks) within the Chandra Deep Field North 2 Ms survey. We find 43 OBXF sources in this area, making up ~15% of the X-ray sources above a 0.5-2 keV flux of ~2.3×10-17 ergs cm-2 s-1. We present spectroscopic identifications for 42 of the OBXF sources and optical spectra for 25, including five previously unpublished redshifts. Deep optical imaging data (either Hubble Space Telescope [HST] or ground-based) are presented for all the OBXF sources; we measure the optical morphologies of the 20 galaxies having HST imaging data. The OBXF population consists mainly of normal and starburst galaxies detected out to cosmologically significant distances (i.e., to a median redshift of z=0.297 and a full redshift range z=0.06-0.845). This is notable since these distances equate to look-back times of up to ~8 Gyr; we are thus provided with a window on the X-ray emission from galaxies at redshifts much closer to the cosmic star formation peak than was possible prior to the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The X-ray luminosity distribution of OBXF sources extends to higher luminosity than does that of ``normal'' galaxies, indicating that a significant fraction are likely dominated by low-luminosity active galactic nuclei or vigorous star formation. The lowest redshift galaxies (z~0.06-0.2) have very low X-ray-to-optical flux ratios [i.e., log(fX/fR)<~-3], which are consistent with those of normal galaxies in the local universe. By combining the detected X-ray counts, we find the average OBXF X-ray spectrum to be consistent with a Γ~2.0 power law. The 0.5-2 keV logN-logS for the OBXF galaxies is much steeper (α~-1.7) than for the general X-ray source population. Indeed, the number of OBXF sources has doubled between the 1 and 2 Ms surveys, rising sharply in numbers at faint fluxes. The extragalactic OBXF sources are found to

  11. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  12. Probing the depths: Relativistic, hydrodynamic simulations and X-ray observations of pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Joseph P.

    2008-06-01

    I have undertaken a joint computational and observational study of the interaction of a light, relativistic pulsar wind with a dense, ambient medium. Such a scenario has been suggested as the origin of asymmetric pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). I present an analysis of Chandra X-ray Observatory data on the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 11-6 2 . I show that the central region's spectrum above 2 keV is dominated by non-thermal emission consistent with that from a PWN. The spatial and spectral analyses strongly suggest that the nebula harbors a compact object with an inferred spin-down energy sufficient to rotationally power the nebula. Nebular asymmetry strongly suggests that the nebula has been crushed by the SNR reverse shock and the nebula and SNR are consistent with being in pressure equilibrium. Thus, this observation provides evidence that, in this case, the density distribution of the interstellar medium has had a dynamical effect on the morphology of the SNR/PWN system. Another scenario wherein the ambient medium influences PWNe morphology arises when the pulsar's space velocity is supersonic. In order to study such a system I have applied an existing adaptive-mesh, axisymmetric, relativistic hydrodynamic code to the simulation of the interaction of a relativistic pulsar wind with the ambient flow setup by the space motion of the pulsar. I discuss simulations showing that this interaction can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow. Further, I present the first results from an extension of the model to study the shock acceleration, and subsequent synchrotron cooling, of particles advected by the flow. The new module may be used to compute models of

  13. Guitar with a bow: a jet-like X-ray-emitting feature associated a fast-moving pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The Guitar Nebula is known to be a ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula associated with the very fast-moving pulsar B2224+65. Existing observations at two epochs have shown an unexpected 2 arcmin long X-ray-emitting jet-like feature emanating from the pulsar and offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. We propose a deep third epoch observation of this system in order to measure the X-ray spectral gradient across the feature as well as to confirm its proper motion, its morphological variation with time, and the presence of a counter jet. We will then critically test scenarios proposed to explain this system, which represents a class of similarly enigmatic objects recently discovered locally and in the central region of our Galaxy.

  14. X-Ray Emission from J1446--4701, J1311--3430, and Other Black Widow Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, George G.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of detailed X-ray analysis of two black-widow pulsars (BWPs), J1446-4701 and J1311-3430. PSR J1446-4701 is a BWP with orbital parameters near the median values of the sample of known BWPs. Its X-ray emission that was detected by XMM-Newton is well characterized by a soft power-law (PL) spectrum (photon index Γ ≈ 3), and it shows no significant orbital modulations. In view of a lack of radio eclipses and an optical non-detection, the system most likely has a low orbital inclination. PSR J1311-3430 is an extreme BWP with a very compact orbit and the lowest minimum mass companion. Our Chandra data confirm the hard Γ ≈ 1.3 emission seen in previous observations. Through phase-restricted spectral analysis, we found a hint (˜2.6σ) of spectral hardening around pulsar inferior conjunction. We also provide a uniform analysis of the 12 BWPs observed with Chandra and compare their X-ray properties. Pulsars with soft, Γ > 2.5 emission seem to have lower than average X-ray and γ-ray luminosities. We do not, however, see any other prominent correlation between the pulsar’s X-ray emission characteristics and any of its other properties. The contribution of the intra-binary shock to the total X-ray emission, if any, is not discernible in this sample of pulsars with shallow observations.

  15. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    The successful operation of the x-ray free electron lasers at LCLS and SACLA are a boon for science. The increase in brightness of 10 orders of magnitude over synchrotron sources as well as the sub-picosecond time profile of the x-rays are opening new avenues of research in fields ranging from biology to solid state physics. However, synchrotrons and free electron lasers that produce x-rays are expensive, with price tags that measured hundreds of millions. Further, the standard unit of measure for the scale of these sources is kilometers. The sheer size and prohibitive cost of these devices means that such sources are out of the reach of universities and smaller laboratories. The focus of this dissertation is in increasing access to x-ray sources by making them both smaller and, perhaps more importantly, cheaper. Current limitations to source size reduction are discussed which leads to the conclusion that smaller x-rays sources require short period undulators. In this context, two approaches to increasing access to x-rays are covered. The first is direct decrease in the period length of undulators through more advanced design and materials. This path begins with a discussion of the design and construction of a 9 mm period prototype. An analysis of the benefits of such a device, in reduced undulator and accelerator lengths at existing free electron lasers, is explored. And finally, the operation of the undulator in a realistic scenario is experimentally explored in a scaled experiment at optical frequencies. The second method for decreasing the period length of the light source is to replace the undulator with a laser, making an inverse Compton scattering source. The relationship between undulator radiation and the inverse Compton scattering process is examined, as well as the characteristics of the source itself. Lastly, as a demonstration of the function of the inverse Compton scattering source at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a diagnostic tool rather than an

  16. INTEGRAL study of temporal properties of bright flares in Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.; Postnov, K.

    2016-04-01

    We have characterized the typical temporal behaviour of the bright X-ray flares detected from the three Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) showing the most extreme transient behaviour (XTE J1739-302, IGR J17544-2619, SAX J1818.6-1703). We focus here on the cumulative distributions of the waiting-time (time interval between two consecutive X-ray flares), and the duration of the hard X-ray activity (duration of the brightest phase of an SFXT outburst), as observed by INTEGRAL/IBIS in the energy band 17-50 keV. Adopting the cumulative distribution of waiting-times, it is possible to identify the typical time-scale that clearly separates different outbursts, each composed by several single flares at ˜ks time-scale. This allowed us to measure the duration of the brightest phase of the outbursts from these three targets, finding that they show heavy-tailed cumulative distributions. We observe a correlation between the total energy emitted during SFXT outbursts and the time interval covered by the outbursts (defined as the elapsed time between the first and the last flare belonging to the same outburst as observed by INTEGRAL). We show that temporal properties of flares and outbursts of the sources, which share common properties regardless different orbital parameters, can be interpreted in the model of magnetized stellar winds with fractal structure from the OB-supergiant stars.

  17. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  18. Temperature variability in X-ray bright points observed with Hinode/XRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyappa, R.; Deluca, E. E.; Saar, S. H.; Golub, L.; Damé, L.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Varghese, B. A.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We investigate the variability in temperature as a function of time among a sample of coronal X-ray bright points (XBPs). Methods: We analysed a 7-h (17:00-24:00 UT) long time sequence of soft X-ray images observed almost simultaneously in two filters (Ti_poly and Al_mesh) on April 14, 2007 with X-ray telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode mission. We identified and selected 14 XBPs for a detailed analysis. The light curves of XBPs were derived using the SolarSoft library in IDL. The temperature of XBPs was determined using the calibrated temperature response curves of the two filters by means of the intensity ratio method. Results: We find that the XBPs show a high variability in their temperature and that the average temperature ranges from 1.1 MK to 3.4 MK. The variations in temperature are often correlated with changes in average X-ray emission. It is evident from the results of time series that the XBP heating rate can be highly variable on short timescales, suggesting that it has a reconnection origin.

  19. X-ray Observations of the Bright Old Nova V603 Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, K.; Orio, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our Chandra and RXTE observations of the bright old nova, V603 Aql, performed in 2001 April, supplemented by our analysis of archival X-ray data on this object. We find that the RXTE data are contaminated by the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission. After accounting for this effect, we find a high level of aperiodic variability in the RXTE data, at a level consistent with the uncontaminated Chandra data. The Chandra HETG spectrum clearly originates in a multi-temperature plasma. We constrain the possible emission measure distribution of the plasma through a combination of global and local fits. The X-ray luminosity and the spectral shape of V603 Aql resemble those of SS Cyg in transition between quiescence and outburst. The fact that the X-ray flux variability is only weakly energy dependent can be interpreted by supposing that the variability is due to changes in the maximum temperature of the plasma. The plasma density is likely to be high, and the emission region is likely to be compact. Finally, the apparent overabundance of Ne is consistent with V603 Aql being a young system.

  20. Association of flaring X-ray bright points with type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Golub, L.

    1980-01-01

    Using the swept-frequency radio observations obtained at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory and the X-ray photographs taken by the S-054 experiment aboard Skylab, a search has been made for type III bursts associated with X-ray bright point (XBP) flares. Using temporal as well as spatial criteria for the association, four such events are found over a period of 43 days. The time period was selected in such a way that the level of flare and radio activity was low in order to minimize the chance coincidences. The detection of type III bursts from the flaring XBPs is of great interest, since it identifies them with the flare process, of which XBP flares are thought to be the simplest form.

  1. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Barletta, William A.; Jiang, Ximan; Ji, Lili

    2009-10-27

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  2. The correspondence between X-ray bright points and evolving magnetic features in the quiet sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Martin, S. F.; Moses, D.; Harvey, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a study of X-ray bright points (XBPs) and small-scale evolving magnetic structures are presented. X-ray images obtained during rocket flights, full-disk magnetograms, and time-lapse magnetograms of multiple fields make up the coordinated data set. XBPs were found to be more frequently associated with pre-existing magnetic features of opposite polarity which appeared to be cancelling than with new or emerging flux regions. Most of the XBPs appeared to correspond to opposite polarity magnetic features which were converging towards each other, and some of which had not yet begun cancelling. It is suggested that most XBPs are created when converging flow brings together oppositely directed field lines. This leads to reconnection and heating in the low corona of the newly-formed loops.

  3. Bright X-Ray Source from a Laser-Driven Microplasma Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Luu-Thanh, Phuc; Shen, Baifei

    2016-03-18

    Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities have become available. These pulses allow for interaction with microstructured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic prepulses. This opens a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with micro- and nanoscale photonic materials at relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that when coupled with a readily available 1.8 J laser, a microplasma waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls and form a dense helical bunch inside the channel. These electrons are efficiently accelerated and wiggled by the waveguide modes in the MPW, which results in a bright, well-collimated emission of hard x rays in the range of 1∼100  keV. PMID:27035304

  4. Bright X-Ray Source from a Laser-Driven Microplasma Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Luu-Thanh, Phuc; Shen, Baifei

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities have become available. These pulses allow for interaction with microstructured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic prepulses. This opens a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with micro- and nanoscale photonic materials at relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that when coupled with a readily available 1.8 J laser, a microplasma waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls and form a dense helical bunch inside the channel. These electrons are efficiently accelerated and wiggled by the waveguide modes in the MPW, which results in a bright, well-collimated emission of hard x rays in the range of 1 ˜100 keV .

  5. THE PROPER MOTION AND X-RAY ANALYSIS OF THE PULSAR WIND NEBULA, PSR J1741-2054 USING CHANDRA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick O.; Romani, Roger W.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.

    2014-08-01

    A pulsar dissipates its rotational energy by generating relativistic winds, which in turn produces a population of high energy electrons and positions that we observe as a synchrotron emitting nebula. If the pulsar has a high space velocity, the corresponding nebula will have a bow-shock morphology due to the pulsar wind being confined by ram pressure. Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) provide a good test bed to study the dynamics and interaction of relativistic outflows with their environment and the corresponding shocks that result from these interactions. They can also aid in understanding the evolution of the neutron star and the properties of the local medium with which they are interacting. Here we report on the X-ray analysis of PSR J1741-2054 carried out as a part of the Chandra XVP program (6 ACIS-S observations, totalling ~300 ks over 5 months). By registering this new epoch of observations using X-ray point sources in the field of view to an archival observation taken 3.2 years earlier, we are able to measure the proper motion of the pulsar with >3σ significance. We also investigate the spatial and spectral properties of the pulsar, its compact nebula and extended tail. We find that the compact nebula can be well described with an absorbed power-law with photon index of Γ=1.6+/-0.2, while the tail shows no evidence of variation in the spectral index with the distance from the pulsar. We have also investigated the X-ray spectrum of the neutron star. We find nonthermal emission accompanied by a significant thermal component and will provide constraints on the overall nature of the emission.

  6. NuSTAR DETECTION OF HARD X-RAY PHASE LAGS FROM THE ACCRETING PULSAR GS 0834–430

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Fürst, Felix; Bellm, Eric C.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chenevez, Jerome; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Wilms, Jörn; and others

    2013-09-20

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array hard X-ray telescope observed the transient Be/X-ray binary GS 0834–430 during its 2012 outburst—the first active state of this system observed in the past 19 yr. We performed timing and spectral analysis and measured the X-ray spectrum between 3-79 keV with high statistical significance. We find the phase-averaged spectrum to be consistent with that observed in many other magnetized, accreting pulsars. We fail to detect cyclotron resonance scattering features that would allow us to constrain the pulsar's magnetic field in either phase-averaged or phase-resolved spectra. Timing analysis shows a clearly detected pulse period of ∼12.29 s in all energy bands. The pulse profiles show a strong, energy-dependent hard phase lag of up to 0.3 cycles in phase, or about 4 s. Such dramatic energy-dependent lags in the pulse profile have never before been reported in high-mass X-ray binary pulsars. Previously reported lags have been significantly smaller in phase and restricted to low energies (E < 10 keV). We investigate the possible mechanisms that might produce this energy-dependent pulse phase shift. We find the most likely explanation for this effect is a complex beam geometry.

  7. Hinode observations and 3D magnetic structure of an X-ray bright point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Del Zanna, G.; Maclean, R. C.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present complete Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT)and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations of an X-ray bright point (XBP) observed on the 10, 11 of October 2007 over its entire lifetime (~12 h). We aim to show how the measured plasma parameters of the XBP change over time and also what kind of similarities the X-ray emission has to a potential magnetic field model. Methods: Information from all three instruments on-board Hinode was used to study its entire evolution. XRT data was used to investigate the structure of the bright point and to measure the X-ray emission. The EIS instrument was used to measure various plasma parameters over the entire lifetime of the XBP. Lastly, the SOT was used to measure the magnetic field strength and provide a basis for potential field extrapolations of the photospheric fields to be made. These were performed and then compared to the observed coronal features. Results: The XBP measured ~15´´ in size and was found to be formed directly above an area of merging and cancelling magnetic flux on the photosphere. A good correlation between the rate of X-ray emission and decrease in total magnetic flux was found. The magnetic fragments of the XBP were found to vary on very short timescales (minutes), however the global quasi-bipolar structure remained throughout the lifetime of the XBP. The potential field extrapolations were a good visual fit to the observed coronal loops in most cases, meaning that the magnetic field was not too far from a potential state. Electron density measurements were obtained using a line ratio of Fe XII and the average density was found to be 4.95 × 109 cm-3 with the volumetric plasma filling factor calculated to have an average value of 0.04. Emission measure loci plots were then used to infer a steady temperature of log Te [ K] ~ 6.1. The calculated Fe XII Doppler shifts show velocity changes in and around the bright point of ±15 km s-1 which are observed to change

  8. THE EFFECT OF STARBURST METALLICITY ON BRIGHT X-RAY BINARY FORMATION PATHWAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Prestwich, A.; Zezas, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the characteristics of young (<20 Myr) and bright (L{sub X} > 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and find the population to be strongly metallicity dependent. We separate the model populations among two distinct formation pathways: (1) systems undergoing active Roche lobe overflow (RLO) and (2) wind accretion systems with donors in the (super)giant stage, which we find to dominate the HMXB population. We find metallicity to primarily affect the number of systems which move through each formation pathway, rather than the observable parameters of systems which move through each individual pathway. We discuss the most important model parameters affecting the HMXB population at both low and high metallicities. Using these results, we show that (1) the population of ultra-luminous X-ray sources can be consistently described by very bright HMXBs which undergo stable RLO with mild super-Eddington accretion and (2) the HMXB population of the bright starburst galaxy NGC 1569 is likely dominated by one extremely metal-poor starburst cluster.

  9. Ionization break-out from millisecond pulsar wind nebulae: an X-ray probe of the origin of superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Vurm, Indrek; Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic spin-down of a rapidly rotating (millisecond) neutron star has been proposed as the power source of hydrogen-poor `superluminous' supernovae (SLSNe-I). However, producing an unambiguous test that can distinguish this model from alternatives, such as circumstellar interaction, has proven challenging. After the supernova explosion, the pulsar wind inflates a hot cavity behind the expanding stellar ejecta: the nascent millisecond pulsar wind nebula. Electron/positron pairs injected by the wind cool through inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron emission, producing a pair cascade and hard X-ray spectrum inside the nebula. These X-rays ionize the inner exposed side of the ejecta, driving an ionization front that propagates outwards with time. Under some conditions this front can breach the ejecta surface within months after the optical supernova peak, allowing ˜0.1-1 keV photons to escape the nebula unattenuated with a characteristic luminosity LX ˜ 1043-1045 erg s-1. This `ionization break-out' may explain the luminous X-ray emission observed from the transient SCP 06F, providing direct evidence that this SLSN was indeed engine powered. Luminous break-out requires a low ejecta mass and that the spin-down time of the pulsar be comparable to the photon diffusion time-scale at optical maximum, the latter condition being similar to that required for a supernova with a high optical fluence. These relatively special requirements may explain why most SLSNe-I are not accompanied by detectable X-ray emission. Global asymmetry of the supernova ejecta increases the likelihood of an early break-out along the direction of lowest density. Atomic states with lower threshold energies are more readily ionized at earlier times near optical maximum, allowing `UV break-out' across a wider range of pulsar and ejecta properties than X-ray break-out, possibly contributing to the blue/UV colours of SLSNe-I.

  10. X-RAY INVESTIGATION OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION AROUND PLAUSIBLE {gamma}-RAY EMITTING PULSAR WIND NEBULAE IN KOOKABURRA REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Bamba, Aya; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2012-05-10

    We report on the results from Suzaku X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV {gamma}-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The Suzaku observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible pulsar wind nebula (PWN) Rabbit with elongated sizes of {sigma}{sub X} = 1.'66 and {sigma}{sub X} = 1.'49, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the {gamma}-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the {gamma}-ray peaks are 2.'8 for PSR J1420-6048 and 4.'5 for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with {Gamma} = 1.7-2.3. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one-zone electron emission model as the first-order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimated as 3 {mu}G and 2.5 {mu}G, respectively. The X-ray spectral and spatial properties strongly support that both TeV sources are PWNe, in which electrons and positrons accelerated at termination shocks of the pulsar winds are losing their energies via the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering as they are transported outward.

  11. X-Ray Investigation of the Diffuse Emission around Plausible γ-Ray Emitting Pulsar Wind Nebulae in Kookaburra Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Bamba, Aya; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-05-01

    We report on the results from Suzaku X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV γ-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The Suzaku observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible pulsar wind nebula (PWN) Rabbit with elongated sizes of σX = 1farcm66 and σX = 1farcm49, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the γ-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the γ-ray peaks are 2farcm8 for PSR J1420-6048 and 4farcm5 for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with Γ = 1.7-2.3. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one-zone electron emission model as the first-order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimated as 3 μG and 2.5 μG, respectively. The X-ray spectral and spatial properties strongly support that both TeV sources are PWNe, in which electrons and positrons accelerated at termination shocks of the pulsar winds are losing their energies via the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering as they are transported outward.

  12. Detection of a new, bright X-ray source in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, M. J.; Bird, A. J.; McBride, V.; Bartlett, E. S.; Haberl, F.

    2013-11-01

    Observations by the INTEGRAL space observatory on 25-26 October 2013 and 30-31 October 2013 of the Small Magellanic Cloud & Bridge detected a previously uncatalogued bright X-ray source. The source is much brighter in the first observation than the second and is seen in both the IBIS and the JEM-X instruments. A peak flux of approximately 4mCrab was detected in both IBIS and JEM-X detectors in the 20-40 keV range.

  13. H0538 + 608 - A bright AM Herculis-type X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Bradt, H. V.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Patterson, J.; Roberts, W.

    1986-01-01

    The discovery of an AM Herculis-type magnetic variable, an accreting binary system that contains a magnetic white dwarf and a late-type companion, is reported. The proposed optical counterpart to the detected X-ray source exhibits all the optical emission characteristics of its class: circular polarization, strongly modulated brightness variations, intense flickering on time scales of seconds, historical 'low states', and intense emission lines, including very strong lines of He II. The modulations in the polarization and the photometric magnitude suggest an orbital period of 3.1 + or -0.2 hr.

  14. AN ACCRETION MODEL FOR THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 4U 0142+61

    SciTech Connect

    Truemper, J. E.; Dennerl, K.; Kylafis, N. D.; Zezas, A.; Ertan, Ue.

    2013-02-10

    We propose that the quiescent emission of anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs) is powered by accretion from a fallback disk, requiring magnetic dipole fields in the range 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} G, and that the luminous hard tails of their X-ray spectra are produced by bulk-motion Comptonization in the radiative shock near the bottom of the accretion column. This radiation escapes as a fan beam, which is partly absorbed by the polar cap photosphere, heating it up to relatively high temperatures. The scattered component and the thermal emission from the polar cap form a polar beam. We test our model on the well-studied AXP 4U 0142+61, whose energy-dependent pulse profiles show double peaks, which we ascribe to the fan and polar beams. The temperature of the photosphere (kT {approx} 0.4 keV) is explained by the heating effect. The scattered part forms a hard component in the polar beam. We suggest that the observed high temperatures of the polar caps of AXPs/SGRs, compared with other young neutron stars, are due to the heating by the fan beam. Using beaming functions for the fan beam and the polar beam and taking gravitational bending into account, we fit the energy-dependent pulse profiles and obtain the inclination angle and the angle between the spin axis and the magnetic dipole axis, as well as the height of the radiative shock above the stellar surface. We do not explain the high-luminosity bursts, which may be produced by the classical magnetar mechanism operating in super-strong multipole fields.

  15. Multiwavelength Study of the Bright X-ray Source Population in the Interacting Galaxies NGC 5774/NGC 5775

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Gutierrez, Carlos M.; Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray source population in the field of the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 5774/5775 is reported. A total of 49 discrete sources are detected, including 12 ultraluminous X-ray source candidates with lum inosities above 10(exp 39)erg/s in the 0.5 - 8.0 keV X-ray band. Several of these latter are transient X-ray sources that fall below detect ion levels in one of two X-ray observations spaced 15 months apart. X-ray source positions are mapped onto optical and radio images to sear ch for potential counterparts. Eleven sources have optically-bright c ounterparts. Optical colors are used to differentiate these sources, which are mostly located outside the optical extent of the interacting galaxies, as potential globular clusters (3 sources) and quasars (5) . Follow-up optical spectroscopy confirms two of the latter are background quasars.

  16. 16 yr of RXTE monitoring of five anomalous X-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M. E-mail: vkaspi@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-20

    We present a summary of the long-term evolution of various properties of the five non-transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) 1E 1841–045, RXS J170849.0–400910, 1E 2259+586, 4U 0142+61, and 1E 1048.1–5937, regularly monitored with RXTE from 1996 to 2012. We focus on three properties of these sources: the evolution of the timing, pulsed flux, and pulse profile. We report several new timing anomalies and radiative events, including a putative anti-glitch seen in 1E 2259+586 in 2009, and a second epoch of very large spin-down rate fluctuations in 1E 1048.1–5937 following a large flux outburst. We compile the properties of the 11 glitches and 4 glitch candidates observed from these 5 AXPs between 1996 and 2012. Overall, these monitoring observations reveal several apparent patterns in the behavior of this sample of AXPs: large radiative changes in AXPs (including long-lived flux enhancements, short bursts, and pulse profile changes) are rare, occurring typically only every few years per source; large radiative changes are almost always accompanied by some form of timing anomaly, usually a spin-up glitch; only 20%-30% of timing anomalies are accompanied by any form of radiative change. We find that AXP radiative behavior at the times of radiatively loud glitches is sufficiently similar to suggest common physical origins. The similarity in glitch properties when comparing radiatively loud and radiatively silent glitches in AXPs suggests a common physical origin in the stellar interior. Finally, the overall similarity of AXP and radio pulsar glitches suggests a common physical origin for both phenomena.

  17. The Transient Accreting X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1946+274: Stability of X-Ray Properties at Low Flux and Updated Orbital Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kühnel, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian; Falkner, Sebastian; Caballero, Isabel; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Peter J.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fürst, Felix; Grinberg, Victoria; Hemphill, Paul B.; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Klochkov, Dmitry; Rothschild, Richard E.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, Peter A.; Wood, Kent S.; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-12-01

    We present a timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274 observed with Suzaku during an outburst decline in 2010 October and compare with previous results. XTE J1946+274 is a transient X-ray binary consisting of a Be-type star and a neutron star with a 15.75 s pulse period in a 172 days orbit with 2-3 outbursts per orbit during phases of activity. We improve the orbital solution using data from multiple instruments. The X-ray spectrum can be described by an absorbed Fermi-Dirac cut-off power-law model along with a narrow Fe Kα line at 6.4 keV and a weak Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) at ˜35 keV. The Suzaku data are consistent with the previously observed continuum flux versus iron line flux correlation expected from fluorescence emission along the line of sight. However, the observed iron line flux is slightly higher, indicating the possibility of a higher iron abundance or the presence of non-uniform material. We argue that the source most likely has only been observed in the subcritical (non-radiation dominated) state since its pulse profile is stable over all observed luminosities and the energy of the CRSF is approximately the same at the highest (˜5 × 1037 erg s-1) and lowest (˜5 × 1036 erg s-1) observed 3-60 keV luminosities.

  18. Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, N.; Ohsawa, S.; Sugimura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Tawada, M.; Watanabe, N.; Sasaki, K.; Ohshima, K.; Wakatsuki, M.; Sakabe, K.

    2008-01-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation. PMID:18421146

  19. Highly bright X-ray generator using heat of fusion with a specially designed rotating anticathode.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, N; Ohsawa, S; Sugimura, T; Ikeda, M; Tawada, M; Watanabe, N; Sasaki, K; Ohshima, K; Wakatsuki, M; Sakabe, K

    2008-05-01

    A new type of rotating anticathode X-ray generator has been developed, in which the electron beam irradiates the inner surface of a U-shaped anticathode (Cu). A high-flux electron beam is focused on the inner surface by optimizing the shape of the bending magnet. The power of the electron beam can be increased to the point at which the irradiated part of the inner surface is melted, because a strong centrifugal force fixes the melted part on the inner surface. When the irradiated part is melted, a large amount of energy is stored as the heat of fusion, resulting in emission of X-rays 4.3 times more brilliant than can be attained by a conventional rotating anticathode. Oscillating translation of the irradiated position on the inner surface during use is expected to be very advantageous for extending the target life. A carbon film coating on the inner surface is considered to suppress evaporation of the target metal and will be an important technique in further realization of highly bright X-ray generation. PMID:18421146

  20. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-05-19

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10{sup 7} photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 {micro}m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials.

  1. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  2. Monte Carlo-based multiphysics coupling analysis of x-ray pulsar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liansheng; Deng, Loulou; Mei, Zhiwu; Zuo, Fuchang; Zhou, Hao

    2015-10-01

    X-ray pulsar telescope (XPT) is a complex optical payload, which involves optical, mechanical, electrical and thermal disciplines. The multiphysics coupling analysis (MCA) plays an important role in improving the in-orbit performance. However, the conventional MCA methods encounter two serious problems in dealing with the XTP. One is that both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray can't be taken into consideration, which always misunderstands the essence of XPT. Another is that the coupling data can't be transferred automatically among different disciplines, leading to computational inefficiency and high design cost. Therefore, a new MCA method for XPT is proposed based on the Monte Carlo method and total reflective theory. The main idea, procedures and operational steps of the proposed method are addressed in detail. Firstly, it takes both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray into consideration simultaneously. And formulate the thermal-structural coupling equation and multiphysics coupling analysis model based on the finite element method. Then, the thermalstructural coupling analysis under different working conditions has been implemented. Secondly, the mirror deformations are obtained using construction geometry function. Meanwhile, the polynomial function is adopted to fit the deformed mirror and meanwhile evaluate the fitting error. Thirdly, the focusing performance analysis of XPT can be evaluated by the RMS. Finally, a Wolter-I XPT is taken as an example to verify the proposed MCA method. The simulation results show that the thermal-structural coupling deformation is bigger than others, the vary law of deformation effect on the focusing performance has been obtained. The focusing performances of thermal-structural, thermal, structural deformations have degraded 30.01%, 14.35% and 7.85% respectively. The RMS of dispersion spot are 2.9143mm, 2.2038mm and 2.1311mm. As a result, the validity of the proposed method is verified through

  3. Chandra Observations of Diffuse Gas and Luminous X-Ray Sources around the X-Ray-bright Elliptical Galaxy NGC 1600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.

    2004-12-01

    We observed the X-ray-bright E3 galaxy NGC 1600 and nearby members of the NGC 1600 group with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S3 to study their X-ray properties. Unresolved emission dominates the observation; however, we resolved some of the emission into 71 sources, most of which are low-mass X-ray binaries associated with NGC 1600. Twenty-one of the sources have LX>2×1039 ergs s-1 (0.3-10.0 keV; assuming they are at the distance of NGC 1600), marking them as ultraluminous X-ray point source (ULX) candidates; we expect that only 11+/-2 are unrelated foreground/background sources. NGC 1600 may have the largest number of ULX candidates in an early-type galaxy to date; however, cosmic variance in the number of background active galactic nuclei cannot be ruled out. The spectrum and luminosity function (LF) of the resolved sources are more consistent with sources found in other early-type galaxies than with sources found in star-forming regions of galaxies. The source LF and the spectrum of the unresolved emission both indicate that there are a large number of unresolved point sources. We propose that these sources are associated with globular clusters (GCs) and that NGC 1600 has a large GC specific frequency. Observations of the GC population in NGC 1600 would be very useful for testing this prediction. Approximately 50%-75% of the unresolved flux comes from diffuse gaseous emission. The spectral fits, hardness ratios, and X-ray surface brightness profile all point to two gas components. We interpret the soft inner component (a<~25'', kT~0.85 keV) as the interstellar medium of NGC 1600 and the hotter outer component (a>~25'', kT~1.5 keV) as the intragroup medium of the NGC 1600 group. The X-ray image shows several interesting structures. First, there is a central region of excess emission that is roughly cospatial with Hα and dust filaments immediately west of the center of NGC 1600. There appear to be holes in the X-ray emission to the north and south of the

  4. Spectral and Temporal Characteristics of X-Ray-Bright Stars in the Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We follow up our deep ROSAT imaging survey of the Pleiades (Stauffer et al. 1994) with an analysis of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray-bright stars in the Pleiades. Raymond & Smith (1977) one and two-temperature models have been used to fit the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pulse-height spectra of the dozen or so brightest sources associated with late-type Pleiades members. The best-fit temperatures suggest hot coronal temperatures for K, M, and rapidly rotating G stars, and cooler temperatures for F and slowly rotating G stars. In order to probe the many less X-ray-luminous stars, we have generated composite spectra by combining net counts from all Pleiades members according to spectral type and rotational velocity. Model fits to the composite spectra confirm the trend seen in the individual spectral fits. Particularly interesting is the apparent dependence of coronal temperature on L(sub x)/L(sub bol). A hardness-ratio analysis also confirms some of these trends. The PSPC data have also revealed a dozen or so strong X-ray flares with peak X-ray luminosities in excess of approx. 10(exp 30) ergs/sec. We have modeled the brightest of these flares with a simple quasi-static cooling loop model. The peak temperature and emission measure and the inferred electron density and plasma volume suggest a very large scale flaring event. The PSPC data were collected over a period of approx. 18 months, allowing us to search for source variability on timescales ranging from less than a day (in the case of flares) to more than a year between individual exposures. On approximately year-long timescales, roughly 25% of the late-type stars are variable. Since the Pleiades was also intensively monitored by the imaging instruments on the Einstein Observatory, we have examined X-ray luminosity variations on the 10 yr timescale between Einstein and ROSAT and find that up to 40% of the late-type stars are X-ray variable. Since there is only marginal

  5. SXP 214: An X-Ray Pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud, Crossing the Circumstellar Disk of the Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance; Sasaki, Manami; Williams, Benjamin; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Wright, Nicholas J.; Laycock, Silas; Udalski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), SXP 214 is an X-ray pulsar in a high mass X-ray binary system with a Be-star companion. A recent survey of the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary program found that the source was in a transition when the X-ray flux was on a steady rise. The Lomb–Scargle periodogram revealed a pulse period of 211.49 ± 0.42 s, which is significantly (>5σ) shorter than the previous measurements made with XMM-Newton and RXTE. This implies that the system has gone through sudden spin-up episodes recently. The pulse profile shows a sharp eclipse-like feature with a modulation amplitude of >95%. The linear rise of the observed X-ray luminosity from ≲2× to 7× {10}35 erg s‑1 is correlated with a steady softening of the X-ray spectrum, which can be described by the changes in the local absorption from N H ˜ 1024 to ≲1020 cm‑2 for an absorbed power-law model. The soft X-ray emission below 2 keV was absent in the early part of the observation when only the pulsating hard X-ray component was observed, whereas at later times, both soft and hard X-ray components were observed to be pulsating. A likely explanation is that the neutron star was initially hidden in the circumstellar disk of the companion, and later came out of the disk with the accreted material that continued fueling the observed pulsation.

  6. SXP 214: An X-Ray Pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud, Crossing the Circumstellar Disk of the Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance; Sasaki, Manami; Williams, Benjamin; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Wright, Nicholas J.; Laycock, Silas; Udalski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), SXP 214 is an X-ray pulsar in a high mass X-ray binary system with a Be-star companion. A recent survey of the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary program found that the source was in a transition when the X-ray flux was on a steady rise. The Lomb–Scargle periodogram revealed a pulse period of 211.49 ± 0.42 s, which is significantly (>5σ) shorter than the previous measurements made with XMM-Newton and RXTE. This implies that the system has gone through sudden spin-up episodes recently. The pulse profile shows a sharp eclipse-like feature with a modulation amplitude of >95%. The linear rise of the observed X-ray luminosity from ≲2× to 7× {10}35 erg s‑1 is correlated with a steady softening of the X-ray spectrum, which can be described by the changes in the local absorption from N H ∼ 1024 to ≲1020 cm‑2 for an absorbed power-law model. The soft X-ray emission below 2 keV was absent in the early part of the observation when only the pulsating hard X-ray component was observed, whereas at later times, both soft and hard X-ray components were observed to be pulsating. A likely explanation is that the neutron star was initially hidden in the circumstellar disk of the companion, and later came out of the disk with the accreted material that continued fueling the observed pulsation.

  7. SIGNS OF MAGNETIC ACCRETION IN THE X-RAY PULSAR BINARY GX 301-2

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhsanov, Nazar R.; Finger, Mark H.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray spectrum of GX 301-2 suggest that the surface field of the neutron star is B{sub CRSF} {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} G. The same value has been derived in modeling the rapid spin-up episodes in terms of the Keplerian disk accretion scenario. However, the spin-down rate observed during the spin-down trends significantly exceeds the value expected in currently used spin-evolution scenarios. This indicates that either the surface field of the star exceeds 50 B{sub CRSF} or a currently used accretion scenario is incomplete. We show that the above discrepancy can be avoided if the accreting material is magnetized. The magnetic pressure in the accretion flow increases more rapidly than its ram pressure and, under certain conditions, significantly affects the accretion picture. The spin-down torque applied to the neutron star in this case is larger than that evaluated within a non-magnetized accretion scenario. We find that the observed spin evolution of the pulsar can be explained in terms of the magnetically controlled accretion flow scenario provided the surface field of the neutron star is {approx}B{sub CRSF}.

  8. A Sequence of Outbursts from the Transient X-Ray Pulsar GS 0834-430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen A.; Finger, Mark H.; Harmon, B.Alan; Scott, D. Matthew; Wilson, Robert B.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Prince, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    GS 0834-430, a 12.3 s accretion-powered pulsar, has been observed in seven outbursts with the BATSE large-area detectors on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The first five outbursts observed by BATSE occurred at intervals of about 107 days, while the final two outbursts were separated by about 140 days. The photon energy spectrum, measured by Earth occultation in the 20 100 keV band, can be fitted by a power law with photon index alpha approximately equals -3.7 or by an exponential spectrum with temperature kT approximately equals 15 keV, with some variations within outbursts. The source has a low pulse fraction, less than or equal to 0.15 in the 20-50 keV band. We have observed significant temporal and energy-dependent variations in epoch folded pulse profiles. Because the intrinsic torque effects for this system are at least comparable to orbital effects, pulse timing analysis did not produce a unique orbital solution. However, confidence regions for the orbital elements yielded the following 1 sigma limits: orbital period P(sub orb) = 105.8 +/- 0.4 days and eccentricity 0.10 less than or approximately equals epsilon less than or approximately equals 0.17. GS 0834-430 is most likely a Be/X-ray binary.

  9. The Multi-Component Nature of the Vela Pulsar Nonthermal X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Strickman, Mark S.; Gwinn, Carl; McCulloch, P.; Moffet, D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on our analysis of a 274 ks observation of the Vela pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The double-peaked, pulsed emission at 2 - 30 keV, which we had previously detected during a 93 ks observation, is confirmed with much improved statistics. There is now clear evidence, both in the spectrum and the light curve, that the emission in the RXTE band is a blend of two separate non-thermal components. The spectrum of the harder component connects smoothly with the OSSE, COMPTEL and EGRET spectrum and the peaks in the light curve are in phase coincidence with those of the high-energy light curve. The spectrum of the softer component is consistent with an extrapolation to the pulsed optical flux, and the second RXTE pulse is in phase coincidence with the second optical peak. In addition, we see a peak in the 2-8 keV RXTE pulse profile at the radio phase.

  10. Detailed Physical Modeling Reveals the Magnetar Nature of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guever, T.; Oezel, F.; Goegues, E.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  11. The Magnetar Nature and the Outburst Mechanism of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, Feryal; Gogus, Ersin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  12. On the power spectra of the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandini, Mauro; Morfill, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model of accretion which is applied to the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2 is developed, assuming that the accretion onto the neutron star does not occur from a continuous flux of plasma, but from blobs of matter which are threaded by the magnetic field lines onto the magnetic polar caps of the neutron star. These 'lumps' are produced at the magnetospheric limit by magnetohydrodynamical instability, introducing a 'noise' in the accretion process, due to the discontinuity in the flux of matter onto the neutron star. This model is able to describe the change of slope observed in the continuum component of the power spectra of the X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2, in the frequency range 0.01 - 0.1 Hz. The physical properties of the infalling blobs derived in the model are in agreement with the constraints imposed by observations.

  13. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Walker, S. A.; Blundell, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with active galactic nucleus feedback, the Perseus cluster and M 87, and a merging system, A 3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compared to other analysis techniques, such as unsharp masking. Filtering cluster images in this way in a hard energy band allows shocks to be detected.

  14. On the Nature of the Eclipsing Bright X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Wu, K.; Tennant, A. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum and light curve of the bright source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of about 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her-type system. Here we show that the light curve and orbital dynamics constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 30 solar masses and the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Combining the mass constraints with the observed X-ray flux, we show that an accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. If the emission is beamed, then the companion star, which intercepts this flux during eclipse, will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 103 yr. We find, therefore, that the observations are most consistent with the interpretation of CG X-1 as a bright, long-period, AM Her system in the Milky Way.

  15. Discovery of a Be/X-ray pulsar binary and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new Be/X-ray pulsar binary located in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The strong pulsed X-ray source was discovered with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The X-ray pulse period of 1062 s is consistently determined from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, revealing one of the slowest rotating X-ray pulsars known in the SMC. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source is the emission-line star 2dFS 3831. Its B0-0.5(III)e+ spectral type is determined from VLT-FLAMES and 2dF optical spectroscopy, establishing the system as a Be/X-ray binary (Be-XRB). The hard X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a power law with additional thermal and blackbody components, the latter reminiscent of persistent Be-XRBs. This system is the first evidence of a recent supernova in the low-density surroundings of NGC 602. We detect a shell nebula around 2dFS 3831 in Hα and [O III] images and conclude that it is most likely a supernova remnant. If it is linked to the supernova explosion that created this new X-ray pulsar, its kinematic age of (2-4) × 104 yr provides a constraint on the age of the pulsar.

  16. Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final performance report for our grant 'Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar.' In the first year of this grant, we received the 50,000-second ROSAT (German acronym for X-ray satellite) High Resolution Images (HRI) observation of the Crab Nebula pulsar. We used the data to create a 65-ms-resolution pulse profile and compared it to a similar pulse profile obtained in 1991. No statistically significant differences were found. These results were presented at the January 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Since then, we have performed more sensitive analyses to search for potential changes in the pulse profile shape between the two data sets. Again, no significant variability was found. In order to augment this long (six-year) baseline data set, we have analyzed archival observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). While these observations have shorter time baselines than the ROSAT data set, their higher signal-to-noise offers similar sensitivity to long-term variability. Again, no significant variations have been found, confirming our ROSAT results. This work was done in collaboration with Prof. Stephen Eikenberry, Cornell University. These analyses will be included in Cornell University graduate student Dae-Sik Moon's doctoral thesis.

  17. Unusual Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Young, High Magnetic Field Pulsar PSR J1119--6127

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M E; Kaspi, V M; Camilo, F; Gaensler, B M; Pivovaroff, M J

    2005-08-05

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, which has an inferred age of 1,700 yr and surface dipole magnetic field strength of 4.1 x 10{sup 13} G. We report the first detection of pulsed X-ray emission from PSR J1119-6127. In the 0.5-2.0 keV range, the pulse profile shows a narrow peak with a very high pulsed fraction of (74 {+-} 14)%. In the 2.0-10.0 keV range, the upper limit for the pulsed fraction is 28% (99% confidence). The pulsed emission is well described by a thermal blackbody model with a temperature of T{infinity} = 2.4{sub -0.2}{sup +0.3} x 10{sup 6} K and emitting radius of 3.4{sub -0.3}{sup +1.8} km (at a distance of 8.4 kpc). Atmospheric models result in problematic estimates for the distance/emitting area. PSR J1119-6127 is now the radio pulsar with smallest characteristic age from which thermal X-ray emission has been detected. The combined temporal and spectral characteristics of this emission are unlike those of other radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies and challenge current models of thermal emission from neutron stars.

  18. Was the X-ray Afterglow of GRB 970815 Detected, or is 3EG J1621+8203 a Pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, Nestor

    2003-09-01

    One of the gamma-ray bursts localized by the RXTE ASM was followed by ASCA and ROSAT HRI pointings. While an X-ray source was detected just outside the ASM error box, it was never associated with the GRB because it was not clearly fading and because no optical afterglow was found. Years later, while attempting to identify an EGRET source whose error ellipse includes the position of GRB 970815, we made deep optical observations of the ASCA and ROSAT source position, which is still blank to a limit V > 24.4. We need a brief Chandra observation to see if the X-ray source is persistent. If not, it was almost certainly the X-ray afterglow of the optically "dark" GRB. If still present, it may be an "off-beam" pulsar counterpart of an EGRET source, and an important target for further study.

  19. A bright attosecond x-ray pulse train generation in a double-laser-driven cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Luo, Wen; Yin, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the generation of a high-brightness attosecond x-ray pulse train in a double-laser-driven cone target. The scheme makes use of two lasers: the first high-intensity laser with a laser peak intensity 1.37 × 1020 W/cm2 irradiates the cone and produces overdense attosecond electron bunches; the second counterpropagating weakly relativistic laser with a laser peak intensity 4.932 × 1017 W/cm2 interacts with the produced electron bunches and a bright x-ray pulse train is generated by Thomson backscattering of the second laser off the attosecond electron bunches. It is shown that the photon flux rises by 5 times using the cone target as compared with a normal channel. Meanwhile, the x-ray peak brightness increases significantly from 1.4 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV) to 6.0 × 1021/(s mm2 mrad2 0.1 keV), which is much higher than that of the Thomson x-ray source generated from traditional accelerators. We also discuss the influence of the laser and target parameters on the x-ray pulse properties. This compact bright x-ray source may have diverse applications, e.g., the study of electric dynamics and harmonics emission in the atomic scale.

  20. Imaging X-Ray, Optical, and Infrared Observations of the Transient Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Buxton, M.; Bailyn, C.

    2004-04-01

    We report X-ray imaging, timing, and spectral studies of XTE J1810-197, a 5.54 s pulsar discovered by Ibrahim and coworkers in recent Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations. In a set of short exposures with the High Resolution Camera on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we detect a strongly modulated signal (55%+/-4% pulsed fraction) with the expected period located at (J2000) 18h09m51s08, -19deg43'51.7", with a uncertainty radius of 0.6" (90% confidence level). Spectra obtained with XMM-Newton are well fitted by a two-component model that typically describes anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs), an absorbed blackbody plus power law with parameters kT=0.67+/-0.01 keV, Γ=3.7+/-0.2, NH=(1.05+/-0.05)×1022 cm-2, and FX(0.5-10keV)=3.98×10-11 ergs cm-2 s-1. Alternatively, a two-temperature blackbody fit is just as acceptable. The location of CXOU J180951.0-194351 is consistent with a point source seen in archival Einstein, ROSAT, and ASCA images, when its flux was nearly 2 orders of magnitude fainter, and from which no pulsations are found. The spectrum changed dramatically between the ``quiescent'' and ``active'' states; the former can be modeled as a softer blackbody. Using XMM-Newton timing data, we place an upper limit of 0.03 lt-s on any orbital motion in the period range 10 minutes-8 hr. Optical and infrared images obtained on the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) show no object in the Chandra error circle to limits V=22.5, I=21.3, J=18.9, and K=17.5. Together, these results argue that CXOU J180951.0-194351 is an isolated neutron star, one most similar to the transient AXP AX J1844.8-0256. Continuing study of XTE J1810-197 in various states of luminosity is important for understanding and possibly unifying a growing class of isolated, young neutron stars that are not powered by rotation.

  1. Discovery of SXP 265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Bartlett, E. S.; Maggi, P.; Rau, A.; Greiner, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-11-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using the Gamma-ray Burst Optical Near-ir Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of Ps = (264.516 ± 0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 1035 erg s-1 and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ˜146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical light curve, can be explained by non-radial pulsations of the Be star. We identify the optical counterpart and classify it as a B1-2II-IVe star. This confirms SXP 265 as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar originating in the tidal structure between the Magellanic Clouds.

  2. Detection of first harmonic of cyclotron line in Be/X-ray binary pulsar Cep X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-07-01

    We present broad-band spectral properties of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar Cep X-4 by using a Suzaku observation, performed during the decline phase of outburst in 2014 July. The pulsation period of the pulsar was estimated to be 66.3 s during the observation. Soft X-ray pulse profile of the pulsar was found to be double peaked which evolved into a single peaked pulse profile at higher energies. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with several continuum models such as partial covering Negative and Positive power-law with Exponential cut-off (NPEX), high-energy cut-off power-law and CompTT models. Additional components such as a cyclotron absorption line at ˜28 keV and two Gaussian functions for 6.4 and 6.9 keV iron emission lines were required to describe the the observed features in the spectrum. An additional absorption like feature was also detected in the pulsar spectrum at ˜45 keV. This feature was found to be model independent and was detected with >4 sigma confidence level. We identified this additional feature as the first harmonic of the fundamental cyclotron line at 28 keV. The energy ratio between first cyclotron harmonic and fundamental line was found to be lower (1.7) than the conventional factor of 2. This indicates that the line forming regions are at different heights or viewed at large angles. Phase-resolved spectroscopy was performed to understand the changes in the cyclotron line parameters with pulsar phases. The fundamental and first cyclotron harmonic line parameters show a significant variation with pulse phase. This can be explained as the effects of the viewing angle or the role of complicated magnetic field of the neutron star.

  3. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  4. Positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity in sub-critical X-ray pulsars: Doppler effect in the accretion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Serber, Alexander V.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    Cyclotron resonance scattering features observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars show significant changes of the line centroid energy with the pulsar luminosity. Whereas for bright sources above the so-called critical luminosity, these variations are established to be connected with the appearance of the high-accretion column above the neutron star surface, at low, sub-critical luminosities the nature of the variations (but with the opposite sign) has not been discussed widely. We argue here that the cyclotron line is formed when the radiation from a hotspot propagates through the plasma falling with a mildly relativistic velocity on to the neutron star surface. The position of the cyclotron resonance is determined by the Doppler effect. The change of the cyclotron line position in the spectrum with luminosity is caused by variations of the velocity profile in the line-forming region affected by the radiation pressure force. The presented model has several characteristic features: (i) the line centroid energy is positively correlated with the luminosity; (ii) the line width is positively correlated with the luminosity as well; (iii) the position and the width of the cyclotron absorption line are variable over the pulse phase; (iv) the line has a more complicated shape than widely used Lorentzian or Gaussian profiles; (v) the phase-resolved cyclotron line centroid energy and the width are negatively and positively correlated with the pulse intensity, respectively. The predictions of the proposed theory are compared with the variations of the cyclotron line parameters in the X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 over a wide range of sub-critical luminosities as seen by the INTEGRAL observatory.

  5. Outburst from 4U 1145-619: A Transient X-Ray Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen; Finger, Mark H.; Scott, Matthew

    1998-01-01

    4U 1145-619, a 293 second Be/X-ray pulsar, was discovered with Uhuru (Forman 1978, ApJS, 38, 357) and first identified as a pulsar in 1977 with Ariel V (White 1978, Nature, 274, 664). From 1991 to 1998, BATSE observed 4U 1145-619 in a series of 12 periodic outbursts, each with durations of 8-30 days. Combining these data with previously published results yielded an outburst ephemeris of T(sub out) = MJD 448871.s (+/- 0.6) +/- 186.68 (+/- 0.05)E(sub out), Where T(sub out) is the time of peak intensity and E(sub out) is the cycle number. Most outbursts occur within phases +/- 0.1 of the outburst ephemeris. Pulse frequency measurements were consistent with a long-term average frequency derivative of the first derivative of v = -3 x 10(exp -14) Hz/s. Most outbursts reached peak total fluxes of approximately equal 100 mCrab (20-50 keV) and had 20-50 keV r.m.s. pulse fractions of about 30%. (A pulse fraction of 70% was observed for one outburst). Two outbursts reached 20-50 keV peak total fluxes of 550 mCrab, but had very different 20-50 keV pulse fractions of about 30% and about 50%. Three outbursts with peak total fluxes of 120, 134, and 180 mCrab, had r.m.s. pulse fractions of about 28%, 34%, and 52%. During the brightest 3 outbursts observed with BATSE, the pulse frequency increased. Fainter outbursts observed with BATSE appeared to reach peak intensity at a later phase (relative to the ephemeris) than brighter outbursts, and were typically not detectable at the expected times of peak intensity. The pulse profile showed significant intensity and energy dependent pulse shape variations. We present histories of pulse frequency, 20-50 keV intensity, and pulse profiles.

  6. X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY PULSAR CENTAURUS X-3 OVER ITS BINARY ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Sachindra; Ali, Zulfikar; Paul, Biswajit

    2011-08-20

    We present a comprehensive spectral analysis of the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar Centaurus X-3 with the Suzaku observatory covering nearly one orbital period. The light curve shows the presence of extended dips which are rarely seen in HMXBs. These dips are seen up to as high as {approx}40 keV. The pulsar spectra during the eclipse, out-of-eclipse, and dips are found to be well described by a partial covering power-law model with high-energy cutoff and three Gaussian functions for 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, and 6.97 keV iron emission lines. The dips in the light curve can be explained by the presence of an additional absorption component with high column density and covering fraction, the values of which are not significant during the rest of the orbital phases. The iron line parameters during the dips and eclipse are significantly different compared to those during the rest of the observation. During the dips, the iron line intensities are found to be lesser by a factor of 2-3 with a significant increase in the line equivalent widths. However, the continuum flux at the corresponding orbital phase is estimated to be lesser by more than an order of magnitude. Similarities in the changes in the iron line flux and equivalent widths during the dips and eclipse segments suggest that the dipping activity in Cen X-3 is caused by an obscuration of the neutron star by dense matter, probably structures in the outer region of the accretion disk, as in the case of dipping low-mass X-ray binaries.

  7. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubiński, P.; Beckmann, V.; Gibaud, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I. E.; Ricci, C.; Soldi, S.; Türler, M.; Walter, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analysed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe < 100 keV, and only for two objects we found kTe > 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48_{-14}^{+57} keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centred at ≈0.8 and a narrow peak at ≈1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption model, reducing the fitted strength of Compton reflection by a factor of about 2. Modest reflection (median R ≈ 0.32) together with a high ratio of Comptonized to seed photon fluxes point towards a geometry with a compact hard X-ray emitting region well separated from the accretion disc. Our results imply that the template Seyferts spectra used in the population synthesis models of active galactic nuclei (AGN) should be revised.

  8. MAXI/GSC detection of the onset of the outburst from Be/X-ray binary pulsar A0535+26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Mihara, T.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sugizaki, M.; Morii, M.; Serino, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Uchida, D.; Negoro, H.; Fukushima, K.; Onodera, T.; Suzuki, K.; Namba, T.; Fujita, M.; Honda, F.; Ueda, Y.; Shidatsu, M.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Kawagoe, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Morooka, Y.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; MAXI Team

    2015-02-01

    An onset of the X-ray outburst from the Be/X-ray binary pulsar A0535+26 was detected by the MAXI/GSC nova alert system on 2015 January 29 (MJD 57051). On the basis of the MAXI on-demand analysis, the current outburst started from MJD 57048.

  9. A Comprehensive Spectral Analysis of the X-Ray Pulsar 4U 1907+09 from Two Observations with the Suzaku X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Pottschmidt, Katja; Roth, Stefanie; Barragan, Laura; Furst, Felix; Suchy, Slawomir; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Jorn; Rothschild, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We present results from two observations of the wind-accreting X-ray pulsar 4U 1907+09 using the Suzaku observatory, The broadband time-averaged spectrum allows us to examine the continuum emission of the source and the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at approx. 19 keV. Additionally, using the narrow CCD response of Suzaku near 6 ke V allows us to study in detail the Fe K bandpass and to quantify the Fe Kp line for this source for the first time. The source is absorbed by fully-covering material along the line of sight with a column density of N(sub H) approx. 2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, consistent with a wind accreting geometry, and a high Fe abundance (approx. 3 - 4 x solar). Time and phase-resolved analyses allow us to study variations in the source spectrum. In particular, dips found in the 2006 observation which are consistent with earlier observations occur in the hard X-ray bandpass, implying a variation of the whole continuum rather than occultation by intervening material, while a dip near the end of the 2007 observation occurs mainly in the lower energies implying an increase in NH along the line of sight, perhaps indicating clumpiness in the stellar wind

  10. A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF THE X-RAY PULSAR 4U 1907+09 FROM TWO OBSERVATIONS WITH THE SUZAKU X-RAY OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Suchy, Slawomir; Rothschild, Richard; Pottschmidt, Katja; Roth, Stefanie; Barragan, Laura; Fuerst, Felix; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Joern

    2010-01-20

    We present results from two observations of the wind-accreting X-ray pulsar 4U 1907+09 using the Suzaku Observatory. The broadband time-averaged spectrum allows us to examine the continuum emission of the source and the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at approx19 keV. Additionally, using the narrow CCD response of Suzaku near 6 keV allows us to study in detail the Fe K bandpass and to quantify the Fe Kbeta line for this source for the first time. The source is absorbed by fully covering material along the line of sight with a column density of N{sub H} approx 2 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, consistent with a wind-accreting geometry, and a high Fe abundance (approx3-4 times solar). Time- and phase-resolved analyses allow us to study variations in the source spectrum. In particular, dips found in the 2006 observation which are consistent with earlier observations occur in the hard X-ray bandpass, implying a variation of the whole continuum rather than occultation by intervening material, while a dip near the end of the 2007 observation occurs mainly in the lower energies implying an increase in N{sub H} along the line of sight, perhaps indicating clumpiness in the stellar wind.

  11. The use of x-ray pulsar-based navigation method for interplanetary flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Guo, Xingcan; Yang, Yong

    2009-07-01

    As interplanetary missions are increasingly complex, the existing unique mature interplanetary navigation method mainly based on radiometric tracking techniques of Deep Space Network can not meet the rising demands of autonomous real-time navigation. This paper studied the applications for interplanetary flights of a new navigation technology under rapid development-the X-ray pulsar-based navigation for spacecraft (XPNAV), and valued its performance with a computer simulation. The XPNAV is an excellent autonomous real-time navigation method, and can provide comprehensive navigation information, including position, velocity, attitude, attitude rate and time. In the paper the fundamental principles and time transformation of the XPNAV were analyzed, and then the Delta-correction XPNAV blending the vehicles' trajectory dynamics with the pulse time-of-arrival differences at nominal and estimated spacecraft locations within an Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) was discussed with a background mission of Mars Pathfinder during the heliocentric transferring orbit. The XPNAV has an intractable problem of integer pulse phase cycle ambiguities similar to the GPS carrier phase navigation. This article innovatively proposed the non-ambiguity assumption approach based on an analysis of the search space array method to resolve pulse phase cycle ambiguities between the nominal position and estimated position of the spacecraft. The simulation results show that the search space array method are computationally intensive and require long processing time when the position errors are large, and the non-ambiguity assumption method can solve ambiguity problem quickly and reliably. It is deemed that autonomous real-time integrated navigation system of the XPNAV blending with DSN, celestial navigation, inertial navigation and so on will be the development direction of interplanetary flight navigation system in the future.

  12. Suzaku Observation of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Mikio; Kitamoto, Shunji; Shibazaki, Noriaki; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Arimoto, Makoto; Ueno, Masaru; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    2010-10-01

    We report on the results of a Suzaku observation of the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1841-045 at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 73. We confirmed that the energy-dependent spectral models obtained by previous separate observations were also satisfied over a wide energy range from 0.4 to ˜70 keV, simultaneously. Here, the models below ˜10 keV were a combination of blackbody (BB) and power-law (PL) functions, or of two BBs with different temperatures at 0.6-7.0 keV (Morii et al. 2003, PASJ, 55, L45), and that above ˜20 keV was a PL function (Kuiper et al. 2004, ApJ, 613, 1173). The combination BB + PL + PL was found to best represent the phase-averaged spectrum. Phase-resolved spectroscopy indicated the existence of two emission regions, one with a thermal and the other with a non-thermal nature. The combination BB + BB + PL was also found to represent the phase-averaged spectrum well. However, we found that this model is physically unacceptable due to an excessively large area of the emission region of the blackbody. Nonetheless, we found that the temperatures and radii of the two blackbody components showed moderate correlations in the phase-resolved spectra. The fact that the same correlations have been observed between the phase-averaged spectra of various magnetars (Nakagawa et al. 2009, PASJ, 61, 109) suggests that a self-similar function can approximate the intrinsic energy spectra of magnetars below ˜10keV.

  13. A radiation-hydrodynamics model of accretion columns for ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-09-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M 82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a supercritical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with the density of 10-4 g cm-3 above a neutron star and solve the two-dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, but gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, and thereby a shock is generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as noted by Basko and Sunyaev (1976, MNRAS, 175, 395). The average accretion rate is very high; dot{M}}˜ 10^{2-3} L_E/c2 (with LE being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below LE/(4πr2) at a distance r in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since a large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed LE by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, the observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.

  14. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  15. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications. PMID:25166170

  16. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  17. X-Ray Analysis of the Proper Motion and Pulsar Wind Nebula for PSR J1741-2054

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Romani, Roger W.; Posselt, Bettina; Pavlov, George G.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Ng, C-Y.; Temim, Tea; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We obtained six observations of PSR J1741-2054 using the Chandra ACIS-S detector totaling approx.300 ks. By registering this new epoch of observations to an archival observation taken 3.2 yr earlier using X-ray point sources in the field of view, we have measured the pulsar proper motion at micron = 109 +/- 10 mas yr(exp. -1) in a direction consistent with the symmetry axis of the observed H(alpha) nebula. We investigated the inferred past trajectory of the pulsar but find no compelling association with OB associations in which the progenitor may have originated. We confirm previous measurements of the pulsar spectrum as an absorbed power law with photon index gamma = 2.68 +/- 0.04, plus a blackbody with an emission radius of (4.5(+3.2/-2.5))d(0.38) km, for a DM-estimated distance of 0.38d(0.38) kpc and a temperature of 61.7 +/- 3.0 eV. Emission from the compact nebula is well described by an absorbed power law model with a photon index of gamma = 1.67 +/- 0.06, while the diffuse emission seen as a trail extending northeast of the pulsar shows no evidence of synchrotron cooling. We also applied image deconvolution techniques to search for small-scale structures in the immediate vicinity of the pulsar, but found no conclusive evidence for such structures.

  18. Possible detection of a cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray pulsar 4U 1909+07

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Paul, Biswajit

    2013-12-10

    We present timing and broad band spectral studies of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1909+07 using data from Suzaku observations during 2010 November 2-3. The pulse period of the pulsar is estimated to be 604.11 ± 0.14 s. Pulsations are seen in the X-ray light curve up to ∼70 keV. The pulse profile is found to be strongly energy-dependent: a complex, multi-peaked structure at low energy becomes a simple single peak at higher energy. We found that the 1-70 keV pulse-averaged continuum can be fit by the sum of a blackbody and a partial covering Negative and Positive power law with Exponential cutoff model. A weak iron fluorescence emission line at 6.4 keV was detected in the spectrum. An absorption-like feature at ∼44 keV was clearly seen in the residuals of the spectral fitting, independent of the continuum model adopted. To check the possible presence of a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) in the spectrum, we normalized the pulsar spectrum with the spectrum of the Crab Nebula. The resulting Crab ratio also showed a clear dip centered at ∼44 keV. We performed statistical tests on the residuals of the spectral fitting and also on the Crab spectral ratio to determine the significance of the absorption-like feature and identified it as a CRSF of the pulsar. We estimated the corresponding surface magnetic field of the pulsar to be 3.8 × 10{sup 12} G.

  19. Ain't no Crab, PWN Got a Brand New Bag: Correlated Radio and X-ray Structures in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. S. E.; Lyutikov, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Tam, C. R.; Romani, R. W.

    2005-04-01

    The traditional view of radio pulsar wind nebulae (PWN), encouraged by the Crab nebula's X-ray and radio morphologies, is that they are a result of the integrated history of their pulsars' wind. The radio emission should therefore be largely unaffected by recent pulsar activity, and hence minimally correlated with structures in the X-ray nebulae. Observations of several PWN, both stationary and rapidly moving, now show clear morphological relationships between structures in the radio and X-ray with radio intensity variations on the order of unity. We present high-resolution X-ray and radio images of several PWN of both types and discuss the morphological relationships between the two wavebands.

  20. An optical synchrotron nebula around the X-ray pulsar 0540 693 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanan, G. A.; Helfand, D. J.; Reynolds, S. P.

    1984-12-01

    The discovery of extended optical continuum emission around the recently discovered 50 ms X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant 0540 - 693 is reported. Exposures in blue and red broad-band filters made with the CTIO 4 m telescope and prime focus CCD show a center-brightened but clearly extended nebula about 4 arcsec in diameter (FWHM), while an image in an (O III) filter shows an 8 arcsec diameter shell (as reported earlier) which encloses the continuum source. The extinction-correction magnitudes B = 17.5 and I = 16.4 both correspond to flux densities which lie directly on the extrapolation of the observed X-ray power-law spectrum, suggesting that the emission from 10 to the 14.5 Hz to 10 to the 18th Hz is synchrotron radiation from a single population of particles. Line emission is shown to be only a small contaminant in the broad-band images. Thus the 0540 - 693 system is apparently a very close analog of the Crab Nebula. Any point source component in the former nebula must have B greater than 20; the Crab pulsar at this distance would have B approximately 23. The implications of the observations for the energetics of the pulsar/nebula system are discussed.

  1. Using the Chandra Source-Finding Algorithm to Automatically Identify Solar X-ray Bright Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A.; Cirtain, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This poster details a technique of bright point identification that is used to find sources in Chandra X-ray data. The algorithm, part of a program called LEXTRCT, searches for regions of a given size that are above a minimum signal to noise ratio. The algorithm allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing exclusion of saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions). For Chandra data the noise is determined by photon counting statistics, whereas solar telescopes typically integrate a flux. Thus the calculated signal-to-noise ratio is incorrect, but we find we can scale the number to get reasonable results. For example, Nakakubo and Hara (1998) find 297 bright points in a September 11, 1996 Yohkoh image; with judicious selection of signal-to-noise ratio, our algorithm finds 300 sources. To further assess the efficacy of the algorithm, we analyze a SOHO/EIT image (195 Angstroms) and compare results with those published in the literature (McIntosh and Gurman, 2005). Finally, we analyze three sets of data from Hinode, representing different parts of the decline to minimum of the solar cycle.

  2. Models for galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to those compact galactic X-ray sources whose X-ray luminosities are considerably in excess of the solar luminosity. It is pointed out that the key breakthrough in the development of an understanding of compact galactic X-ray sources was the discovery of X-ray pulsars with the UHURU satellite. There is now overwhelming evidence that these objects are neutron stars in close binary stellar systems. The X-ray pulsations are thought to be thermal emission from the magnetic polar caps of a neutron star that is accreting matter from a companion star and whose magnetic field is misaligned with its rotation axis. Among the compact galactic X-ray sources that are not X-ray pulsars, some still show direct evidence of binary membership, such as X-ray eclipses. There is evidence that the galactic-bulge sources are, in fact, close binary stellar systems. It is concluded, that the great majority of bright galactic X-ray sources, with only a tiny handful of exceptions (such as the Crab and Vela pulsars), are likely to be binaries.

  3. A Chandra look at the X-ray faint millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestell, L. M.; Heinke, C. O.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Cool, A. M.; Anderson, J.

    2014-06-01

    We combine new and archival Chandra observations of the globular cluster NGC 6752 to create a deeper X-ray source list, and study the faint radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) of this cluster. We detect four of the five MSPs in NGC 6752, and present evidence for emission from the fifth. The X-rays from these MSPs are consistent with thermal emission from the neutron star surfaces, with significantly higher fitted blackbody temperatures than other globular cluster MSPs (though we cannot rule out contamination by non-thermal emission or other X-ray sources). NGC 6752 E is one of the lowest-LX MSPs known, with LX(0.3-8 keV) = 1.0^{+0.9}_{-0.5}× 10^{30} erg s-1. We check for optical counterparts of the three isolated MSPs in the core using new Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images, finding no plausible counterparts, which is consistent with their lack of binary companions. We compile measurements of LX and spin-down power for radio MSPs from the literature, including errors where feasible. We find no evidence that isolated MSPs have lower LX than MSPs in binary systems, omitting binary MSPs showing emission from intrabinary wind shocks. We find weak evidence for an inverse correlation between the estimated temperature of the MSP X-rays and the known MSP spin period, consistent with the predicted shrinking of the MSP polar cap size with increasing spin period.

  4. ORBITAL DECAY AND EVIDENCE OF DISK FORMATION IN THE X-RAY BINARY PULSAR OAO 1657-415

    SciTech Connect

    Jenke, P. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-11-10

    OAO 1657-415 is an eclipsing X-ray binary wind-fed pulsar that has exhibited smooth spin-up/spin-down episodes and has undergone several torque reversals throughout its long history of observation. We present a frequency history spanning nearly 19 years of observations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment and from the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (Fermi/GBM). Our analysis suggests two modes of accretion: one resulting in steady spin-up correlated with flux during which we believe a stable accretion disk is present and one in which the neutron star is spinning down at a lesser rate which is uncorrelated with flux. Orbital elements of the pulsar system are determined at several intervals throughout this history. With these ephemerides, statistically significant orbital decay with a P-dot {sub orb}=(-9.74{+-}0.78) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} is established.

  5. The Crab Pulsar Observed by RXTE: Monitoring the X-Ray to Radio Delay for 16 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold; Jahoda, Keith

    2012-01-01

    In 2004 we published the results of monitoring the Crab Pulsar by RXTE. At that time we determined that the primary pulse of the pulsar at X-ray energies precedes its radio counterpart by about 0.01 period in phase or approximately 330 micro seconds. However, we could not establish unambiguously whether the delay is in phase or due to a difference in pathlength. At this time we have twice the time baseline we had in 2004 and we present the same analysis, but now over a period of 16 years, which will represent almost the full mission and the best that will be available from RXTE. The full dataset shows that the phase delay has been decreasing faster than the pulse frequency over the 16 year baseline and that there are variations in the delay on a variety of timescales.

  6. ON THE EVOLUTION OF ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS WITH FALL BACK DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ertan, Ue.; Alpar, M. A.; Eksi, K. Y.; Erkut, M. H.

    2009-09-10

    We show that the period clustering of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), their X-ray luminosities, ages, and statistics can be explained with fall back disks with large initial specific angular momentum. The disk evolution models are developed by comparison to self-similar analytical models. The initial disk mass and angular momentum set the viscous timescale. An efficient torque, with (1 - {omega}{sup 2}{sub *}) dependence on the fastness parameter {omega}{sub *}, leads to period clustering in the observed AXP-SGR period range under a wide range of initial conditions. The timescale t{sub 0} for the early evolution of the fall back disk, and the final stages of fall back disk evolution, when the disk becomes passive, are the crucial determinants of the evolution. The disk becomes passive at temperatures around 100 K, which provides a natural cutoff for the X-ray luminosity and defines the end of evolution in the observable AXP and SGR phase. This low value for the minimum temperature for active disk turbulence indicates that the fall back disks are active up to a large radius, {approx}>10{sup 12} cm. We find that transient AXPs and SGRs are likely to be older than their persistent cousins. A fall back disk with mass transfer rates corresponding to the low quiescent X-ray luminosities of the transient sources in early evolutionary phases would have a relatively lower initial mass, such that the mass-flow rate in the disk is not sufficient for the inner disk to penetrate into the light cylinder of the young neutron star, making mass accretion onto the neutron star impossible. The transient AXP phase therefore must start later. The model results imply that the transient AXP/SGRs, although older, are likely to be similar in number to persistent sources. This is because the X-ray luminosities of AXPs and SGRs are found to decrease faster at the end of their evolution, and the X-ray luminosities of transient AXP and SGRs in quiescence lie

  7. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT X-RAY COUNTERPART AND A PARSEC-LONG X-RAY TAIL FOR THE MIDDLE-AGED, {gamma}-RAY-ONLY PULSAR PSR J0357+3205

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Bignami, G. F.; Marelli, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Mignani, R. P.; Hummel, W.; Collins, S.; Shearer, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Belfiore, A.

    2011-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting {gamma}-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, {approx}40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged ({tau}{sub C} {approx} 0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (E-dot{sub rot}{approx}6x10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}), indeed the lowest among non-recycled {gamma}-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index {Gamma} = 2.53 {+-} 0.25). The absorbing column (N{sub H} = 8 {+-} 4 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from energetic particles from the pulsar wind, possibly similar to other elongated X-ray tails associated with rotation-powered pulsars and explained as bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). However, energetic arguments as well as the peculiar morphology of the diffuse feature associated with PSR J0357+3205 make the bow-shock PWN interpretation rather challenging.

  8. Chandra X-ray Observation of a Mature Cloud-Shock Interaction in the Bright Eastern Knot of Puppis A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Flanagan, Kathryn A.; Petre, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray images and spectra of the most prominent cloud-shock interaction region in the Puppis A supernova remnant. The Bright Eastern Knot (BEK) has two main morphological components: (1) a bright compact knot that lies directly behind the apex of an indentation in the eastern X-ray boundary and (2) lying 1 westward behind the shock, a curved vertical structure (bar) that is separated from a smaller bright cloud (cap) by faint diffuse emission. Based on hardness images and spectra, we identify the bar and cap as a single shocked interstellar cloud. Its morphology strongly resembles the "voided sphere" structures seen at late times in Klein et al. experimental simulat.ions of cloud-shock interactions, when the crushing of the cloud by shear instabilities is well underway. We infer an intera.ction time of roughly cloud-crushing timescales, which translates to 2000-4000 years, based on the X-ray temperature, physical size, and estimated expansion of the shocked cloud. This is the first X-ray identified example of a cloud-shock interaction in this advanced phase. Closer t o the shock front, the X-ray emission of the compact knot in the eastern part of the BEK region implies a recent interaction with relatively denser gas, some of which lies in front of the remnant. The complex spatial relationship of the X-ray emission of the compact knot to optical [O III] emission suggests that there are multiple cloud interactions occurring along the line of sight.

  9. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2014-11-01

    B2224+65 is well known to have a very high proper motion and to be associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' in the opposite direction of the motion. A jet-like X-ray feature, however, is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, the X-ray luminosity and morphology of the feature changed significantly between three Chandra observations. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the feature and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic system. The study will also have strong implications for understanding somewhat similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that have been identified in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  10. Radiation-driven evolution of low-mass x-ray binaries and the formation of millisecond pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Tavani, M. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Astronomy)

    1991-08-08

    Recent data on low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and millisecond pulsars (MSPs) pose a challenge to evolutionary theories which neglect the effects of disk and comparison irradiation. Here we discuss the main features of a radiation-driven (RD) evolutionary model that may be applicable to several LMXBs. According to this model, radiation from the accreting compact star in LMXBs vaporizes'' the accretion disk and the companion star by driving a self-sustained mass loss until a sudden accretion-turn off occurs. The main characteristics of the RD-evolution are: (1) lifetime of RD-LMXB's is of order 10{sup 7} years or less; (2) both the orbital period gap and the X-ray luminosity may be consequences of RD-evolution of LMXB's containing lower main sequence and degeneration companion stars; (3) the companion star may transfer mass to the primary even if it underfills its Roche lobe; (4) a class of recycled MSPs can continue to vaporize the low-mass companions by a strong pulsar wind even after the accretion turn-off; (5) the RD-evolutionary model resolves the apparent statistical descrepancy between the number of MSPs and their LMXB progenitors in the Galaxy. We discuss the implications of the discovery of single MSPs in low-density globular clusters and the recent measurements of short orbital timescales of four LMXBs. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Deep Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of AWM 7 - I. Investigating X-ray surface brightness fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the levels of small-scale structure in surface brightness images of the core of the X-ray bright cool-core galaxy cluster AWM 7. After subtraction of a model of the smooth cluster emission, we find a number of approximately radial surface brightness depressions which are not present in simulated images and are seen in both the Chandra and XMM-Newton data. The depressions are most strongly seen in the south of the cluster and have a magnitude of around 4 per cent in surface brightness. We see these features in both an energy band sensitive to the density (0.6-5 keV) and a band more sensitive to the pressure (3.5-7.5 keV). Histograms of surface brightness in the data, when compared to realizations of a smooth model, reveal stronger surface brightness variations. We use the Δ-variance technique to characterize the magnitude of the fluctuations as a function of length scale. We find that the spectrum in the 0.6-5 keV band is flatter than expected for Kolmogorov index fluctuations. If characterized by a power spectrum, on large scales it would have an index around -1.7, rather than -3.7. The implied three-dimensional (3D) density fluctuations have a standard deviation of around 4 per cent. The implied 3D pressure variations are at most 4 per cent. Most of the longer scale power in the density spectrum is contributed by the southern half of the cluster, where the depressions are seen. The density variations implied by the spectrum of the northern sector have a standard deviation of about 2 per cent.

  12. Broad-band spectral analysis of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintore, F.; Sanna, A.; Di Salvo, T.; Del Santo, M.; Riggio, A.; D'Aì, A.; Burderi, L.; Scarano, F.; Iaria, R.

    2016-04-01

    We analysed a 115-ks XMM-Newton observation and the stacking of 8 d of INTEGRAL observations, taken during the raise of the 2015 outburst of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021. The source showed numerous type-I burst episodes during the XMM-Newton observation, and for this reason we studied separately the persistent and burst epochs. We described the persistent emission with a combination of two soft thermal components, a cold thermal Comptonization component (˜2 keV) and an additional hard X-ray emission described by a power law (Γ ˜ 2.3). The continuum components can be associated with an accretion disc, the neutron star (NS) surface and a thermal Comptonization emission coming out of an optically thick plasma region, while the origin of the high-energy tail is still under debate. In addition, a number of broad (σ = 0.1-0.4 keV) emission features likely associated with reflection processes have been observed in the XMM-Newton data. The estimated 1.0-50 keV unabsorbed luminosity of the source is ˜5 × 1037 erg s-1, about 25 per cent of the Eddington limit assuming a 1.4 M⊙ NS. We suggest that the spectral properties of SAX J1748.9-2021 are consistent with a soft state, differently from many other accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars which are usually found in the hard state. Moreover, none of the observed type-I burst reached the Eddington luminosity. Assuming that the burst ignition and emission are produced above the whole NS surface, we estimate an NS radius of ˜7-8 km, consistent with previous results.

  13. Superorbital Modulation and Orbital Parameters of the Eclipsing High-Mass X-ray Pulsar IGR J16493-4348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron B.; Corbet, R.; Pottschmidt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous infrared studies of the X-ray pulsar IGR J16493-4348 classified the system as a supergiant high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). A ~6.78 d orbital period was discovered from Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) Galactic Bulge scan observations. A coherent signal at ~20.07 d was also found using the PCA and BAT instruments, suggestive of superorbital behavior within the system. Using well-sampled PCA archival pointed data (2.5-25 keV) spanning 9.5 d, we find strong evidence for a pulse period at ~1093 s from pulse arrival time analysis and the power spectrum of the light curve after removal of low frequency noise. We present an eclipse model for the folded PCA scan and BAT 66-month snapshot light curves, which constrains the system's behavior during orbital transitions. Pulse arrival times are derived using the PCA pointed light curve, and circular and eccentric orbital solutions are provided. A 14.0 ± 2.3 M⊙ mass function is determined, which further confirms the designation of IGR J16493-4348 as a supergiant HMXB.

  14. ON THE SPIN-DOWN AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1207.4-5209

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu

    2011-06-01

    We analyze all of the archival X-ray timing data from the years 2000-2008 on the weakly magnetized central compact object (CCO) pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209 in an attempt to measure its dipole magnetic field strength via spin-down. because most of these observations were not planned for the purpose of phase-coherent timing, the resulting ephemeris is not unique, but is restricted to two comparably good timing solutions that correspond to B{sub s} = 9.9 x 10{sup 10} G or 2.4 x 10{sup 11} G, respectively, assuming dipole spin-down. One of these should be the correct value and the other one an alias. There are no spinning-up solutions. The smaller value of B{sub s} is close to the surface field of 8 x 10{sup 10} G that is measured independently from the unique absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of 1E 1207.4-5209, assuming that the lowest-energy line at 0.7 keV is the electron-cyclotron fundamental. We suggest that 1E 1207.4-5209 has the strongest magnetic field among CCOs, which would account for the unique presence of its cyclotron absorption spectrum, while other CCOs likely have even weaker fields for which the cyclotron fundamental falls below the observable soft X-ray band.

  15. Discovery of Eclipses from the Accreting Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar Swift J1749.4-2807

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markwardt, C. B.; Stromhmayer, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of X-ray eclipses in the recently discovered accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SWIFT J1749.4-2807. This is the first detection of X-ray eclipses in a system of this type and should enable a precise neutron star mass measurement once the companion star is identified and studied. We present a combined pulse and eclipse timing solution that enables tight constraints on the orbital parameters and inclination and shows that the companion mass is in the range 0.6-0.8 solar mass for a likely range of neutron star masses, and that it is larger than a main-sequence star of the same mass. We observed two individual eclipse egresses and a single ingress. Our timing model shows that the eclipse features are symmetric about the time of 90 longitude from the ascending node, as expected. Our eclipse timing solution gives an eclipse duration (from the mid-points of ingress to egress) of 2172+/-13 s. This represents 6.85% of the 8.82 hr orbital period. This system also presents a potential measurement of "Shapiro" delay due to general relativity; through this technique alone, we set an upper limit to the companion mass of 2.2 Solar mass .

  16. On the possibility of improving the orbits of satellites based on observations of isolated X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M. G.; Gadzhily, O. E.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Molkov, S. V.; Arefiev, V. A.; Pavlinsky, M. N.; Tuchin, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    At present, there is a great worldwide interest in the development of technologies that allow information about the X-ray emission from pulsating cosmic sources to be used to obtain navigation solutions for a spacecraft in deep space. In this paper, we illustrate the technique for determining the spatial position of a spacecraft based on the already existing data from the RXTE X-ray space observatory. We show that the spacecraft position toward the Crab pulsar can be determined using an X-ray detector with an effective area of about 0.6 m2 in the energy range 3-15 keV with an accuracy up to 730 m in a signal integration time of ~1000 s. Extending the energy range to 1 keV (the efficiency of the RXTE/PCA spectrometer decreases dramatically at energies below 3 keV) will allow a spacecraft position accuracy of ~400-450 m to be achieved at the same effective area and up to 300-350 m when using detectors with an effective area of ~1 m2 in the energy range 1-10 keV.

  17. DISCOVERY OF ECLIPSES FROM THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR SWIFT J1749.4-2807

    SciTech Connect

    Markwardt, C. B.; Strohmayer, T. E.

    2010-07-10

    We report the discovery of X-ray eclipses in the recently discovered accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SWIFT J1749.4-2807. This is the first detection of X-ray eclipses in a system of this type and should enable a precise neutron star mass measurement once the companion star is identified and studied. We present a combined pulse and eclipse timing solution that enables tight constraints on the orbital parameters and inclination and shows that the companion mass is in the range 0.6-0.8 M{sub sun} for a likely range of neutron star masses, and that it is larger than a main-sequence star of the same mass. We observed two individual eclipse egresses and a single ingress. Our timing model shows that the eclipse features are symmetric about the time of 90{sup 0} longitude from the ascending node, as expected. Our eclipse timing solution gives an eclipse duration (from the mid-points of ingress to egress) of 2172 {+-} 13 s. This represents 6.85% of the 8.82 hr orbital period. This system also presents a potential measurement of 'Shapiro' delay due to general relativity; through this technique alone, we set an upper limit to the companion mass of 2.2 M{sub sun}.

  18. A FAST X-RAY DISK WIND IN THE TRANSIENT PULSAR IGR J17480-2446 IN TERZAN 5

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jon M.; Maitra, Dipankar; Cackett, Edward M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2011-04-10

    Accretion disk winds are revealed in Chandra gratings spectra of black holes. The winds are hot and highly ionized (typically composed of He-like and H-like charge states) and show modest blueshifts. Similar line spectra are sometimes seen in 'dipping' low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), which are likely viewed edge-on; however, that absorption is tied to structures in the outer disk, and blueshifts are not typically observed. Here, we report the detection of blueshifted He-like Fe XXV (3100 {+-} 400 km s{sup -1}) and H-like Fe XXVI (1000 {+-} 200 km s{sup -1}) absorption lines in a Chandra/HETG spectrum of the transient pulsar and LMXB IGR J17480-2446 in Terzan 5. These features indicate a disk wind with at least superficial similarities to those observed in stellar-mass black holes. The wind does not vary strongly with numerous weak X-ray bursts or flares. A broad Fe K emission line is detected in the spectrum, and fits with different line models suggest that the inner accretion disk in this system may be truncated. If the stellar magnetic field truncates the disk, a field strength of B= (0.7-4.0)x10{sup 9} G is implied, which is in line with estimates based on X-ray timing techniques. We discuss our findings in the context of accretion flows onto neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes.

  19. X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan; Kubat, Jiri

    2012-10-01

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  20. X-Ray Photoionized Bubble in the Wind of Vela X-1 Pulsar Supergiant Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří; Skalický, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  1. The distribution of kHz QPO frequencies in bright low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, T.; Méndez, M.; Homan, J.

    2005-07-01

    We analyzed all published frequencies, ν1 and ν2, of the twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. The two frequencies are well correlated but, contrary to recent suggestions, the frequency-frequency correlation is significantly different from a ν2 = (3/2) ν1 relation. To check whether, although not following the the 3/2 relation, the QPO frequencies cluster around a region where ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2, we re-analyzed the Sco X-1 data that were used to report that ratio and show that, because the distribution of ratios of linearly correlated measurements is intrinsically biased, although the significance of the clustering around ν2/ν1 ≈ 3/2 previously reported in the case of Sco X-1 is formally correct, it does not provide any useful information about a possible underlying resonance mechanism in this source. Using the same data, we then show that the (unbiased) distribution of QPO frequencies is consistent with a uniform distribution at a 2.4σ level. To investigate this further, we analyzed a larger data set of Sco X-1 and four other sources, 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, 4U 1728-34 and 4U 1820-30. We find that for all five sources the distribution of the kHz QPO frequencies is not uniform and has multiple peaks, which have no analogy in the distribution of points in the spectral color-color diagrams of these sources. Finally, we demonstrate that a simple random walk of the QPO frequencies can reproduce qualitatively the observed distributions in frequency and frequency ratio. This result weakens the support for resonance models of kHz QPOs in neutron stars.

  2. Molecular gas in the x-ray bright group NGC 5044 as revealed by ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    David, Laurence P.; Forman, William; Vrtilek, Jan; Jones, Christine; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Lim, Jeremy; Combes, Francoise; Salome, Philippe; Edge, Alastair; Hamer, Stephen; Sun, Ming; Gastaldello, Fabio; Bardelli, Sandro; Temi, Pasquale; Ohyama, Youichi; Mathews, William; Giacintucci, Simona; Trung, Dinh-V

    2014-09-10

    An ALMA observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 5044, which resides at the center of an X-ray bright group with a moderate cooling flow, detected 24 molecular structures within the central 2.5 kpc. The masses of the molecular structures vary from 3 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} to 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} and the CO(2-1) linewidths vary from 15 to 65 km s{sup –1}. Given the large CO(2-1) linewidths, the observed structures are likely giant molecular associations (GMAs) and not individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Only a few of the GMAs are spatially resolved and the average density of these GMAs yields a GMC volume filling factor of about 15%. The masses of the resolved GMAs are insufficient for them to be gravitationally bound, however, the most massive GMA does contain a less massive component with a linewidth of 5.5 km s{sup –1} (typical of an individual virialized GMC). We also show that the GMAs cannot be pressure confined by the hot gas. Given the CO(2-1) linewidths of the GMAs (i.e., the velocity dispersion of the embedded GMCs) they should disperse on a timescale of about 12 Myr. No disk-like molecular structures are detected and all indications suggest that the molecular gas follows ballistic trajectories after condensing out of the thermally unstable hot gas. The 230 GHz luminosity of the central continuum source is 500 times greater than its low frequency radio luminosity and probably reflects a recent accretion event. The spectrum of the central continuum source also exhibits an absorption feature with a linewidth typical of an individual GMC and an infalling velocity of 250 km s{sup –1}.

  3. A Sharper Picture of X-ray Bright Galaxy Groups: Chandra Imaging and Spectroscopy of HCG 62 and NGC 741

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, J. M.; Grego, L.; David, L. P.; Ponman, T. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Harris, D. E.

    2002-04-01

    Groups and poor clusters are the locus of most galaxies in the present-day Universe and the building blocks from which clusters form. They accordingly occupy a significant place in the continuum of structure between isolated galaxies and rich clusters. Owing to the lower temperature of their intracluster gas, X-ray emission from groups produces strong lines from a broader range of elements than do hotter clusters. Here, we employ Chandra images of the X-ray bright groups HCG 62 and NGC 741 to determine spatial variations of abundance and temperature, study the origin and enrichment of intragroup gas, and examine the interactions between gas and radio sources. Of particular note are the two X-ray "cavities" in HCG 62. With extents of about 10 kpc and nearly symmetrically placed on opposite sides of the X-ray peak, these cavities most likely result from interaction between relativistic plasma produced by a recently-active nucleus in the central elliptical galaxy and the intragroup gas. This observation extends to groups the phenomenon of X-ray cavities found in Chandra data of a number of clusters. This work was supported in part by NASA grants GO0-1037X and GO1-2138X and contract NAS8-39073.

  4. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials. PMID:25607175

  5. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the IC443 Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bucciantini, Niccolo; Clarke, Tracy E.; Karovska, Margarita; Pavlov, George G.; van der Horst, Alexander; Yukita, Mihoko; Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2014-08-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar CXOU J061705.3+222127, in the supernova remnant IC443, reveal a ~5" radius ring-like morphology surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like structure oriented roughly north-south across the ring and through the pulsar's location. The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar, (2) the non-thermal spectrum and morphology of the surrounding nebula are consistent with a pulsar wind, and (3) the spectrum at greater distances is consistent with thermal emission from the supernova remnant. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion towards the southwest, appears to be subsonic: There is no evidence for a strong bow shock; and the ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium. Comparing this observation with historical observations of the same target we set a 99-% confidence upper limit to the proper motion of CXOU J061705.3+222127 to be less than 310 km/s, with the best-fit (but not statistically significant) direction toward the west.

  6. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the IC 443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Pavlov, George G.; Clarke, Tracy; Castelletti, Gabriela; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Karovska, Margarita; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-07-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXOU J061705.3+222127, in the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 reveal an ∼5″ radius ring-like structure surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like feature oriented roughly north–south across the ring and through the pulsar's location at 06h17m5.ˢ200 + 22°21‧27.″52 (J2000.0 coordinates). The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar, (2) the non-thermal spectrum and morphology of the surrounding nebula are consistent with a pulsar wind, and (3) the spectrum at greater distances is consistent with thermal emission from the SNR. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion toward the southwest, appears to be subsonic: There is no evidence either spectrally or morphologically for a bow shock or contact discontinuity; the nearly circular ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium; and the shape near the apex of the nebula is narrow. Comparing this observation with previous observations of the same target, we set a 99% confidence upper limit to the proper motion of CXOU J061705.3+222127 to be less than 44 mas yr‑1 (310 km s‑1 for a distance of 1.5 kpc), with the best-fit (but not statistically significant) projected direction toward the west.

  7. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-09-15

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  8. A broadband X-ray study of the Geminga pulsar with NuSTAR And XMM-Newton

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Halpern, Jules P.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Dufour, Francois; Kaspi, Victoria M.; An, Hongjun; Bachetti, Matteo; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first hard X-ray detection of the Geminga pulsar above 10 keV using a 150 ks observation with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observatory. The double-peaked pulse profile of non-thermal emission seen in the soft X-ray band persists at higher energies. Broadband phase-integrated spectra over the 0.2-20 keV band with NuSTAR and archival XMM-Newton data do not fit to a conventional two-component model of a blackbody plus power law, but instead exhibit spectral hardening above ∼5 keV. We find that two spectral models fit the data well: (1) a blackbody (kT {sub 1} ∼ 42 eV) with a broken power law (Γ{sub 1} ∼ 2.0, Γ{sub 2} ∼ 1.4 and E {sub break} ∼ 3.4 keV) and (2) two blackbody components (kT {sub 1} ∼ 44 eV and kT {sub 2} ∼ 195 eV) with a power-law component (Γ ∼ 1.7). In both cases, the extrapolation of the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the thermal component is consistent with the UV data, while the non-thermal component overpredicts the near-infrared data, requiring a spectral flattening at E ∼ 0.05-0.5 keV. While strong phase variation of the power-law index is present below ∼5 keV, our phase-resolved spectroscopy with NuSTAR indicates that another hard non-thermal component with Γ ∼ 1.3 emerges above ∼5 keV. The spectral hardening in non-thermal X-ray emission as well as spectral flattening between the optical and X-ray bands argue against the conjecture that a single power law may account for multi-wavelength non-thermal spectra of middle-aged pulsars.

  9. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D.H.; Feng, J.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H.A.

    2011-07-21

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  10. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Feng, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H. A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D. H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.

    2011-07-18

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  11. Broad-band spectroscopy of the transient X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during 2013 giant outburst: Detection of pulsating soft X-ray excess component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Prahlad; Naik, Sachindra; Jaisawal, Gaurava K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results obtained from detailed timing and spectral studies of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during its 2013 giant outburst. We used data from Suzaku observations of the pulsar at two epochs, i.e. on 2013 October 22 (close to the peak of the outburst) and 2013 November 22. X-ray pulsations at ∼18.81 s were clearly detected in the light curves obtained from both observations. Pulse periods estimated during the outburst showed that the pulsar was spinning up. The pulse profile was found to be single-peaked up to ∼10 keV beyond which a sharp peak followed by a dip-like feature appeared at hard X-rays. The dip-like feature has been observed up to ∼70 keV. The 1–110 keV broad-band spectroscopy of both observations revealed that the best-fit model was comprised of a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power law with EXponential cutoff (NPEX) continuum model along with a blackbody component for the soft X-ray excess and two Gaussian functions at 6.4 and 6.7 keV for emission lines. Both the lines were identified as emission from neutral and He-like iron atoms. To fit the spectra, we included the previously reported cyclotron absorption line at 12.2 keV. From the spin-up rate, the magnetic field of the pulsar was estimated to be ∼1.2×1012 G and found to be comparable to that obtained from the detection of the cyclotron absorption feature. Pulse-phase resolved spectroscopy revealed the pulsating nature of the soft X-ray excess component in phase with the continuum flux. This confirms that the accretion column and/or accretion stream are the most probable regions of the soft X-ray excess emission in KS1947+300. The presence of the pulsating soft X-ray excess in phase with continuum emission may be the possible reason for not observing the dip at soft X-rays.

  12. Monitoring Accreting X-ray Pulsars with the GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Colleen A.; Finger, Mark H.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Bhat, P. Narayana; Preece, Robert D.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Accreting pulsars are exceptionally good laboratories for probing the detailed physics of accretion onto magnetic stars. While similar accretion flows also occur in other types of astrophysical systems, e.g. magnetic CVs, only neutron stars have a small enough moment of inertia for the accretion of angular momentum to result in measurable changes in spin-frequency in a timescale of days. Long-term monitoring of accreting pulsar spin-frequencies and fluxes was demonstrated with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Here we present sample results from BATSE, discuss measurement techniques appropriate for GBM, and estimate the expected GBM sensitivity.

  13. Monitoring Accreting X-ray Pulsars with the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Finger, Mark H.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Bhat, P. Narayana; Preece, Robert D.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2007-07-12

    Accreting pulsars are exceptionally good laboratories for probing the detailed physics of accretion onto magnetic stars. While similar accretion flows also occur in other types of astrophysical systems, e.g. magnetic CVs, only neutron stars have a small enough moment of inertia for the accretion of angular momentum to result in measurable changes in spin-frequency in a timescale of days. Long-term monitoring of accreting pulsar spin-frequencies and fluxes was demonstrated with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Here we present sample results from BATSE, discuss measurement techniques appropriate for GBM, and estimate the expected GBM sensitivity.

  14. A Bright Source of High-Energy X-rays: Final Report on LDRD Project 04-FS-007

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Felter, T E; Searson, P C; Chen, M

    2005-02-03

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating pure-metal foams via a novel four-step technique based upon ion beam lithography. In this report we discuss why and how such foams are useful as bright, high-photon-energy x-ray sources; the details of the fabrication technique we employed to make such foams; the results obtained; and what we plan to do in the future to improve the technique and turn the foams so fabricated into real laser targets for high-brightness, high-energy back lighting.

  15. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Haberl, F.; Delvaux, C.; Sturm, R.; Udalski, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the results of a ˜40-d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded 1036 erg s-1 we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1σ), making it the 17th known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law (Γ = 0.63) plus a high-temperature blackbody (kT ˜2 keV) component. By analysing ˜12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability while its IR flux varied in phase with the X-ray luminosity, which implies the presence of a disc-like component adding cooler light to the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  16. The Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High-Resolution Hinode Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu; Ravindra, B.

    2015-03-01

    By using high-resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial Solar Optical Telescope spectropolarimeter and X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the problematic relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray brightness. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data were used for this study. The total X-ray brightness over active regions is well correlated with integrated magnetic quantities such as the total unsigned magnetic flux, the total unsigned vertical current, and the area-integrated square of the vertical and horizontal magnetic fields. On accounting for the inter-dependence of the magnetic quantities, we inferred that the total magnetic flux is the primary determinant of the observed integrated X-ray brightness. Our observations indicate that a stronger coronal X-ray flux is not related to a higher non-potentiality of active-region magnetic fields. The data even suggest a slightly negative correlation between X-ray brightness and a proxy of active-region non-potentiality. Although there are small numerical differences in the established correlations, the main conclusions are qualitatively consistent over two different X-ray filters, the Al-poly and Ti-poly filters, which confirms the strength of our conclusions and validate and extend earlier studies that used low-resolution data. We discuss the implications of our results and the constraints they set on theories of solar coronal heating.

  17. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5-9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ˜460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  18. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  19. Application of the relativistic precession model to the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, I. Zh.

    2016-03-01

    The observation of a pair of simultaneous twin kHz QPOs in the power density spectrum of a neutron star or a black hole allows its mass-angular-momentum relation to be constrained. Situations in which the observed simultaneous pairs are more than one allow the different models of the kHz QPOs to be falsified. Discrepancy between the estimates coming from the different pairs would call the used model into question. In the current paper, the relativistic precession model is applied to the twin kHz QPOs that appear in the light curves of three groups of observations of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057. It was found that the predictions of one of the groups are practically in conflict with the other two. Another interesting result is that the region in which the kHz QPOs have been born is rather broad and extends quite far from the ISCO.

  20. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jonathan; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D.; Zheng Zheng; Hickox, Ryan E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu

    2013-09-10

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

  1. The very massive X-ray bright binary system Wack2134 (= WR21a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, V. S.; Gamen, R. C.; Barbá, R. H.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Benaglia, P.; Solivella, G. R.; Reig, P.; Coe, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    From the radial velocities of the NIV λ4058 and HeII λ4686 emission lines, and the NV λ4604-20 absorption lines, determined in digital spectra, we report the discovery that the X-ray bright emission line star Wack2134 (= WR21a) is a spectroscopic binary system with an orbital period of 31.673 +/- 0.002d. With this period, the NIV and HeII emission and NV absorption lines, which originate in the atmosphere of the primary component, define a rather eccentric binary orbit (e = 0.64 +/- 0.03). The radial velocity variations of the NV absorptions have a lower amplitude than those of the HeII emission. Such a behaviour of the emission line radial velocities could be due to distortions produced by a superimposed absorption component from the companion. High-resolution echelle spectra observed during the quadrature phases of the binary show H and HeII absorptions of both components with a radial velocity difference of about 541kms-1. From this difference, we infer quite high values of the minimum masses, of about 87 and 53Msolar for the primary and secondary components, respectively, if the radial velocity variations of the HeII emission represent the true orbit of the primary. No HeI absorption lines are observed in our spectra. Thus, the secondary component in the Wack2134 binary system appears to be an early O-type star. From the presence of H, HeII and NV absorptions, and NIV and CIV emissions, in the spectrum of the primary component, it most clearly resembles those of Of/WNLha-type stars. Based partially on data collected at SAAO, CASLEO, LCO, CTIO and La Silla (under programme ID 68.D-0073) Observatories. In memoriam (1936-2006). ‡ E-mail: rgamen@casleo.gov.ar § Member of Carrera del Investigador CONICET, Argentina. Visiting Astronomer, Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile, and CASLEO, Argentina. ¶ Member of Carrera del Investigador CONICET, Argentina. Visiting Astronomer, Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter

  2. The donor star of the X-ray pulsar X1908+075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Núñez, S.; Sander, A.; Gímenez-García, A.; Gónzalez-Galán, A.; Torrejón, J. M.; Gónzalez-Fernández, C.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2015-06-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries consist of a massive donor star and a compact object. While several of those systems have been well studied in X-rays, little is known for most of the donor stars as they are often heavily obscured in the optical and ultraviolet regime. There is an opportunity to observe them at infrared wavelengths, however. The goal of this study is to obtain the stellar and wind parameters of the donor star in the X1908+075 high-mass X-ray binary system with a stellar atmosphere model to check whether previous studies from X-ray observations and spectral morphology lead to a sufficient description of the donor star. We obtained H- and K-band spectra of X1908+075 and analysed them with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. For the first time, we calculated a stellar atmosphere model for the donor star, whose main parameters are: Mspec = 15 ± 6 M⊙, T∗ = 23-3+6 kK, log geff = 3.0 ± 0.2 and log L/L⊙ = 4.81 ± 0.25. The obtained parameters point towards an early B-type (B0-B3) star, probably in a supergiant phase. Moreover we determined a more accurate distance to the system of 4.85 ± 0.50 kpc than the previously reported value. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Propeller effect in two brightest transient X-ray pulsars: 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, S. S.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Doroshenko, V.; Mushtukov, A. A.; Suleimanov, V.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We present the results of the monitoring programmes performed with the Swift/XRT telescope and aimed specifically to detect an abrupt decrease of the observed flux associated with a transition to the propeller regime in two well-known X-ray pulsars 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53. Methods: Both sources form binary systems with Be optical companions and undergo so-called giant outbursts every 3-4 years. The current observational campaigns were performed with the Swift/XRT telescope in the soft X-ray band (0.5-10 keV) during the declining phases of the outbursts exhibited by both sources in 2015. Results: The transitions to the propeller regime were detected at the threshold luminosities of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 1036 erg s-1 and (2.0 ± 0.4) × 1036 erg s-1 for 4U 0115+63 and V 0332+53, respectively. Spectra of the sources are shown to be significantly softer during the low state. In both sources, the accretion at rates close to the aforementioned threshold values briefly resumes during the periastron passage following the transition into the propeller regime. The strength of the dipole component of the magnetic field required to inhibit the accretion agrees well with estimates based on the position of the cyclotron lines in their spectra, thus excluding presence of a strong multipole component of the magnetic field in the vicinity of the neutron star.

  4. NuSTAR Discovery of a Cyclotron Line in the Accreting X-Ray Pulsar IGR J16393-4643

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John A.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Stern, Daniel; Mori, Kaya; Rahoui, Farid; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    The high-mass X-ray binary and accreting X-ray pulsar IGR J16393-4643 was observed by the Nuclear Spectroscope Telescope Array in the 3–79 keV energy band for a net exposure time of 50 ks. We present the results of this observation which enabled the discovery of a cyclotron resonant scattering feature with a centroid energy of {29.3}-1.3+1.1 keV. This allowed us to measure the magnetic field strength of the neutron star for the first time: B = (2.5 ± 0.1) × 1012 G. The known pulsation period is now observed at 904.0 ± 0.1 s. Since 2006, the neutron star has undergone a long-term spin-up trend at a rate of \\dot{P}=-2× {10}-8 s s‑1 (‑0.6 s per year, or a frequency derivative of \\dot{ν }=3× {10}-14 Hz s‑1). In the power density spectrum, a break appears at the pulse frequency which separates the zero slope at low frequency from the steeper slope at high frequency. This addition of angular momentum to the neutron star could be due to the accretion of a quasi-spherical wind, or it could be caused by the transient appearance of a prograde accretion disk that is nearly in corotation with the neutron star whose magnetospheric radius is around 2 × 108 cm.

  5. EXTraS discovery of an 1.2-s X-ray pulsar in M 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, P.; Israel, G. L.; Belfiore, A.; Novara, G.; Sidoli, L.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.; Haberl, F.; Salvaterra, R.; Read, A. M.; Salvetti, D.; Sandrelli, S.; Marelli, M.; Wilms, J.; D'Agostino, D.

    2016-03-01

    During a search for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton, we discovered a modulation at 1.2 s in 3XMM J004301.4+413017 (3X J0043), a source lying in the direction of an external arm of M 31. This short period indicates a neutron star (NS). Between 2000 and 2013, the position of 3X J0043 was imaged by public XMM-Newton observations 35 times. The analysis of these data allowed us to detect an orbital modulation at 1.27 d and study the long-term properties of the source. The emission of the pulsar was rather hard (most spectra are described by a power law with Γ < 1) and, assuming the distance to M 31, the 0.3-10 keV luminosity was variable, from ˜3 × 1037 to 2 × 1038 erg s-1. The analysis of optical data shows that, while 3X J0043 is likely associated to a globular cluster in M 31, a counterpart with V ≳ 22 outside the cluster cannot be excluded. Considering our findings, there are two main viable scenarios for 3X J0043: a peculiar low-mass X-ray binary, similar to 4U 1822-37 or 4U 1626-67, or an intermediate-mass X-ray binary resembling Her X-1. Regardless of the exact nature of the system, 3X J0043 is the first accreting NS in M 31 in which the spin period has been detected.

  6. PSR J2022 plus 3842: An Energetic Radio and X-Ray Pulsar Associated with SNR G76.9 plus 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Ransom, S. M.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory, Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope (GBT), and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations directed toward the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G76.9+1.0. The Chandra investigation reveals a hard, unresolved X-ray source coincident with the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology and surrounded by faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. These features suggest that an energetic neutron star is powering a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) seen in synchrotron emission. Indeed, the spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to the extended emission around the Vela pulsar. A follow-up pulsation search with the GBT uncovered a highly-dispersed (DM = 427 +/- 1 pc/cu cm) and highly-scattered pulsar with a period of 24 ms. Its subsequently measured spin-down rate implies a characteristic age T(sub c) = 8.9 kyr, making PSR J2022+3842 the most rapidly rotating young radio pulsar known. With a spin-down luminosity E = 1.2 x 10(exp 38) erg/s, it is the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab pulsar. The 24-ms pulsations have also been detected in the RXTE observation; the combined Chandra and RXTE spectral fit suggests that the Chandra point-source emission is virtually 100% pulsed. The 2-16 keV spectrum of the narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) pulse is well-fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N(sub H) = (1.7 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 22)/sq cm and photon index Gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2, strongly suggestive of magnetospheric emission. For an assumed distance of 10 kpc, the 2-10 keV luminosity of L(sub X) = 6.9 x 10(exp 33) erg/s suggests one of the lowest known X-ray conversion efficiencies L(sub X)/ E = 5.8 x 10(exp -5), similar to that of the Vela pulsar. Finally, the PWN around PSR J2022+3842 revealed by Chandra is also underluminous, with F(sub PWN)/ F(sub PSR) < or approx.1 in the 2-10 keV band, a further surprise given the pulsar's high spin-down luminosity.

  7. Orbital decay and evidence of disk formation in the x-ray binary pulsar OAO 1657-415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    OAO 1657-415 is an eclipsing X-ray binary wind-fed pulsar that has exhibited smooth spin-up/spin-down episodes and has undergone several torque reversals throughout its long history of observation. We present a frequency history spanning nearly 19 years of observations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) and from the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (Fermi/GBM). The analysis suggests two modes of accretion: one resulting in steady spin-up during which we believe a stable accretion disk is present and one that results in what appears to be a random walk in spin frequency where an unstable accretion disk forms alternating in direction ("flip flop"). Orbital elements of the pulsar system are determined at several intervals throughout this history. With these ephemerides, statistically significant orbital decay (\\dot{P}/P =(-3.40 ±0.15)×10^{-6} yr^{-1}) is established suggesting a transition between wind-fed and disk-mediated accretion.

  8. Excitation of a non-radial mode in a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Umin

    2014-08-01

    We discuss non-radial modes in mass-accreting and rapidly rotating neutron stars for the coherent frequency detected in a millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1751-305. The spin frequency of the pulsar is νspin ≅ 435 Hz and the identified frequency is νosc = 0.572 7595 × νspin. Assuming that the frequency detected is that in the corotating frame of the star, we examine r and g modes in the surface layer of accreting matter composed mostly of helium, inertial and r modes in the fluid core, and toroidal modes in the solid crust. We find that the r modes of l' = m = 1 and 2 excited by ɛ-mechanism in the surface layer can give the ratio κ = νosc/νspin ≃ 0.57 at νspin = 435 Hz, where m and l' are the azimuthal wavenumber and the harmonic degree of the modes. We also suggest a toroidal crust mode and a core r mode destabilized by gravitational wave emission for the observed ratio κ. We find that the amplitude of the core r mode of l' = m = 2 can be amplified at the surface layer by a large factor famp ˜ 102 at νspin = 435 Hz for a M = 1.4 M⊙ neutron-star model. This amplification, however, may not be large enough for the r-mode amplitude to be consistent with an estimation by Mahmoodifar & Strohmayer (2013).

  9. 4U 1626--67: A prograde spinning X-ray pulsar in A 2500 s binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, J.; Mason, K.O.; Nelson, J.E.; White, N.E.

    1981-03-15

    The binary period of 4U 1626--67 has been found from a careful analysis of its optical pulsations. A single lower frequency sidelobe of the 2.4% amplitude 7.68 s optical pulsations from this X-ray pulsar has been detected on at least three different nights in Fourier transforms of high speed photometry obtained with the CTIO 4 m telescope. The 0.42% sidelobe pulsations have a frequency which is 0.4011(21) mHz lower than the frequency of the direct pulsations near 130.26 mHz. The weaker sidelobe pulsations are interpreted as arising from X-ray to optical reprocessing on the companion star and are shifted to the lower frequency by the rotation frequency of the binary because the X-ray pulsar spins in the same sense as as the orbital motion (direct, or prograde). The orbital period is refined by connecting phases to be either 2491.06 s or 2492.32 s +- 0.13 s (the epoch for equal phases for the direct and lower sidelobe pulsations is JD 2,444,048.68162). Third harmonic (3F) structure in the lower sidelobe pulsations has enabled us to detect and measure the Doppler phase modulation due to the projected orbital motion and obtain an inclination-independent measurement of the total orbital separation. A simple geometrical model for the optical pulsations from the companion's Roche lobe is developed to calibrate the systematic effects of the measurements of orbital dimensions.With the help of a new limit of a/sub x/ sin i<0.04 lt-sec established from HEAO 1 data, the corrected values for the orbital parameters are: a/sub c/ sin i = 0.36(10) lt-sec, a/sub x/+a/sub c/ = 1.14(40) lt-sec, i = 18 /sup 0/(+18 /sup 0/, -7 /sup 0/) M/sub x/+M/sub c/ = 1.9(+2.8, -1.4) M/sub sun/, M/sub x/ = 1.8(+2.9, -1.3) M/sub sun/, and M/sub c/<0.5 Msun.

  10. High-Energy X-rays from J174545.5-285829, the Cannonball: a Candidate Pulsar Wind Nebula Associated with Sgr a East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nynka, Melania; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Perez, Kerstin M.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the unambiguous detection of non-thermal X-ray emission up to 30 keV from the Cannonball, a few arcsecond long diffuse X-ray feature near the Galactic Center, using the NuSTAR X-ray observatory. The Cannonball is a high-velocity (v(proj) approximately 500 km s(exp -1)) pulsar candidate with a cometary pulsar wind nebula (PWN) located approximately 2' north-east from Sgr A*, just outside the radio shell of the supernova remnant Sagittarius A (Sgr A) East. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum, measured up to 30 keV, is well characterized by a Gamma is approximately 1.6 power law, typical of a PWN, and has an X-ray luminosity of L(3-30 keV) = 1.3 × 10(exp 34) erg s(exp -1). The spectral and spatial results derived from X-ray and radio data strongly suggest a runaway neutron star born in the Sgr A East supernova event. We do not find any pulsed signal from the Cannonball. The NuSTAR observations allow us to deduce the PWN magnetic field and show that it is consistent with the lower limit obtained from radio observations.

  11. Gammy-Ray and Hard X-Ray Emission from Pulsar-aided Supernovae as a Probe of Particle Acceleration in Embryonic Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Kiuchi, Kenta; Bartos, Imre

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that some classes of luminous supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are driven by newborn magnetars. Fast-rotating proto-neutron stars have also been of interest as potential sources of gravitational waves (GWs). We show that for a range of rotation periods and magnetic fields, hard X-rays and GeV gamma rays provide us with a promising probe of pulsar-aided SNe. It is observationally known that young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in the Milky Way are very efficient lepton accelerators. We argue that, if embryonic PWNe satisfy similar conditions at early stages of SNe (in ˜1-10 months after the explosion), external inverse-Compton emission via upscatterings of SN photons is naturally expected in the GeV range as well as broadband synchrotron emission. To fully take into account the Klein-Nishina effect and two-photon annihilation process that are important at early times, we perform detailed calculations including electromagnetic cascades. Our results suggest that hard X-ray telescopes such as NuSTAR can observe such early PWN emission by follow-up observations in months to years. GeV gamma-rays may also be detected by Fermi for nearby SNe, which serve as counterparts of these GW sources. Detecting the signals will give us an interesting probe of particle acceleration at early times of PWNe, as well as clues to driving mechanisms of luminous SNe and GRBs. Since the Bethe-Heitler cross section is lower than the Thomson cross section, gamma rays would allow us to study subphotospheric dissipation. We encourage searches for high-energy emission from nearby SNe, especially SNe Ibc including super-luminous objects.

  12. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mura, G.; Berton, M.; Ciroi, S.; Cracco, V.; Di Mille, F.; Rafanelli, P.

    2014-10-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size r⩽0.1 pc) and it is not possible to obtain resolved images of the source, spectroscopic studies of this radiation represent the only valuable key to constrain the physical properties of matter and its structure in the center of active galaxies. Based on previous studies on the physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) and on the X-ray spectra of broad (FWHMHβ ⩾ 2000 km s-1) and narrow line (1000 km s-1 ⩽FWHMHβ ⩽ 2000 km s-1) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z=0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present analysis of the broad emission line fluxes and profiles, as well as the properties of the X-ray continuum and Fe Kα emission and we use these parameters to assess the consistency of our current AGN understanding.

  13. MAXI/GSC detection of an onset of X-ray outburst from X-ray binary pulsar GS1843-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Negoro, H.; Mihara, T.; Serino, M.; Sasaki, R.; Tanimoto, A.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sugizaki, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tsuboi, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.; MAXI Report Team

    2015-12-01

    On 2015 December 8.12 (MJD 57364.12), the MAXI/GSC nova alert system detected an X-ray flux enhancement from a position of (R.A., Dec) = (282.5, -2.0). At almost the same time, the Swift/BAT observed a X-ray brightening from GS1843-02 (GCN#18675).

  14. The 805s X-ray pulsar H2252-035

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    The X-ray flux from the 3.6 hr binary system H2252-035 is shown to be modulated at a period of 805s. The spectrum is consistent with either a 1.4 photon index power law or 20 keV thermal model. A 560t0r-350 eV equivalent width iron line is seen at approximately 6.7 keV. The possibility that this system contains a slowly rotating neutron star is discussed.

  15. Orbital Parameters and Spectroscopy of the Transient X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0115+63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Sebastian; Obst,Maria; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Fuerst, Felix; Kuehnel, Matthias; Wilms, Joern; Klochkov, Dmitry; Staubert, Ruediger; Santangelo, Andrea; Pottschmidt, Katja; Suchy, Slawomir; Rothschild, Richard E.; Caballero, Isabel; Schoenherr, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    We report on an outburst of the high mass X-ray binary 4U 0115+63 with a pulse period of 3.6s in spring 2008 as observed with INTEGRAL and RXTE. By analyzing the lightcurves we derive an updated orbital- and pulse period ephemeris of the neutron star. We also study the pulse profile variations as a function of time and energy as well as the variability of the spectral parameters. We find clear evidence for at least three cyclotron line features. In agreement with previous observations of 4U 0115+63, we detect an anti-correlation between the luminosity and the fundamental cyclotron line energy.

  16. X-ray bright points and high-speed wind streams: A preliminary analysis from Yohkoh and Ulysses data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Khan, J. I.; Uchida, Y.; Hiei, E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Strong, K. T.; Harvey, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following aspect of the solar wind mass flux, and of its variation, is examined: whether coronal plumes might be responsible for the long-term variability of the mass flux in high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes. The assumption that plumes are rooted in coronal bright points (BP's) is made. The behavior of X-ray BP's, imaged by the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT), during a seven month period when Ulysses experiments observed a series of recurrent high-speed streams, is analyzed. If plumes/BP's are sources of the wind mass flux, changes in the coronal hole BP density to mimic changes of the mass flux in high-speed streams are expected. SOHO will have the capability of measuring the solar wind speed/density at small heliocentric distances while simultaneously observing coronal BP's and coronal plumes.

  17. Discovery of Radio Pulsations from the X-ray Pulsar JO205+6449 in Supernova Remnant 3C58 with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camilo, F.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Backer, D. C.; Ransom, S. M.; Klein, B.; Wielebinski, R.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report the discovery with the 100m Green Bank Telescope of 65 ms radio pulsations from the X-ray pulsar J0205+6449 at the center of supernova remnant 3C58, making this possibly the youngest radio pulsar known. From our observations at frequencies of 820 and 1375 MHz, the free electron column density to USSR J0205+6449 is found to be 140.7 +/- 0.3/cc pc. The barycentric pulsar period P and P(dot) determined from a phase-coherent timing solution are consistent with the values previously measured from X-ray observations. The averaged radio profile of USSR J0205+6449 consists of one sharp pulse of width = 3 ms = 0.05 P. The pulsar is an exceedingly weak radio source, with pulse-averaged flux density in the 1400 MHz band of approximately 45 micro-Jy and a spectral index of approximately -2.1. Its radio luminosity of approximately 0.5 may kpc(exp 2) at 1400 MHz is lower than that of approximately 99% of known pulsar and is the lowest among known young pulsars.

  18. X-Ray and Near-infrared Observations of the Obscured Accreting Pulsar IGR J18179-1621

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M. A.; Paizis, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Chaty, S.; Del Santo, M.; Grinberg, V.; Wilms, J.; Ubertini, P.; Chini, R.

    2012-10-01

    IGR J18179-1621 is an obscured accreting X-ray pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL on 2012 February 29. We report on our 20 ks Chandra-High Energy Transmission Gratings Spectrometer observation of the source performed on 2012 March 17, on two short contemporaneous Swift observations, and on our two near-infrared (Ks , Hn , and Jn ) observations performed on 2012 March 13 and 26. We determine the most accurate X-ray position of IGR J18179-1621, αJ2000 = 18h17m52.s18, δJ2000 = -16°21'31farcs68 (90% uncertainty of 0farcs6). A strong periodic variability at 11.82 s is clearly detected in the Chandra data, confirming the pulsating nature of the source, with the light-curve softening at the pulse peak. The quasi-simultaneous Chandra-Swift spectra of IGR J18179-1621 can be well fit by a heavily absorbed hard power law (N H = 2.2 ± 0.3 × 1023 cm-2 and photon index Γ = 0.4 ± 0.1) with an average absorbed 2-8 keV flux of 1.4 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1. At the Chandra-based position, a source is detected in our near-infrared (NIR) maps with Ks = 13.14 ± 0.04 mag, Hn = 16 ± 0.1 mag, and no Jn -band counterpart down to ~18 mag. The NIR source, compatible with 2MASS J18175218-1621316, shows no variability between 2012 March 13 and 26. Searches of the UKIDSS database show similar NIR flux levels at epochs six months prior to and after a 2007 February 11 archival Chandra observation where the source's X-ray flux was at least 87 times fainter. In many ways IGR J18179-1621 is unusual: its combination of a several week long outburst (without evidence of repeated outbursts in the historical record), high absorption column (a large fraction of which is likely local to the system), and 11.82 s period does not fit neatly into existing X-ray binary categories.

  19. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin'ya; Finke, Justin; Stawarz, Łukasz; Tanaka, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  20. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  1. X-ray source brightness comparison: Rigaku rotating anode source vs. Kevex microfocus tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B

    2010-03-17

    In 2007, we began to explore alternative x-ray sources for application to refraction-enhanced (phase contrast) x-ray radiography of cryogenic NIF ignition capsules containing frozen deuterium-tritium (D-T) ice layers. These radiographs are currently obtained using Kevex microfocus tubes as backlights, and for these sources the x-ray source size is approximately 5 {micro}m. As part of this exploration, we obtained refraction-enhanced radiographs of empty plastic capsules using the Janus laser facility at LLNL, demonstrating that even large ({approx} 100 {micro}m) sources can be utilized in refraction-enhanced radiography provided the source/sample distance is sufficiently large, and provided the final x-ray detector has sufficient spatial resolution. Essentially, in the current geometry, we rely on a small source to provide spatial resolution and on the source/sample distance to provide refraction contrast, but an equally useful alternative geometry is to use a large source and rely on fine detector spatial resolution to provide spatial resolution and on the sample/detector distance to provide refraction contrast.

  2. A search for X-ray bright distant clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichol, R. C.; Ulmer, M. P.; Kron, R. G.; Wirth, G. D.; Koo, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of a search for X-ray luminous distant clusters of galaxies. We found extended X-ray emission characteristic of a cluster toward two of our candidate clusters of galaxies. They both have a luminosity in the ROSAT bandpass of approximately equals 10(exp 44) ergs/s and a redshift greater than 0.5; thus making them two of the most distant X-ray clusters ever observed. Furthermore, we show that both clusters are optically rich and have a known radio source associated with them. We compare our result with other recent searches for distant X-ray luminous clusters and present a lower limit of 1.2 x 10(exp -7)/cu Mpc for the number density of such high-redshift clusters. This limit is consistent with the expected abundance of such clusters in a standard (b = 2) cold dark matter universe. Finally, our clusters provide important high-redshift targets for further study into the origin and evolution of massive clusters of galaxies.

  3. A High X-ray Brightness State of HBL Source 1ES 0033+595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2015-09-01

    The TeV-detected HBL object of unknown redshift 1ES 0033+595 has been observed six times with X-ray Telecope onboard Swift satellite (Swift-XRT) since 2015 August 30 on the basis of our Target of Opportunity (ToO) requests of low and medium urgencies (see https://www.swift.psu.edu/secure/toop/summary.php).

  4. Bright X-ray Fe K-shell Source Development at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Mark; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J.; Barrios, M. A.; Widmann, K.; Patterson, R.; Schneider, M.; Regan, S.

    2012-10-01

    High conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell sources are being developed for High Energy Density (HED) experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high X-ray fluences. Recently, sources with high CE in the Fe K-shell have been investigated at the National Ignition Facility. These targets were 4.1 mm in diameter 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. 160 of the NIF laser beams deposited 500 kJ of 3φ light into the target in a 150 TW 3.3 ns square pulse. This laser configuration sufficiently heated the target to optimize the K-shell emission. The absolute X-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dantes, which are filtered X-ray spectrometers. Time resolved and time integrated images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to understand the heating of the target. Time integrated high resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range. Details of the experiment and CE's will be discussed. This work was done under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Defense Threat Reduction Agency IACRO no. 11-4551l, ``Research Program for X-Ray Experimentation Cap

  5. The Reawakening of the Sleeping X-ray Pulsar XTE J1946+274

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Sebastian; Mueller, Sebastian; Kuechnel, Matthias; Fuerst, Felix; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Sagredo, Macarena; Obst, Maria; Wilms, Joern; Caballero, Isabel; Potttschmidt, Katja; Ferrigno, Carlo; Rothschild, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a series of outbursts of the high mass X-ray binary XTE 11946+274 in 2010/2011 as observed with INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Swift. We discuss possible mechanisms resulting in the extraordinary outburst behavior of this source. The X-ray spectra can be described by standard phenomenological models, enhanced by an absorption feature of unknown origin at about 10 keV and a narrow iron K alpha fluorescence line at 6.4keV, which are variable in flux and pulse phase. We find possible evidence for the presence of a cyclotron resonance scattering feature at about 25 keV at the 93% level. The presence of a strong cyclotron line at 35 keV seen in data from the source's 1998 outburst and confirmed by a reanalysis of these data can be excluded. This result indicates that the cyclotron line feature in XTE 11946+274 is variable between individual outbursts.

  6. A XMM-Newton Observation of Nova LMC 1995, a Bright Supersoft X-ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orio, Marina; Hartmann, Wouter; Still, Martin; Greiner, Jochen

    2003-01-01

    Nova LMC 1995, previously detected during 1995-1998 with ROSAT, was observed again as a luminous supersoft X-ray source with XMM-Newton in December of 2000. This nova offers the possibility to observe the spectrum of a hot white dwarf, burning hydrogen in a shell and not obscured by a wind or by nebular emission like in other supersoft X-ray sources. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the calibration of the EPIC instruments at energy E<0.5 keV, using atmospheric models in Non Local Thermonuclear Equilibrium we derived an effective temperature in the range 400,000-450,000 K, a bolometric luminosity Lbolabout equal to 2.3 times 10 sup37 erg s sup-l, and we verified that the abundance of carbon is not significantly enhanced in the X-rays emitting shell. The RGS grating spectra do not show emission lines (originated in a nebula or a wind) observed for some other supersoft X-ray sources. The crowded atmospheric absorption lines of the white dwarf cannot be not resolved. There is no hard component (expected from a wind, a surrounding nebula or an accretion disk), with no counts above the background at E>0.6 keV, and an upper limit Fx,hard = 10 sup-14 erg s sup-l cm sup-2 to the X-ray flux above this energy. The background corrected count rate measured by the EPIC instruments was variable on time scales of minutes and hours, but without the flares or sudden obscuration observed for other novae. The power spectrum shows a peak at 5.25 hours, possibly due to a modulation with the orbital period. We also briefly discuss the scenarios in which this nova may become a type Ia supernova progenitor.

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Observations of the Globular Cluster M28 and its Millisecond Pulsar PSR B1821-24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Werner; Swartz, Douglas A.; Pavlov, George G.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Mignani, Roberto; Tennant, Allyn F.; Backer, Don; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2003-01-01

    We report here the results of the first Chandra X-Ray Observatory observations of the globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). We detect 46 X-ray sources of which 12 lie within one core radius of the center. We show that the apparently extended X-ray core emission seen with the ROSAT HRI is due to the superposition of multiple discrete sources for which we determine the X-ray luminosity function down to a limit of about 6 x 10(exp 30) erg/s. We measure the radial distribution of the X-ray sources and fit it to a King profile finding a core radius of r(sub c,x) approx. 11 sec. We obtain the best-fit mass of the X-ray sources to be M(sub x) approx. 1.9 solar masses. We measure for the first time the unconfused phase-averaged X-ray spectrum of the 3.05-ms pulsar B1821-24 and find it best described by a power law with photon-index Gamma approx. equal to 1.2. We find marginal evidence of an emission line centered at 3.3 kev in the pulsar spectrum, which could be interpreted as cyclotron emission from a corona above the pulsar's polar cap if the the magnetic field is strongly different from a centered dipole. The unabsorbed pulsar flux in the 0.5-8.0 keV band is approx. 3.5 x 10(exp -13) ergs/s/sq cm. We present spectral analyses of the 5 brightest unidentified sources. Based on the spectral parameters of the brightest of these sources, we suggest that it is a transiently accreting neutron star in a low-mass X-ray binary, in quiescence. Fitting its spectrum with a hydrogen neutron star atmosphere model yields the effective temperature T(sup infinity)(sub eff) = 90(sup +30)(sub -10) eV and the radius R(sup infinity)(sub NS) = 14.5(sup +6.9)(sub -3.8) km. In addition to the resolved sources, we detect fainter, unresolved X-ray emission from the central core. Using the Chandra-derived positions, we also present a preliminary report on the result of searching archival Hubble Space Telescope data for possible optical counterparts.

  8. The X-ray spectral properties of the AGN population in the XMM-Newton bright serendipitous survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, A.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Brunner, H.; Carrera, F. J.; Page, M. J.; Schwope, A. D.

    2011-06-01

    Context. X-ray surveys are a key instrument in the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Thanks to their penetrating ability, X-rays are able to map the innermost regions close to the central super massive black hole (SMBH) as well as to detect and characterize its emission up to high redshift. Aims: We present here a detailed X-ray spectral analysis of the AGN belonging to the XMM-Newton bright survey (XBS). The XBS is composed of two flux-limited samples selected in the complementary 0.5-4.5 and 4.5-7.5 keV energy bands and comprising more than 300 AGN up to redshift ~2.4. Methods: We performed an X-ray analysis following two different approaches: by analyzing individually each AGN X-ray spectrum and by constructing average spectra for different AGN types. Results: From the individual analysis, we find that there seems to be an anti correlation between the spectral index and the sources' hard X-ray luminosity, such that the average photon index for the higher luminosity sources (>1044 erg s-1) is significantly (>2σ) flatter than the average for the lower luminosity sources. We also find that the intrinsic column density distribution agrees with AGN unified schemes, although a number of exceptions are found (3% of the whole sample), which are much more common among optically classified type 2 AGN. We also find that the so-called "soft-excess", apart from the intrinsic absorption, constitutes the principal deviation from a power-law shape in AGN X-ray spectra and it clearly displays different characteristics, and likely a different origin, for unabsorbed and absorbed AGN. Regarding the shape of the average spectra, we find that it is best reproduced by a combination of an unabsorbed (absorbed) power law, a narrow Fe Kα emission line and a small (large) amount of reflection for unabsorbed (absorbed) sources. We do not significantly detect any relativistic contribution to the line emission and we compute an upper limit for its equivalent width (EW) of 230 eV at

  9. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  10. On the lack of X-ray bright Type IIP supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe) are expected to arise from red supergiant stars (RSGs). These stars have observed mass-loss rates that span more than two orders of magnitude, from less than 10^{-6} M_{⊙} yr-1 to almost 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr-1. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from at least some IIPs should reflect the larger end of the high mass-loss rates. Strangely, no IIP SNe are seen where the X-ray luminosity is large enough to suggest mass-loss rates greater than about 10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr-1. We investigate if this could be due to absorption of the X-ray emission. After carefully studying all the various aspects, we conclude that absorption would not be large enough to prevent us from having detected X-ray emission from high mass-loss rate IIPs. This leads us to the conclusion that there may be an upper limit of ˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr-1 to the mass-loss rate of Type IIP progenitors, and therefore to the luminosity of RSGs that explode to form Type IIPs. This in turn suggests an upper limit of ≲ 19 M_{⊙} for the progenitor mass of a Type IIP SN. This limit is close to that obtained by direct detection of IIP progenitors, as well as that suggested by recent stellar evolution calculations. Although the statistics need to be improved, many current indicators support the notion that RSGs above ˜ 19 M_{⊙} do not explode to form Type IIP SNe.

  11. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  12. XMM-Newton observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Be/X-ray binary pulsars active between October 2006 and June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Eger, P.; Pietsch, W.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analysed eight XMM-Newton observations toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), performed between October 2006 and June 2007, to investigate high mass X-ray binary systems. Methods: We produced images from the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and extracted X-ray spectra and light curves in different energy bands from sources that yielded a sufficiently high number of counts for a detailed temporal and spectral analysis. To search for periodicity we applied Fourier transformations and folding techniques and determined pulse periods using a Bayesian approach. To identify optical counterparts we produced X-ray source lists for each observation using maximum likelihood source detection techniques and correlated them with optical catalogues. The correlations were also used for astrometric boresight corrections of the X-ray source positions. Results: We found new X-ray binary pulsars with periods of 202 s (XMMU J005929.0-723703), 342 s (XMMU J005403.8-722632), 645 s (XMMU J005535.2-722906) and 325 s (XMMU J005252.1-721715), in the latter case confirming the independent discovery in Chandra data. In addition we detected sixteen known Be/X-ray binary pulsars and six ROSAT-classified candidate high mass X-ray binaries. From one of the candidates, RX J0058.2-7231, we discovered X-ray pulsations with a period of 291 s which makes it the likely counterpart of XTE J0051-727. From the known pulsars, we revise the pulse period of CXOU J010206.6-714115 to 967 s, and we detected the 18.37 s pulsar XTE J0055-727 (=XMM J004911.4-724939) in outburst, which allowed us to localise the source. The pulse profiles of the X-ray pulsars show a wide variety of shapes from smooth to highly structured patterns and differing energy dependence. For all the candidate high mass X-ray binaries, optical counterparts can be identified with magnitudes and colours consistent with Be stars. Twenty of the Be/X-ray binaries were detected with X-ray luminosities in the range 1.5 × 1035-5.5

  13. DISCOVERY OF {gamma}-RAY PULSATION AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BLACK WIDOW PULSAR PSR J2051-0827

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. H. K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Huang, R. H. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Takata, J.; Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S. E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2012-04-01

    We report the discovery of pulsed {gamma}-ray emission and X-ray emission from the black widow millisecond pulsar PSR J2051-0827 by using the data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer array on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Using three years of LAT data, PSR J2051-0827 is clearly detected in {gamma}-rays with a significance of {approx}8{sigma} in the 0.2-20 GeV band. The 200 MeV-20 GeV {gamma}-ray spectrum of PSR J2051-0827 can be modeled by a simple power law with a photon index of 2.46 {+-} 0.15. Significant ({approx}5{sigma}) {gamma}-ray pulsations at the radio period were detected. PSR J2051-0827 was also detected in soft (0.3-7 keV) X-ray with Chandra. By comparing the observed {gamma}-rays and X-rays with theoretical models, we suggest that the {gamma}-ray emission is from the outer gap while the X-rays can be from intra-binary shock and pulsar magnetospheric synchrotron emissions.

  14. Dynamic Ultra-Bright X-ray Laser Scattering from Isochorically Heated Cryogenic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Luke; High Energy Density Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent x-ray scattering experiments performed at the MEC end-station of the LCLS, have demonstrated novel plasma measurements of the electron temperature, pressure, and density by simultaneous high-resolution angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scattering from shock-compressed materials in the warm dense regime. Such measurements provide the structural properties relating the microscopic quantities in terms of thermodynamic properties using first-principles calculations. These studies have led us on a path where we create conditions with increasing temperatures and pressures to explore the high-energy density phase space. Specifically, we have begun experiments on hot and dense hydrogen plasmas producing energetic proton beams that find applications in fusion research and astrophysical phenomena. For our experiments with the 25 TW short pulse laser we apply repetition rates and pulse widths with a good match to the LCLS x-ray beam capabilities allowing pump-probe experiments with ultrahigh temporal resolution with very high data throughput with shot rates of up to 5 Hz. In this talk we will discuss our recent measurements that have resolved the ultrafast structural response of hydrogen to intense heating.

  15. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  16. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 1018 cm−3). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron–photon source can be ideal for pump–probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  17. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Observations of the Globular Cluster M28 and its Milisecond Pulsar PSR B1821-24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Werner; Swartz, Douglas A.; Pavlov, George G.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Mignani, Roberto; Tennant, Allyn F.; Backer, Don; Pulone, Luigi; Testa, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    We report here the results of the first Chandra X-Ray Observatory observations of the globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). We detect 46 X-ray sources, of which 12 lie within 1 core radius of the center. We show that the apparently extended X-ray core emission seen with the ROSAT HRI is due to the superposition of multiple discrete sources, for which we determine the X-ray luminosity function down to a limit of about 6 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s. We measure the radial distribution of the X-ray sources and fit it to a King profile finding a core radius of r(sub c,X) approx. = 5 11". We measure for the first time the unconfused phase-averaged X-ray spectrum of the 3.05 ms pulsar B1821-24 and find that it is best described by a power law with photon index Gamma approx. = 1.2. We find marginal evidence of an emission line centered at 3.3 keV in the pulsar spectrum, which could be interpreted as cyclotron emission from a corona above the pulsar s polar cap if the magnetic field is strongly different from a centered dipole. The unabsorbed pulsar flux in the 0.1 - 8.0 keV band is approx. = 3.5 x 10(exp -13) ergs/s sq cm. We present spectral analyses of the five brightest unidentified sources. Based on the spectral parameters of the brightest of these sources, we suggest that it is a transiently accreting neutron star in a low-mass X-ray binary, in quiescence. Fitting its spectrum with a hydrogen neutron star atmosphere model yields the effective temperature T(sub eff, sup infinity) = 90(sup +30, sub -10) eV and the radius R(sub NS, sup infinity) = 14.5(sup +6.9, sub -3.8) km. In addition to the resolved sources, we detect fainter, unresolved X-ray emission from the central core. Using the Chandra-derived positions, we also report on the result of searching archival Hubble Space Telescope data for possible optical counterparts.

  18. SXP523 = Suzaku J0102-7204 = 2XMM J010247.4-720449, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Tsujimoto, M.; Wada, Q.; Ebisawa, K.; Miller, E.; Coe, M. J.; Klus, H.; Beardmore, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    After application of an attitude correction to the Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 described in ATel #4628, we derive an improved position for the X-ray pulsar Suzaku J0102-7204 of R.A. = 01:02:46.8, and Dec. = -72:04:56 (J2000, 1 sigma uncertainty of 20 arcsec). The new position is consistent with that of the Be/X-ray binary 2XMM J010247.4-720449 in the Small Magellanic Cloud seen by XMM-Newton, Swift and Chandra (ATel #3761) and most likely all detections are from the same source.

  19. Luminosity-dependent change of the emission diagram in the X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koliopanos, Filippos; Gilfanov, Marat

    2016-03-01

    We detect variability of the Fe K α emission line in the spectrum of X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67, correlated with changes in its luminosity and in the shape of its pulse profile. Analysis of archival Chandra and RXTE observations revealed the presence of an intrinsically narrow Fe K α emission line in the spectrum obtained during the source's current high-luminosity period. However, the line was not present during an XMM-Newton observation seven years earlier, when the source was ˜three times fainter. The line is resolved by the high-energy grating of Chandra at the 98 per cent confidence level, and its small intrinsic width, σ =36.4_{-11.3}^{+15.3} eV, suggests reflection off an accretion disc at the radius R≈ (7.5_{-3.8}^{+8.2})× 10^8 cm assuming a Keplerian disk, viewed at an inclination angle of 20°. This value is consistent with the radius of the magnetosphere of the pulsar, suggesting that the line originates near the inner edge of a disc that is truncated by the magnetic field of the neutron star. Timing analysis of the XMM-Newton and RXTE data revealed a major change in the pulse profile of the source from a distinct double-peaked shape during the high-luminosity state when the line was present, to a much more complex multipeak structure during the low-luminosity state. We argue that the appearance of the line and the change in the shape of the pulse profile are correlated and are the result of a major change in the emission diagram of the accretion column, from a pencil-beam pattern at low luminosity, to a fan-beam pattern at high luminosity.

  20. Generation of ultrahigh-energy gamma rays in accreting x ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnedin, Yu. N.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic protons producing ultrahigh energy gamma rays as a result of nuclear collisions ought to be generated in close proximity to the surface of a neutron star due to accretion. The main features of the mechanism in question are a high efficiency of conversion of the gravitational energy of the accreting matter into acceleration energy and a high efficiency of the acceleration itself. It is shown that in accretion to a neutron star with a strong magnetic field, a loss cone type distribution of accreting protons is formed, which due to instability effectively generates small scale Alfven and proton cyclotron waves, as well as nonlinear waves (magneto-acoustic and Alfven solitons). The electric field of the moving solitons may accelerate the protons to energies of greater than 10(exp 15) eV. The region of acceleration is not locally isolated, but extends from its surface. New possible sources of ultrahigh energy gamma rays are predicted. They may be binary x ray systems containing neutron stars with magnetic fields of about 10(exp 9) gauss.

  1. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Metal nanoplasmas as bright sources of hard X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, P P; Taneja, P; Ayyub, P; Sandhu, A S; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2003-03-21

    We report significant enhancements in light coupling to intense-laser-created solid plasmas via surface plasmon and "lightning rod" effects. We demonstrate this in metal nanoparticle-coated solid targets irradiated with 100 fs, 806 nm laser pulses, focused to intensities approximately 10(14)-10(15) W cm(-2). Our experiments show a 13-fold enhancement in hard x-ray yield (10-200 keV) emitted by copper nanoparticle plasmas formed at the focal volume. A simple model explains the observed enhancement quantitatively and provides pointers to the design of structured surfaces for maximizing such emissions. PMID:12688936

  3. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, A; Senft, C; Thompson, K F; Feng, J; Cabrini, S; Schuck, P J; Padmore, H A; Peppernick, S J; Hess, W P

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the efficient generation of electrons from metals using multiphoton photoemission by use of nanostructured plasmonic surfaces to trap, localize, and enhance optical fields. The plasmonic surface increases absorption over normal metals by more than an order of magnitude, and due to the localization of fields, this results in over 6 orders of magnitude increase in effective nonlinear quantum yield. We demonstrate that the achieved quantum yield is high enough for use in rf photoinjectors operating as electron sources for MHz repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers. PMID:25166390

  4. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Optically Bright Planets using the Chandra Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its launch in July 1999, Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) has observed several planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn) and 6 comets. At 0.5 arc-second spatial resolution, ACIS detects individual x-ray photons with good quantum efficiency (25% at 0.6 KeV) and energy resolution (20% FWHM at 0.6 KeV). However, the ACIS CCDs are also sensitive to optical and near-infrared light, which is absorbed by optical blocking filters (OBFs) that eliminate optical contamination from all but the brightest extended sources, e.g., planets. .Jupiter at opposition subseconds approx.45 arc-seconds (90 CCD pixels.) Since Chandra is incapable of tracking a moving target, the planet takes 10 - 20 kiloseconds to move across the most sensitive ACIS CCD, after which the observatory must be re-pointed. Meanwhile, the OBF covering that CCD adds an opt,ical signal equivalent to approx.110 eV to each pixel that lies within thc outline of the Jovian disk. This has three consequences: (1) the observatory must be pointed away from Jupiter while CCD bias maps are constructed; (2) most x-rays from within the optical image will be misidentified as charged-particle background and ignored; and (3) those x-rays that are reported will bc assigned anomalously high energies. The same also applies to thc other planets, but is less serious since they are either dimmer at optical wavelengths, or they show less apparent motion across the sky, permitting reduced CCD exposure times: the optical contamination from Saturn acids approx.15 eV per pixel, and from Mars and Venus approx.31 eV. After analyzing a series of short .Jupiter observations in December 2000, ACIS parameters were optimized for the February 2003 opposition. CCD bias maps were constructed while Chandra pointed away from Jupiter, and the subsequent observations employed on-board software to ignore any pixel that contained less charge than that expected from optical leakage. In addition, ACIS was commanded to report 5 x 5

  5. Discovery of spin-up in the X-ray pulsar companion of the hot subdwarf HD 49798

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; Pintore, Fabio; Esposito, Paolo; La Palombara, Nicola; Tiengo, Andrea; Israel, Gian Luca; Stella, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The hot subdwarf HD 49798 has an X-ray emitting compact companion with a spin-period of 13.2 s and a dynamically measured mass of 1.28 ± 0.05 M⊙, consistent with either a neutron star or a white dwarf. Using all the available XMM-Newton and Swift observations of this source, we could perform a phase-connected timing analysis extending back to the ROSAT data obtained in 1992. We found that the pulsar is spinning up at a rate of (2.15 ± 0.05) × 10-15 s s-1. This result is best interpreted in terms of a neutron star accreting from the wind of its subdwarf companion, although the remarkably steady period derivative over more than 20 yr is unusual in wind-accreting neutron stars. The possibility that the compact object is a massive white dwarf accreting through a disc cannot be excluded, but it requires a larger distance and/or properties of the stellar wind of HD 49798 different from those derived from the modelling of its optical/UV spectra.

  6. A WHITE DWARF MERGER AS PROGENITOR OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 4U 0142+61?

    SciTech Connect

    Rueda, J. A.; Boshkayev, K.; Izzo, L.; Ruffini, R.; Loren-Aguilar, P.; Kuelebi, B.; Aznar-Siguan, G.; Garcia-Berro, E. E-mail: enrique.garcia-berro@upc.edu

    2013-08-01

    It has been recently proposed that massive, fast-rotating, highly magnetized white dwarfs could describe the observational properties of some of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Moreover, it has also been shown that high-field magnetic white dwarfs can be the outcome of white dwarf binary mergers. The products of these mergers consist of a hot central white dwarf surrounded by a rapidly rotating disk. Here we show that the merger of a double degenerate system can explain the characteristics of the peculiar AXP 4U 0142+61. This scenario accounts for the observed infrared excess. We also show that the observed properties of 4U 0142+6 are consistent with an approximately 1.2 M{sub Sun} white dwarf, remnant of the coalescence of an original system made of two white dwarfs of masses 0.6 M{sub Sun} and 1.0 M{sub Sun }. Finally, we infer a post-merging age {tau}{sub WD} Almost-Equal-To 64 kyr and a magnetic field B Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G. Evidence for such a magnetic field may come from the possible detection of the electron cyclotron absorption feature observed between the B and V bands at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 15} Hz in the spectrum of 4U 0142+61.

  7. The X-Ray Structure and Spectrum of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Surrounding PSR B1853+01 in W44

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Shelton, R. L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present the result of a Chandra ACIS observation of the pulsar PSR B1853+01 and its associated pulsar wind nebula (PWN), embedded within the supernova remnant W44. A hard band ACIS map cleanly distinguishes the PWN from the thermal emission of W44. The nebula is extended in the north-south direction, with an extent about half that of the radio emission. Morphological differences between the X-ray and radio images are apparent. Spectral fitting reveals a clear difference in spectral index between the hard emission from PSR B1853+01 (Gamma approx. 1.4) and the extended nebula (Gamma approx. 2.2). The more accurate values for the X-ray flux and spectral index are used refine estimates for PWN parameters, including magnetic field strength, the average Lorentz factor gamma of the particles in the wind, the magnetization parameter sigma, and the ratio k of electrons to other particles.

  8. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ˜30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  9. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ∼30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  10. Long-term timing and glitch characteristics of anomalous X-ray pulsar 1RXS J170849.0–400910

    SciTech Connect

    Muş, Sinem Şaşmaz; Göğüş, Ersin

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of our detailed timing studies of an anomalous X-ray pulsar, 1RXS J170849.0–400910, using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations spanning over ∼6 yr from 2005 until the end of the RXTE mission. We constructed the long-term spin characteristics of the source and investigated the time and energy dependence of the pulse profile and pulsed count rates. We find that the pulse profile and pulsed count rates in the 2-10 keV band do not show any significant variations in ∼6 yr. 1RXS J170849.0–400910 has been the most frequently glitching anomalous X-ray pulsar: three spin-up glitches and three candidate glitches were observed prior to 2005. Our extensive search for glitches later in the timeline resulted in no unambiguous glitches, though we identified two glitch candidates (with Δν/ν ∼ 10{sup –6}) in two data gaps: a strong candidate around MJD 55532 and another one around MJD 54819, which is slightly less robust. We discuss our results in the context of pulsar glitch models and expectancy of glitches within the vortex unpinning model.

  11. Yohkoh/SXT x-ray synoptic maps of coronal brightness and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Lemen, J. R.; Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    The Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) records on the order of 50 solar images per day in two different color filters. These provide material for the generation of synoptic maps, which compress the 3-dimensional data cube into two dimensions. We are creating synoptic maps from strips of data both at disk center and at different heights, including limb maps that are analogous to those produced by ground-based coronagraphs. The ratios of intensities in images taken in two filters provide estimates of the electron temperature in the range 1 - 3 x 10(exp 6) K. These are broad-band temperature maps; rather than maps created with discrete sampling as in the case of the coronal green and red lines. We discuss the properties of these maps and their application to the study of energy release in the corona.

  12. The large-scale surface brightness distribution of the x ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The x-ray background (XRB) and the microwave background are the dominant isotropic radiation fields available for measurement. There was extensive work on trying to determine the physical origin of the background. That is, whether it is due to a superposition of numerous faint well-known sources, such as active galaxies, an early unidentified population of AGN at high redshift, a new population of objects, or to truly diffuse processes or to a superposition of these. However, while of great intrinsic interest, these studies were not aimed at using the XRB to provide the cosmological information that was gleaned from the microwave background. An alternate approach is presented, which uses the available information on the large, greater than 5 deg, scale distribution of the sky flux to see if the XRB can provide such constraints.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  14. The relative and absolute timing accuracy of the EPIC-pn camera on XMM-Newton, from X-ray pulsations of the Crab and other pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Carrillo, A.; Kirsch, M. G. F.; Caballero, I.; Freyberg, M. J.; Ibarra, A.; Kendziorra, E.; Lammers, U.; Mukerjee, K.; Schönherr, G.; Stuhlinger, M.; Saxton, R. D.; Staubert, R.; Suchy, S.; Wellbrock, A.; Webb, N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: Reliable timing calibration is essential for the accurate comparison of XMM-Newton light curves with those from other observatories, to ultimately use them to derive precise physical quantities. The XMM-Newton timing calibration is based on pulsar analysis. However, because pulsars show both timing noise and glitches, it is essential to monitor these calibration sources regularly. To this end, the XMM-Newton observatory performs observations twice a year of the Crab pulsar to monitor the absolute timing accuracy of the EPIC-pn camera in the fast timing and burst modes. We present the results of this monitoring campaign, comparing XMM-Newton data from the Crab pulsar (PSR B0531+21) with radio measurements. In addition, we use five pulsars (PSR J0537-69, PSR B0540-69, PSR B0833-45, PSR B1509-58, and PSR B1055-52) with periods ranging from 16 ms to 197 ms to verify the relative timing accuracy. Methods: We analysed 38 XMM-Newton observations (0.2-12.0 keV) of the Crab taken over the first ten years of the mission and 13 observations from the five complementary pulsars. All data were processed with SAS, the XMM-Newton Scientific Analysis Software, version 9.0. Epoch-folding techniques coupled with χ2 tests were used to derive relative timing accuracies. The absolute timing accuracy was determined using the Crab data and comparing the time shift between the main X-ray and radio peaks in the phase-folded light curves. Results: The relative timing accuracy of XMM-Newton is found to be better than 10-8. The strongest X-ray pulse peak precedes the corresponding radio peak by 306 ± 9 μs, which agrees with other high-energy observatories such as Chandra, INTEGRAL and RXTE. The derived absolute timing accuracy from our analysis is ± 48 μs.

  15. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  16. The bright knots at the tops of soft X-ray flare loops: Quantitative results from Yohkoh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Strong, K. T.; Tsuneta, S.

    1995-01-01

    Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) observations from the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft have shown that confined bright regions are common features at the tops of flare loops throughout most of the duration of the flares. In this paper we present quantitative results for these flare knots, in relation to other flare regions, for four relatively 'simple' flares. Emission measure distributions, electron temperatures, and electron densities are derived from SXT and Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) observations. The four flares selected are dominated by what appear to be single-loop structures, with bright knots at the loop tops. The flares are neither long-duration nor impulsive events. The spatial distributions of brightness and emission measure in the flares are found to be quite similar for all four events, even though there are significant differences in dynamical behavior between at least two of the events. Temperatures and densities calculated for these flares are consistent with previous results from many solar experiments. An investigation of intensity correlations between adjacent pixels at the tops of the loops suggests the existence of local disturbances in the magnetic loops that occur on spatial scales less than the radii of the loops.

  17. Identification of HESS J1303-631 as a pulsar wind nebula through γ-ray, X-ray, and radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: The previously unidentified very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray source HESS J1303-631, discovered in 2004, is re-examined including new data from the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope array in order to identify this object. Archival data from the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite and from the PMN radio survey are also examined. Methods: Detailed morphological and spectral studies of VHE γ-ray emission as well as of the XMM-Newton X-ray data are performed. Radio data from the PMN survey are used as well to construct a leptonic model of the source. The γ-ray and X-ray spectra and radio upper limit are used to construct a one zone leptonic model of the spectral energy distribution (SED). Results: Significant energy-dependent morphology of the γ-ray source is detected with high-energy emission (E > 10 TeV) positionally coincident with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305 and lower energy emission (E < 2 TeV) extending 0.4° to the southeast of the pulsar. The spectrum of the VHE source can be described with a power-law with an exponential cut-off N0 = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-12 TeV-1 cm-2 s-1, Γ = 1.5 ± 0.2) and Ecut = (7.7 ± 2.2) TeV. The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) is also detected in X-rays, extending 2-3' from the pulsar position towards the center of the γ-ray emission region. A potential radio counterpart from the PMN survey is also discussed, showing a hint for a counterpart at the edge of the X-ray PWN trail and is taken as an upper limit in the SED. The extended X-ray PWN has an unabsorbed flux of F_2{-10 keV ˜ 1.6+0.2-0.4× 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1} and is detected at a significance of 6.5σ. The SED is well described by a one zone leptonic scenario which, with its associated caveats, predicts a very low average magnetic field for this source. Conclusions: Significant energy-dependent morphology of this source, as well as the identification of an associated X-ray PWN from XMM-Newton observations enable identification of the VHE source as an evolved PWN associated to the

  18. LB 1800 - A bright eclipsing cataclysmic variable and a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Sullivan, D. J.; Remillard, R. A.; Tuohy, I. R.; Clark, M.

    1990-01-01

    The star LB 1800 has been discovered to be a 13th mag high-excitation cataclysmic variable exhibiting novalike characteristics and partial eclipses in its light curve. It has subsequently been identified as the optical counterpart of the transient hard X-ray source 4U 0608-49 following analysis of HEAO 1 data. Both the radial velocity and photometric variations have a period of 5.56 hr, while the K-velocity of the relatively uncomplicated radial velocity curves is 134 + or - 9 km/s, leading to a mass function of 0.058 + or - 0.003 solar mass. The dynamical and eclipse solutions point to an orbital inclination of 87 deg + or - 3 deg and a mass ratio of 0.46 + or - 0.04 for the empirical secondary mass 0.55 solar mass. The implied white dwarf mass is therefore quite high at about 1.2 solar mass. The disk size, from timings of first and last contact, was estimated to be very close to that of the secondary star. Phase-dependent, double-peak emission lines are sometimes observed. It is argued that the orbital variations in the relative strengths of the red and blue peaks arise from changing hot-spot visibility.

  19. Serendipitous ALMA Detection of a Distant CO-emitting X-Ray Bright Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yoichi; Saito, Toshiki; Tsuru, Takeshi G.; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Espada, Daniel; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2014-02-01

    We report the detection of a distant star-forming galaxy, ALMA J010748.3-173028, which is identified by a 13σ emission line at 99.75 GHz (SΔv = 3.1 Jy km s-1), behind the nearby merging galaxies VV114 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3. We also find an 880 μm counterpart with ALMA Band 7 (S 880μm = 11.2 mJy). A careful comparison of the intensities of the line and the continuum suggests that the line is a redshifted 12CO transition. A photometric redshift analysis using the infrared to radio data favors a CO redshift of z = 2.467, although z = 3.622 is acceptable. We also find a hard X-ray counterpart, suggesting the presence of a luminous (L X ~ 1044 erg s-1) active galactic nucleus obscured by a large hydrogen column (N H ~ 2 × 1023 cm-2 if z = 2.47). A cosmological simulation shows that the chance detection rate of a CO-emitting galaxy at z > 1 with >=1 Jy km s-1 is ~10-3 per single ALMA field of view and 7.5 GHz bandwidth at 99.75 GHz. This demonstrates that ALMA has sufficient sensitivity to find an emission-line galaxy such as ALMA J010748.3-173028 even by chance, although the likelihood of stumbling across such a source is not high.

  20. Bright x-ray sources from laser irradiation of foams with high concentration of Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, F. Patterson, J. R.; May, M.; Colvin, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Wittstock, A.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Satcher, J. H.; Gammon, S. A.; Poco, J. F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ishihara, K.; Tanaka, N.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2014-02-15

    Low-density foams irradiated by a 20 kJ laser at the Omega laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, USA) are shown to convert more than 5% of the laser energy into 4.6 to 6.0 keV x rays. This record efficiency with foam targets is due to novel fabrication techniques based on atomic-layer-deposition of Ti atoms on an aerogel scaffold. A Ti concentration of 33 at. % was obtained in a foam with a total density of 5 mg/cm{sup 3}. The dynamics of the ionization front through these foams were investigated at the 1 kJ laser of the Gekko XII facility (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan). Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the average electron temperature but fail to predict accurately the heat front velocity in the foam. This discrepancy is shown to be unrelated to the possible water adsorbed in the foam but could be attributed to effects of the foam micro-structure.

  1. Variability Profiles of Millisecond X-Ray Pulsars: Results of Pseudo-Newtonian Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. K.; Romanova, M. M.

    2005-11-01

    We model the variability profiles of millisecond-period X-ray pulsars. We performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of disk accretion to millisecond-period neutron stars with a misaligned magnetic dipole moment, using the pseudo-Newtonian Paczyński-Wiita potential to model general relativistic effects. We found that the shapes of the resulting funnel streams of accreting matter and the hot spots on the surface of the star are quite similar to those for more slowly rotating stars obtained from earlier simulations using the Newtonian potential. The funnel streams and hot spots rotate approximately with the same angular velocity as the star. The spots are bow-shaped (bar-shaped) for small (large) misalignment angles. We found that the matter falling on the star has a higher Mach number when we use the Paczyński-Wiita potential than in the Newtonian case. Having obtained the surface distribution of the emitted flux, we calculated the variability curves of the star, taking into account general relativistic, Doppler, and light-travel time effects. We found that general relativistic effects decrease the pulse fraction (flatten the light curve), while Doppler and light-travel time effects increase it and distort the light curve. We also found that the light curves from our hot spots are reproduced reasonably well by spots with a Gaussian flux distribution centered at the magnetic poles. We also calculated the observed image of the star in a few cases and saw that for certain orientations, both the antipodal hot spots are simultaneously visible, as noted by earlier authors.

  2. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  3. On the Nature of X-Ray Surface Brightness Fluctuations in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, P.; Churazov, E.; Zhuravleva, I.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7‧ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3‧ from the center. For features of ˜5-10 kpc, we show that the central 4‧ × 4‧ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14‧ × 14‧ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ˜30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  4. MAXI/GSC detection of a recent low-level X-ray activity and a bright hard X-ray flare from V404 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, J.; Negoro, H.; Kawai, N.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Tsuboi, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2015 December 23, a series of hard X-rays detections of the Galactic black hole candidate V404 Cyg (GS 2023+338) were reported with Swift-BAT (Barthelmy et al 2015 GCN #18716; ATel #8455), Fermi-GBM (Jenke at al 2015, GCN #18719; ATel #8457), and INTEGRAL-IBIS/ISGRI (Malyshev et al. ATel #8458).

  5. An X-ray Pulsar with a Superstrong Magnetic Field in the Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater SGR1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Dieters, S.; Strohmayer, T.; vanParadijs, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Hurley, K.; Kommers, J.; Smith, I.; Frail, D.; Murakami, T.

    1998-01-01

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) emit multiple, brief (approximately O.1 s) intense outbursts of low-energy gamma-rays. They are extremely rare; three are known in our galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Two SGRs are associated with young supernova remnants (SNRs), and therefore most probably with neutron stars, but it remains a puzzle why SGRs are so different from 'normal' radio pulsars. Here we report the discovery of pulsations in the persistent X-ray flux of SGR1806-20, with a period of 7.47 s and a spindown rate of 2.6 x 10(exp -3) s/yr. We argue that the spindown is due to magnetic dipole emission and find that the pulsar age and (dipolar) magnetic field strength are approximately 1500 years and 8 x 10(exp 14) gauss, respectively. Our observations demonstrate the existence of 'magnetars', neutron stars with magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those of radio pulsars, and support earlier suggestions that SGR bursts are caused by neutron-star 'crust-quakes' produced by magnetic stresses. The 'magnetar' birth rate is about one per millenium, a substantial fraction of that of radio pulsars. Thus our results may explain why some SNRs have no radio pulsars.

  6. SXP 1062, a young Be X-ray binary pulsar with long spin period. Implications for the neutron star birth spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Filipović, M. D.; Pietsch, W.; Crawford, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is ideally suited to investigating the recent star formation history from X-ray source population studies. It harbours a large number of Be/X-ray binaries (Be stars with an accreting neutron star as companion), and the supernova remnants can be easily resolved with imaging X-ray instruments. Aims: We search for new supernova remnants in the SMC and in particular for composite remnants with a central X-ray source. Methods: We study the morphology of newly found candidate supernova remnants using radio, optical and X-ray images and investigate their X-ray spectra. Results: Here we report on the discovery of the new supernova remnant around the recently discovered Be/X-ray binary pulsar CXO J012745.97-733256.5 = SXP 1062 in radio and X-ray images. The Be/X-ray binary system is found near the centre of the supernova remnant, which is located at the outer edge of the eastern wing of the SMC. The remnant is oxygen-rich, indicating that it developed from a type Ib event. From XMM-Newton observations we find that the neutron star with a spin period of 1062 s (the second longest known in the SMC) shows a very high average spin-down rate of 0.26 s per day over the observing period of 18 days. Conclusions: From the currently accepted models, our estimated age of around 10 000-25 000 years for the supernova remnant is not long enough to spin down the neutron star from a few 10 ms to its current value. Assuming an upper limit of 25 000 years for the age of the neutron star and the extreme case that the neutron star was spun down by the accretion torque that we have measured during the XMM-Newton observations since its birth, a lower limit of 0.5 s for the birth spin period is inferred. For more realistic, smaller long-term average accretion torques our results suggest that the neutron star was born with a correspondingly longer spin period. This implies that neutron stars in Be/X-ray binaries with long spin periods can be much younger

  7. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2): AN EVOLVED PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, H.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R. E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2013-09-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) studies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have opened a new window to address the physics of pulsar winds, zoom on their interaction with their hosting supernova remnant (SNR) and interstellar medium, and identify their powering engines. We here present a new 70 ks, plus an archived 18 ks, Chandra ACIS observation of the SNR CTB 87 (G74.9+1.2), classified as a PWN with unusual radio properties and poorly studied in X-rays. We find that the peak of the X-ray emission is clearly offset from the peak of the radio emission by {approx}100'' and located at the southeastern edge of the radio nebula. We detect a point source-the putative pulsar-at the peak of the X-ray emission and study its spectrum separately from the PWN. This new point source, CXOU J201609.2+371110, is surrounded by a compact nebula displaying a torus-like structure and possibly a jet. A more extended diffuse nebula is offset from the radio nebula, extending from the point source to the northwest for {approx}250''. The spectra of the point source, compact nebula, and extended diffuse nebula are all well described by a power-law model with a photon index of 1.1 (0.7-1.6), 1.2 (0.9-1.4), and 1.7 (1.5-1.8), respectively, for a column density N{sub H} = 1.38 (1.21-1.57) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (90% confidence). The total X-ray luminosity of the source is {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} at an assumed distance of 6.1 kpc, with {approx}2% and 6% contribution from the point source and compact nebula, respectively. The observed properties suggest that CTB 87 is an evolved ({approx}5-28 kyr) PWN, with the extended radio emission likely a ''relic'' PWN, as in Vela-X and G327.1-1.1. To date, however, there is no evidence for thermal X-ray emission from this SNR, and the SNR shell is still missing, suggesting expansion into a low-density medium (n{sub 0} < 0.2 D{sup -1/2}{sub 6.1} cm{sup -3}), likely caused by a stellar wind bubble blown by the

  8. Systematic X-ray Mapping of Metal-Rich Ejecta in Bright Supernova Remnants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenck, Andrew; Park, Sangwook; Bhalerao, Jayant; Post, Seth; Alan, Neslihan; Abualfoul, Mujahed

    2015-01-01

    We apply our adaptive mesh technique coupled with simple automated NEI spectral modelings for archival Chandra data of several bright supernova remnants (SNRs) DEML71, N132D, E0102-72.3, G292.0+1.8, G299.2-2.9, Kepler, and Tycho. Based on the chi-square distributions of these model fits, we identify regions in which metal elements are enhanced compared to the circumstellar/interstellar abundances, and thus map over-abundant ejecta regions throughout these SNRs. With these maps we also reveal spatial structures of the individual ejecta elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe. We find that this simple chi-square mapping is effective to study spatial distributions of ejecta elements without performing extensive spectral model fits for individual sub-regions in SNRs. These ejecta maps may also be useful to reveal global structures such as the contact discontinuity. We present our preliminary results demonstrating the utility of this method.

  9. Conical crystal spectrograph for high brightness x-ray Kα spectroscopy in subpicosecond laser-solid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolli, E.; Koenig, M.; Boudenne, J. M.; Perelli, E.; Batani, D.; Hall, T. A.

    2004-06-01

    A high brightness crystal spectrograph was designed and successfully used to study the x-ray Kα spectrum of aluminum as a diagnostic for target heating due to suprathermal electrons in subpicosecond laser-solid interaction experiments. Conical geometry was chosen in order to enhance spatial focusing, since an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio was expected for the photon flux, and to have a reasonable spectral range while occupying only a small solid angle within the target chamber. Very high image brightness is obtained through strong spatial focusing, as well as good spectral resolution. A simple analytical model and three-dimensional numerical simulation are presented to describe the crystal characteristics. The performance of the spectrograph was tested both on an optical bench and with a ray-tracing code. The experimental spectra allowed us to estimate the target temperature and characterize the fast electron transport. The spectrograph is considered to be particularly useful, in the configuration described here, for high power laser experiments where the solid angle accessible to the spectrograph is small and blast and debris damage from the laser produced plasma is significant.

  10. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  11. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  12. TRANSIENT EXTREMELY SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M3: A NEW CV X-RAY LUMINOSITY RECORD?

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. S.; Heinke, C. O.; Elsner, R. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Edmonds, P. D.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    We observed the accreting white dwarf (WD) 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in 2003 November, 2004 May, and 2005 January, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index {Gamma} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} to 8.5{sup +4.9}{sub -4.6} x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission from a WD. In 2005 January, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below {approx}0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral component. This raises the possibility that the supersoft X-ray emission seen from 1E1339 in 1992 may have shifted to the far-UV.

  13. Hard X-ray polarimetry with Astrosat-CZTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Chattopadhyay, T.; Rao, A. R.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bhalerao, V. B.; Vagshette, N.; Pawar, P.; Sreekumar, S.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray polarimetry is largely an unexplored area of an otherwise mature field of X-ray astronomy. Except for a few early attempts during the 1970s, no dedicated X-ray polarimeter has been flown during the past four decades. On the other hand, the scientific value of X-ray polarization measurement has been well known for a long time, and there has been significant technical progress in developing sensitive X-ray polarimeters in recent years. But there are no approved dedicated X-ray polarimetric experiments to be flown in the near future, so it is important to explore the polarimetric capabilities of other existing or planned instruments and examine whether they can provide significant astrophysical polarization measurements. In this paper, we present experimental results to show that the CZTI instrument onboard the forthcoming Indian astronomy mission, Astrosat, will be able to provide sensitive measurements of X-ray polarization in the energy range of 100-300 keV. CZTI will be able to constrain any intrinsic polarization greater than ~40% for bright X-ray sources (>500 mCrab) within a short exposure of ~100 ks with a 3-sigma confidence level. We show that this seemingly "modest" sensitivity can play a very significant role in addressing long pending questions, such as the contribution of relativistic jets to hard X-rays in black hole binaries and X-ray emission mechanism and geometry in X-ray pulsars.

  14. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, S.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.; Wilhein, T.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  15. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, S; Kanngießer, B; Malzer, W; Stiel, H; Wilhein, T

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns. PMID:26329204

  16. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, S. Wilhein, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.

    2015-08-15

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  17. Hercules X-1: Spectral Variability of an X-Ray Pulsar in a Stellar Binary System. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    A cosmic X-ray spectroscopy experiment onboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8 (OSO-8), observed Her x-1 continuously for approximately 8 days. Spectral-temporal correlations of the X-ray emission were obtained. The major results concern observations of: (1) iron band emission, (2) spectral hardening (increase in effective x-ray temperature) within the X-ray pulse, and (3) a transition from an X-ray low state to a high state. The spectrum obtained prior to the high state can be interpreted as reflected emission from a hot coronal gas surrounding an accretion disk, which itself shields the primary X-ray source from the line of sight during the low state. The spectral hardening within the X-ray pulse was indicative of the beaming mechanism at the neutron star surface. The hardest spectrum by pulse phase was identified with the line of sight close to the Her x-1 magnetic dipole axis, and the X-ray pencil beam become harder with decreasing angle between the line of sight and the dipole axis.

  18. RXTE Observations of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 during and after its 2008 and 2009 Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Scholz, Paul; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Swift monitoring observations of the magnetar 1E 1547.0-5408 following the pulsar's radiative outbursts in 2008 October and 2009 January. We report on a study of the evolution of the timing properties and the pulsed flux from 2008 October 4 through 2009 December 26. In our timing study, a phase-coherent analysis shows that for the first 29 days following the 2008 outburst, there was a very fast increase in the magnitude of the rotational frequency derivative \\dot{\

  19. Discovery of a cyclotron absorption line in the spectrum of the binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 observed by Ginga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.; Woo, Jonathan W.; Nagase, Fumiaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakao, Taro

    1990-01-01

    A cyclotron absorption line near 20 keV has been found in the spectrum of the massive eclipsing binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 in observations with the Ginga observatory. The line is detected throughout the 529 s pulse cycle with a variable equivalent width that has its maximum value during the smaller peak of the two-peak pulse profile. It is found that the profile of the pulse and the phase-dependence of the cyclotron line can be explained qualitatively by a pulsar model based on recent theoretical results on the properties of pencil beams emitted by accretion-heated slabs of magnetized plasma at the magnetic poles of a neutron star. The indicated field at the surface of the neutron star is 1.7 (1 + z) x 10 to the 12th G, where z is the gravitational redshift.

  20. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ho, W. C. G.; Weltevrede, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Shannon, R.; Gonzalez, M. E.

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE PULSAR WIND NEBULA ASSOCIATED WITH THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE HESS J1640-465

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiere, A.; Slane, P.; Murray, S.; Gaensler, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray observation of the very high energy gamma-ray source HESS J1640 - 465. We identify a point source surrounded by a diffuse emission that fills the extended object previously detected by XMM-Newton at the centroid of the HESS source, within the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3 - 0.0. The morphology of the diffuse emission strongly resembles that of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and extends asymmetrically to the southwest of a point source presented as a potential pulsar. The spectrum of the putative pulsar and compact nebula are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model which, for a reasonable N{sub H} value of 14 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, exhibit an index of 1.1 and 2.5 respectively, typical of Vela-like PWNe. We demonstrate that, given the H I absorption features observed along the line of sight, the SNR and the H II surrounding region are probably connected and lie between 8 kpc and 13 kpc. The resulting age of the system is between 10 and 30 kyr. For a 10 kpc distance (also consistent with the X-ray absorption) the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of the putative pulsar and nebula are L{sub PSR} approx 1.3 x 10{sup 33} d {sup 2}{sub 10kpc} erg s{sup -1} and L{sub PWN} approx 3.9 x 10{sup 33} d {sup 2}{sub 10} erg s{sup -1} (d {sub 10} = d/10 kpc). Both the flux ratio of L {sub PWN}/L{sub PSR} approx 3.4 and the total luminosity of this system predict a pulsar spin-down power around E-dotapprox4 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. We finally consider several reasons for the asymmetries observed in the PWN morphology and discuss the potential association with the HESS source in terms of a time-dependent one-zone leptonic model.

  2. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-Ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wu, Kinwah; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are reexamined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass > or approx. 50 solar masses although it has been noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Herculis system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main-sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Furthermore, a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star that intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Herculis system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  3. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass approx. greater than 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Further a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrains the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star which intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Her system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  4. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  5. Gamma-ray emission from globular clusters. Shock high energy emission from the Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63. Echoes in x-ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1995-01-01

    This grant covers work on the Compton phase 3 investigation, 'Shock High Energy Emission from the Be- Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63' and cycle 4 investigations 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' and 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae'. Work under the investigation 'Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes' has lead to the publication of a paper (attached), describing gamma-ray emissivity variations in the northern galactic hemisphere. Using archival EGRET data, we have found a large irregular region of enhanced gamma-ray emissivity at energies greater 100 MeV. This is the first observation of local structure in the gamma-ray emissivity. Work under the investigation 'Echoes in X-Ray Novae' is proceeding with analysis of data from OSSE from the transient source GRO J1655-40. The outburst of this source last fall triggered this Target of Opportunity investigation. Preliminary spectral analysis shows emission out to 600 keV and a pure power low spectrum with no evidence of an exponential cutoff. Work is complete on the analysis of BATSE data from the Be-Star/Pulsar Sustem PSR 1259-63.

  6. 10 Years of RXTE Monitoring of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Long-Term Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2007-09-01

    We report on 10 years of monitoring of the 8.7 s anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61 using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). This pulsar exhibited stable rotation from 2000 March until 2006 February; the rms phase residual for a spin-down model, which includes ν, ν˙, and ν̈, is 2.3%. We report a possible phase-coherent timing solution valid over a 10 yr span extending back to 1996 March. A glitch may have occurred between 1998 and 2000, but is not required by the existing timing data. The pulse profile has been evolving since 2000. In particular, the dip of emission between its two peaks got shallower between 2002 and 2006, as if the profile were evolving back to its pre-2000 morphology, following an earlier event, which possibly also included the glitch suggested by the timing data. These profile variations are seen in the 2-4 keV band, but not in 6-8 keV. We also detect a slow increase in the pulsed flux between 2002 May and 2004 December, such that it has risen by 36%+/-3% over 2.6 yr in the 2-10 keV band. The pulsed flux variability and the narrowband pulse profile changes present interesting challenges to aspects of the magnetar model.

  7. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Ben; Ray, Paul S.; Wolff, Michael; Wood, Kent S.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Deneva, Julia; Camilo, Fernando; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees G.; Keane, Evan F.; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Harding, Alice K.

    2015-02-10

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm{sup −3} associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M{sub ⊙} suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.

  8. EXPLORING THE X-RAY AND γ-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1723–2837

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C. Y.; Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H.; Wu, J. H. K.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Wu, E. M. H.; Lin, L. C. C.

    2014-01-20

    We have investigated the X-ray and γ-ray properties of the redback millisecond pulsar PSR J1723–2837 with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Fermi. We have discovered the X-ray orbital modulation of this binary system with a minimum that coincides with the phases of radio eclipse. The X-ray emission is clearly non-thermal in nature, which can be described well by a simple power law with a photon index of ∼1.2. The phase-averaged luminosity is ∼9 × 10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} in 0.3-10 keV, which consumes ∼0.2% of the spin-down power. We have detected the γ-ray emission in 0.1-300 GeV from this system at a significance of ∼6σ for the first time. The γ-rays in this energy range consume ∼2% of the spin-down power and can be modeled by a power law with a photon index of ∼2.6. We discuss the high energy properties of the new redback in the context of an intrabinary shock model.

  9. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb relation to the spin-up/down behavior in the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed continuous Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC) data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh and Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The "Ghosh & Lamb" relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that found by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star, because the Ghosh & Lamb model depends on these parameters. We attempted this idea, and found that an assumed distance of, e.g., 10 kpc gives a mass in the range of 1.81-1.90 solar mass, and a radius of 11.4-11.5 km, although these results are still subject to considerable systematic uncertainties, other than distance.

  10. Discovery of a 1.69 ms radio pulsar associated with the X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Deneva, Julia S.; Camilo, Fernando M.

    2014-08-01

    XSS J12270-4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9-4852 (Hill et al. 2011). In 2012 December, the source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped suddenly and spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared (Bassa et al. 2014). We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar associated with this source using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 607 MHz, confirming that this system now contains an active radio millisecond pulsar. We report on radio timing observations of the source with the GMRT and the Parkes Telescope that allow determination of the orbital parameters and eclipse behavior as a function of frequency. We also describe searches for gamma-ray pulsations from the newly-visible pulsar.We thank the staff of the GMRT who have made these observations possible. GMRT is run by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research. The Fermi LAT Collaboration acknowledges support from a number of agencies and institutes for both development and the operation of the LAT as well as scientific data analysis. These include NASA and DOE in the United States, CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS in France, ASI and INFN in Italy, MEXT, KEK, and JAXA in Japan, and the K. A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board in Sweden. Additional support from INAF in Italy and CNES in France for science analysis during the operations phase is also gratefully acknowledged.

  11. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  12. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fei; Yan, Zhen

    2011-04-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long-term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  13. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Hester, J. Jeff; Tennant, Allyn F.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Marshall, Herman L.; Karovska, Margarita; Nichols, Joy S.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  14. Evidence from Quasi-Periodic Oscillations for a Millisecond Pulsar in the Low Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, E.; Kaaret, P.; Tavani, M.; Barret, D.; Bloser, P.; Grindlay, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) near 1 kHz from the low mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 in observations with RXTE. The observations span several months and sample the source over a large range of X-ray luminosity. In every interval QPOs are present above 400 Hz with fractional RMS amplitudes from 3 to 12% over the full PCA band. At high count rates, two high frequency QPOs are detected simultaneously. The difference of their frequency centroids is consistent with a constant value of 323 Hz in all observations. During one interval a third signal is detected at 328 +/- 2 Hz. This suggests the system has a stable 'clock' which is most likely the neutron star with spin period 3.1 msec. Thus, our observations of 4U 0614+091 and those of 4U 1728-34 provide the first evidence for millisecond pulsars within low-mass X-ray binary systems and reveal the 'missing-link' between millisecond radiopulsars and the late stages of binary evolution in low mass X-ray binaries. The constant difference of the high frequency QPOs sug,,ests a beat-frequency interpretation. In this model, the high frequency QPO is associated with the Keplerian frequency of the inner accretion disk and the lower frequency QPO is a 'beat' between the differential rotation frequency of the inner disk and the spinning neutron star. Assuming the high frequency QPO is a Keplerian orbital frequency for the accretion disk, we find a maximum mass of 1.9 solar mass and a maximum radius of 17 km for the neutron star.

  15. High-brightness table-top hard X-ray source driven by sub-100-femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaupt, Jannick; Juvé, Vincent; Holtz, Marcel; Ku, Shinan; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas; Ališauskas, Skirmantas; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius

    2014-12-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in the condensed phase represents a key topic of current physics, chemistry and materials science. Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are important structure probes that have been applied in time-resolved X-ray absorption and diffraction. Optical pump/X-ray probe schemes with compact laser-driven table-top sources have allowed for tiny changes of diffracted intensity to be measured with X-ray photon statistics, which has set the ultimate sensitivity limit. To address the strong quest for a higher X-ray flux, here we present the first hard X-ray plasma source driven by intense mid-infrared sub-100-fs pulses at 3.9 μm. The comparably long optical period allows for accelerating electrons from the Cu target to very high kinetic energies and for generating a characteristic Kα flux of 109 photons per pulse, 25 times more than with our 800 nm driver. Theoretical simulations account for the experimental results in a wide range of driving fields and predict a further enhancement of X-ray flux.

  16. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C D

    2015-07-24

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications. PMID:26252685

  17. Generation of Bright, Spatially Coherent Soft X-Ray High Harmonics in a Hollow Waveguide Using Two-Color Synthesized Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Stein, Gregory J.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lin, C. D.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the efficient generation of low-divergence high-order harmonics driven by waveform-optimized laser pulses in a gas-filled hollow waveguide. The drive waveform is obtained by synthesizing two-color laser pulses, optimized such that highest harmonic yields are emitted from each atom. Optimization of the gas pressure and waveguide configuration has enabled us to produce bright and spatially coherent harmonics extending from the extreme ultraviolet to soft x rays. Our study on the interplay among waveguide mode, atomic dispersion, and plasma effect uncovers how dynamic phase matching is accomplished and how an optimized waveform is maintained when optimal waveguide parameters (radius and length) and gas pressure are identified. Our analysis should help laboratory development in the generation of high-flux bright coherent soft x rays as tabletop light sources for applications.

  18. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey data. I. Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since z ~ 1.2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; R. Perfecto; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; et al

    2016-01-14

    Here, using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift.

  19. Determination of parameters of Long-Term variability of the X-ray pulsar LMC X-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molkov, S. V.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Falanga, M.

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the temporal variability of the X-ray flux measured from the high-mass X-ray binary LMCX-4 on time scales from several tens of days to tens of years, i.e., exceeding considerably the orbital period (~1.408 days). In particular, we have investigated the 30-day cycle of modulation of the X-ray emission from the source (superorbital or precessional variability) and refined the orbital period and its first derivative. We show that the precession period in the time interval 1991-2015 is near its equilibrium value P sup = 30.370 days, while the observed historical changes in the phase of this variability can be interpreted in terms of the "red noise" model. We have obtained an analytical law from which the precession phase can be determined to within 5% in the entire time interval under consideration. Using archival data from several astrophysical observatories, we have found 43 X-ray eclipses in LMC X-4 that, together with the nine eclipses mentioned previously in the literature, have allowed the parameters of the model describing the evolution of the orbital period to be determined. As a result, the rate of change in the orbital period Ṗ orb/ P orb = (1.21 ± 0.07) × 10-6 yr-1 has been shown to be higher than has been expected previously.

  20. Orbital Phase-Resolved X-ray Observations of the Black-Widow Pulsar J1446-4701

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    PSR J1446--4701 is a recently discovered radio and gamma-ray recycled pulsar in a tight binary (binary period P_b = 6.6 hr, a sin i = 1.7 R_⊙). The relativistic pulsar wind at such close proximity is expected to evaporate the low mass companion (M_{min}= 0.019 M_⊙), which should lead to an orbital phase dependence of the multiwavelength emission of this Black Widow pulsar (BWP) system. We observed the system with XMM-Newton EPIC (0.3--10 keV) and Optical Monitor (B,V) for 60 ks, covering about 2.5 binary orbits, to look for the orbital variability of its flux and spectrum. The EPIC data do not show a significant orbital variability of the flux, perhaps due to a low orbital inclination. However, the orbital phase-resolved spectral analysis allowed us to separate two spectral components: thermal pulsar polar-cap emission (kT=0.18±0.02 keV, R=216±60 m), detected throughout the orbit, and a hard power-law component (Γ = 1.4±0.6), detected only for the half-orbit around superior conjunction of the pulsar. We infer the hard non-thermal component to be the intra-binary shock emission. We did not detect an optical counterpart with the optical monitor, which sets some strong constraints on the companion. In the context of similar BWPs, we discuss the pulsar's high energy emission characteristics and intra-binary shock energetics.

  1. XMM-Newton observation of the persistent Be/NS X-ray binary pulsar RX J0440.9+4431

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Palombara, N.; Sidoli, L.; Esposito, P.; Tiengo, A.; Mereghetti, S.

    2012-03-01

    Many X-ray accreting pulsars have a soft excess below 10 keV. This feature was also detected in faint sources and at low luminosity levels, suggesting that it is an ubiquitous phenomenon. For the high luminosity pulsars (LX > 1036 erg s-1), the fit to this component with thermal emission models usually provides low temperatures (kT < 0.5 keV) and large emission regions (R ≥ a few hundred km), hence it is referred to as a "soft" excess. Nevertheless, we previously found that in persistent, low-luminosity (LX ~ 1034 erg s-1) and long-period (P > 100 s) Be accreting pulsars the observed excess can be modeled with a rather hot (kTBB > 1 keV) black-body component of small area (RBB < 0.5 km), which can be interpreted as emission from the NS polar caps. In this paper, we present an analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the Galactic Be pulsar RX J0440.9+4431, which is a poorly studied member of this class of sources. We find a best-fit period of P = 204.96 ± 0.02 s, which implies an average pulsar spin-down over the past 13 years of Ṗ ≃ 6 × 10-9 s s-1. The estimated source luminosity is LX ~ 8 × 1034 erg s-1, which is higher by a factor of less than ten compared to those obtained in the first source observations, but almost two orders of magnitude lower than those measured during the few outbursts that have been detected most recently. The source spectrum can be described with a power-law and black-body model, with kTBB = 1.34 ± 0.04 keV and RBB = 273 ± 16 m, suggesting a polar-cap origin of this component. Our results support the classification of RX J0440.9+4431 as a persistent Be/NS pulsar, and confirm that the hot black-body spectral component is a common property of this class of sources.

  2. Pulse-phased spectroscopy of X-ray pulsars as a tool for the study of physical conditions and geometry of the binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutovinov, Alexander; Tsygankov, Sergey

    Results of the pulse phase-resolved spectroscopy of the transient X-ray pulsar V0332+53 are presented. We found a strong variation of the cyclotron resonance line parameters (energy and depth) along the pulse profile, that seems to connect with observations of regions with different magnetic fields under different angles during different pulse phases. Moreover, a variability of the iron line equivalent width on different time scales (pulse period, orbital period, outburst phase) was also revealed and searched for its correlation with the continuum flux, spectral parameters, etc. We discussed a possibility to use variations of spectral parameters during a pulse for the study of the emission geometry, spatial distribution and physical conditions of the matter around the compact object and in the binary system.

  3. Thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 401-Hz accreting pulsar IGR J17498-2921: indication of burning in confined regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-05-01

    We use the 2011 Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data of the 401-Hz accreting pulsar and burster IGR J17498-2921 to perform timing analysis and time-resolved spectroscopy of 12 thermonuclear X-ray bursts. We confirm previously reported burst oscillations from this source with a much higher significance (8.8σ). We note that the bursts can be divided into three groups: big photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts are about 10 times more luminous than medium bursts, while the latter are about 10 times more luminous than small bursts. The PCA field of view of these observations contains several known bursters, and hence some of the observed bursts might not be from IGR J17498-2921. The oscillations during big bursts at the known pulsar frequency show that these bursts were definitely from IGR J17498-2921. We find that at least several of the other bursts were also likely originated from IGR J17498-2921. Spectral analysis reveals that the luminosity differences among various bursts are primarily due to differences in normalizations, and not temperatures, even when we consider the effects of colour factor. This shows burning on a fraction of the stellar surface for those small and medium bursts, which originated from IGR J17498-2921. The low values of the upper limits of burst oscillation amplitude for these bursts suggest a small angle between the spin axis and the magnetic axis. We find indications of the PRE nature of a medium burst, which likely originated from IGR J17498-2921. If true, then, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that two PRE bursts with a peak count rate ratio of as high as ≈12 have been detected from the same source.

  4. X-Ray and UV/Optical Variability of the Missing Link Binary Pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patruno, A.; Archibald, A.; Bogdanov, S.; Kaspi, V.; Tendulkar, S.; Bassa, C.; Janssen, G.; Stappers, B.; Lyne, A.

    2013-10-01

    Following the reported state change of the missing link binary PSR J1023+0038 (ATel #5513), we analysed the Swift observation started on October 18, 2013 at 05:11:50 UT with a total on-source exposure time of about 10 ks. The X-ray and UV/optical counterparts were observed with the XRT instrument in PC mode (time resolution of 2.5 s) and with the UVOT telescope with the U and W1 filters.

  5. The slow X-ray pulsar SXP 1062 and associated supernova remnant in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Sun, W.; Chu, Y.-H.; Evans, C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gruendl, R. A.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-03-01

    SXP 1062 is an exceptional case of a young neutron star in a wind-fed high-mass X-ray binary associated with a supernova remnant. A unique combination of measured spin period, its derivative, luminosity and young age makes this source a key probe for the physics of accretion and neutron star evolution. Theoretical models proposed to explain the properties of SXP 1062 shall be tested with new data.

  6. CONTINUED NEUTRON STAR CRUST COOLING OF THE 11 Hz X-RAY PULSAR IN TERZAN 5: A CHALLENGE TO HEATING AND COOLING MODELS?

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Fridriksson, J.; Brown, E. F.; Cackett, E. M.; Homan, J.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Pooley, D.

    2013-09-20

    The transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446 in the globular cluster Terzan 5 exhibited an 11 week accretion outburst in 2010. Chandra observations performed within five months after the end of the outburst revealed evidence that the crust of the neutron star became substantially heated during the accretion episode and was subsequently cooling in quiescence. This provides the rare opportunity to probe the structure and composition of the crust. Here, we report on new Chandra observations of Terzan 5 that extend the monitoring to ≅2.2 yr into quiescence. We find that the thermal flux and neutron star temperature have continued to decrease, but remain significantly above the values that were measured before the 2010 accretion phase. This suggests that the crust has not thermally relaxed yet, and may continue to cool. Such behavior is difficult to explain within our current understanding of heating and cooling of transiently accreting neutron stars. Alternatively, the quiescent emission may have settled at a higher observed equilibrium level (for the same interior temperature), in which case the neutron star crust may have fully cooled.

  7. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  8. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging of the Pulsar Wind Nebula MSH 15-52: Constraints on Particle Acceleration and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Hongjun; Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fryer, Chris L.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15-52 in the hard X-ray band (8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3-7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry. We find that the integrated PWN spectra measured with NuSTAR and Chandra suggest that there is a spectral break at 6 keV, which may be explained by a break in the synchrotron emitting electron distribution at approximately 200 TeV and/or imperfect cross calibration. We also measure spatially resolved spectra, showing that the spectrum of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509-58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models. We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50 of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the N(sub H) map. We discuss possible origins of the shell-like structure and their implications.

  9. High-energy X-ray imaging of the pulsar wind nebula MSH 15–52: constraints on particle acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15–52 in the hard X-ray band (≳8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3-7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry. We find that the integrated PWN spectra measured with NuSTAR and Chandra suggest that there is a spectral break at 6 keV, which may be explained by a break in the synchrotron-emitting electron distribution at ∼200 TeV and/or imperfect cross calibration. We also measure spatially resolved spectra, showing that the spectrum of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509–58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models. We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50'' of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the N {sub H} map. We discuss possible origins of the shell-like structure and their implications.

  10. Two-beam interferometric encoding of photoluminescent gratings in LiF crystals by high-brightness tabletop soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, G.; Ritucci, A.; Reale, A.; Arrizza, L.; Flora, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T.

    2004-11-01

    Two-beam interferometric encoding of periodic lines of permanent color centers in LiF has been obtained by use of an intense and high spatially coherent soft x-ray laser beam. A spatial resolution of the lines less than 1 {mu}m is demonstrated. We have used the 46.9 nm laser pulses (0.3 mJ, 1.7 ns at 0.2 Hz) produced in compact capillary discharges. Due to the low penetration depth of their radiation, their high brightness and spatial coherence, soft x-ray lasers can represent a powerful tool to encode integrated optical devices having low dimensionality and high spatial resolution inside optically transparent dielectrics, in extremely short exposure times.

  11. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H. T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-05-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the 0.3-10 keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of z ~ 0.5, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time (<700 s after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above ~380 GeV of 4.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been observed in the other bright X-ray GRB 130427A. A comparison between the H.E.S.S. upper limit and the contemporaneous energy output in X-rays constrains the ratio between the X-ray and VHE gamma-ray fluxes to be greater than 0.4. This value is an important quantity for modelling the afterglow and can constrain leptonic emission scenarios, where leptons are responsible for the X-ray emission and might produce VHE gamma rays.

  12. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  13. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  14. RXTE Monitoring of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937: Long-Term Variability and the 2007 March Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2009-01-01

    After three years of no unusual activity, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937 reactivated in 2007 March. We report on the detection of a large glitch (deltav/v = 1.63(2) x 10(exp -5)) on 2007 March 26 (MJD 54185.9), contemporaneous with the onset of a pulsed-flux flare, the third flare observed from this source in 10 years of monitoring with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Additionally, we report on a detailed study of the evolution of the timing properties, the pulsed flux, and the pulse profile of this source as measured by RXTE from 1996 July to 2008 January. In our timing study, we attempted phase coherent timing of all available observations. We show that in 2001, a timing anomaly of uncertain nature occurred near the rise of the first pulsed flux flare; we show that a likely glitch (deltav/v = 2.91(9) x 10(exp -6)) occurred in 2002, near the rise of the second flare, and we present a detailed description of the variations in the spin-down. In our pulsed flux study, we compare the decays of the three flares and discuss changes in the hardness ratio. In our pulse profile study, we show that the profile exhibited large variations near the peak of the first two flares, and several small short-term profile variations during the most recent flare. Finally, we report on the discovery of a small burst 27 days after the peak of the last flare, the fourth burst discovered from this source. We discuss the relationships between the observed properties in the framework of the magnetar model.

  15. Observation of intensity oscillations above X-ray bright points from the Hinode/XRT: signature of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukul; Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    2011-08-01

    We analyse the temporal image data of the quiet Sun observed by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft and Al-poly filter on 2007 March 31. We choose these temporal image data of ˜30 s cadence from 11:34:48 UT to 14:19:35 UT to study intensity oscillations above selected X-ray bright points (XBPs) with an exposure time 8.193 s of each XRT image. Using the Fourier filtering method, we reconstruct X-ray light curves for the periods outside the cone-of-influence (COI) of their power spectrum. Using the standard wavelet software, we derive the power spectra of the reconstructed light curves which are generated by filtering the original X-ray time-series at the Fourier scale (54.55 min) outside the COI period (60.18 min) free from the edge effect and inappropriate long-term periodicities. This procedure provides statistically significant and globally distributed multiple periodicities in the intensity and global wavelet power spectra of the X-ray light curves derived from the selected coronal structures. We select seven XBPs to extract their respective X-ray light curves. We find the statistically significant observed periodicities (two or three) for XBP1, XBP2, XBP4, XBP5, XBP6 and XBP7, respectively, to be (28, 15) min, (50, 20) min, (60, 20, 12) min, (51, 23) min, (35, 23, 13) min, (49, 20) min and (35, 19) min. We interpret these observed periodicities in terms of the leakage of various harmonics of magnetoacoustic waves into the higher corona. Some BPs (XBP1, XBP3, XBP5 and XBP7) show the shift in the period ratio either as (P1/P2) < 2.0 or as (P1/P3)< 3.0. This period ratio shift provides the first most likely observational signature of the density stratification in these XBPs. Other BPs (XBP2, XBP4 and XBP6) show the shift in the period ratio (P1/P2) > 2.0, which may serve as evidence for magnetic field divergence with a significant effect on the various harmonics of magnetoacoustic waves.

  16. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey. XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission-line star VFTS 399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Bartlett, E. S.; Broos, P. S.; Townsley, L. K.; Taylor, W. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Bird, A. J.; Sana, H.; de Mink, S. E.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Langer, N.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Soszyński, I.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. Aims: One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. Methods: To accomplish this we performed a time-resolved analysis of optical, infrared and X-ray observations. Results: We found VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select He i lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that the accretor is a neutron star. Conclusions: VFTS 399 appears to be the first high-mass X-ray binary identified within 30 Dor, sharing many observational characteristics with classical Be X-ray binaries. Comparison of the current properties of VFTS 399 to binary-evolution models suggests a progenitor mass ≳25 M⊙ for the putative neutron star, which may host a magnetic field comparable in strength to those of magnetars. VFTS 399 is now the second member of the cohort of rapidly rotating "single" O-type stars in 30 Dor to show evidence of binary interaction resulting in spin-up, suggesting that this may be a viable evolutionary pathway for the formation of a subset of this stellar population. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory under program ID 182.D-0222.

  17. Comprehensive Monitoring of Gamma-Ray Bright Blazars. I. Statistical Study of Optical, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Spectral Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Karen E.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Agudo, Iván; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Casadio, Carolina; Efimova, Natalia V.; Gómez, José L.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Joshi, Manasvita; Konstantinova, Tatiana S.; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N.; Larionova, Elena G.; Larionova, Liudmilla V.; Malmrose, Michael P.; McHardy, Ian M.; Molina, Sol N.; Morozova, Daria A.; Schmidt, Gary D.; Taylor, Brian W.; Troitsky, Ivan S.

    2014-07-01

    We present γ-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 γ-ray bright blazars over 4 years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their γ-ray behavior. We derive γ-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, αγ, α X , and α o , respectively (F νvpropνα), and construct spectral energy distributions during quiescent and active states. We analyze the relationships between different spectral indices, blazar classes, and activity states. We find (1) significantly steeper γ-ray spectra of FSRQs than for BL Lacs during quiescent states, but a flattening of the spectra for FSRQs during active states while the BL Lacs show no significant change; (2) a small difference of α X within each class between states, with BL Lac X-ray spectra significantly steeper than in FSRQs; (3) a highly peaked distribution of X-ray spectral slopes of FSRQs at ~ -0.60, but a very broad distribution of α X of BL Lacs during active states; (4) flattening of the optical spectra of FSRQs during quiescent states, but no statistically significant change of α o of BL Lacs between states; and (5) a positive correlation between optical and γ-ray spectral slopes of BL Lacs, with similar values of the slopes. We discuss the findings with respect to the relative prominence of different components of high-energy and optical emission as the flux state changes.

  18. RXTE Observations of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 During and After its 2008 and 2009 Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Scholz, Paul; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Swift monitoring observations of the magnetar 1E 1547.0-5408 following the pulsar's radiative outbursts in 2008 October and 2009 January. We report on a study of the evolution of the timing properties and the pulsed flux from 2008 October 4 through 2009 December 26. In our timing study, a phase-coherent analysis shows that for the first 29 days following the 2008 outburst, there was a very fast increase in the magnitude of the rotational frequency derivative upsilon-dot, such that upsilon-dot-dot was a factor of 60 larger than that reported in data from 2007. This upsilon-dot magnitude increase occurred in concert with the decay of the pulsed flux following the start of the 2008 event. Following the 2009 outburst, for the first 23 days, upsilon-dot-dot was consistent with zero, and upsilon-dot had returned to close to its 2007 value. In contrast to the 2008 event, the 2009 outburst showed a major increase in persistent flux, relatively little change in the pulsed flux, and sudden significant spectral hardening approx 15 days after the outburst. We show that, excluding the month following each of the outbursts, and because of the noise and the sparsity in the data, multiple plausible timing solutions fit the pulsar's frequency behavior. We note similarities in the behavior of 1E 1547.0-5408 following the 2008 outburst to that seen in the AXP 1E 1048.1-5937 following its 2001-2002 outburst and discuss this in terms of the magnetar model.

  19. EXOSAT guest observer program. Binary parameters of the X-ray Pulsar 4U1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, Jeffrey E.

    1987-01-01

    The pulsing X-ray source 4U1626-67 is an accreting neutron star in a binary system with a very low mass companion. The source was observed with EXOSAT continuously for 23 hr on 30 to 31 March 1986 UT. These observations allowed the setting of a stringent upper limit on the projected semimajor axis of the orbit of the neutron star of approx. 10 light msec for the 2485-s orbital period found by Middleditch et al., and a limit of approx. 13 light msec for any other plausible orbital period. The corresponding upper limit on the mass function for the 2485-s orbital period is 1.3 x 0.000001 solar mass. It was concluded that if the orbital inclination angle, i, equals 90 deg, then the optical companion star has a mass greater than 0.02 solar mass. However, it was found that a companion star mass greater than 0.06 solar mass is required if gravitational radiation is responsible for driving the mass transfer in this system. Only for i less than 16 deg can a companion star mass this large be accommodated by the limits set on the orbital amplitude. Also presented are results on the flaring activity in 4U1626-67 on time scales of approx. 1000 s, the energy dependent pulse profiles, and the pulse period history over the past decade.

  20. X ray timing observations and gravitational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, Peter F.; Wood, Kent S.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-rich x ray observations on bright compact galactic sources will make it possible to detect many fast processes that may occur in these systems on millisecond and submillisecond timescales. Many of these processes are of direct relevance to gravitational physics because they arise in regions of strong gravity near neutron stars and black holes where the dynamical timescales for compact objects of stellar mass are milliseconds. To date, such observations have been limited by the detector area and telemetry rates available. However, instruments such as the proposed X ray Large Array (XLA) would achieve collecting areas of about 100 sq m. This instrument has been described elsewhere (Wood and Michelson 1988) and was the subject of a recent prephase A feasibility study at Marshall Space Flight Center. Observations with an XLA class instrument will directly impact five primary areas of astrophysics research: the attempt to detect gravitational radiation, the study of black holes, the physics of mass accretion onto compact objects, the structure of neutron stars and nuclear matter, and the characterization of dark matter in the universe. Those observations are discussed that are most directly relevant to gravitational physics: the search for millisecond x ray pulsars that are potential sources of continuous gravitational radiation; and the use of x ray timing observations to probe the physical conditions in extreme relativistic regions of space near black holes, both stellar-sized and supermassive.

  1. The relationship between substructure in 2D X-ray surface brightness images and weak-lensing mass maps of galaxy clusters: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Leila C.; Kay, Scott T.; Babul, Arif

    2009-12-01

    Recent X-ray and weak-lensing observations of galaxy clusters have revealed that the hot gas does not always directly trace the dark matter within these systems. Such configurations are extremely interesting. They offer a new vista on to the complex interplay between gravity and baryonic physics, and may even be used as indicators of the clusters' dynamical state. In this paper, we undertake a study to determine what insight can be reliably gleaned from the comparison of the X-ray and the weak-lensing mass maps of galaxy clusters. We do this by investigating the two-dimensional (2D) substructure within three high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters. Our main results focus on non-radiative gas dynamics, but we also consider the effects of radiative cooling at high redshift. For our analysis, we use a novel approach, based on unsharp-masking, to identify substructures in 2D surface mass density and X-ray surface brightness maps. At full resolution (~15h-1 kpc), this technique is capable of identifying almost all self-bound dark matter subhaloes with M > 1012h-1Msolar. We also report a correlation between the mass of a subhalo and the area of its corresponding 2D detection; such a correlation, once calibrated, could provide a useful estimator for substructure mass. Comparing our 2D mass and X-ray substructures, we find a surprising number of cases where the matching fails: around one-third of galaxy-sized substructures have no X-ray counterpart. Some interesting cases are also found at larger masses, in particular the cores of merging clusters where the situation can be complex. Finally, we degrade our mass maps to what is currently achievable with weak-lensing observations (~100h-1kpc at z = 0.2). While the completeness mass limit increases by around an order of magnitude, a mass-area correlation remains. Our paper clearly demonstrates that the next generation of lensing surveys should start to reveal a wealth of information on cluster substructure.

  2. Radio and X-ray observations of the gamma-ray bright quasar PKS 0528+134

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yun Fei; Marscher, Alan P.; Aller, Hugh D.; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Valtaoja, Esko

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of the z = 2.07 quasar PKS 0528+134, which has been detected as an extraordinarily luminous gamma-ray source. Its radio properties are highly variable in both total and polarized flux density. Milliarcsecond-scale maps from global very long base interferometry (VLBI) experiments, an X-ray spectrum from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations, and light curves in total flux density and polarization are used to investigate the geometry, radiation mechanism, and physical environment of the emission region in the source. The VLBI images reveal a bent jet extending toward the northeast on parsec scales, with less intense knots of emission appearing on the opposite side of the brightest spot. The position of the core usually found in such sources is unclear. The polarization angle is stable despite strong variability in polarized flux density and indicates that the magnetic field is aligned with the jet axis as defined by our 8.4 GHz image. The ROSAT X-ray flux density of PKS 0528+134 in 1991 March is measured to be 1.6 micro Jy at 1 keV, with a very steep spectral (`energy') index sigma(sub x) approximately equal to 2.2. The X-ray observations reveal the presence of cold gas along the line of sight significantly in excess of that present in the Galaxy. A strong radio flare began within two months of the first observation of a high flux of gamma-rays from PKS 0528+134 by Hunter et al. Using the geometry and spectral chacateristics determined by our VLBI observations, a synchrotron self-Compton calculation indicates that relativistic bulk motion is required in PKS 0528+134, with an estimated Doppler beaming factor delta approximately greater than 4.3, similar to the value delta approximately greater than 7 required to explain the low optical depth of the gamma-rays to photon-photon pair production. We suggest that the core activity of PKS 0528+134 is sporadic in nature, with the nonthermal outburst starting in 1991 representing

  3. Bright MeV-energy x-ray beams from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Bright MeV energy x-ray beams produced by conventional inverse-Compton-scattering sources are used for nuclear physics research, but their large size (>100-m) restricts accessibility and utilization for real-world radiological applications. By developing a method to integrate a compact laser-driven accelerator with Compton scattering, we have developed a source that produces MeV energy x-rays, but with a four orders-of-magnitude increase in peak brightness, and yet has a size (< 10 m) small enough to fit in a hospital laboratory, or even on a portable platform. Our design employs two independently adjustable laser pulses---one to accelerate electrons by means of a high-gradient laser wakefield, and one to Compton scatter. The use of two separate pulses from the same high-peak-power laser system allowed us to independently optimize the electron accelerator and the Compton scattering process. It also allowed the electron bunch and scattering laser pulse to be spatially overlapped on the micron scale, and be synchronized with femtosecond timing accuracy. The resulting x-ray photon energy was peaked at 1 MeV, and reached up to 4 MeV, which is twenty times higher than from an earlier all-laser-driven Compton source with a different design [K. Ta Phuoc et al., Nature Photonics 6, 308 (2012)]. The total photon number was measured to be 2x10^7; the source size was 5 μm; and the beam divergence angle was ˜10 mrad. The measurements were found to be consistent with a theoretical model that included realistic beams. We also discuss the results of the first application of the source, namely, the diagnosis---with micron resolution---of both the radiation source size and the emittance of a laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beam. Ultrafast nuclear science can also be enabled by MeV x-ray energy combined with ultrashort pulse duration (fs).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray bright AGN in massive galaxy clusters (Ehlert+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, S.; Allen, S. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Canning, R. E. A.; Luo, B.; Mantz, A.; Morris, R. G.; von der Linden, A.; Xue, Y. Q.

    2015-06-01

    The clusters included in our study have been drawn from wide-area cluster surveys derived from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (Truemper, 1993Sci...260.1769T, See Cat. IX/29): the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS; Ebeling et al., 1998, Cat. J/MNRAS/301/881); the ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Sample (REFLEX; Bohringer et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/425/367); and the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS; Ebeling et al., 2007ApJ...661L..13T, 2010MNRAS.407...83E). We also included clusters from the 400deg2 ROSAT PSPC Galaxy Cluster Survey (Burenin et al., 2007, Cat. J/ApJS/172/561). (1 data file).

  5. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M.; Hester, J. J.; Tennant, A. F.; Elsner, R. F.; Schulz, N. S.; Marshall, H. L.; Karovska, M.; Nichols, J. S.; Swartz, D. A.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and Pulsar During orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) read-out by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure, at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the Nebula.

  6. POLIX: A Thomson X-ray polarimeter for a small satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit; Gopala Krishna, M. R.; Puthiya Veetil, Rishin

    2016-07-01

    POLIX is a Thomson X-ray polarimeter for a small satellite mission of ISRO. The instrument consists of a collimator, a scatterer and a set proportional counters to detect the scattered X-rays. We will describe the design, specifications, sensitivity, and development status of this instrument and some of the important scientific goals. This instrument will provide unprecedented opportunity to measure X-ray polarisation in the medium energy range in a large number of sources of different classes with a minimum detectable linear polarisation degree of 2-3%. The prime objects for observation with this instrument are the X-ray bright accretion powered neutron stars, accreting black holes in different spectral states, rotation powered pulsars, magnetars, and active galactic nuclei. This instrument will be a bridge between the soft X-ray polarimeters and the Compton polarimeters.

  7. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    's clearly fading as it ages, it is still more than holding its own with the younger generations." It's likely that two forms of X-ray emission are produced in J0108: emission from particles spiraling around magnetic fields, and emission from heated areas around the neutron star's magnetic poles. Measuring the temperature and size of these heated regions can provide valuable insight into the extraordinary properties of the neutron star surface and the process by which charged particles are accelerated by the pulsar. The younger, bright pulsars commonly detected by radio and X-ray telescopes are not representative of the full population of objects, so observing objects like J0108 helps astronomers see a more complete range of behavior. At its advanced age, J0108 is close to the so-called "pulsar death line," where its pulsed radiation is expected to switch off and it will become much harder, if not impossible, to observe. "We can now explore the properties of this pulsar in a regime where no other pulsar has been detected outside the radio range," said co-author Oleg Kargaltsev of the University of Florida. "To understand the properties of 'dying pulsars,' it is important to study their radiation in X-rays. Our finding that a very old pulsar can be such an efficient X-ray emitter gives us hope to discover new nearby pulsars of this class via their X-ray emission." The Chandra observations were reported by Pavlov and colleagues in the January 20, 2009, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. However, the extreme nature of J0108 was not fully apparent until a new distance to it was reported on February 6 in the PhD thesis of Adam Deller from Swinburne University in Australia. The new distance is both larger and more accurate than the distance used in the Chandra paper, showing that J0108 was brighter in X-rays than previously thought. "Suddenly this pulsar became the record holder for its ability to make X-rays," said Pavlov, "and our result became even more interesting without us

  8. Stable High-Brightness Electron Beam System with a Photocathode RF Gun for Short Pulse X-Ray Generation by Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Yang, Jinfeng; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Endo, Akira

    2002-03-01

    A high-brightness electron accelerator system with a photocathode RF gun and an all-solid stable laser for the photocathode was installed, and a commissioning test was performed to generate short-pulse X-ray beams by the Thomson scattering method. Electron energy was boosted by a linear accelerator (linac) up to 14 MeV. Energy dispersion of the electron beams was measured to be 0.7% (rms). The normalized emittance of the electron beam was 4 πmm-mrad with a 0.4 nC bunch charge. The electron beam size at the interaction point, where the electron beams and high peak power laser light interacted, was measured to be 100 μm (rms). Good stability in the spatial and temporal domains was also obtained.

  9. Spectral variability in hard X-rays and discovery of a 13,5 years period in bright quasar 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R.

    SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN HARD X-RAYS AND DISCOVERY OF A 13.5 YEARS PERIOD IN BRIGHT QUASAR 3C273. R. K. Manchanda Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai-400005, India. ravi@tifr.res.in/Fax:+91-22-2152110 Among the large variety of active galactic nuclei, 3C 273 is the nearest quasi stellar object. The source has been studied in details in various energy bands and shows a large variety of morphological features. In the X-ray energy range 2-20 keV, the spectrum follows a power law with a spectral index of -1.5, however, the observed value of the spectral index in the 20-120 keV band shows a large variation. In the case of old archival data, the derived spectral index has a value between 1.5 and 2.2 while, the recent data from OSSE experiment showed a flat spectrum with index 0.8. Thus, to fit the GeV fluxes from the source, a break in the spectrum around 1 MeV has been proposed. In this paper we report the balloon-borne hard X-ray observations of 3C273 made with LASE instrument on Nov. 20, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20-200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20-200 keV with spectral index a = -2.26+ 0.07 and its extrapolation can fit the GeV data. The presence of steep power law index is in complete contrast to earlier observation from OSSE. From a comparison with the available archival data of the source we have discovered that 50 keV flux from the source, shows very strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years and which is also present at 100 keV and in the spectral index to a lesser degree. We discuss the periodicity in terms of precessing source geometry.

  10. NuSTAR discovery of a cyclotron absorption line in the transient X-ray pulsar 2S 1553-542

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Molkov, Sergey V.; Jenke, Peter J.; Finger, Mark H.; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of a spectral and timing analysis of the poorly studied transient X-ray pulsar 2S 1553-542 using data collected with the NuSTAR and Chandra observatories and the Fermi/GBM instrument during an outburst in 2015. The properties of the source at high energies (>30 keV) are studied for the first time and the sky position has been essentially improved. The source broad-band spectrum has a quite complicated shape and can be reasonably described by a composite model with two continuum components - a blackbody emission with the temperature about 1 keV at low energies and a power law with an exponential cut-off at high energies. Additionally, an absorption feature at ˜23.5 keV is discovered both in phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra and interpreted as the cyclotron resonance scattering feature corresponding to the magnetic field strength of the neutron star B ˜ 3 × 1012 G. Based on the Fermi/GBM data, the orbital parameters of the system were substantially improved, which allowed us to determine the spin period of the neutron star P = 9.27880(3) s and a local spin-up dot{P} ˜eq -7.5 × 10^{-10} s s-1 due to the mass accretion during the NuSTAR observations. Assuming accretion from the disc and using standard torque models, we estimated the distance to the system as d = 20 ± 4 kpc.

  11. NuSTAR discovers a cyclotron line and reveals the spinning up of the accreting X-ray pulsar IGR J16393-4643

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodaghee, Arash; Tomsick, John; Fornasini, Francesca; Krivonos, Roman; Stern, Daniel; Mori, Kaya; Rahoui, Farid; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles James; Harrison, Fiona; Zhang, William

    2016-04-01

    After several misclassifications, IGR J16393-4643 is now known to be a high-mass X-ray binary consisting of a heavily-absorbed pulsar that is likely paired with a massive and distant B star. It was observed for 50-ks by NuSTAR in the 3--79 keV energy band, complemented by a contemporaneous 2-ks observation with Swift-XRT. These observations enabled the discovery of a cyclotron resonant scattering feature with a centroid energy of 29.3(+1.1/-1.3) keV. This allowed us to measure the magnetic field strength of the neutron star for the first time: B = (2.5±0.1)×1012 G. The known pulsation period is now observed at 904.0±0.1 s. Since 2006, the neutron star has undergone a long-term spin-up trend at a rate of dP/dt = -2×10-8 s s-1 (-0.6 s per year, or a frequency derivative of dν/dt = 3×10-14 Hz s-1). In the power density spectrum, a break appears at the pulse frequency which separates the zero slope at low frequency from the steeper slope at high frequency. This addition of angular momentum to the neutron star could be due to the accretion of a quasi-spherical wind, or it could be caused by the transient appearance of a prograde accretion disk that is nearly in corotation with the neutron star whose magnetospheric radius is around 2×108 cm.

  12. Spectral and Temporal Properties of the Ultraluminous X-Ray Pulsar in M82 from 15 years of Chandra Observations and Analysis of the Pulsed Emission Using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Walton, Dominic J.; Fuerst, Felix; Hornschemeier, Ann; Zezas, Andreas; Bachetti, Matteo; Grefenstette, Brian; Ptak, Andrew; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Yukita, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery by Bachetti et al. of a pulsar in M82 that can reach luminosities of up to 1040 erg s-1, a factor of ˜100 times the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 M⊙ compact object, poses a challenge for accretion physics. In order to better understand the nature of this source and its duty cycle, and in light of several physical models that have been subsequently published, we conduct a spectral and temporal analysis of the 0.5-8 keV X-ray emission from this source from 15 years of Chandra observations. We analyze 19 ACIS observations where the point-spread function (PSF) of the pulsar is not contaminated by nearby sources. We fit the Chandra spectra of the pulsar with a power-law model and a disk blackbody model, subjected to interstellar absorption in M82. We carefully assess for the effect of pile-up in our observations, where four observations have a pile-up fraction of >10%, which we account for during spectral modeling with a convolution model. When fitted with a power-law model, the average photon index when the source is at high luminosity (LX > 1039 erg s-1) is Γ = 1.33 ± 0.15. For the disk blackbody model, the average temperature is Tin = 3.24 ± 0.65 keV, the spectral shape being consistent with other luminous X-ray pulsars. We also investigated the inclusion of a soft excess component and spectral break, finding that the spectra are also consistent with these features common to luminous X-ray pulsars. In addition, we present spectral analysis from NuSTAR over the 3-50 keV range where we have isolated the pulsed component. We find that the pulsed emission in this band is best fit by a power-law with a high-energy cutoff, where Γ = 0.6 ± 0.3 and {E}{{C}}={14}-3+5 keV. While the pulsar has previously been identified as a transient, we find from our longer-baseline study that it has been remarkably active over the 15-year period, where for 9/19 (47%) observations that we analyzed, the pulsar appears to be emitting at a luminosity in excess of

  13. Deep optical imaging of the γ-ray pulsar J1048-5832 with the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilenko, A.; Kirichenko, A.; Sollerman, J.; Shibanov, Yu.; Zyuzin, D.

    2013-04-01

    Context. PSR J1048-5832 is a young radio-pulsar that has recently been detected in γ-rays with Fermi, and also in X-rays with Chandra and XMM-Newton. It powers a compact pulsar wind nebula visible in X-rays and is in many ways similar to the Vela pulsar. Aims: We present deep optical observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope to search for optical counterparts of the pulsar and its nebula and to explore their multi-wavelength emission properties. Methods: The data were obtained in the V and R bands and were compared with archival data in other spectral domains. Results: We do not detect the pulsar in the optical and derive informative upper limits of R ≳ 28.m1 and V ≳ 28.m4 for its brightness. Using a red-clump star method, we estimate an interstellar extinction towards the pulsar of AV ≈ 2 mag, which is consistent with the absorbing column density derived from X-rays. The respective distance agrees with the dispersion measure distance. We reanalysed the Chandra X-ray data and compared the dereddened upper limits with the unabsorbed X-ray spectrum of the pulsar. We find that regarding its optical-X-ray spectral properties this γ-ray pulsar is not distinct from other pulsars detected in both ranges. However, like the Vela pulsar, it is very inefficient in the optical and X-rays. Among a dozen optical sources overlapping with the pulsar X-ray nebula we find one with V ≈ 26.m9 and R ≈ 26.m3, whose colour is slightly bluer than that of the field stars and is consistent with the peculiar colours typical for pulsar nebula features. It positionally coincides with a relatively bright feature of the pulsar X-ray nebula, resembling the Crab wisp and is located in ~2 from the pulsar. We suggest this source as a counterpart candidate to the feature. Conclusions: Based on the substantial interstellar extinction towards the pulsar and its optical inefficiency, additional optical studies should be carried out at longer wavelengths. Based on observations made

  14. X-ray reprocessing in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss several aspects of X-ray reprocessing into X-rays or longer wavelength radiation in different kinds of binary systems. In high mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing of hard X-rays into emission lines or lower temperature black body emission is a useful tool to investigate the reprocessing media like the stellar wind, clumpy structures in the wind, accretion disk or accretion stream. In low mass X-ray binaries, reprocessing from the surface of the companion star, the accretion disk, warps and other structures in the accretion disk produce signatures in longer wavelength radiation. X-ray sources with temporal structures like the X-ray pulsars and thermonuclear burst sources are key in such studies. We will discuss results from several new investigations of X-ray reprocessing phenomena in X-ray binaries.

  15. Short communication: use of the output video signal for dynamic range, brightness control and image memory assessment in X-ray fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okkalides, D

    1996-09-01

    The output video signal from three X-ray fluoroscopy machines was recorded with a storage oscilloscope to calculate the dynamic range of their image intensifier television camera chains. The two MERATE MTH90 and MGR50hf machines employed the same imaging chain but the response of the former to exposure was significantly lower because of a three channel light distribution optical system which was installed but not used. The CGR Stenoscope machine was found to have a very narrow dynamic range to the extent that it was not usable. Additional measurements on the CGR machine showed that the image intensifier brightness control mechanism would produce stabilized brightness in less than 0.4 s and it proved to be faster than the manual selection of exposure parameters. The quality of the image stored in the memory device on the same system was compared with the original by subtracting the two video signals on the oscilloscope and thus acquiring a quantitative measure of their difference. PMID:8983591

  16. Accreting Millisecond Pulsars: Neutron Star Masses and Radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2004-01-01

    High amplitude X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. The recent discovery of X-ray burst oscillations from two accreting millisecond pulsars has confirmed this basic picture and provided a new route to measuring neutron star properties and constraining the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly summarize the current observational understanding of accreting millisecond pulsars, and describe recent attempts to determine the mass and radius of the neutron star in XTE J1814-338.

  17. The Extended X-ray Nebula of PSR J1420-6048

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-19

    The vicinity of the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1420-6038 has undergone extensive study in the search for counterparts, revealing the energetic young pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and its surrounding wind nebula as a likely candidate for at least part of the emission from this bright and extended gamma-ray source. We report on new Suzaku observations of PSR J1420-6048, along with analysis of archival XMM Newton data. The low background of Suzaku permits mapping of the extended X-ray nebula, indicating a tail stretching {approx} 8 minutes north of the pulsar. The X-ray data, along with archival radio and VHE data, hint at a pulsar birthsite to the North, and yield insights into its evolution and the properties of the ambient medium. We further explore such properties by modeling the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the extended nebula.

  18. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  19. Accreting X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes the behavior of matter in environments with extreme magnetic and gravitational fields, explains the instability/stability of accretion disks in certain systems, and discusses how emergent radiation affects accretion flow. Magnetic field measurements are obtained by measuring the lowest cyclotron absorption line energy, observing the cutoff of accretion due to centrifugal inhibition and measuring the spin-up rate at high luminosity.

  20. Long-term spectral and timing properties of the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1833-0832 and detection of extended X-ray emission around the radio pulsar PSR B1830-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, P.; Israel, G. L.; Turolla, R.; Mattana, F.; Tiengo, A.; Possenti, A.; Zane, S.; Rea, N.; Burgay, M.; Götz, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Stella, L.; Wieringa, M. H.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Enoto, T.; Romano, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Makishima, K.; Nakazawa, K.; Nishioka, H.; François-Martin, C.

    2011-09-01

    SGR 1833-0832 was discovered on 2010 March 19, thanks to the Swift detection of a short hard X-ray burst and follow-up X-ray observations. Since then, it was repeatedly observed with Swift, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton. Using these data, which span about 225 d, we studied the long-term spectral and timing characteristics of SGR 1833-0832. We found evidence for diffuse emission surrounding SGR 1833-0832, which is most likely a halo produced by the scattering of the point-source X-ray radiation by dust along the line of sight, and we show that the source X-ray spectrum is well described by an absorbed blackbody, with temperature kT˜ 1.2 keV and absorbing column NH= (10.4 ± 0.2) × 1022 cm-2, while different or more complex models are disfavoured. The source persistent X-ray emission remained fairly constant at ˜3.7 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 for the first ˜20 d after the onset of the bursting episode, then it faded by a factor of ˜40 in the subsequent ˜140 d, following a power-law trend with index α≃-0.5. We obtained a phase-coherent timing solution with the longest baseline (˜225 d) to date for this source which, besides period P= 7.565 4084(4) s and period derivative ? s s-1, includes higher order period derivatives. We also report on our search of the counterpart to the soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) at radio frequencies using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Parkes Radio Telescope. No evidence for radio emission was found, down to flux densities of 0.9 mJy (at 1.5 GHz) and 0.09 mJy (at 1.4 GHz) for the continuum and pulsed emissions, respectively, consistently with other observations at different epochs. Finally, the analysis of the field of PSR B1830-08 (J1833-0827), which was serendipitously imaged by the XMM-Newton observations, led to the discovery of the X-ray pulsar wind nebula generated by this 85-ms radio pulsar. We discuss its possible association with the unidentified TeV source HESS J1834-087.

  1. Observations and Models of X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubus, Guillaume

    1998-06-01

    This PhD thesis presents X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy M33 and an X-ray irradiated accretion disk model. X-ray observations of nearby galaxies allow direct access to the underlying high energy populations, amongst which are X-ray binaries where a compact object (black hole, neutron star) accretes matter from its normal star companion. I present a catalogue and a variability analysis of the sources in M33 detected by the X-ray satellite ROSAT. I discuss X-7 which is shown to be an X-ray binary pulsar. Some 70% of the X-ray flux from M33 comes from the nucleus source X-8. I show that the luminosity from this object is modulated on a 106 day period. Additional observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope show a bright stellar-like UV source in the center of the nucleus. These observations significantly constrain models of the bright (Lx~1e39 ergs/s) nucleus source which we believe to be a 10 solar mass black hole X-ray binary. Illumination of the accretion disk surrounding the compact object plays a crucial role in such a system. An accretion disk is thermally and viscously unstable around the hydrogen ionisation temperature. This instability is thought to power the outbursts of dwarf novae and soft X-ray transients. I present a numerical code that can follow the evolution of the instability in a disk with high precision. This model is modified to account for illumination. Contrary to observations of low mass X-ray binaries, illumination by a point source does not modify the properties of a planar disk. However, if the illumination source is not in the disk plane, as is the case for instance if the disk is warped or if the source is above the disk, illumination can stabilise the disk. It is concluded that the physical processes and the geometry of illumination in low mass X-ray binaries is still ill-understood.

  2. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3–79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ˜4× and ˜8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3–10 and 10–40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%–60%). Both spectral analysis and logN–logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5–2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  3. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3–79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ∼4× and ∼8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3–10 and 10–40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%–60%). Both spectral analysis and logN–logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5–2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  4. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  5. EX56a study of extended X-ray emission around isolated galaxies EX56b identification and spectra of bright X-ray sources at high galactic latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.

    1987-01-01

    The EXOSAT observations confirmed the identification and extended nature of PKS 2345-35. It gave a good 2 to 10 keV X-ray spectrum and a detailed spatial profile indicating asymmetry of the structure. In the high galactic latitidue investigation, the BL Lac object identified with the HEAO-1 source 1430+423 was detected, and the first X-ray spectrum was obtained. Several simulataneous observations of H0323+022 were obtained over a broad range of electromagnetic spectrum. Studies of luminous active galactic nuclei have given significant information on the spectrum of the quasar PKS 0558-504. In a study of Southern sky cataclysmic variables, the EXOSAT was used to determine the X-ray spectrum and search for periodicities in two objects. Studies of complete identifications have revealed that X-ray sources in two high galactic latitude fields are stars, and therefore are to be excluded from the Piccinotti extragalactic sample. Only one Piccinotti source remains to be identified.

  6. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  7. Revealing the X-Ray Emission Processes of Old Rotation-Powered Pulsars: XMM-Newton Observations of PSR B0950+08, PSR B0823+26 and PSR J2043+2740

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Werner; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tenant, Allyn F.; Jessmer, Axel; Zhang, Shiang N.

    2004-01-01

    We have completed part of a program to study the X-ray emission properties of old rotation-powered pulsars with XMM-Newton in order to probe and identify the origin of their X radiation. The X-ray emission from these old pulsars is largely dominated by non-thermal processes. None of the observed spectra required adding a thermal component consisting of either a hot polar cap or surface cooling emission to model the data. The energy spectrum of PSR B0950+08 is best described by a single power law of photon-index alpha = 1.93(sup +0.14)(sub -0.12). Three-sigma temperature upper limits for possible contributions from a heated polar cap or the whole neutron star surface are T(sup infinity)(sub pc) < 0.87 x 10(exp 6) K and T(sup infinity)(sub s) < 0.48 x 10(exp 6) K, respectively. We also find that the X-ray emission from PSR B0950+08 is pulsed with two peaks per rotation period. The phase separation between the two X-ray peaks is approx. 144 deg (maximum to maximum) which is similar to the pulse peak separation observed in the radio band at 1.4 GHz. The fraction of X-ray pulsed photons is approx. 30%. A phase resolved spectral analysis confirms the nonthermal nature of the pulsed emission and finds power law slopes of alpha = 2.4(sup +0.52)(sub -0.42) and alpha = 1.93(sup +0.29)(sub -0.24) for the pulse peaks P1 and P2, respectively. The spectral emission properties observed for PSR B0823+26 are similar to those of PSR B0950+08. Its energy spectrum is very well described by a single power law with photon-index alpha = 2.5(sup +0.52)(sub -0.24. Three-sigma temperature upper limits for thermal contributions from a hot polar cap or from the entire neutron star surface are T(sup infinity)(sub pc) < 1.17 x 10(exp 6) K and T(sup infinity)(sub s) < 0.5 x 10(exp 6) K, respectively. There is evidence for pulsed X-ray emission at the - 97% confidence level with a pulsed fraction of 49 +/- 22%. For PSR 52043+2740 we report the first detection of X-ray emission. A power law

  8. X-Ray Spectral Evolution of the Crab Pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Pravdo, S. H.; Angelini, L.

    1997-01-01

    The Crab Pulsar was observed with the X-ray detectors on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) on May 2, 1996. The large area, high time resolution, extended energy range, and moderate energy resolution of the RXTE instruments provided an unprecedented measurement of the Crab pulsar spectrum as it evolved in phase across the 33 msec pulse.

  9. A New X-ray Bright Point Catalog From Honode XRT images As An Application of Feature Recognition Methods and Emerging Heliophysics Knowledge Base Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Freeland, S. L.; Weber, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new effort is underway to process the rapidly growing volume of solar observational data by using automated feature recognition and cataloguing software (c.f., Schrijver et al SPD 2007 or Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). We apply a particular set of feature recognition tools called FINDSTUFF, available within the SolarSoft IDL framework, to the problem of automatically extracting X-Ray Bright Point (XBP) features from images recorded by the XRT instrument aboard the recently launched Japanese Hinode satellite. The extracted events are automatically catalogued by the FINDSTUFF software. The events are converted into standardized XML format as VOEvents, and these XML event files in turn are automatically deposited in the Heliophysics Knowledge Base (HKB) being developed at Lockheed Martin in collaboration with other institutions (c.f., Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). In addition to providing a very useful end-to-end test of the Heliophysics Knowledge Base Project (Schrijver et al), the catalogue yields a valuable scientific database of XBPs extracted from high resolution XRT images. We discuss the aspects of our processing pipeline which are generally applicable to many feature archiving projects; we demonstrate how the final Heliophysics Knowledge Base may be queried to explore the XBP archive; we compare our catalogue of XBPs with previously generated ones; and we provide examples of discoveries made with massively autonomous feature extraction (MAFE). The U.S. XRT team is supported by NASA contracts from NASA to SAO (XRT), while the SOT team is supported by NASA contract number NNM07AA01C. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  10. GBM Observations of Be X-Ray Binary Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008 we have been monitoring accreting pulsars using the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi. This monitoring program includes daily blind full sky searches for previously unknown or previously quiescent pulsars and source specific analysis to track the frequency evolution of all detected pulsars. To date we have detected outbursts from 23 transient accreting pulsars, including 21 confirmed or likely Be/X-ray binaries. I will describe our techniques and highlight results for selected pulsars.

  11. X-ray Polarization Probes of SNR and PWN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray synchrotron radiation traces the high energy extrema of e+/e- accelerated by pulsar magnetospheres and supernova shocks. X-ray polarization lets us probe the unresolved geometry of these relativistic shock structures. I summarize what we know about magnetic field geometries in these nebulae and the prospects for learning more from X-ray polarimetry.

  12. Recent results of X-ray observations from OSO-7 and SAS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Recent observations bearing on the nature of compact X-ray sources obtained from the MIT instruments aboard OSO-7 and SAS-3 are discussed. Results on the X-ray sky survey, new ultralow-energy X-ray sources, X-ray sources in globular clusters, slow X-ray pulsars, and variability and position of compact X-ray sources in Cen A are discussed. Descriptions of the satellite-borne X-ray instruments are provided.

  13. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  14. A complete library of X-ray pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds: A new resource for modeling the time evolution of luminosity and pulse profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Fingerman, Samuel; Cappallo, Rigel; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; Hong, Jaesub; Ho, Wynn; Coe, Malcolm; Klus, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed all XMM-Newton and Chandra (˜ 300) observations of the known pulsars in the Small & Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC, LMC). We aim to classify various pulsar properties with amplitude logLX = 33 ˜ 38 erg/s and incorporate the related parameters in theoretical models. With the high time-resolution data from the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the latest calibration files and the Science Analysis System (SAS) software from High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center Software (HEASOFT), our pipeline generates a suite of useful products for each pulsar detection: point-source event lists, pulse profiles, periodograms, and spectra for the broad energy band, the soft band (0.2-2 keV), and the hard band (2-12 keV). Of 59 SMC pulsars in the EPIC field of view, we were able to measure 29 with pulse periods and power spectra. From XMM for example, for 16 of them, we find 12 are spinning up and 4 are spinning down. We also compare the observed pulse profiles to geometric models of the pulsars in order to constrain the magnetospheric parameters of each of these sources. Our motivation is to provide a library for time domain studies and profile modeling.

  15. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    2015-11-13

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar's by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres. PMID:26564852

  16. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  17. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star-Formation History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we point out that the X-ray luminosity L(sub x) of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population and that the profile of L(sub x) with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the Star Formation Rate (SFR) profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We update our previous work using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on L(sub x)-evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spirals and the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We also discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies.

  18. Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-01

    Pulsars can be considered as the ultimate time-variable source. They show variations on time-scales ranging from nanoseconds to as long as years, and they emit over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The dominant modulation is associated with the rotation period, which can vary from slighty more than a millisecond to upwards of ten seconds (if we include the magnetars). Variations on time-scales shorter than the pulse period are mostly associated with emission processes and are manifested as giant pulses, microstructure and sub-pulses (to name a few). On time-scales of a rotation to a few hundred rotations are other phenomena also associated with the emission, such as nulling, moding, drifting and intermittency. By probing these and slightly longer time-scales we find that pulsars exhibit ``glitches'', which are rapid variations in spin rates. They are believed to be related to the interaction between the superfluid interior of the neutron star and the outer crust. Detailed studies of glitches can reveal much about the properties of the constituents of neutron stars-the only way to probe the physics of material at such extreme densities. Time-scales of about an hour or longer reveal that some pulsars are in binary systems, in particular the most rapidly rotating systems. Discovering and studying those binary systems provides vital clues to the evolution of massive stars, while some of the systems are also the best probes of strong-field gravity theories; the elusive pulsar-black hole binary would be the ultimate system. Pulsars are tools that allow us to probe a range of phenomena and time-scales. It is possible to measure the time of arrival of pulses from some pulsars to better than a few tens of nanoseconds over years, making them some of the most accurate clocks known. Concerning their rotation, deviations from sphericity may cause pulsars to emit gravitational waves which might then be detected by next-generation gravitational-wave detectors. Pulsars

  19. Challenges in explaining the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess with millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-06-01

    Millisecond pulsars have been discussed as a possible source of the gamma-ray excess observed from the region surrounding the Galactic Center. With this in mind, we use the observed population of bright low-mass X-ray binaries to estimate the number of millisecond pulsars in the Inner Galaxy. This calculation suggests that only ~ 1-5% of the excess is produced by millisecond pulsars. We also use the luminosity function derived from local measurements of millisecond pulsars, along with the number of point sources resolved by Fermi, to calculate an upper limit for the diffuse emission from such a population. While this limit is compatible with the millisecond pulsar population implied by the number of low-mass X-ray binaries, it strongly excludes the possibility that most of the excess originates from such objects.

  20. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbieri, C.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Desiante, F. de Palma R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hagiwara, K.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Johnson, T. J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marshall, F.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naletto, G.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zampieri, L.

    2015-11-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar’s by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres.

  1. Pulse Phase Dependence of Low Energy Emission Lines in an X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67 during its spin-up and spin-down phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Aru; Paul, Biswajit; Dewangan, Gulab Chand

    2016-07-01

    We will present the results obtained from the new observation of an ultra-compact X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67, carried out with the XMM-Newton observatory. 4U 1626-67, a unique accretion powered pulsar underwent two torque reversals since its discovery in 1977. Pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of this source performed using the data from the XMM-Newton observatory during its spin-down phase revealed the dependence of the emission lines on the pulse phase. O VII emission line at 0.569 keV showed the maximum variation by factor of 4. These variations were interpreted due to warps in the accretion disk (Beri et al. 2015). Radiation pressure induced warping is also believed to be the cause for spin-down. In light of this possible explanation for spin-down torque reversal we expect different line variability during the spin-up phase. We will discuss the implications of the results obtained after performing pulse phase resolved spectroscopy using data from the EPIC-pn during the current spin-up phase. Detailed study of the prominent Neon and Oxygen line complexes with the high resolution Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on-board XMM-Newton will also be presented.

  2. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  4. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity–average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  5. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  6. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  7. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR B0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations separated by 1 month to search for changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a toroidal morphology remarkably similar to that observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. Between the two observations, taken ~3×105 s and ~3×106 s after the glitch, the flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75% the 3 σ limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <~10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer arc; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propagation velocity is >~0.7c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright X-ray arcs are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind that is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula comprising the postshock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter σ of the Vela pulsar wind is allowed to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B<=4×10-4 G. The inclination angle of the axis of the equatorial torus with respect to the line of sight is identical to that of the rotation axis of the pulsar as previously measured from the polarization of the radio pulse. The projection of the rotation axis on the sky may also be close to the direction of proper motion of the pulsar if previous radio measurements were confused by

  8. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J; Bauer, Franz E; Krivonos, Roman A; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barrière, Nicolas M; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Wik, Daniel R; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre. PMID:25925477

  9. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Krivonos, Roman A.; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K.; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre.

  10. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  11. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  12. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  13. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  14. Discovery of an Energetic Pulsar Associated with SNR G76.9+1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gotthelf, E. V.; Ransom, S. M.; Safi-Harb, S.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J2022-<-3842, a 24 ms radio and X-ray pulsar in the supernova remnant G76.9+i.0, in observations with the Chandra X-ray telescope, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope, and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The pulsar's spin-down rate implies a rotation-powered luminosity E = 1.2 X 10(exp 38) erg/s, a surface dipole magnetic field strength B(sub S), = 1.0 X 10(exp 12) G, and a characteristic age of 8.9 kyr. PSR J2022+3842 is thus the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab, as well as the most rapidly-rotating young, radio-bright pulsar known. The radio pulsations are highly dispersed and broadened by interstellar scattering, and we find that a large (delta f/f approximates 1.9 x 10(exp -6)) spin glitch must have occurred between our discovery and confirmation observations. The X-ray pulses are narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) and visible up to 20 keV, consistent with magnetospheric emission from a rotation-powered pulsar. The Chandra X-ray image identifies the pulsar with a hard, unresolved source at the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology of G76.9+ 1.0 and embedded within faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. The spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to extended structure seen around the Vela pulsar. The combined Chandra and RXTE pulsar spectrum is well-fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N(sub H) = (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp 22) / sq cm and photon index Gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2; it implies that the Chandra point-source flux is virtually 100% pulsed. For a distance of 10 kpc, the X-ray luminosity of PSR J2022+3842 is L(sub x){2-1O keV) = 7.0 x 10(exp 33) erg/s. Despite being extraordinarily energetic, PSR J2022+3842 lacks a bright X-ray wind nebula and has an unusually low conversion efficiency of spin-down power to X-ray luminosity, Lx/E = 5.9 X 10(exp-5).

  15. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  16. Quiescent emission in accreting neutron star transients: comparing Cen X-4 and the transitional millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2016-07-01

    Many accreting neutron star in low-mass X-ray binaries are transient X-ray sources, undergoing bright X-ray outbursts lasting days to weeks alternating with long quiescent intervals lasting months to years. The origin of their faint quiescent power-law X-ray emission has been a longstanding question, with theorists primarily debating between Comptonization and synchrotron shock models. However, recent NuSTAR observations of the nearby source Cen X-4 unexpectedly revealed a bremsstrahlung origin for the quiescent hard X-ray component. I will discuss the implications of this result, and will also compare Cen X-4 with the "transitional" millisecond pulsars, which exhibit markedly different behavior at comparable X-ray luminosities.

  17. Two XTE A01 Projects: A Multifrequency Study of Circinus X-1 and a Search for Microsecond Variability From Bright Galactic X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernigan, Garrett

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the research of a single common portion of the above-named two projects, conducted by G. Jernigan, i.e., the theory for a new method, a variation of a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, for determining the fastest variability present in an X-ray source. The current phase involves testing the newly developed code on real example sources (CYG X1). Unfortunately, there are no calibration sources for testing the code, which therefore required the development of an X-ray source simulation code. The goal is to evaluate the sensitivity of the code for the detection of a range of different types of variability (bursts, pulsations, etc.).

  18. NuSTAR OBSERVATIONS AND BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MODELING OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Jin, Ruolan; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y. E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-12-20

    We report the first hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary PSR J1023+0038 using NuSTAR. This system has been shown transiting between a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) state and a rotation-powered MSP state. The NuSTAR observations were taken in both LMXB state and rotation-powered state. The source is clearly seen in both states up to ∼79 keV. During the LMXB state, the 3-79 keV flux is about a factor of 10 higher than in the rotation-powered state. The hard X-rays show clear orbital modulation during the X-ray faint rotation-powered state but the X-ray orbital period is not detected in the X-ray bright LMXB state. In addition, the X-ray spectrum changes from a flat power-law spectrum during the rotation-powered state to a steeper power-law spectrum in the LMXB state. We suggest that the hard X-rays are due to the intrabinary shock from the interaction between the pulsar wind and the injected material from the low-mass companion star. During the rotation-powered MSP state, the X-ray orbital modulation is due to Doppler boosting of the shocked pulsar wind. At the LMXB state, the evaporating matter of the accretion disk due to the gamma-ray irradiation from the pulsar stops almost all the pulsar wind, resulting in the disappearance of the X-ray orbital modulation.

  19. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  20. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, James Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-10-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T 90 durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) × 1038 erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  1. BURST AND PERSISTENT EMISSION PROPERTIES DURING THE RECENT ACTIVE EPISODE OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1841-045

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Baring, Matthew G.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Mcenery, Julie; Michael Burgess, James; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert D.; Granot, Jonathan; Tierney, David

    2011-10-10

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T {sub 90} durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 10{sup 38} erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  2. Swings between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar.

    PubMed

    Papitto, A; Ferrigno, C; Bozzo, E; Rea, N; Pavan, L; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Campana, S; Di Salvo, T; Falanga, M; Filipović, M D; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Possenti, A; Ransom, S M; Riggio, A; Romano, P; Sarkissian, J M; Stairs, I H; Stella, L; Torres, D F; Wieringa, M H; Wong, G F

    2013-09-26

    It is thought that neutron stars in low-mass binary systems can accrete matter and angular momentum from the companion star and be spun-up to millisecond rotational periods. During the accretion stage, the system is called a low-mass X-ray binary, and bright X-ray emission is observed. When the rate of mass transfer decreases in the later evolutionary stages, these binaries host a radio millisecond pulsar whose emission is powered by the neutron star's rotating magnetic field. This evolutionary model is supported by the detection of millisecond X-ray pulsations from several accreting neutron stars and also by the evidence for a past accretion disc in a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar. It has been proposed that a rotation-powered pulsar may temporarily switch on during periods of low mass inflow in some such systems. Only indirect evidence for this transition has hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of accretion-powered, millisecond X-ray pulsations from a neutron star previously seen as a rotation-powered radio pulsar. Within a few days after a month-long X-ray outburst, radio pulses were again detected. This not only shows the evolutionary link between accretion and rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, but also that some systems can swing between the two states on very short timescales. PMID:24067710

  3. X-ray radiation from accreting, magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of recent developments in the theory of emission from a magnetized plasma for accreting neutron star conditions. Some observational data on X-ray pulsars are discussed, and present problems are indicated. 26 references.

  4. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  5. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  6. X-ray Pulsation Searches with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray telescope with capabilities optimized for the study of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars in the 0.2-12 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision photon time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission as an attached payload on the International Space Station around the end of 2016. I will describe the science planning for the pulsation search science working group, which is charged with searching for pulsations and studying flux modulation properties of pulsars and other neutron s