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Sample records for broad growth substrate

  1. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments. PMID:24123252

  2. Film Growth on Nanoporous Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James; Zhao, Chenwei; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James

    Self-ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) provides an easy way to fabricate nano structured material, such as nano wires and nano particles. We employ AAO as substrates and focus on the thermally evaporated film growth on the surface of the substrate. With various materials deposited onto the substrate, we find the films show different structures, e,g. ordered array of nano particles for Lead and nanohoneycomb structure for Silver. We relate the differing behaviors to the difference of surface energy and diffusion constant. To verify this, the effect of substrate temperature on the film growth has been explored and the structure of the film has been successfully changed through the process. We are grateful for the support of NSF Grants No. DMR-1307290.

  3. Broad Band Antireflection Coatings for Silicon and Germanium Substrates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuidenhout, Dirk Francois

    Infrared antireflection coatings for silicon and germanium substrates and some of the associated problems are addressed in this thesis. One of the first problems identified and investigated was that of the adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The cleaning of the Ge discs was evaluated by means of Auger spectroscopy. The main contaminant species found were carbon, oxygen and in the case of germanium substrates sulphur. No sulphur was found on silicon substrates. A wash in a series of organic solutions followed by a bake inside the vacuum chamber lead to much improved though still not acceptable adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The influence of a contact layer between the substrate and ZnS was investigated. Firstly, metal contact layers (Ni, Cr, Cu) were tried to improve the adhesion of the ZnS films. These samples (germanium-metal-zinc sulphide) were annealed in air in order to transfer the germanium -metal film to a germanide region and thus high optical transmission at long wave-lengths. Slight absorption still results even after the annealing of these samples. A dielectric material, Y_2O_3 , was therefore tested replacing the metal films. The system Ge-Y_2O_3 -ZnS in conjunction with an organic wash and vacuum bake lead to excellent adhesion of the ZnS layers to the germanium substrates. The next problem area addressed was that of a low refractive index material replacement for ThF _4. Four materials were investigated, i.e. ZnS, PbF_2, Y_2O _3 and YF_3. The refractive indices found for these compounds in thin film form at a wavelength of 10 μm is 2,18 for ZnS, 1,7 for PbF_2, 1,42 for Y_2O_3 and 1,3 for YF_3. From these results YF_3 was chosen as low refractive index material in the coating designs. Multi-layer coatings incorporating ZnS, Ge and YF_3 films were designed and evaporated. Measured reflectance values below 0,2% were obtained from 9 μm to 11 mum. These systems were stable and robust. Finally, a silicon ball lens was

  4. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1989-05-09

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  5. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Ginley, David S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  6. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-10-23

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

  7. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  8. Understanding the Broad Substrate Repertoire of Nitroreductase Based on Its Kinetic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Pitsawong, Warintra; Hoben, John P.; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase from Enterobacter cloacae (NR) catalyzes two-electron reduction of nitroaromatics to the corresponding nitroso compounds and, subsequently, to hydroxylamine products. NR has an unusually broad substrate repertoire, which may be related to protein dynamics (flexibility) and/or a simple non-selective kinetic mechanism. To investigate the possible role of mechanism in the broad substrate repertoire of NR, the kinetics of oxidation of NR by para-nitrobenzoic acid (p-NBA) were investigated using stopped-flow techniques at 4 °C. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the p-NBA concentration with a limiting rate of 1.90 ± 0.09 s−1, indicating one-step binding before the flavin oxidation step. There is no evidence for a distinct binding step in which specificity might be enforced. The reduction of p-NBA is rate-limiting in steady-state turnover (1.7 ± 0.3 s−1). The pre-steady-state reduction kinetics of NR by NADH indicate that NADH reduces the enzyme with a rate constant of 700 ± 20 s−1 and a dissociation constant of 0.51 ± 0.04 mm. Thus, we demonstrate simple transient kinetics in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that help to explain the broad substrate repertoire of NR. Finally, we tested the ability of NR to reduce para-hydroxylaminobenzoic acid, demonstrating that the corresponding amine does not accumulate to significant levels even under anaerobic conditions. Thus E. cloacae NR is not a good candidate for enzymatic production of aromatic amines. PMID:24706760

  9. Spatiospectral and picosecond spatiotemporal properties of a broad area operating channeled-substrate-planar laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, NU; Defreez, Richard K.; Bossert, David J.; Wilson, Geoffrey A.; Elliott, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Spatiospectral and spatiotemporal properties of an eight-element channeled-substrate-planar laser array are investigated in both CW and pulsed operating conditions. The closely spaced CSP array with strong optical coupling between array elements is characterized by a broad area laserlike operation determined by its spatial mode spectra. The spatiotemporal evolution of the near and far field exhibits complex dynamic behavior in the picosecond to nanosecond domain. Operating parameters for the laser device have been experimentally determined. These results provide important information for the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of coherent semiconductor laser arrays.

  10. Transmembrane aromatic amino acid distribution in P-glycoprotein. A functional role in broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pawagi, A B; Wang, J; Silverman, M; Reithmeier, R A; Deber, C M

    1994-01-14

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a membrane protein which interacts with structurally diverse hydrophobic molecules of high membrane affinity. In an analysis of the molecular basis for this broad range of substrate specificity, we found that the transmembrane (TM) regions of Pgp are rich in highly conserved aromatic amino acid residues. Computer-generated three-dimensional model structures showed that a typical substrate, rhodamine 123, can intercalate between three to four phenylalanine side-chains in any of several Pgp TM helices with minimal protrusion of the drug into bulk lipid, and that five to six (of the 12 Pgp putative TM segments) helices can facilitate transport through creation of a sterically compatible pore. In contrast to the case for proteins involved in the transport of membrane-impermeable, relatively polar substrates, the "transport path" for Pgp substrates need not be polar, and may involve either an internal channel occupied largely by aromatic side-chains, or external gaps along TM helix-lipid interfaces. Weakly polar interactions between drug cationic sites and Pgp aromatic residues contribute additionally to overall protein/drug binding. The ability of Pgp to recognize and efflux structurally diverse molecules suggests that rather than a unique structure, the Pgp channel may maintain the intrinsic capacity to undergo wide-ranging drug-dependent dynamic reorganization. PMID:7904655

  11. Step-controlled homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC on vicinal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, Birgit; Berwian, Patrick; Friedrich, Jochen; Thomas, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive study on the step-controlled homoepitaxial growth on the (0001)Si-face of vicinal 4H-SiC substrates was performed in order to establish epitaxial growth on 2° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates and 4° towards <11bar00> off-cut substrates. A standard epitaxial growth process was developed by optimizing the growth temperature T, Si/H ratio and C/Si ratio for growth on 4° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates. Thereby, step-controlled epitaxial growth was achieved within a broad operating window. The surface roughness of such epilayers varies typically between rms=0.5 nm and rms=2.5 nm and step-controlled growth is conserved even at a growth rate of 27 μm/h. Then, the standard growth process was applied to substrates with different off-cut angles α of 2°, 4° and 8° as well as with different off-cut directions <112bar0> and <11bar00>. The step-controlled growth was achieved also within a wide range of Si/H ratio and C/Si ratio for growth on 8° and 4° off-cut substrates, but the process window narrows strongly for growth on 2° off-cut substrates. The epilayers' surface roughness increases with decreasing off-cut angle of the substrate. Epilayers grown on 4° towards <11bar00> off-cut substrates were significantly smoother than epilayers grown on 4° towards <112bar0> off-cut substrates. No influence of the substrates' off-cut angle and direction on the growth rate was found. The experimental results of this comprehensive study are discussed globally in consideration of other relevant publications.

  12. Physiological characterization of the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Luttik, Marijke A H; Tai, Siew Leng; Boer, Viktor M; Morais, Marcos A; Schipper, Dick; Almering, Marinka J H; Kötter, Peter; Dickinson, J Richard; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2005-06-01

    Aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D were grown with different nitrogen sources. Cultures grown with phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine as a nitrogen source contained high levels of the corresponding fusel alcohols and organic acids, indicating activity of the Ehrlich pathway. Also, fusel alcohols derived from the other two amino acids were detected in the supernatant, suggesting the involvement of a common enzyme activity. Transcript level analysis revealed that among the five thiamine-pyrophospate-dependent decarboxylases (PDC1, PDC5, PDC6, ARO10, and THI3), only ARO10 was transcriptionally up-regulated when phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine was used as a nitrogen source compared to growth on ammonia, proline, and asparagine. Moreover, 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity measured in cell extract from CEN.PK113-7D grown with phenylalanine, methionine, or leucine displayed similar broad-substrate 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Constitutive expression of ARO10 in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures in a strain lacking the five thiamine-pyrophosphate-dependent decarboxylases, grown with ammonia as a nitrogen source, led to a measurable decarboxylase activity with phenylalanine-, leucine-, and methionine-derived 2-oxo acids. Moreover, even with ammonia as the nitrogen source, these cultures produced significant amounts of the corresponding fusel alcohols. Nonetheless, the constitutive expression of ARO10 in an isogenic wild-type strain grown in a glucose-limited chemostat with ammonia did not lead to any 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Furthermore, even when ARO10 was constitutively expressed, growth with phenylalanine as the nitrogen source led to increased decarboxylase activities in cell extracts. The results reported here indicate the involvement of posttranscriptional regulation and/or a second protein in the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity decarboxylase activity. PMID:15933030

  13. Plasmonic substrates for multiplexed protein microarrays with femtomolar sensitivity and broad dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Tabakman, Scott M.; Lau, Lana; Robinson, Joshua T.; Price, Jordan; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhuo; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Jarrell, Justin A.; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Protein chips are widely used for high-throughput proteomic analysis, but to date, the low sensitivity and narrow dynamic range have limited their capabilities in diagnostics and proteomics. Here we present protein microarrays on a novel nanostructured, plasmonic gold film with near-infrared fluorescence enhancement of up to 100-fold, extending the dynamic range of protein detection by three orders of magnitude towards the fM regime. We employ plasmonic protein microarrays for the early detection of a cancer biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen, in the sera of mice bearing a xenograft tumour model. Further, we demonstrate a multiplexed autoantigen array for human autoantibodies implicated in a range of autoimmune diseases with superior signal-to-noise ratios and broader dynamic range compared with commercial nitrocellulose and glass substrates. The high sensitivity, broad dynamic range and easy adaptability of plasmonic protein chips presents new opportunities in proteomic research and diagnostics applications. PMID:21915108

  14. Epitaxial crystalline growth upon cold substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebduska, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    By sputtering a material with a high-energy ion-beam bombardment, the molecules of the target can be dislodged and ejected for subsequent deposition on a cold substrate of the desired crystallographic type and orientation.

  15. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  16. Growth Kinetics of Suspended Microbial Cells: From Single-Substrate-Controlled Growth to Mixed-Substrate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová-Kovar, Karin; Egli, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Growth kinetics, i.e., the relationship between specific growth rate and the concentration of a substrate, is one of the basic tools in microbiology. However, despite more than half a century of research, many fundamental questions about the validity and application of growth kinetics as observed in the laboratory to environmental growth conditions are still unanswered. For pure cultures growing with single substrates, enormous inconsistencies exist in the growth kinetic data reported. The low quality of experimental data has so far hampered the comparison and validation of the different growth models proposed, and only recently have data collected from nutrient-controlled chemostat cultures allowed us to compare different kinetic models on a statistical basis. The problems are mainly due to (i) the analytical difficulty in measuring substrates at growth-controlling concentrations and (ii) the fact that during a kinetic experiment, particularly in batch systems, microorganisms alter their kinetic properties because of adaptation to the changing environment. For example, for Escherichia coli growing with glucose, a physiological long-term adaptation results in a change in KS for glucose from some 5 mg liter−1 to ca. 30 μg liter−1. The data suggest that a dilemma exists, namely, that either “intrinsic” KS (under substrate-controlled conditions in chemostat culture) or μmax (under substrate-excess conditions in batch culture) can be measured but both cannot be determined at the same time. The above-described conventional growth kinetics derived from single-substrate-controlled laboratory experiments have invariably been used for describing both growth and substrate utilization in ecosystems. However, in nature, microbial cells are exposed to a wide spectrum of potential substrates, many of which they utilize simultaneously (in particular carbon sources). The kinetic data available to date for growth of pure cultures in carbon-controlled continuous culture

  17. A study of substrate factor on carbon nanotube forest growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Carlos; Call, Robert; Shen, T. C.

    2010-10-01

    Carbon Nanotube Forests (CNFs) are vertically grown carbon nanotubes. They can be as tall as millimeters with radii from less than one nm (single-walled) to more than a hundred nm (multi-walled). Their high surface to volume ratio provides a unique material system for EM radiation absorption, dry adhesive and biosensor applications. There have been numerous, but not all consistent reports on successful CNF growth. We find that the optimal growth conditions depend critically on the substrate, at least by the spray pyrolysis method we have adopted. To determine the substrate factor, we have investigated two grades of copper, stainless steel, silicon and quartz as substrates on which the catalytic particles and carbon source are delivered simultaneously by a ferrocine-xylene solution. We find that the interplay of lateral and in-diffusion of the iron atoms and interactions with existing gas molecules such as H2, O2, H2O on the substrates dictate the CNF growth.

  18. Influence of substrate micropatterning on biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Stephan; Li, Yiwei; Liu, Bi-Feng Liu; Weitz, David

    2015-11-01

    We culture triple reporter Bacillus Subtilis biofilm on micropatterned agar substrates. We track the biofilm development in terms of size, thickness, shape, and phenotype expression. For a tiling composed of elevated rectangles, we observe the biofilm develops an oval shape or triangular shape depending on the rectangle's aspect ratio and orientation. The motile cells are primarily located in the valleys between the rectangles and the matrix producing cells are mostly located on the rectangles. Wrinkles form at the edges of the elevated surfaces, and upon merging form channels centered on the elevated surface. After a few days, the spore-forming cells appear at the periphery. Since biofilms in nature grow on irregular surfaces, our work may provide insight into the complex patterns observed.

  19. Direct growth of Si nanowires on flexible organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Di Mario, Lorenzo; Minotti, Antonio; Tiburzi, Giorgio; Mendis, Budhika G; Zeze, Dagou A; Martelli, Faustino

    2016-06-01

    A key characteristic of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is that they grow on any substrate that can withstand the growth conditions, paving the way for their use in flexible electronics. We report on the direct growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on polyimide substrates. The Si NWs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which allows the growth to proceed at temperatures low enough to be compatible with plastic substrates (350 °C), where gold or indium are used as growth seeds. In is particularly interesting as the seed not only because it leads to a better NW crystal quality but also because it overcomes a core problem induced by the use of Au in silicon processing, i.e. Au creates deep carrier traps when incorporated in the nanowires. PMID:27098523

  20. Direct growth of Si nanowires on flexible organic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Di Mario, Lorenzo; Minotti, Antonio; Tiburzi, Giorgio; Mendis, Budhika G.; Zeze, Dagou A.; Martelli, Faustino

    2016-06-01

    A key characteristic of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is that they grow on any substrate that can withstand the growth conditions, paving the way for their use in flexible electronics. We report on the direct growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on polyimide substrates. The Si NWs are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, which allows the growth to proceed at temperatures low enough to be compatible with plastic substrates (350 °C), where gold or indium are used as growth seeds. In is particularly interesting as the seed not only because it leads to a better NW crystal quality but also because it overcomes a core problem induced by the use of Au in silicon processing, i.e. Au creates deep carrier traps when incorporated in the nanowires.

  1. Growth and Characterization of Graphene on Single Crystal Cu Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Z. R.; Tyagi, P.; Geisler, H.; Ventrice, C. A., Jr.; Bol, A. A.; Hannon, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    One of the key issues for the use of CVD graphene in device applications is the influence of defects on the transport properties of the graphene. Therefore, it is important to understand the influence of the substrate on the orientation of the graphene. Growth of graphene films on Cu(111) has the potential for producing films with a low defect density because of the hexagonal symmetry of the substrate and relatively small lattice mismatch, whereas growth on Cu(100) is expected to result in multi-domain growth because of its square symmetry. In this study, graphene films were grown on Cu single crystal substrates, and characterized with LEEM, LEED, SEM, AFM, and Raman spectroscopy. The clean Cu substrates were prepared by sputtering and annealing in UHV. For the initial growth studies, the samples were transferred to a tube furnace for graphene growth using a technique optimized for Cu foils. The UHV system has recently been modified with a button heater compatible with the conditions needed for graphene growth to enable in-situ growth and characterization.

  2. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids. PMID:25037641

  3. Synergistic growth in bacteria depends on substrate complexity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi-Jie; Wang, Shiao Y.

    2016-01-01

    Both positive and negative interactions among bacteria take place in the environment. We hypothesize that the complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact with greater cooperation in the presence of recalcitrant substrate. We isolated lignocellulolytic bacteria from salt marsh detritus and compared the growth, metabolic activity and enzyme production of pure cultures to those of three-species mixed cultures in lignocellulose and glucose media. Synergistic growth was common in lignocellulose medium containing carboxyl methyl cellulose, xylan and lignin but absent in glucose medium. Bacterial synergism promoted metabolic activity in synergistic mixed cultures but not the maximal growth rate (μ). Bacterial synergism also promoted the production of β-1,4-glucosidase but not the production of cellobiohydrolase or β-1,4-xylosidase. Our results suggest that the chemical complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact. While a complex substrate such as lignocellulose promotes positive interactions and synergistic growth, a labile substrate such as glucose promotes negative interactions and competition. Synergistic interactions among indigenous bacteria are suggested to be important in promoting lignocellulose degradation in the environment. PMID:26727898

  4. Synergistic growth in bacteria depends on substrate complexity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi-Jie; Wang, Shiao Y

    2016-01-01

    Both positive and negative interactions among bacteria take place in the environment. We hypothesize that the complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact with greater cooperation in the presence of recalcitrant substrate. We isolated lignocellulolytic bacteria from salt marsh detritus and compared the growth, metabolic activity and enzyme production of pure cultures to those of three-species mixed cultures in lignocellulose and glucose media. Synergistic growth was common in lignocellulose medium containing carboxyl methyl cellulose, xylan and lignin but absent in glucose medium. Bacterial synergism promoted metabolic activity in synergistic mixed cultures but not the maximal growth rate (μ). Bacterial synergism also promoted the production of β-1,4-glucosidase but not the production of cellobiohydrolase or β-1,4-xylosidase. Our results suggest that the chemical complexity of the substrate affects the way bacteria interact. While a complex substrate such as lignocellulose promotes positive interactions and synergistic growth, a labile substrate such as glucose promotes negative interactions and competition. Synergistic interactions among indigenous bacteria are suggested to be important in promoting lignocellulose degradation in the environment. PMID:26727898

  5. Growth and characterization of graphene on CuNi substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Parul

    Graphene is a single layer of sp2 bonded carbon atoms that crystallizes in the honeycomb structure. Because of its true two-dimensional structure, it has very unique electrical properties, including a very high carrier mobility that is symmetric for holes and electrons. To realize these unique properties, it is important to develop a method for growing graphene films with uniform thickness and low defect density. One of the most popular methods of growth is by chemical vapor deposition on Cu substrates, because it is self-limited. However many applications require the growth of graphene films that are more than one atomic layer thick. In this research project, the growth of graphene on CuNi substrates has been studied. The presence of Ni in the alloy results in an increase in the catalytic activity of the surface. This results in lower deposition pressures than for pure Cu and also increases the carbon solubility, which allows the growth of films that are more than one atomic layer thick. Two types of substrates were used for the growth of the graphene films: CuNi foils with an alloy composition of 90:10 and 70:30 Cu-Ni by weight and a CuNi(111) single crystal with a composition of 90:10 by weight. For the 70:30 substrates, it was very difficult to control the graphene thickness. On the other hand, the controlled growth of graphene films that were more than one layer thick was achieved on the 90:10 substrates. The growth morphology and the crystal structure of graphene grown on the CuNi(111) surface was determined by performing these studies in an ultra-high vacuum chamber to achieve very high purity conditions. The low energy electron diffraction analysis of the graphene films showed that the graphene films always nucleated in more than one rotational orientation with respect to the substrate. The growth was achieved at temperatures as low as 500 °C, which is much lower in temperature than for Cu substrates. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the graphene

  6. Mechanistic Basis for High Stereoselectivity and Broad Substrate Scope in the (salen)Co(III)-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David D.; Nielsen, Lars P. C.; Zuend, Stephan J.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    In the (salen)Co(III)-catalyzed hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of terminal epoxides, the rate- and stereoselectivity-determining epoxide ring-opening step occurs by a cooperative bimetallic mechanism with one Co(III) complex acting as a Lewis acid and another serving to deliver the hydroxide nucleophile. In this paper, we analyze the basis for the extraordinarily high stereoselectivity and broad substrate scope observed in the HKR. We demonstrate that the stereochemistry of each of the two (salen)Co(III) complexes in the rate-determining transition structure is important for productive catalysis: a measurable rate of hydrolysis occurs only if the absolute stereochemistry of each of these (salen)Co(III) complexes is the same. Experimental and computational studies provide strong evidence that stereochemical communication in the HKR is mediated by the stepped conformation of the salen ligand, and not the shape of the chiral diamine backbone of the ligand. A detailed computational analysis reveals that the epoxide binds the Lewis acidic Co(III) complex in a well-defined geometry imposed by stereoelectronic, rather than steric effects. This insight serves as the basis of a complete stereochemical and transition structure model that sheds light on the reasons for the broad substrate generality of the HKR. PMID:24041239

  7. Epitaxial growth mechanisms of graphene and effects of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özçelik, V. Ongun; Cahangirov, S.; Ciraci, S.

    2012-06-01

    The growth process of single layer graphene with and without substrate is investigated using ab initio, finite temperature molecular dynamic calculations within density functional theory. An understanding of the epitaxial graphene growth mechanisms in the atomic level is provided by exploring the transient stages which occur at the growing edges of graphene. These stages are formation and collapse of large carbon rings together with the formation and healing of Stone-Wales like pentagon-heptagon defects. The activation barriers for the healing of these growth induced defects on various substrates are calculated using the climbing image nudge elastic band method and compared with that of the Stone-Wales defect. It is found that the healing of pentagon-heptagon defects occurring near the edge in the course of growth is much easier than that of Stone-Wales defect. The role of the substrate in the epitaxial growth and in the healing of defects are also investigated in detail, along with the effects of using carbon dimers as the building blocks of graphene growth.

  8. Growth of Woody Plants in Clean Chip Residual Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clean chip residual (CCR) is a potential replacement for pine bark (PB) in nursery crop substrates. It is a by-product of in-field forestry harvesting practices and has been shown to produce annual plants and perennials similar in size to plants grown in PB. This study evaluated growth of woody orna...

  9. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. S. Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  10. Substrate Preparations in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. Annealing-temperature dependence of ZnO substrates was studied. ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates have also been investigated for comparison purposes and the annealing temperature of A1203 substrates is 1000 C. Substrates and films were characterized using photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, energy dispersive spectrum, and electric transport measurements. It has been found that the ZnO film properties were different when films were grown on the two polarity surfaces of ZnO substrates and the A1203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of homoepitaxial ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  11. Characterization of a naphthalene dioxygenase endowed with an exceptionally broad substrate specificity toward polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jouanneau, Yves; Meyer, Christine; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gaillard, Jacques

    2006-10-10

    In Sphingomonas CHY-1, a single ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase is responsible for the initial attack of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of up to five rings. The components of this enzyme were separately purified and characterized. The oxygenase component (ht-PhnI) was shown to contain one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear Fe center per alpha subunit, based on EPR measurements and iron assay. Steady-state kinetic measurements revealed that the enzyme had a relatively low apparent Michaelis constant for naphthalene (K(m) = 0.92 +/- 0.15 microM) and an apparent specificity constant of 2.0 +/- 0.3 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1). Naphthalene was converted to the corresponding 1,2-dihydrodiol with stoichiometric oxidation of NADH. On the other hand, the oxidation of eight other PAHs occurred at slower rates and with coupling efficiencies that decreased with the enzyme reaction rate. Uncoupling was associated with hydrogen peroxide formation, which is potentially deleterious to cells and might inhibit PAH degradation. In single turnover reactions, ht-PhnI alone catalyzed PAH hydroxylation at a faster rate in the presence of organic solvent, suggesting that the transfer of substrate to the active site is a limiting factor. The four-ring PAHs chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were subjected to a double ring-dihydroxylation, giving rise to the formation of a significant proportion of bis-cis-dihydrodiols. In addition, the dihydroxylation of benz[a]anthracene yielded three dihydrodiols, the enzyme showing a preference for carbons in positions 1,2 and 10,11. This is the first characterization of a dioxygenase able to dihydroxylate PAHs made up of four and five rings. PMID:17014090

  12. Characterization of a Naphthalene Dioxygenase Endowed with an Exceptionally Broad Substrate Specificity Toward Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau,Y.; Meyer, C.; Jakoncic, J.; Stojanoff, V.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-01-01

    In Sphingomonas CHY-1, a single ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase is responsible for the initial attack of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of up to five rings. The components of this enzyme were separately purified and characterized. The oxygenase component (ht-PhnI) was shown to contain one Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster and one mononuclear Fe center per {alpha} subunit, based on EPR measurements and iron assay. Steady-state kinetic measurements revealed that the enzyme had a relatively low apparent Michaelis constant for naphthalene (K{sub m} = 0.92 {+-} 0.15 {mu}M) and an apparent specificity constant of 2.0 {+-} 0.3 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Naphthalene was converted to the corresponding 1,2-dihydrodiol with stoichiometric oxidation of NADH. On the other hand, the oxidation of eight other PAHs occurred at slower rates and with coupling efficiencies that decreased with the enzyme reaction rate. Uncoupling was associated with hydrogen peroxide formation, which is potentially deleterious to cells and might inhibit PAH degradation. In single turnover reactions, ht-PhnI alone catalyzed PAH hydroxylation at a faster rate in the presence of organic solvent, suggesting that the transfer of substrate to the active site is a limiting factor. The four-ring PAHs chrysene and benz[a]anthracene were subjected to a double ring-dihydroxylation, giving rise to the formation of a significant proportion of bis-cis-dihydrodiols. In addition, the dihydroxylation of benz[a]anthracene yielded three dihydrodiols, the enzyme showing a preference for carbons in positions 1,2 and 10,11. This is the first characterization of a dioxygenase able to dihydroxylate PAHs made up of four and five rings.

  13. Use of alternative growth substrates to enhance PAH degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Tittle, P.C.; Liu, Y.T.; Strand, S.E.; Stensel, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Freshwater and saltwater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-degrading enrichments were developed from seed from a manufactured gas plant site and contaminated marine sediment, respectively. Both enrichments were able to maintain specific degradation rates of 3- and 4-ring PAHs after growth with salicylate or phthalate, which increased their biomass concentrations by a factor of 9 to 10. Phthalate was a more effective alternative substrate than was salicylate. Specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and anthracene by the freshwater enrichment were increased after growth with phthalate. Growth with phthalate increased the specific degradation rates of phenanthrene and pyrene by the saltwater enrichment.

  14. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  15. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  16. A Potential Substrate Binding Conformation of β-Lactams and Insight into the Broad Spectrum of NDM-1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qinghui; He, Lin

    2012-01-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) is a key enzyme that the pathogen Klebsiella pneumonia uses to hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics. It is currently unclear why NDM-1 has a broad spectrum of activity. Docking of the representatives of the β-lactam families into the active site of NDM-1 is reported here. All the β-lactams naturally fit the NDM-1 pocket, implying that NDM-1 can accommodate the substrates without dramatic conformation changes. The docking reveals two major binding modes of the β-lactams, which we tentatively name the S (substrate) and I (inhibitor) conformers. In the S conformers of all the β-lactams, the amide oxygen and the carboxylic group conservatively interact with two zinc ions, while the substitutions on the fused rings show dramatic differences in their conformations and positions. Since the bridging hydroxide ion/water in the S conformer is at the position for the nucleophilic attack, the S conformation may simulate the true binding of a substrate to NDM-1. The I conformer either blocks or displaces the bridging hydroxide ion/water, such as in the case of aztreonam, and is thus inhibitory. The docking also suggests that substitutions on the β-lactam ring are required for β-lactams to bind in the S conformation, and therefore, small β-lactams such as clavulanic acid would be inhibitors of NDM-1. Finally, our docking shows that moxalactam uses its tyrosyl-carboxylic group to compete with the S conformer and would thus be a poor substrate of NDM-1. PMID:22825119

  17. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Different Types of Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiangtao

    We report the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on different types of substrates with or without catalytic materials by using different approaches. The roles of the substrates and the catalysts in the formation of the CNTs are studied. We also characterized and identified the structural properties of the CNTs products. In this work, three types of substrates had been used, namely biomorphic bamboo charcoal, Au-coated silicon wafer, and copper foil. The CNTs were grown on different substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method at temperature range between 700°C and 1400°C. Ethanol vapor was used as the carbon source, while tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) vapor was also applied to the process for bamboo charcoal. The products formed on different substrates had their own characteristic features. Hollow or silicate filled CNTs with silicate droplet tips were formed on the surface of bamboo charcoal. Their diameter was in hundreds of nanometers and the length was about several microns. CNT-coated silica core-shell structures were obtained on Au-coated silicon wafer. The graphitic carbon shell was formed in thickness about 145 nm for the sample prepared at 1185°C, but amorphous carbon shell was produced in thickness more than 300 nm for the sample prepared at 1236°C. Lastly, CNTs with bamboo-like structure were synthesized on the copper foil substrate. The CNTs were getting thicker from 70 nm to 170 nm when temperature was increased from 700°C to 1000°C. The yield increased with temperature and annealing time if the sample was annealed for less than 30 min. Apart from being a support, the three substrates had their own roles in the growth of CNTs. Bamboo charcoal also acted as a catalyst provider. Au-coated silicon wafer participated in the formation of the silica/CNT composite nanowires. Copper foil itself was a catalyst. The silicate, the Au/Si droplet, and the copper particles were the catalysts for the growth of CNTs in these three substrates

  18. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (1) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (2) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (3) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (4) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (5) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (6) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  19. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth.

    PubMed

    Ming, D W; Henninger, D L

    1994-01-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth. PMID:11538023

  20. Use of lunar regolith as a substrate for plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Henninger, D. L.

    1994-11-01

    Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) will be required to regenerate air, water, and wastes, and to produce food for human consumption during long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars. It may be possible to supplement some of the materials needed for a lunar RLSS from resources on the Moon. Natural materials at the lunar surface may be used for a variety of lunar RLSS needs, including (i) soils or solid-support substrates for plant growth, (ii) sources for extraction of essential, plant-growth nutrients, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, (iv) sources of O2 and H2, which may be used to manufacture water, (v) feed stock materials for the synthesis of useful minerals (e.g., molecular sieves), and (vi) shielding materials surrounding the outpost structure to protect humans, plants, and microorganism from harmful radiation. Use of indigenous lunar regolith as a terrestrial-like soil for plant growth could offer a solid support substrate, buffering capacity, nutrient source/storage/retention capabilities, and should be relatively easy to maintain. The lunar regolith could, with a suitable microbial population, play a role in waste renovation; much like terrestrial waste application directly on soils. Issues associated with potentially toxic elements, pH, nutrient availability, air and fluid movement parameters, and cation exchange capacity of lunar regolith need to be addressed before lunar materials can be used effectively as soils for plant growth.

  1. Cellular response to micropatterned growth promoting and inhibitory substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal development and the response to injury both require cell growth, migration and morphological remodeling, guided by a complex local landscape of permissive and inhibitory cues. A standard approach for studying by such cues is to culture cells on uniform substrates containing known concentrations of these molecules, however this method fails to represent the molecular complexity of the natural growth environment. Results To mimic the local complexity of environmental conditions in vitro, we used a contact micropatterning technique to examine cell growth and differentiation on patterned substrates printed with the commonly studied growth permissive and inhibitory substrates, poly-L-lysine (PLL) and myelin, respectively. We show that micropatterning of PLL can be used to direct adherence and axonal outgrowth of hippocampal and cortical neurons as well as other cells with diverse morphologies like Oli-neu oligodendrocyte progenitor cell lines and fibroblast-like COS7 cells in culture. Surprisingly, COS7 cells exhibited a preference for low concentration (1 pg/mL) PLL zones over adjacent zones printed with high concentrations (1 mg/mL). We demonstrate that micropatterning is also useful for studying factors that inhibit growth as it can direct cells to grow along straight lines that are easy to quantify. Furthermore, we provide the first demonstration of microcontact printing of myelin-associated proteins and show that they impair process outgrowth from Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Conclusion We conclude that microcontact printing is an efficient and reproducible method for patterning proteins and brain-derived myelin on glass surfaces in order to study the effects of the microenvironment on cell growth and morphogenesis. PMID:24119185

  2. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  3. The Cleaning of Indium Phosphide Substrates for Growth by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstra, Peter

    1995-11-01

    A novel technique of using an in-situ ECR generated H-plasma to produce high quality surfaces on InP substrates, for growth of n-and p-type InP layers by GSMBE, has been investigated. The initial substrate surface quality determines the quality of the subsequently grown layers and therefore, the cleaning procedure is of critical importance. The standard approach entails a thermal desorption of a passivating oxide; however, this technique leaves carbon on the surface and, because oxides may vary in composition depending on the growth conditions, a consistent temperature for desorption may not be obtained. The desorption process is also dependent on the atmosphere in which it is carried out; i.e. whether an overpressure of P_2 or As _2 is used. Thermal desorption of oxides from InP requires the substrate to reach temperatures higher than normal GSMBE growth temperatures which can lead to substrate decomposition and, for regrowth applications, can alter dopant profiles and layer composition in ternary and quaternary layer growths. As an alternative, H-plasmas in separate vacuum chambers have been used to remove oxides from InP but this typically produces highly defective substrates due to a loss of phosphorus from the substrate. In this work the combination of an in-situ H-plasma with a stabilizing atmosphere of P_2 is used for the removal of oxides at temperatures equal to growth temperature and below. The mechanism involved in the thermal desorption of an oxide is first clarified and this procedure is compared with oxide removal by H-plasma etch in a phosphorus atmosphere. The ECR source can produce various plasma modes which have been thoroughly characterized. The effect of the different plasma conditions on clean InP is determined. These modes have different properties which result in different oxide etch rates. Various modes are compared and the mechanism of oxide removal is documented. As an alternative to oxide growth S-passivation has recently received

  4. Tailored surfaces of perovskite oxide substrates for conducted growth of thin films.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Florencio; Ocal, Carmen; Fontcuberta, Josep

    2014-04-01

    Oxide electronics relies on the availability of epitaxial oxide thin films. The extreme flexibility of the chemical composition of ABO3 perovskites and the broad spectrum of properties they cover, inspire the creativity of scientists and place perovskites in the lead of functional materials for advanced technologies. Moreover, emerging properties are being discovered at interfaces between distinct perovskites that could not be anticipated on the basis of those of the adjacent epitaxial layers. All dreamed new prospects require the use of suitable substrates for epitaxial growth. Perovskite single crystals are the workhorses of this activity and understanding and controlling their surface properties have become critical. In this tutorial review we will chiefly focus on the impact of the morphology and composition of the surface of ABO3 perovskite substrates on the growth mechanisms and properties of thin films epitaxially grown on them. As SrTiO3 is the most popular substrate, we will mostly concentrate on describing the current understanding and achievements for it. Illustrative examples of other perovskite substrates (LaAlO3, LSAT and DyScO3) will be also included. We will show that distinct chemical terminations can exist on the surfaces used for growth and we will review methods employed either to select the most appropriate one for specific growth to allow, for instance, tailoring the ultimate outmost epilayer, or to induce self-ordering to engineer long-range nanoscale patterns of chemical terminations. We will demonstrate the capacity of this knowledge by the growth of low-dimensional organic and inorganic structures. PMID:24553667

  5. Multiple substrate growth kinetics of Leptothrix discophora SP-6.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Nurdan; Sears, John; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2002-01-01

    The growth parameters of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 were quantified on the basis of the steady-state concentrations and utilization rates of pyruvate, dissolved oxygen, and concentration of microorganisms in a chemostat operated at 25 degrees C, pH 7.2, and an agitation rate of 350 rpm. The results showed that the microbial growth was limited by both pyruvate and dissolved oxygen. A combined growth kinetics model using Monod growth kinetics for pyruvate and Tessier growth kinetics for oxygen showed the best correlation with the experimental data when analyzed using an interactive multiple substrate model. The growth kinetics parameters and the respective confidence limits, estimated using the Monte Carlo simulation, were mu(max) = 0.576 +/- 0.021 h(-1), K(sMp) = 38.81 +/- 4.24 mg L(-1), K(sTo) = 0.39 +/- 0.04 mg L(-1), Y(X/p) = 0.150 (mg microorganism mg(-1) pyruvate), Y(X/o) = 1.24 (mg microorganism mg(-1) oxygen), the maintenance factors for pyruvate and oxygen were m(p) = 0.129 (mg pyruvate consumed mg(-1) microorganism h(-1)) and m(o) = 0.076 (mg oxygen consumed mg(-1) microorganism h(-1)), respectively. PMID:12363350

  6. ``Electric growth`` of metal overlayers on semiconductor substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Cho, J.H. |; Niu, Q.; Shih, C.K.; Suo, Z.

    1998-02-01

    In this article, the authors present the main results from their recent studies of metal overlayer growth on semiconductor substrates. They show that a variety of novel phenomena can exist in such systems, resulting from several competing interactions. The confined motion of the conduction electrons within the metal overlayer can mediate a surprisingly long-range repulsive force between the metal-semiconductor interface and the growth front, acting to stabilize the overlayer. Electron transfer from the overlayer to the substrate leads to an attractive force between the two interfaces, acting to destabilize the overlayer. Interface-induced Friedel oscillations in electron density can further impose an oscillatory modulation onto the two previous interactions. These three competing factors, of all electronic nature, can make a flat metal overlayer critically, marginally, or magically stable, or totally unstable against roughening. The authors further show that, for many systems, these electronic effects can easily win over the effect of stress. First-principles studies of a few representative systems support the main features of the present electronic growth concept.

  7. Graphene on Pt(111): Growth and Substrate interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, P.; Sadowski, J.T.; Sutter, E.

    2009-12-01

    In situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) of graphene growth combined with measurements of the graphene structure and electronic band structure has been used to study graphene on Pt(111). Growth by carbon segregation produces macroscopic monolayer graphene domains extending continuously across Pt(111) substrate steps and bounded by strongly faceted edges. LEEM during cooling from the growth temperature shows the propagation of wrinkles in the graphene sheet, driven by thermal stress. The lattice mismatch between graphene and Pt(111) is accommodated by moire structures with a large number of different rotational variants, without a clear preference for a particular interface geometry. Fast and slow growing graphene domains exhibit moire structures with small [e.g., (3 x 3){sub G}, ({radical}6 x {radical}6)R2{sub G}, and (2 x 2)R4{sub G}] and large unit cells [e.g., ({radical}44 x {radical}44)R15{sub G}, ({radical}52 x {radical}52)R14{sub G}, and (8 x 8){sub G}], respectively. A weak substrate coupling, suggested by the growth and structural properties of monolayer graphene on Pt(111), is confirmed by maps of the band structure, which is close to that of isolated graphene aside from minimal hole doping due to charge transfer from the metal. Finally, the decoupled graphene monolayer on Pt(111) appears impenetrable to carbon diffusion, which self-limits the graphene growth at monolayer thickness. Thicker graphene domains, which can form at boundaries between monolayer domains, have been used to characterize the properties of few-layer graphene on Pt(111).

  8. Laser direct growth of graphene on silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Dapeng; Xu Xianfan

    2012-01-09

    We demonstrate laser direct growth of few layer graphene on a silicon substrate. In our study, a continuous wave laser beam was focused on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-coated silicon wafer to evaporate PMMA and melt the silicon wafer. Carbon atoms, decomposed from PMMA, were absorbed by the molten silicon surface, and then separated from silicon in the cooling process to form few-layer graphene. This Si-catalyzed method will provide a new approach and platform for applications of graphene.

  9. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. These findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  10. Titanium oxide as substrate for neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Vila, Mónica; Moreno-Burriel, Berta; Chinarro, Eva; Jurado, José R; Casañ-Pastor, Nieves; Collazos-Castro, Jorge E

    2009-07-01

    Titanium oxide has antiinflammatory activity and tunable electrochemical behavior that make it an attractive material for the fabrication of implantable devices. The most stable composition is TiO2 and occurs mainly in three polymorphs, namely, anatase, rutile, and brookite, which differ in its crystallochemical properties. Here, we report the preparation of rutile surfaces that permit good adherence and axonal growth of cultured rat cerebral cortex neurons. Rutile disks were obtained by sinterization of TiO2 powders of commercial origin or precipitated from hydrolysis of Ti(IV)-isopropoxide. Commercial powders sintered at 1300-1600 degrees C produced rutile surfaces with abnormal grain growth, probably because of impurities of the powders. Neurons cultured on those surfaces survived in variable numbers and showed fewer neurites than on control materials. On the other hand, rutile sintered from precipitated powders had less contaminants and more homogenous grain growth. By adjusting the thermal treatment it was possible to obtain surfaces performing well as substrate for neuron survival for at least 10 days. Some surfaces permitted normal axonal elongation, whereas dendrite growth was generally impaired. These findings support the potential use of titanium oxide in neuroprostheses and other devices demanding materials with enhanced properties in terms of biocompatibility and axon growth promotion. PMID:18481786

  11. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  12. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  13. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  14. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x

  15. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  16. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1-5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  17. Epitaxial growth of germanium thin films on crystal silicon substrates by solid phase crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Masao; Kanai, Mikuri

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the solid phase crystallization (SPC) of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) precursors on single crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates as seed layers and successfully obtained the epitaxial growth of Ge. The n-type (100) Si substrate is most suitable for preferential growth following the substrate orientation, because the velocity of preferential growth is higher than those on the other substrates and preferential growth is completed before random nucleation. The impurity contamination in the a-Ge precursors probably enhances random nucleation. The epitaxial growth is disturbed by the impurity contamination at a relatively high SPC temperature in the intrinsic and p-type Si substrates with the (100) orientation and the n-type and intrinsic Si substrates with the (111) orientation, because the lower velocity of preferential growth allows random crystallization. Almost no epitaxial growth is observed on the p-type (111) Si substrates even when low-impurity a-Ge precursors are used.

  18. Seedless Pattern Growth of Quasi-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays on Cover Glass Substrates in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsanulhaq, Q.; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Hahn, Y. B.

    2010-03-01

    A hybrid technique for the selective growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on wanted areas of thin cover glass substrates was developed without the use of seed layer of ZnO. This method utilizes electron-beam lithography for pattern transfer on seedless substrate, followed by solution method for the bottom-up growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on the patterned substrates. The arrays of highly crystalline ZnO nanorods having diameter of 60 ± 10 nm and length of 750 ± 50 nm were selectively grown on different shape patterns and exhibited a remarkable uniformity in terms of diameter, length, and density. The room temperature cathodluminescence measurements showed a strong ultraviolet emission at 381 nm and broad visible emission at 585-610 nm were observed in the spectrum.

  19. Connective tissue progenitor cell growth characteristics on textured substrates.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2007-01-01

    Growth characteristics of human connective tissue progenitor (CTP) cells were investigated on smooth and textured substrates, which were produced using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fabrication technology. Human bone marrow derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates comprising smooth (non-patterned) surfaces (SMOOTH), 4 different cylindrical post micro-textures (POSTS) that were 7-10 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm diameter, respectively, and channel micro-textures (CHANNELS) with curved cross-sections that were 11 microm high, 45 microm wide, and separated by 5 microm wide ridges. Standard glass-tissue culture surfaces were used as controls. Micro-textures resulted in the modification of CTP morphology, attachment, migration, and proliferation characteristics. Specifically, cells on POSTS exhibited more contoured morphology with closely packed cytoskeletal actin microfilaments compared to the more random orientation in cells grown on SMOOTH. CTP colonies on 10 gm-diameter POSTS exhibited higher cell number than any other POSTS, and a significant increase in cell number (442%) compared to colonies on SMOOTH (71%). On CHANNELS, colonies tended to be denser (229%) than on POSTS (up to 140% on 10 microm POSTS), and significantly more so compared to those on SMOOTH (104%). PMID:18019838

  20. A propionate CoA-transferase of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with broad substrate specificity catalyzing the CoA thioester formation of various carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lindenkamp, Nicole; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated a propionate CoA-transferase (Pct) homologue encoded in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16. The corresponding gene has been cloned into the vector pET-19b to yield a histidine-tagged enzyme which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analyses revealed that the enzyme exhibits a broad substrate specificity for carboxylic acids. The formation of the corresponding CoA-thioesters of acetate using propionyl-CoA as CoA donor, and of propionate, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropionate, crotonate, acrylate, lactate, succinate and 4-hydroxybutyrate using acetyl-CoA as CoA donor could be shown. According to the substrate specificity, the enzyme can be allocated in the family I of CoA-transferases. The apparent molecular masses as determined by gel filtration and detected by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 228 and 64 kDa, respectively, and point to a quaternary structure of the native enzyme (α4). The enzyme exhibited similarities in sequence and structure to the well investigated Pct of Clostridium propionicum. It does not contain the typical conserved (S)ENG motif, but the derived motif sequence EXG with glutamate 342 to be, most likely, the catalytic residue. Due to the homo-oligomeric structure and the sequence differences with the subclasses IA-C of family I CoA-transferases, a fourth subclass of family I is proposed, comprising - amongst others - the Pcts of R. eutropha H16 and C. propionicum. A markerless precise-deletion mutant R. eutropha H16∆pct was generated. The growth and accumulation behaviour of this mutant on gluconate, gluconate plus 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP), acetate and propionate was investigated but resulted in no observable phenotype. Both, the wild type and the mutant showed the same growth and storage behaviour with these carbon sources. It is probable that R. eutropha H16 is upregulating

  1. Co-Gradient Variation in Growth Rate and Development Time of a Broadly Distributed Butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Madeleine; Sunnucks, Paul; Norgate, Melanie; Murray, Neil; Kearney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Widespread species often show geographic variation in thermally-sensitive traits, providing insight into how species respond to shifts in temperature through time. Such patterns may arise from phenotypic plasticity, genetic adaptation, or their interaction. In some cases, the effects of genotype and temperature may act together to reduce, or to exacerbate, phenotypic variation in fitness-related traits across varying thermal environments. We find evidence for such interactions in life-history traits of Heteronympha merope, a butterfly distributed across a broad latitudinal gradient in south-eastern Australia. We show that body size in this butterfly is negatively related to developmental temperature in the laboratory, in accordance with the temperature-size rule, but not in the field, despite very strong temperature gradients. A common garden experiment on larval thermal responses, spanning the environmental extremes of H. merope's distribution, revealed that butterflies from low latitude (warmer climate) populations have relatively fast intrinsic growth and development rates compared to those from cooler climates. These synergistic effects of genotype and temperature across the landscape (co-gradient variation) are likely to accentuate phenotypic variation in these traits, and this interaction must be accounted for when predicting how H. merope will respond to temperature change through time. These results highlight the importance of understanding how variation in life-history traits may arise in response to environmental change. Without this knowledge, we may fail to detect whether organisms are tracking environmental change, and if they are, whether it is by plasticity, adaptation or both. PMID:24743771

  2. Co-gradient variation in growth rate and development time of a broadly distributed butterfly.

    PubMed

    Barton, Madeleine; Sunnucks, Paul; Norgate, Melanie; Murray, Neil; Kearney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Widespread species often show geographic variation in thermally-sensitive traits, providing insight into how species respond to shifts in temperature through time. Such patterns may arise from phenotypic plasticity, genetic adaptation, or their interaction. In some cases, the effects of genotype and temperature may act together to reduce, or to exacerbate, phenotypic variation in fitness-related traits across varying thermal environments. We find evidence for such interactions in life-history traits of Heteronympha merope, a butterfly distributed across a broad latitudinal gradient in south-eastern Australia. We show that body size in this butterfly is negatively related to developmental temperature in the laboratory, in accordance with the temperature-size rule, but not in the field, despite very strong temperature gradients. A common garden experiment on larval thermal responses, spanning the environmental extremes of H. merope's distribution, revealed that butterflies from low latitude (warmer climate) populations have relatively fast intrinsic growth and development rates compared to those from cooler climates. These synergistic effects of genotype and temperature across the landscape (co-gradient variation) are likely to accentuate phenotypic variation in these traits, and this interaction must be accounted for when predicting how H. merope will respond to temperature change through time. These results highlight the importance of understanding how variation in life-history traits may arise in response to environmental change. Without this knowledge, we may fail to detect whether organisms are tracking environmental change, and if they are, whether it is by plasticity, adaptation or both. PMID:24743771

  3. Growth and characterization of rutile TiO2 nanorods on various substrates with fabricated fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal UV detector based on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, Abbas M.; Hassan, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Rutile-phase titanium dioxide nanorods (NRs) were synthesized successfully on p-type silicon (Si) (1 1 1), c-plane sapphire (Al2O3), glass coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), glass, and quartz substrates via chemical bath deposition method. All substrates were seeded with a TiO2 seed layer synthesized with a radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering system prior to NRs growth. The effect of substrate type on structural, morphological, and optical properties of rutile TiO2 NRs was studied. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy analyses showed the tetragonal rutile structure of the synthesized TiO2 NRs. Optical properties were examined with photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of the grown rutile NRs on all substrates, with the spectra exhibiting one strong ultraviolet emission peak intensity compared with broad visible peak. The optimal sample of rutile NRs was grown on Si substrate. Thus, a fast-response metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet (UV) detector was fabricated. Upon exposure to 365 nm light (2.3 mW/cm2) at 5 V bias, the device displays 2.62 × 10-5 A photocurrent, and the response and recovery times are calculated as 18.5 and 19.1 ms, respectively. These results demonstrate that the fabricated high-quality photodiode is a promising candidate as a low-cost UV photodetector for commercially integrated photoelectronic applications.

  4. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  5. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2013-02-19

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  6. Methods of preparing flexible photovoltaic devices using epitaxial liftoff, and preserving the integrity of growth substrates used in epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting

    2015-01-06

    There is disclosed methods of making photosensitive devices, such as flexible photovoltaic (PV) devices, through the use of epitaxial liftoff. Also described herein are methods of preparing flexible PV devices comprising a structure having a growth substrate, wherein the selective etching of protective layers yields a smooth growth substrate that us suitable for reuse.

  7. Direct Optical Characterization of Graphene Growth and Domains on Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chuancheng; Jiang, Jiaolong; Gan, Lin; Guo, Xuefeng

    2012-01-01

    We detailed a facile detection technique to optically characterize graphene growth and domains directly on growth substrates through a simple thermal annealing process. It was found that thermal annealing transformed the naked Cu to Cu oxides while keeping graphene and graphene-covered Cu intact. This increases the interference color contrast between Cu oxides and Cu, thus making graphene easily visible under an optical microscope. By using this simple method, we studied the factors that affect graphene nucleation and growth and achieved graphene domains with the domain size as large as ~100 μm. The concept of chemically making graphene visible is universal, as demonstrated by the fact that a solution process based on selective H2O2 oxidation has been developed to achieve the similar results in a shorter time. These techniques should be valuable for studies towards elucidating the parameters that control the grains, boundaries, structures and properties of graphene. PMID:23050091

  8. Substrate temperature changes during molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaMnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, V.; Olejnik, K.; Cukr, M.; Smrcka, L.; Remes, Z.; Oswald, J.

    2007-10-15

    Our band gap spectroscopy measurements reveal a remarkably big increase of the substrate temperature during the low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaMnAs layers. With the help of numerical simulations we explain the effect as a consequence of changing absorption/emission characteristics of the growing epilayer. We discuss possibilities for reducing the substrate temperature variations during the growth.

  9. Investigation of Drainage and Plant Growth from Nursery Container Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of water and major nutrients lost through drainage from a nursery container substrate treated with different amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphate (P), and potassium (K), and potted with butterfly bush plants were investigated. The substrate was mainly composed of aged pine bark and steamed...

  10. Strawberry Production in Soilless Substrate Troughs – Plant Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilless substrates made of peat moss, coconut coir, perlite, rockwool or bark are pathogen free and they have been used in strawberry production in Europe in troughs or containers. Open field strawberry production in soilless substrate is new to California growers. The objective of this study was t...

  11. In situ growth of monolayer porous gold nanoparticles film as high-performance SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chunyuan; Wei, Yuhan; Da, Bingtao; Zhang, Haiting; Cong, Xing; Yang, Boyue; Yang, Yanjun; Wang, Lianhui

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has recently received considerable attention as an ultrasensitive analytic technique. However, its wide application is limited by lack of excellent SERS-active substrates. In this work a SERS substrate with arrayed monolayer films of porous gold nanoparticles is prepared on a solid substrate by a facile, in situ and one-step growth approach. Specifically, the solid substrate was coated with a layer of dense positive charges first by layer-by-layer assembly, followed by patterned a PDMS film with arrayed wells on the substrate. Then the growth solution including chlorauric acid, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, and ascorbic acid in a certain proportion was transferred into the wells for in situ and one-step growth of porous gold nanoparticles on the substrate. The growth time, feed ratio of the reagents, and repeat times of the in situ growth were studied systematically to obtain optimal parameters for preparing an optimal SERS substrate. The as-prepared optimal SERS substrate not only has good SERS performance with the enhancement factor up to ∼1.10 × 106, but also shows good uniformity and stability. The SERS substrate was further utilized to be ultrasensitive SERS-based chemical sensors for ppb-level detection of highly toxic dyfonate. The preliminary result indicates that the as-prepared SERS substrate has good SERS performance and shows a number of great potential applications in SERS-based sensors.

  12. Substrate specificity screening of oat (Avena sativa) seeds aminopeptidase demonstrate unusually broad tolerance in S1 pocket.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Anna D; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Drag, Marcin

    2012-05-01

    Aminopeptidases are proteolytic enzymes that remove one amino acid at a time from N-terminus of peptidic substrates. In plants, inhibitors of aminopeptidases can find potential applications in agriculture as herbicides. In this report we have used a library of fluorogenic derivatives of natural and unnatural amino acids for substrate specificity profiling of oat (Avena sativa) aminopeptidase. Interestingly, we have found that this enzyme recognizes effectively among the natural amino acids basic residues like Arg and Lys, hydrophobic Phe, Leu and Met, but also to some extent acidic residues Asp and Glu. In the case of unnatural amino acids hydrophobic residues (hPhe and hCha) and basic hArg were preferentially recognized. PMID:22366636

  13. Substrate-bound growth of Au-Pd diblock nanowire and hybrid nanorod-plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiating; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Zhanxi; Lam, Zhenhui; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-04-01

    We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures.We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supporting TEM and SEM images of control experiments with different reaction conditions and another type of diblock nanowires. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00361j

  14. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  15. Direct Growth Properties of Graphene Layers on Sapphire Substrate by Alcohol-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Miyasaka, Yuta; Temmyo, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    Few nanometers thick graphene layers were directly grown on a-plane (11bar 20) sapphire substrates by alcohol-chemical vapor deposition (alcohol-CVD) using ethanol as a carbon source and without any catalytic metal on the substrate surface. The growth relationship between the graphene layer and substrate was analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The growth rate of graphene layers with different growth temperatures revealed that the Al atom act as a catalyst for synthesizing a graphitic material during the decomposition of ethanol. An optical transmittance and a sheet resistance of the graphene sheet directly grown on sapphire substrate were observed. SiO2/Si and n-6H-SiC substrates were also examined for graphene direct growth to discuss the catalytic behavior of Si atoms compared with Al atoms.

  16. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Lee, Scott J.; Hazen, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  17. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates.

    PubMed

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G; Lee, Scott J; Hazen, Samuel P; Leschine, Susan B

    2016-02-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  18. Substrate Facet Effect on the Growth of Monolayer MoS2 on Au Foils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaona; Ma, Donglin; Zhu, Jianbao; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhenxi; Yao, Yu; Ji, Qingqing; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanshuo; Li, Cong; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhu, Wenguang; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2015-04-28

    MoS2 on polycrystalline metal substrates emerges as an intriguing growth system compared to that on insulating substrates due to its direct application as an electrocatalyst in hydrogen evolution. However, the growth is still indistinct with regard to the effects of the inevitably evolved facets. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that the crystallography of Au foil substrates can mediate a strong effect on the growth of monolayer MoS2, where large-domain single-crystal MoS2 triangles are more preferentially evolved on Au(100) and Au(110) facets than on Au(111) at relative high growth temperatures (>680 °C). Intriguingly, this substrate effect can be weakened at a low growth temperature (∼530 °C), reflected with uniform distributions of domain size and nucleation density among the different facets. The preferential nucleation and growth on some specific Au facets are explained from the facet-dependent binding energy of MoS2 according to density functional theory calculations. In brief, this work should shed light on the effect of substrate crystallography on the synthesis of monolayer MoS2, thus paving the way for achieving batch-produced, large-domain or domain size-tunable growth through an appropriate selection of the growth substrate. PMID:25801730

  19. Growth patterns of the slime mold Physarum on a nonuniform substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorsrud, Ragnhild; Wagner, Geri

    1998-01-01

    The Myxomycete Physarum polycephalum has been grown on nonuniform substrates, where the nutrients were confined in separated drops of agar medium. Spatial and temporal aspects of the resulting growth structures were studied by time-lapse video techniques and analyzed using image processing software. The growth process on a linear substrate of drops can be described in terms of a searching phase alternating with a feeding phase. On a linear array of drops, the Physarum advanced uniformly after an initial lag phase. On a two-dimensional drop substrate two different growth regimes could be distinguished: branched growth was observed on substrates with small drop diameters and compact growth, similar to growth on uniform substrates, was observed on substrates with larger drop diameters. The drop size is a crucial parameter that mediates characteristic plasmodial morphologies. A crossover from branched to compact growth was observed in some of the experiments. A spatial correlation function was used that could quantitatively distinguish between the different growth regimes.

  20. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  1. Relationship between substrate morphology and growth of aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Karl; Leistikow, Annette; Graff, Andreas; Leonhardt, Albrecht

    2002-10-01

    Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were deposited by bias enhanced microwave chemical vapor deposition on oxidized silicon substrates coated with thin Co layers. The obtained tubes were characterized with respect to the structure and catalyst particle size. No significant difference in size between the particles on the substrate after a plasma treatment and the particles included in the tubes after the deposition process was observed. Two structure types (tubular and bamboo-like) were detected and reasons for their formation are discussed.

  2. A thermophilic endo-1,4-β-glucanase from Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 with broad substrate specificity and great application potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Bai, Yingguo; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Xue, Xianli; Yao, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic cellulases are of significant interest to the efficient conversion of plant cell wall polysaccharides into simple sugars. In this study, a thermophilic and thermostable endo-1,4-β-glucanase, TeEgl5A, was identified in the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii CBS394.64 and functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified recombinant TeEgl5A exhibits optimal activity at pH 4.5 and 90 °C. It is highly stable at 70 °C and over a broad pH range of 1.0-10.0, and shows strong resistance to most metal ions, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and proteases. TeEgl5A has broad substrate specificity and exhibits high activity on substrates containing β-1,4-glycosidic bonds and β-1,3-glycosidic bonds (barley β-glucan, laminarin, lichenan, CMC-Na, carob bean gum, and birchwood xylan). Under simulated mashing conditions, addition of 60 U TeEgl5A reduced more viscosity (10.0 vs.7.6 %) than 80 U of Ultraflo XL from Novozymes. These properties make TeEgl5A a good candidate for extensive application in the detergent, textile, feed, and food industries. PMID:24668246

  3. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate.

    PubMed

    Guzmán de Villoria, R; Figueredo, S L; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A; Slocum, A H; Wardle, B L

    2009-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of approximately 1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s(-1). Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport. PMID:19752503

  4. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  5. The Prophage-encoded Hyaluronate Lyase Has Broad Substrate Specificity and Is Regulated by the N-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease “strangles” in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. PMID:25378402

  6. A novel three-unit tRNA splicing endonuclease found in ultrasmall Archaea possesses broad substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Sugahara, Junichi; Miller, Christopher S.; Baker, Brett J.; Di Giulio, Massimo; Takesue, Kanako; Sato, Asako; Tomita, Masaru; Banfield, Jillian F.; Kanai, Akio

    2011-01-01

    tRNA splicing endonucleases, essential enzymes found in Archaea and Eukaryotes, are involved in the processing of pre-tRNA molecules. In Archaea, three types of splicing endonuclease [homotetrameric: α4, homodimeric: α2, and heterotetrameric: (αβ)2] have been identified, each representing different substrate specificity during the tRNA intron cleavage. Here, we discovered a fourth type of archaeal tRNA splicing endonuclease (ε2) in the genome of the acidophilic archaeon Candidatus Micrarchaeum acidiphilum, referred to as ARMAN-2 and its closely related species, ARMAN-1. The enzyme consists of two duplicated catalytic units and one structural unit encoded on a single gene, representing a novel three-unit architecture. Homodimeric formation was confirmed by cross-linking assay, and site-directed mutagenesis determined that the conserved L10-pocket interaction between catalytic and structural unit is necessary for the assembly. A tRNA splicing assay reveal that ε2 endonuclease cleaves both canonical and non-canonical bulge–helix–bulge motifs, similar to that of (αβ)2 endonuclease. Unlike other ARMAN and Euryarchaeota, tRNAs found in ARMAN-2 are highly disrupted by introns at various positions, which again resemble the properties of archaeal species with (αβ)2 endonuclease. Thus, the discovery of ε2 endonuclease in an archaeon deeply branched within Euryarchaeota represents a new example of the coevolution of tRNA and their processing enzymes. PMID:21880595

  7. Substrate Shape Effect on the Sn Whisker Growth in the Electroplating Matte Sn System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yee-Wen; Li, Chao-Kang; Tsou, Meng-Yu; Shao, Pei-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the substrate shape effect on the Cu substrates for Sn whisker growth has been investigated. A Cu foil, as a substrate, was bent to 90° by a universal testing machine. The matte Sn layers were electroplated on the Cu substrate under various current densities. Then, the samples were given heat treatment under various temperatures for 250 h. The results indicate that Sn whisker growth was promoted by the compression stress on the concave side and was restrained by the tension stress on the convex side. The increase of plating thickness in electroplating process offered the extensive residual stress to mitigate the Sn whisker growth. Increasing the aging temperatures also enhanced the thickness of the oxide layer. Thick oxide layers can prevent Sn whisker growth.

  8. Nonlinear estimation of Monod growth kinetic parameters from a single substrate depletion curve.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J A; Tiedje, J M

    1983-01-01

    Monod growth kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting sigmoidal substrate depletion data to the integrated Monod equation, using nonlinear least-squares analysis. When the initial substrate concentration was in the mixed-order region, nonlinear estimation of simulated data sets containing known measurement errors provided accurate estimates of the mu max, Ks, and Y values used to create these data. Nonlinear regression analysis of sigmoidal substrate depletion data was also evaluated for H2-limited batch growth of Desulfovibrio sp. strain G11. The integrated Monod equation can be more convenient for the estimation of growth kinetic parameters, particularly for gaseous substrates, but it must be recognized that the estimates of mu max, Ks, and Y obtained may be influenced by the growth rate history of the inoculum. PMID:6870238

  9. A thraustochytrid diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 with broad substrate specificity strongly increases oleic acid content in engineered Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyu; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the last step in acyl-CoA-dependent triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and is an important determinant of cellular oil content and quality. In this study, a gene, designated TaDGAT2, encoding a type 2 DGAT (DGAT2)-related enzyme was identified from the oleaginous marine protist Thraustochytrium aureum. The deduced TaDGAT2 sequence contains a ~460 amino acid domain most closely related to DGAT2s from Dictyostelium sp. (45–50% identity). Recombinant TaDGAT2 restored TAG biosynthesis to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1246 TAG-deficient mutant, and microsomes from the complemented mutant displayed DGAT activity with C16 and C18 saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol substrates. To examine its biotechnological potential, TaDGAT2 was expressed under control of a strong seed-specific promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the high linoleic acid fad3fae1 mutant. In both backgrounds, little change was detected in seed oil content, but a striking increase in oleic acid content of seeds was observed. This increase was greatest in fad3fae1 seeds, where relative amounts of oleic acid increased nearly 2-fold to >50% of total fatty acids. In addition, >2-fold increase in oleic acid levels was detected in the triacylglycerol sn-2 position and in the major seed phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. These results suggest that increased seed oleic acid content mediated by TaDGAT2 is influenced in part by the fatty acid composition of host cells and occurs not by enhancing oleic acid content at the TAG sn-3 position directly but by increasing total oleic acid levels in seeds, presumably by limiting flux through phosphatidylcholine-based desaturation reactions. PMID:23814277

  10. One-dimensional crystal growth model on a square lattice substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi; Lu, Chenxi; Yang, Bo; Tao, Xiangming; Wang, Jianfeng; Ye, Gaoxiang

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional crystal growth model along the preferential growth direction is established. The simulation model is performed on a square lattice substrate. First, particles are deposited homogeneously and, as a result, each of the lattice sites is occupied by one particle. In the subsequent stage, N nuclei are selected randomly on the substrate, then the growth process starts by adsorbing the surrounding particles along the preferential growth directions of the crystals. Finally, various one-dimensional crystals with different length and width form. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. Mathematical modeling of the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis on artificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasechkina, E. F.; Kazankova, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    A mathematical model simulating the growth and development of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam. on artificial substrates has been constructed. The model is based on experimental data and contains mathematical descriptions of the filtration, respiration, excretion, spawning, and growth of an individual during its ontogenesis from the moment it attaches to a solid substrate to the attainment of a marketable size. The test computations have been compared to the available observation data for mussel farms.

  12. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  13. Influence of substrate material, orientation, and surface termination on GaN nanowire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Fabian Weiszer, Saskia; Hetzl, Martin; Winnerl, Andrea; Garrido, Jose A.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2014-08-07

    In this work, we investigate the fundamental role of the substrate material, surface orientation, and termination on GaN nanowire (NW) nucleation and growth. First of all, the use of a patterned a-Si/diamond substrate confirms that NW shape and dimension are mainly determined by the applied growth conditions instead of the nature of the substrate. More important is the surface orientation as it defines growth direction and epitaxial relationship towards the GaN NWs, where both (111) and (100) surfaces yield NW growth for equivalent growth conditions. (110) substrates are found to be not suited for NW growth. Finally, the surface termination of diamond is demonstrated to survive the employed growth conditions and, therefore, to affect the nucleation of nanowires and the electronic properties of the heterointerface by its surface dipoles. This difference in nucleation is exploited as an alternative approach for selective area growth without deposition of a foreign mask material, which might also be transferable to other substrates.

  14. Plant Growth Experiments in Zeoponic Substrates: Applications for Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J. E.; Henderson, K. E.; Steinberg, S. L.; Barta, D. J.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    A zeoponic plant-growth system is defined as the cultivation of plants in artificial soils, which have zeolites as a major component (Allen and Ming, 1995). Zeolites are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate minerals that have the ability to exchange constituent cations without major change of the mineral structure. Recently, zeoponic systems developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) slowly release some (Allen et at., 1995) or all of the essential plant-growth nutrients (Ming et at., 1995). These systems have NH4- and K-exchanged clinoptilolite (a natural zeolite) and either natural or synthetic apatite (a calcium phosphate mineral). For the natural apatite system, Ca and P were made available to the plant by the dissolution of apatite. Potassium and NH4-N were made available by ion-exchange reactions involving Ca(2+) from apatite dissolution and K(+) and NH4(+) on zeolitic exchange sites. In addition to NH4-N, K, Ca, and P, the synthetic apatite system also supplied Mg, S, and other micronutrients during dissolution (Figure 1). The overall objective of this research task is to develop zeoponic substrates wherein all plant growth nutrients are supplied by the plant growth medium for several growth seasons with only the addition of water. The substrate is being developed for plant growth in Advanced Life Support (ALS) testbeds (i.e., BioPLEX) and microgravity plant growth experiments. Zeoponic substrates have been used for plant growth experiments on two Space Shuttle flight experiments (STS-60; STS-63; Morrow et aI., 1995). These substrates may be ideally suited for plant growth experiments on the International Space Station and applications in ALS testbeds. However, there are several issues that need to be resolved before zeoponics will be the choice substrate for plant growth experiments in space. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on recent research directed toward the refinement of zeoponic plant growth substrates.

  15. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  16. Ammothermal Growth of Gan Substrates For Leds: High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The new GaN crystal growth method is adapted from that used to grow quartz crystals, which are very inexpensive and represent the second-largest market for single crystals for electronic applications (after silicon). More extreme conditions are required to grow GaN crystals and therefore a new type of chemical growth chamber was invented that is suitable for large-scale manufacturing. A new process was developed that grows GaN crystals at a rate that is more than double that of current processes. The new technology will enable GaN substrates with best-in-world quality at lowest-in-world prices, which in turn will enable new generations of white LEDs, lasers for full-color displays, and high-performance power electronics.

  17. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  18. Acclimation of Foliar Antioxidant Systems to Growth Irradiance in Three Broad-Leaved Evergreen Species.

    PubMed Central

    Grace, S. C.; Logan, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    The protective role of leaf antioxidant systems in the mechanism of plant acclimation to growth irradiance was studied in Vinca major, Schefflera arboricola, and Mahonia repens, which were grown for several months at 20, 100, and 1200 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1. As growth irradiance increased, several constituents of the "Mehler-peroxidase" pathway also increased: superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, ascorbate, and glutathione. This occurred concomitantly with increases in the xanthophyll cycle pool size and in the rate of nonphotochemical energy dissipation under steady-state conditions. There was no evidence for photosystem II overreduction in plants grown at high irradiance, although the reduction state of the stromal NADP pool, estimated from measurements of NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity, was greater than 60% in V. major and S. arboricola. Ascorbate, which removes reactive O2 species generated by O2 photoreduction in the chloroplast and serves as a reductant for the conversion of the xanthophyll cycle pigments to the de-epoxidized forms A plus Z, generally exhibited the most dramatic increases in response to growth irradiance. We conclude from these results that O2 photoreduction occurs at higher rates in leaves acclimated to high irradiance, despite increases in xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation, and that increases in leaf antioxidants protect against this potential oxidative stress. PMID:12226469

  19. Growth and characterization of GaP nanowires on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Tateno, K.; Sogawa, T.; Nakano, H.

    2008-01-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductor materials with Si technology is of great interest for optoelectronic integration circuits. We have studied the growth and structural aspects of GaP nanowires (NWs) grown on Si substrate in a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy system. Au colloid particles dispersed on Si substrate were used as catalysts to conduct the NW growth. The growth temperature considerably affected the growth rate and shape of GaP NWs. The growth rate showed a maximum value of 14.69nm/s at 480°C. When growth temperature increased the radial growth on NW sides was enhanced and the NWs therefore exhibited a tapering shape. GaP NWs with a uniform diameter could be grown at a growth temperature as low as 420°C using a two-temperature process. The NW diameter could be well controlled by using size-selective Au colloid particles. The growth rate dependence showed that the thin NWs grew more slowly than thick ones and the V/III source ratio had a significant effect on the growth rate dependence. An analysis of the GaP/Si interface by transmission electron microscopy indicated that the NWs were epitaxially grown on the Si(111) substrate. Based on these experimental results, the growth mechanism of the GaP NWs on Si was discussed.

  20. Relationship between planar GaAs nanowire growth direction and substrate orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Ryan S.; Walko, Donald A.; Li, Xiuling

    2013-01-01

    Planar GaAs nanowires are epitaxially grown on GaAs substrates of various orientations, via the Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The nanowire geometry and growth direction are examined using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microdiffraction. A hypothesis relating the planar nanowire growth direction to the surface projections of <111> B crystal directions is proposed. GaAs planar nanowire growth on vicinal substrates is performed to test this hypothesis. Good agreement between the experimental results and the projection model is found.

  1. Enhanced Graphene Mechanical Properties through Ultrasmooth Copper Growth Substrates.

    PubMed

    Griep, Mark H; Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Tumlin, Travis M; Wetzel, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The combination of extraordinary strength and stiffness in conjunction with exceptional electronic and thermal properties in lightweight two-dimensional materials has propelled graphene research toward a wide array of applications including flexible electronics and functional structural components. Tailoring graphene's properties toward a selected application requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process, transfer, and postprocessing procedures. To date, the mechanical properties of graphene are largely controlled through postprocess defect engineering techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the role of varied catalytic surface morphologies on the tailorability of subsequent graphene film quality and breaking strength, providing a mechanism to tailor the physical, electrical, and mechanical properties at the growth stage. A new surface planarization methodology that results in over a 99% reduction in Cu surface roughness allows for smoothness parameters beyond that reported to date in literature and clearly demonstrates the role of Cu smoothness toward a decrease in the formation of bilayer graphene defects, altered domain sizes, monolayer graphene sheet resistance values down to 120 Ω/□ and a 78% improvement in breaking strength. The combined electrical and mechanical enhancements achieved through this methodology allows for the direct growth of application quality flexible transparent conductive films with monolayer graphene. PMID:26882091

  2. Modeling carbon nanotube growth on the catalyst-substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma [

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2014-06-15

    The paper presents a theoretical model to study the growth of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on the catalyst substrate surface subjected to reactive plasma. The charging rate of the CNT, kinetics of electron, ions and neutral atoms, the growth rate of the CNT because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle inclusion of the issue of the plasma sheath is undertaken in the present model. Numerical calculations on the effect of ion density and temperature and the substrate bias on the growth of the CNT have been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that the height of CNT increases with the ion density of carbon ions and radius of CNT decreases with hydrogen ion density. The substrate bias also affects the growth rate of the CNT. The field emission characteristics from the CNTs can be analyzed from the results obtained.

  3. Characterization of an Alkaline Family I.4 Lipase from Bacillus sp. W130-35 Isolated from a Tidal Mud Flat with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Jung, Won Kyeong; Lee, Hyun Woo; Yoo, Wanki; Kim, T Doohun; Kim, Hoon

    2015-12-28

    A gene encoding lipolytic enzyme, lip7-3, was isolated from Bacillus sp. W130-35 isolated from a tidal mud flat. The gene encoded a protein of 215 amino acids with a signal peptide composed of 34 amino acid residues. Lip7-3 belonged to the family I.4 lipase and showed its maximal activity at pH 9.0 and 60°C. Its activity increased in the presence of 30% methanol and, remarkably, increased as well to 154.6% in the presence of Ca(2+). Lip7-3 preferred pnitrophenyl octanoate (C8) as a substrate and exhibited broad specificity for short- to longchain fatty acid esters. Additionally, Lip7-3 showed a low degree of enantioselectivity for an S-enantiomer (e.g., (S)-methyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpropionate). It efficiently hydrolyzed glyceryl tributyrate, but did not hydrolyze glyceryl trioleate, fish oil, or olive oil. Its substrate specificity and activation by the solvent might offer a merit to the biotechnological enzyme applications like transesterification in the production of biodiesel. PMID:26370800

  4. Kinetic modeling of Moorella thermoacetica growth on single and dual-substrate systems.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Elliott; Bura, Renata; Gustafson, Rick; Ehsanipour, Mandana

    2016-10-01

    Acetic acid is an important chemical raw material that can be produced directly from sugars in lignocellulosic biomass. Development of kinetic models that capture the bioconversion dynamics of multiple sugar systems will be critical to optimization and process control in future lignocellulosic biorefinery processes. In this work, a kinetic model was developed for the single- and dual-substrate conversion of xylose and glucose to acetic acid using the acetogen Moorella thermoacetica. Batch fermentations were performed experimentally at 20 g L(-1) total sugar concentration using synthetic glucose, xylose, and a mixture of glucose and xylose at a 1:1 ratio. The product yield, calculated as total product formed divided by total sugars consumed, was 79.2, 69.9, and 69.7 % for conversion of glucose, xylose, and a mixture of glucose and xylose (1:1 ratio), respectively. During dual-substrate fermentation, M. thermoacetica demonstrated diauxic growth where xylose (the preferred substrate) was almost entirely consumed before consumption of glucose began. Kinetic parameters were similar for the single-substrate fermentations, and a strong linear correlation was determined between the maximum specific growth rate μ max and substrate inhibition constant, K s . Parameters estimated for the dual-substrate system demonstrated changes in the specific growth rate of both xylose and glucose consumption. In particular, the maximum growth rate related to glucose tripled compared to the single-substrate system. Kinetic growth is affected when multiple substrates are present in a fermentation system, and models should be developed to reflect these features. PMID:27262717

  5. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  6. Growth evolution of AlN films on silicon (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-05-14

    AlN films with various thicknesses have been grown on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface morphology and structural property of the as-grown AlN films have been investigated carefully to comprehensively explore the epitaxial behavior. The ∼2 nm-thick AlN film initially grown on Si substrate exhibits an atomically flat surface with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.23 nm. As the thickness increases, AlN grains gradually grow larger, causing a relatively rough surface. The surface morphology of ∼120 nm-thick AlN film indicates that AlN islands coalesce together and eventually form AlN layers. The decreasing growth rate from 240 to 180 nm/h is a direct evidence that the growth mode of AlN films grown on Si substrates by PLD changes from the islands growth to the layer growth. The evolution of AlN films throughout the growth is studied deeply, and its corresponding growth mechanism is hence proposed. These results are instructional for the growth of high-quality nitride films on Si substrates by PLD, and of great interest for the fabrication of AlN-based devices.

  7. Direct Growth of Graphene Film on Germanium Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K.; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:23955352

  8. Direct Growth of Graphene Film on Germanium Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K.; di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-08-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS).

  9. Direct growth of graphene film on germanium substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:23955352

  10. Initial growth behavior of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 on molybdenum substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenker, T.; Schock, H. W.; Werner, J. H.

    2003-11-01

    We study the initial growth stage of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 on Mo films on glass, as the typical back contact for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 solar cells. A thermal evaporation process deposits Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 of nominal 3 nm thickness at different rates R and substrate temperatures TSub. An ultrahigh resolution scanning electron microscope serves to visualize the nucleation behavior. The deposited Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 forms three-dimensional isolated nuclei, known as Volmer-Weber growth mode. Deposition rate R and substrate temperature TSub control the areal density n of the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 nuclei. For the growth on polycrystalline Mo substrates fabricated by sputter process, we observe a power law dependence between the island density n and the deposition rate R, and an exponential dependence of the island density n on substrate temperature TSub. The theory of homogeneous nucleation explains the Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 cluster formation on sputtered Mo substrates and the dependence of the island density on the growth conditions. On electron gun evaporated molybdenum, the cluster growth shows a similar behavior, but the nucleation mechanism deviates from the model of homogeneous nucleation and strong island density fluctuations occur.

  11. Effect of 'Azotobacter' Bioinoculant on the Growth and Substrate Utilization Potential of Pleurotus eous Seed Spawn

    PubMed Central

    Parani, K.; Pothiraj, C.; Rajapandy, V.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of nitrogen fixing Azotobacter bioinoculant on the mycelial growth and the rate of substrate utilization by Pleurotus eous. The synergistic or antagonistic role of the microorganism during dual culturing with the mushroom or the competitor molds Trichoderma viride, and Trichoderma reesi was studied. Azotobacter was inhibitory to the molds, which are competitive to the mushroom in the seed spawn substrate, but was synergistic towards the mushroom. The growth, substrate utilization potential as total nitrogen content and cellulase enzyme activities of the mushroom in the seed spawn substrate were also enhanced in the presence of the bioinoculant at lower inoculum concentrations, upto 5 ml broth culture per spawn bottle. PMID:24049469

  12. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  13. Carbon nanotube growth from metallic nanoparticles deposited by pulsed-laser deposition on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Mireille; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Semmar, Nadjib; Millon, Éric; Petit, Agnès

    2012-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes carpets were grown by RF plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on various substrates coated by Fe and Ni transition metals that act as catalyst. C2H2 gas was used for the carbon source. The results show that carbon nanotubes CNT can be grown on Si3N4/Si and SiO2/Si substrates only with an Fe catalyst. They are typically formed by multi-walled graphene layers, and can be obtained for a temperature as low as 550 °C. Nanotubes grown on TiN/SiO2/Si substrate from Fe or Ni catalysts present bamboo-like nanostructures and are obtained for particular experimental conditions. This study demonstrates substrate-to-catalyst effect on the CNT growth and their microstructures indicating that the adhesion force of nanoparticles on substrates is a main parameter. Catalyst particles are spherical and several tens of nm in diameter (weak adhesion strength) when deposited onto SiO2/Si or Si3N4/Si, the tip growth mode of nanotube is favored. On TiN/SiO2/Si substrate, particles are larger (large adhesion strength) and CNT growth is no more in tip mode, bamboo-like structures are obtained. When an Fe-Ni catalyst multilayer has been deposited onto the different substrates, carbon nanotube microstructures show multi-walled graphene parallel layers on Si3N4/Si and SiO2/Si insulating substrates, and bamboo-like microstructures on TiN/SiO2/Si conductor substrate.

  14. LmbE proteins from Bacillus cereus are de-N-acetylases with broad substrate specificity and are highly similar to proteins in Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Alexandra; Koutsioulis, Dimitrios; Fadouloglou, Vasiliki E.; Spiliotopoulou, Panagiota; Balomenou, Stavroula; Arnaouteli, Sofia; Tzanodaskalaki, Maria; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kokkinidis, Michalis; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2010-05-19

    The genomes of Bacillus cereus and its closest relative Bacillus anthracis each contain two LmbE protein family homologs: BC1534 (BA1557) and BC3461 (BA3524). Only a few members of this family have been biochemically characterized including N-acetylglucosaminylphosphatidyl inositol (GlcNAc-PI), 1-D-myo-inosityl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside (GlcNAc-Ins), N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2) and lipoglycopeptide antibiotic de-N-acetylases. All these enzymes share a common feature in that they de-N-acetylate the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moiety of their substrates. The bc1534 gene has previously been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified and its 3D structure determined. In this study, the bc3461 gene from B. cereus ATCC14579 was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzymes BC1534 (EC 3.5.1.-) and BC3461 were biochemically characterized. The enzymes have different molecular masses, pH and temperature optima and broad substrate specificity, de-N-acetylating GlcNAc and N-acetylchito-oligomers (GlcNAc2, GlcNAc3 and GlcNAc4), as well as GlcNAc-1P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1 phosphate; GlcNAc-6P, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-6 phosphate; GalNAc, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine; ManNAc, N-acetyl-d-mannosamine; UDP-GlcNAc, uridine 5'-diphosphate N-acetyl-d-glucosamine. However, the enzymes were not active on radiolabeled glycol chitin, peptidoglycan from B. cereus, N-acetyl-d-glucosaminyl-(β-1,4)-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanyl-d-isoglutamine (GMDP) or N-acetyl-d-GlcN-Nα1-6-d-myo-inositol-1-HPO4-octadecyl (GlcNAc-I-P-C18). Kinetic analysis of the activity of BC1534 and BC3461 on GlcNAc and GlcNAc2 revealed that GlcNAc2 is the favored substrate for both native enzymes. Based on the recently determined crystal structure of BC1534, a mutational analysis identified functional key residues, highlighting their

  15. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts. PMID:25584770

  16. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Brusa, R.S.; Macchi, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Karwasz, G.P.; Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Anderle, M.

    2005-05-30

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation.

  17. Comparative analysis of some models of gene regulation in mixed-substrate microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Narang, Atul

    2006-09-21

    Mixed-substrate microbial growth is of fundamental interest in microbiology and bioengineering. Several mathematical models have been developed to account for the genetic regulation of such systems, especially those resulting in diauxic growth. In this work, we compare the dynamics of three such models (Narang, 1998a. The dynamical analogy between microbial growth on mixtures of substrates and population growth of competing species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 59, 116-121; Thattai and Shraiman, 2003. Metabolic switching in the sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli. Biophys. J. 85(2), 744-754; Brandt et al., 2004. Modelling microbial adaptation to changing availability of substrates. Water Res. 38, 1004-1013). We show that these models are dynamically similar--the initial motion of the inducible enzymes in all the models is described by the Lotka-Volterra equations for competing species. In particular, the prediction of diauxic growth corresponds to "extinction" of one of the enzymes during the first few hours of growth. The dynamic similarity occurs because in all the models, the inducible enzymes possess properties characteristic of competing species: they are required for their own synthesis, and they inhibit each other. Despite this dynamic similarity, the models vary with respect to the range of dynamics captured. The Brandt et al. model always predicts the diauxic growth pattern, whereas the remaining two models exhibit both diauxic and non-diauxic growth patterns. The models also differ with respect to the mechanisms that generate the mutual inhibition between the enzymes. In the Narang model, mutual inhibition occurs because the enzymes for each substrate enhance the dilution of the enzymes for the other substrate. The Brandt et al. model superimposes upon this dilution effect an additional mechanism of mutual inhibition. In the Thattai and Shraiman model, the mutual inhibition is entirely due to competition for the phosphoryl groups. For quantitative

  18. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process. PMID:26796583

  19. Chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on copper substrates: current trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, I. V.

    2013-10-01

    The most interesting recent developments and trends in graphene growth technologies on copper substrates are reviewed. An analysis is given of how the substrate preparation quality and other process parameters affect the properties of films obtained at different pressures and temperatures on a copper foil and lower-thickness copper films. The fabrication methods and properties of large single-crystal graphene domains are discussed together with technologies that do not require graphene film transfer onto a dielectric substrate. Another important possible approach, that of graphene growing laterally from specially formed few-layer graphene and carbon-containing seeds or metal catalysts, is also discussed.

  20. Improved GaSb-based quantum well laser performance through metamorphic growth on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Christopher J. K. He, Lei; Apiratikul, Paveen; Siwak, Nathan P.; Leavitt, Richard P.

    2015-03-09

    The promise of the metamorphic growth paradigm is to enable design freedom of the substrate selection criteria beyond current choices that are limited by lattice matching requirements. A demonstration of this emerging degree of freedom is reported here by directly comparing identical laser structures grown both pseudomorphically on a GaSb substrate and metamorphically on a GaAs substrate. Improved thermal performance of the metamorphic laser material enables a higher output power before thermal roll-over begins. These performance gains are demonstrated in minimally processed gain-guided broad-area type-I lasers emitting close to 2-μm wavelengths and mounted p-side up. Continuous wave measurements at room temperature yield a T{sub 0} of 145 K and peak output power of 192 mW from metamorphic lasers, compared to a T{sub 0} of 96 K and peak output power of 164 mW from identical lasers grown pseudomorphically on GaSb.

  1. Growth of carbon nanotubes on stainless steel substrates by DC-PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Dao Quang; Kim, Hyun Suk; Yoon, Dang Mo; Lee, Kang Jae; Ha, Jung Woong; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun; Cong, Bach Thanh

    2009-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Ni-coated stainless steel (SUS) substrates by using dc plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The synthesized CNTs have the diameter of about 30 nm and the length of about 1.2 μm. To verify the effects of SUS substrates on the growth of CNTs, CNTs had also been grown on Ni-coated Si substrates. CNTs grown on the SUS substrates were more uniform compared with those grown on the Si substrates. Field emission properties of the CNT films were measured in the diode configuration, and the turn-on electric field of 3.87 V/μm and field enhancement factor β of about 1737 were obtained from the synthesized CNTs at the gap of 500 μm between the SUS substrate and the anode. These results have not only clarified the effects of the substrate on the growth of CNTs, but also shown the potential of CNTs in field emission applications, especially CNT-based cold-cathode X-ray tubes.

  2. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating

    PubMed Central

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell–substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm2 (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  3. Enhancement of island size by dynamic substrate disorder in simulations of graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Enstone, Gwilym; Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David; R Bell, Gavin

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a new mechanism in the early stages of sub-monolayer epitaxial island growth, using Monte Carlo simulations motivated by experimental observations on the growth of graphene on copper foil. In our model, the substrate is "dynamically rough", by which we mean (i) the interaction strength between Cu and C varies randomly from site to site, and (ii) these variable strengths themselves migrate from site to site. The dynamic roughness provides a simple representation of the near-molten state of the Cu substrate in the case of real graphene growth. Counterintuitively, the graphene island size increases when dynamic roughness is included, compared to a static and smooth substrate. We attribute this effect to destabilisation of small graphene islands by fluctuations in the substrate, allowing them to break up and join larger islands which are more stable against roughness. In the case of static roughness, when process (ii) is switched off, island growth is strongly inhibited and the scale-free behaviour of island size distributions, present in the smooth-static and rough-dynamic cases, is destroyed. The effects of the dynamic substrate roughness cannot be mimicked by parameter changes in the static cases. PMID:27199250

  4. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm(2) (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  5. Growth map for Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiman, Faebian; Küpers, Hanno; Somaschini, Claudio; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    For the Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, growth temperature, As flux, and Ga flux have been systematically varied across the entire window of growth conditions that result in the formation of nanowires. A range of GaAs structures was observed, progressing from pure Ga droplets under negligible As flux through horizontal nanowires, tilted nanowires, vertical nanowires, and nanowires without droplets to crystallites as the As flux was increased. Quantitative analysis of the resulting sample morphology was performed in terms of nanowire number and volume density, number yield and volume yield of vertical nanowires, diameter, length, as well as the number and volume density of parasitic growth. The result is a growth map that comprehensively describes all nanowire and parasitic growth morphologies and hence enables growth of nanowire samples in a predictive manner. Further analysis indicates the combination of global Ga flux and growth temperature determines the total density of all objects, whereas the global As/Ga flux ratio independently determines the resultant sample morphology. Several dependencies observed here imply that all objects present on the substrate surface, i.e. both nanowires and parasitic structures, originate from Ga droplets.

  6. Quantum Dots: Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on GaAs (511)A Substrates: The Competition between Thermal Dynamics and Kinetics (Small 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Gao, Fangliang; Zhang, Shuguang; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    On page 4277, G. Li and co-workers aim to promote III-V compound semiconductors and devices for a broad range of applications with various technologies. The growth process of InAs quantum dots on GaAs (511)A substrates is systematically studied. By carefully controlling the competition between growth thermal-dynamics and kinetics, InAs quantum dots with high size uniformity are prepared, which are highly desirable for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells. PMID:27510365

  7. [Effects of substrate-aeration cultivation pattern on tomato growth].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Aeroponics can increase the fruit yield of tomato plant, but its cost is very high. In this paper, tomato seedlings were planted with three cultures, i. e., whole perlite culture (CK), perlite-aeration culture (T1), and aeroponics (T2), and a comparative study was made on the seedlings growth. Compared with CK, T1 improved the gas environment in root zone significantly, with the CO2 and O2 concentrations in root zone being 0.2 and 1.17 times higher, and increased the plant height and stem diameter after 60 days of transplanting by 5.1% and 8.4%, respectively. The plant net photosynthetic rate of T1 was significantly higher than that of CK, with the maximum value after transplanting 45 days increased by 13%. T1 also increased the root activity and ion absorbing ability significantly, with the root activity after transplanting 45 days being 1.23 times of CK, and the root K, Ca, and Mg contents after transplanting 60 days increased by 31%, 37%, and 27%, respectively. The fruit yield of T1 was 1.16 times of CK. No significant differences in these indices were observed between T1 and T2, and less difference in the fruit soluble sugar and organic acid contents as well as the sugar-acid ratio was found among CK, T1, and T2. It was suggested that perlite-aeration cultivation pattern was an easy and feasible way to markedly improve the fruit yield of tomato plant. PMID:20387426

  8. Growth of Well-Aligned InN Nanorods on Amorphous Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-05-01

    The growth of well-aligned nanorods on amorphous substrates can pave the way to fabricate large-scale and low-cost devices. In this work, we successfully prepared vertically well-aligned c-axis InN nanorods on amorphous glass substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The products formed directly on bare glass are randomly oriented without preferential growth direction. By inserting a GaN/Ti interlayer, the nanowire alignment can be greatly improved as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  9. Growth of Well-Aligned InN Nanorods on Amorphous Glass Substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-12-01

    The growth of well-aligned nanorods on amorphous substrates can pave the way to fabricate large-scale and low-cost devices. In this work, we successfully prepared vertically well-aligned c-axis InN nanorods on amorphous glass substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The products formed directly on bare glass are randomly oriented without preferential growth direction. By inserting a GaN/Ti interlayer, the nanowire alignment can be greatly improved as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. PMID:27229517

  10. Self-organized MBE growth of II VI epilayers on patterned GaSb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmann, H.; Tran Anh, T.; Rogaschewski, S.; von Ortenberg, M.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the self-organized MBE growth of II-VI epilayers on patterned and unpatterned GaSb substrates resulting in quantum wires and quantum wells, respectively. The HgSe : Fe quantum wires were grown on (0 0 1)GaSb substrates with a buffer of lattice-matched ZnTe 1- xSe x. Due to the anisotropic growth of HgSe on the A-oriented stripes roof-like overgrowth with a definite ridge was obtained. Additional Fe doping in the direct vicinity of the ridge results in a highly conductive quantum wire.

  11. Growth and characterization of CdTe on GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Nouhi, A.; Liu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been employed to achieve this growth. The GaAs layers are grown in Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, followed by the growth of CdTe on GaAs/Si substra by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the CdTe films.

  12. MHC-restricted phosphopeptides derived from Insulin receptor substrate-2 and CDC25b offer broad-based immunotherapeutic agents for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zarling, Angela L.; Obeng, Rebecca C.; Desch, A. Nicole; Pinczewski, Joel; Cummings, Kara L.; Deacon, Donna H.; Conaway, Mark; Slingluff, Craig L.; Engelhard, Victor H.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells display novel phosphopeptides in association with MHC class I and II molecules. In this study, we evaluated two HLA-A2-restricted phosphopeptides derived from the insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25b. These proteins are both broadly expressed in multiple malignancies and linked to cancer cell survival. Two phosphopeptides, termed pIRS-21097-1105 and pCDC25b38-46, served as targets of strong and specific CD8 T-cell memory responses in normal human donors. We cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) cDNAs from murine CD8 T-cell lines specific for either pIRS-21097-1105 or pCDC25b38-46. Expression of these TCR in human CD8 T-cells imparted high-avidity phosphopeptide-specific recognition and cytotoxic and cytokine-secreting effector activities. Using these cells, we found that endogenously processed pIRS-21097-1105 was presented on HLA-A2+ melanomas and breast, ovarian, and colorectal carcinomas. Presentation was correlated with the level of the Ser1100-phosphorylated IRS-2 protein in metastatic melanoma tissues. The highest expression of this protein was evident on dividing malignant cells. Presentation of endogenously processed pCDC25b38-46 was narrower, but still evident on HLA-A2+ melanoma, breast carcinoma and lymphoblastoid cells. Notably, pIRS-21097-1105-specific and pCDC25b38-46-specific TCR-expressing human CD8 T-cells markedly slowed tumor outgrowth in vivo. Our results define two new antigens that may be developed as immunotherapeutic agents for a broad range of HLA-A2+ cancers. PMID:25297629

  13. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns.

    PubMed

    Barbagini, Francesca; Bengoechea-Encabo, Ana; Albert, Steven; Martinez, Javier; Sanchez García, Miguel Angel; Trampert, Achim; Calleja, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials. PMID:22168918

  14. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials. PMID:22168918

  15. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; et al

    2016-01-27

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V’s on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V’s of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. Themore » patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. In conclusion, the work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V’s on application-specific substrates by direct growth.« less

  16. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager, Joel W., III; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth.

  17. Comparative study on graphene growth mechanism using Ni films, Ni/Mo sheets, and Pt substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong-Joo; Jeong, Goo-Hwan

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a comparative study on graphene growth mechanism using various catalytic metal substrates such as Ni thin films, Ni-deposited Mo (Ni/Mo) sheets, and Pt sheets during chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Depending on the substrates, two kinds of graphene growth mechanisms that involve either precipitation or surface adsorption of carbon have been reported. We synthesized graphene, focusing especially on the initial growth stage during CVD, by varying synthesis parameters such as synthesis time, amount of feedstock, and cooling rate after synthesis. We concluded that precipitation-driven synthesis is dominant in the case of Ni substrates whereas adsorption-driven growth is dominant in the Ni/Mo system. In the case of the Pt substrate, which is generally believed to grow by carbon precipitation, graphene growth by adsorption was found to be dominant. We believe that our results will contribute to a clearer understanding of the graphene synthesis mechanism, and development of manufacturing routes for controllable synthesis of high-quality graphenes.

  18. Direct growth of single-crystalline III–V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager III, Joel W.; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III–V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III–V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III–V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III–V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III–V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  19. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager Iii, Joel W; Chrzan, Daryl C; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  20. Growth mechanisms and crystallographic structure of InP nanowires on lattice-mismatched substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moewe, Michael; Chuang, Linus C.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2008-08-01

    We present a growth model that predicts the growth phase and mechanism of InP nanowires (NWs) and the experimental verifications of the model. The NWs were grown on lattice-mismatched GaAs substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition via Au nanodrop-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth. Nanodrops with larger diameters are shown to grow longer NWs because growth is governed mainly by direct precursor impingement on the nanodrop surface. The theoretical and experimental results also show that growth phase is dependent on NW diameter. We show that InP NWs with a diameter less than a certain value exhibit coherent growth of a single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) phase, whereas larger diameter InP NWs often contain sequences of WZ and zincblende phases and stacking faults. These findings allow one to achieve coherent NW growth and WZ phases free from twinning if the NW diameter is below certain material-dependent critical diameters.

  1. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-05-01

    α-Fe2O3 (hematite) nanowires have been grown by simple thermal oxidation of iron foil at 700°C in a moist oxygen flow. It was observed that the growth of nanowires highly depends on the texture of the iron substrate, in particular the presence of [110] oriented iron grains. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigation of as-grown sample revealed that the growth of nanowires has definite orientation relation with the underlying oxide grains Fe3O4 (magnetite) and FeO (wustite), which can be interpreted by the primary orientation relationships of topotaxial growth of iron oxides. The observation can pave the way for patterning of the nanowire growth by controlling the texture of original substrate. Samples were also characterized with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  2. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  3. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-02-09

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

  4. Molecular-mediated crystal growth of PbTiO 3 nanostructure on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chunying; Ren, Zhaohui; Liu, Zhenya; Xiao, Zhen; Xu, Gang; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xiao; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong

    2011-09-01

    A simple approach based on an organically modified sol-gel process has been developed to fabricate PbTiO3 (PT) nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate, where the amorphous powder modified by acetylacetone (acac) was used as precursor. After dropping the amorphous powder precursor prepared by freeze-drying process, PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate were obtained after heat treatment at 720 °C for 30 min in air. PT nanocrystals have been detected by XRD to be tetragonal perovskite structure. With the increase of acac/Pb molar ratio, the relative (1 0 0)/(0 0 1) diffraction peak intensity gradually increases, which probably suggested an oriented growth of PT nanocrystal along [1 0 0] on Si (1 0 0) substrates. In addition, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results indicated that the height and the average lateral size of PT nanocrystal increased and then decreased as the acac/Pb molar ratio increased. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrated that all the samples show obvious piezoelectric activity. These results implied that the acetylacetone molecular mediated the growth of PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrates possibly by the acac/Pb molar ratio. This simple method has been suggested to be attractive for tailoring an oriented growth of the nanostructures of perovskite oxide systems on Si substrates.

  5. Thin crystalline 3C-SiC layer growth through carbonization of differently oriented Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, A.; D'Arrigo, G.; Bongiorno, C.; Scalese, S.; La Via, F.; Foti, G.

    2007-07-01

    The growth of thin cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) buffer layers in an horizontal hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor, through the carbonization of differently oriented Si surfaces, is presented. A qualitative and quantitative study has been performed on statistical parameters related to voids due to the buffer layer growth on the different substrate orientations emphasizing shape, size, and density as a function of the substrate orientation. Variation in the void parameters can be attributed to the atomic packing density related to the substrate orientations, which were (100) Si, (111) Si, and (110) Si in this study. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were performed to analyze the surface and the crystalline quality of the 3C-SiC films grown and, eventually, an empirical model for the carbonization of Si surfaces formulated. Large platens characterize the 3C-SiC films with shapes related to the orientations of the substrate. These platens derive from the two-dimensional growth of different SiC islands which enlarge during the process due to the continuous reaction between Si and C atoms. The interior part of platens was characterized by the presence of a pure crystalline material with the presence of small tilts affecting some grains in the 3C-SiC layer in order to relief the stress generated with the substrate.

  6. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  7. Low-Dislocation-Density GaN from a Single Growth on a Textured Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    ASHBY,CAROL I.; WILLAN,CHRISTINE C.; HAN,JUNG; MISSERT,NANCY A.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.; PEAKE,GREGORY M.; GRIEGO,LEONARDO

    2000-07-31

    The density of threading dislocations (TD) in GaN grown directly on flat sapphire substrates is typically greater than 10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}. Such high dislocation densities degrade both the electronic and photonic properties of the material. The density of dislocations can be decreased by orders of magnitude using cantilever epitaxy (CE), which employs prepatterned sapphire substrates to provide reduced-dimension mesa regions for nucleation and etched trenches between them for suspended lateral growth of GaN or AlGaN. The substrate is prepatterned with narrow lines and etched to a depth that permits coalescence of laterally growing III-N nucleated on the mesa surfaces before vertical growth fills the etched trench. Low dislocation densities typical of epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) are obtained in the cantilever regions and the TD density is also reduced up to 1 micrometer from the edge of the support regions.

  8. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  9. Availability of Clean Chip Residual as a Growth Substrate in the Southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Residual chipping material (also called clean chip residual or CCR) has potential use as a growth substrate in the nursery industry. The objective of this study was to quantify the amount and type of CCR material available in the Southeast United States for possible horticultural use by surveying wo...

  10. Growth of ternary and quaternary compounds on non-planar InP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, C.A.; Robinson, B.J.; Thompson, D.A.; Weatherly, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    InP based ternary and quaternary materials are in wide use for optoelectronic systems. It has been well documented that phase separation occurs when these are deposited onto planar substrates. The use of non-planar substrates is becoming increasingly popular for the fabrication of novel devices. Obviously, epitaxial growth of these materials onto a non-planar surface will differ from growth on a planar surface. The effect of simultaneously growing on two or more crystal planes which have different atom migration lengths and sticking coefficients must now be considered. Since phase segregation occurs in InP-based materials the question arises, what effect will growth on a patterned substrate have? The authors have previously shown how InP, InGaAs and InGaAsP deposited onto etched DFB gratings under the same conditions act differently and here they will show both how the atomic concentrations change in deposited InGaAs and InGaAsP layers with position above the grating and how the total incorporation rate changes when compared to growth on a planar substrate.

  11. Interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on seedling growth of Salix nigra and Taxodium distichum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, R.H.; Doyle, T.W.; Draugelis-Dale, R. O.

    2006-01-01

    The large river swamps of Louisiana have complex topography and hydrology, characterized by black willow (Salix nigra) dominance on accreting alluvial sediments and vast areas of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) deepwater swamps with highly organic substrates. Seedling survival of these two wetland tree species is influenced by their growth rate in relation to the height and duration of annual flooding in riverine environments. This study examines the interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on growth rates of black willow and baldcypress seedlings. In a greenhouse experiment with a split-split-plot design, 1-year seedlings of black willow and baldcypress were subjected to two nutrient treatments (unfertilized versus fertilized), two hydroperiods (continuously flooded versus twice daily flooding/draining), and two substrates (sand versus commercial peat mix). Response variables included height, diameter, lateral branch count, biomass, and root:stem ratio. Black willow growth in height and diameter, as well as all biomass components, were significantly greater in peat substrate than in sand. Black willow showed a significant hydroperiod-nutrient interaction wherein fertilizer increased stem and root biomass under drained conditions, but flooded plants did not respond to fertilization. Baldcypress diameter and root biomass were higher in peat than in sand, and the same two variables increased with fertilization in flooded as well as drained treatments. These results can be used in Louisiana wetland forest models as inputs of seedling growth and survival, regeneration potential, and biomass accumulation rates of black willow and baldcypress.

  12. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  13. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  14. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  15. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1996-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  16. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1995-10-10

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal-to-noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  17. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.

    1996-12-31

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  18. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triax cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement.

  19. Effect of Different Substrates and Casing Materials on the Growth and Yield of Calocybe indica

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Khair, Abul; Alam, Nuhu

    2010-01-01

    Calocybe indica, a tropical edible mushroom, is popular because it has good nutritive value and it can be cultivated commercially. The current investigation was undertaken to determine a suitable substrate and the appropriate thickness of casing materials for the cultivation of C. indica. Optimum mycelial growth was observed in coconut coir substrate. Primordia initiation with the different substrates and casing materials was observed between the 13th and 19th day. The maximum length of stalk was recorded from sugarcane leaf, while diameter of stalk and pileus, and thickness of pileus were found in rice straw substrate. The highest biological and economic yield, and biological efficiency were also obtained in the rice straw substrate. Cow dung and loamy soil, farm-yard manure, loamy soil and sand, and spent oyster mushroom substrates were used as casing materials to evaluate the yield and yield-contributing characteristics of C. indica. The results indicate that the number of effective fruiting bodies, the biological and economic yield, and the biological efficiency were statistically similar all of the casing materials used. The maximum biological efficiency was found in the cow dung and loamy soil casing material. The cow dung and loamy soil (3 cm thick) was the best casing material and the rice straw was the best substrate for the commercial cultivation of C. indica. PMID:23956634

  20. Growth and characterization of GaN-based structures on SiCOI-engineered substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikme, Y.; van Gemmern, P.; Lin, Y. C.; Szymakowski, A.; Kalisch, H.; Faure, B.; Richtarch, C.; Larhèche, H.; Bove, P.; Letertre, F.; Woitok, J. F.; Efthimiadis, K.; Jansen, R. H.; Heuken, M.

    2004-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) still shows the best properties as substrate for the growth of GaN and its alloys but suffers from a very high price. An innovative alternative for this substrate are SiC/SiO 2/Si (SiCOI) substrates, combining SiC and Si (silicon) substrate advantages thanks to the Smart Cut™ technology. These substrates consist of thin SiC layers (˜270 nm) bonded on (0 0 1) Si substrates. Using SiCOI substrates, up to 3 μm of GaN could be grown crack-free. The structures were investigated by atomic force microscopy (root mean square=0.86 nm), high-resolution X-ray diffraction and low-temperature (20 K) photoluminescence (PL) (FWHM (full-width at half-maximum)=4.9 meV). Electroluminescence test heterostructures consisting of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were also deposited on SiCOI. Room temperature PL measurements resulted in a QW emission at around 440 nm with a FWHM of 7.8 nm. At electrical excitation, blue light emission was observed.

  1. Effect of substrate offcut angle on BGaN epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyama, Kohei; Mimura, Hidenori; Inoue, Yoku; Aoki, Toru; Nakano, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Researchers expect the material BGaN to be useful in neutron detectors and ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting devices. In this study, we investigate the effect of the substrate offcut angle and polarity upon BGaN growth. In particular, BGaN is grown on top of GaN upon Al2O3 substrates with various offcut angles. In the case of Ga-polar BGaN growth, the BN mole fraction increases as the offcut angle increases. Furthermore, as the offcut angle increases, the terrace width becomes reduced, which inhibits the formation of nuclei on the terrace and promotes the incorporation of B atoms at the step edges. Such incorporation is important at the step edge (which is the stable site) during BGaN growth because B atoms are easily desorbed from the surface and easily react in the gas phase. In the case of N-polar BGaN growth, the BN mole fraction exhibits different behavior in response to the offcut angle of the substrate. For this reason, the surface of N-polar BGaN is different from that of Ga-polar BGaN as it has facets of N-polar GaN and step bunching. These results indicate that the incorporation of B atoms at step edges significantly affects the BN mole fraction in BGaN growth.

  2. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-02-01

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm-1.

  3. Graphene growth on Ge(100)/Si(100) substrates by CVD method

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Iwona; Wesolowski, Marek; Jozwik, Iwona; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Lupina, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Pawel; Baranowski, Jacek M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2016-01-01

    The successful integration of graphene into microelectronic devices is strongly dependent on the availability of direct deposition processes, which can provide uniform, large area and high quality graphene on nonmetallic substrates. As of today the dominant technology is based on Si and obtaining graphene with Si is treated as the most advantageous solution. However, the formation of carbide during the growth process makes manufacturing graphene on Si wafers extremely challenging. To overcome these difficulties and reach the set goals, we proposed growth of high quality graphene layers by the CVD method on Ge(100)/Si(100) wafers. In addition, a stochastic model was applied in order to describe the graphene growth process on the Ge(100)/Si(100) substrate and to determine the direction of further processes. As a result, high quality graphene was grown, which was proved by Raman spectroscopy results, showing uniform monolayer films with FWHM of the 2D band of 32 cm−1. PMID:26899732

  4. Growth of AlN layer on patterned sapphire substrate by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gang Seok; Lee, Chanmi; Jeon, Hunsoo; Lee, Chanbin; Bae, Sung Geun; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yang, Min; Yi, Sam Nyung; Yu, Young Moon; Lee, Jae Hak; Honda, Yoshio; Sawaki, Nobuhiko; Kim, Suck-Whan

    2016-05-01

    Even though a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) has been used for the growth of a high-quality epilayer because of its many advantages, it has not been successfully used to grow an AlN epilayer for ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on a PSS up to now. We report the growth of a high-quality AlN epilayer on a PSS, as a substrate for the manufacture of UV LEDs, by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks for the AlN epilayer grown on the PSS indicate that crystalline AlN with a wurtzite structure was grown successfully on the PSS. Furthermore, HVPE combining both in situ HVPE technology and liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) using a mixed source is proposed as a novel method for the growth of a flat AlN epilayer on a PSS.

  5. Effects of substrate crystallinity and dopant on the growth kinetics of platinum silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, H.; Psaras, P. A.; Tu, K. N.

    1985-12-01

    The growth kinetics of platinum silicides have been studied on four substrate categories: single-crystal, amorphous, undoped polycrystalline, and phosphorus-doped (8×1020 at./cm3) polycrystalline silicon. The sequential growth of Pt2Si and PtSi were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Seeman-Bohlin x-ray diffraction, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus depth profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Our results conclude that the activation energies for the growth of Pt2Si and PtSi are not affected by substrate crystallinity and doping of phosphorus. Analysis of the phosphorus profile by SIMS clearly showed that phosphorus atoms are segregated near the interface between PtSi and polycrystalline silicon, but not at the Pt2Si/polycrystalline silicon interface.

  6. Growth of indium oxide nanowalls on patterned conducting substrates: towards direct fabrication of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changlong; Wei, Yuling; Sun, Guoxin; Shao, Baiqi

    2012-05-01

    Nanowall materials are ideal two-dimensional structures with high surface-to-volume ratios and open edge geometries. We first report on the growth and characterization of indium oxide nanowalls on transparent and conducting indium tin oxide substrates. The nanosheets that compose the nanowalls are single-crystalline and are approximately 8 nm in thickness. The density and the lateral dimensions of the nanosheets on the substrate can be controlled by the growth time. Adopting a bridgework-like strategy, we directly construct indium oxide nanowall gas sensors on the patterned indium tin oxide substrates. The pattern lines on the substrates are etched using transparent plastic adhesive tape as shadow mask, which is both simple and cheap in comparison with the conventional photolithography technique. The sensors exhibit fast response/recovery behavior and good reproducibility to NO(2) gas under mild testing conditions, such as room temperature, ambient pressure, dry air background, and 1.5 V dc bias, and can achieve a detection limit as low as 50 ppb. We propose an assumption that the gas adsorption is composed of deep adsorption and probe adsorption to explain the interesting gas-sensing behavior of the indium oxide nanowalls. We suggest that the work reported herein, including the facile growth of indium oxide nanowalls, the bridgework-like strategy to directly construct electronic devices, and the high gas-sensing performance of the indium oxide nanowalls sensors, is a significant step towards the real applications of novel semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:22328146

  7. Growth mechanism of pulsed laser fabricated few-layer MoS₂ on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tamie A J; Chua, Daniel H C

    2014-09-24

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on metal substrates has recently been discovered to present an alternative method for producing highly crystalline few-layer MoS2. However, not every metal behaves in the same manner during film growth, and hence, it is crucial that the ability of various metals to produce crystalline MoS2 be thoroughly investigated. In this work, MoS2 was deposited on metal substrates, Al, Ag, Ni, and Cu, using a pulsed laser. Highly crystalline few-layer MoS2 was successfully grown on Ag, but is absent in Al, Ni, and Cu under specific growth conditions. This discrepancy was attributed to either excessively strong or insufficient adlayer-substrate interactions. In the case of Al, the effects of the strong interface interactions can be offset by increasing the amount of source atoms supplied, thereby producing semicrystalline few-layer MoS2. The results show that despite PLD being a physical vapor deposition technique, both physical and chemical processes play an important role in MoS2 growth on metal substrates. PMID:25203278

  8. Growth of long and aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on carbon and metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Delmas, M; Pinault, M; Patel, S; Porterat, D; Reynaud, C; Mayne-L'Hermite, M

    2012-03-16

    Well aligned, long and dense multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be grown on both carbon fibres and any metal substrates compatible with the CNT synthesis temperature. The injection-CVD process developed involves two stages, including fibre pretreatment by depositing a SiO(2)-based sub-layer from an organometallic precursor followed by CNT growth from toluene/ferrocene precursor mixture. Carbon substrates, as well as metals, can easily be treated with this process, which takes place in the same reactor and does not need any handling in between the two stages. The aligned CNT carpets obtained are similar to the ones grown on reference quartz substrates. The CNT growth rate is fairly high (ca. 30 μm min(-1)) and it is possible to control CNT length by varying the CNT synthesis duration. The thickness of the SiO(2)-based sub-layer can be varied and is shown to have an influence on the CNT growth. This layer is assumed to play a diffusion barrier layer role between the substrate and the iron based catalyst nanoparticles producing CNT. The CNT anchorage to the carbon fibres has been checked and good overall adhesion proved, which is in favour of a good transfer of electrical charge and heat between the nanotubes and fibre. PMID:22362164

  9. Growth-substrate dependent dechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane by a homoacetogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    De Wildeman, Stefaan; Neumann, Anke; Diekert, Gabriele; Verstraete, Willy

    2003-08-01

    A rod shaped, gram positive, non sporulating Acetobacterium strain was isolated that dechlorinated 1,2dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) to ethene at a dechlorination rate of up to 2 nmol Cl- min(-1) mg(-1) of protein in the exponential growth phase with formate (40 mM) as the substrate. Although with other growth substrates such as pyruvate, lactate, H2/CO2, and ethanol higher biomass productions were obtained, the dechlorination rate with these substrates was more than 10-fold lower compared with formate growing cells. Neither cell extracts nor autoclaved cells of the isolated Acetobacterium strain mediated the dechlorination of 1,2-DCA at significant rates. The addition of 1,2-DCA to the media did not result in increased cell production. No significant differences in corrinoid concentrations could be measured in cells growing on several growth-substrates. However, these measurements indicated that differences in corrinoid structure might cause the different dechlorination activity. The Acetobacterium sp. strain gradually lost its dechlorination ability during about 10 transfers in pure culture, probably due to undefined nutritional requirements. 16S rDNA analysis of the isolate revealed a 99.7% similarity with Acetobacterium wieringae. However, the type strains of A. wieringae and A. woodii did not dechlorinate 1,2-DCA. PMID:12948054

  10. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, D. L.; Gawlitza, P.; Cambie, R.; Dhuey, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Warwick, T.; Braun, S.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Padmore, H. A.

    2012-05-01

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr+ ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  11. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gawlitza, Peter; Cambie, Rossana; Dhuey, Scott; Gullikson, Eric; Warwick, Tony; Braun, Stefan; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard

    2012-01-23

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects we used an ionbeam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the Linear Continuous Model of film growth.

  12. Conformal growth of Mo/Si multilayers on grating substrates using collimated ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D. L.; Cambie, R.; Dhuey, S.; Gullikson, E. M.; Warwick, T.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Padmore, H. A.; Gawlitza, P.; Braun, S.

    2012-05-01

    Deposition of multilayers on saw-tooth substrates is a key step in the fabrication of multilayer blazed gratings (MBG) for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays. Growth of the multilayers can be perturbed by shadowing effects caused by the highly corrugated surface of the substrates, which results in distortion of the multilayer stack structure and degradation of performance of MBGs. To minimize the shadowing effects, we used an ion-beam sputtering machine with a highly collimated atomic flux to deposit Mo/Si multilayers on saw-tooth substrates. The sputtering conditions were optimized by finding a balance between smoothening and roughening processes in order to minimize degradation of the groove profile in the course of deposition and at the same time to keep the interfaces of a multilayer stack smooth enough for high efficiency. An optimal value of energy of 200 eV for sputtering Kr{sup +} ions was found by deposition of test multilayers on flat substrates at a range of ion energies. Two saw-tooth substrates were deposited at energies of 200 eV and 700 eV for the sputtering ions. It was found that reduction of the ion energy improved the blazing performance of the MBG and resulted in a 40% gain in the diffraction efficiency due to better replication of the groove profile by the multilayer. As a result of the optimization performed, an absolute diffraction efficiency of 28.8% was achieved for the 2nd blaze order of the MBG with a groove density of 7350 lines/mm at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. Details of the growth behavior of the multilayers on flat and saw-tooth substrates are discussed in terms of the linear continuous model of film growth.

  13. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA’s advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  14. Initial growth on microcrystalline silicon on atomically flat hetero-substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, K.; Kondo, M.; Matsuda, A.

    1997-07-01

    Initial growth of microcrystalline silicon ({micro}c-Si:H) deposited on an atomically flat GaAs (001) wafer using a RF glow-discharge decomposition of hydrogen diluted monosilane gas mixture has been studied by means of atomic force microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). It is shown that the initial growth of {micro}c-Si:H deposited at a substrate temperature of 50--250 C consists of four successive stages, i.e., (1) a layer-by-layer growth of a-Si:H up to d {approximately}5 {angstrom}, (2) island formation of a-Si:H, (3) the coalescence of the islands and the nucleation of microcrystalline at d{approximately}10{approximately}40 {angstrom} depending on the growth temperature, and (4) a rapid roughening with microcrystalline growth.

  15. Effect of Substrate Composition on Sn Whisker Growth in Pure Sn Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sarah M.; Sahaym, Uttara; Norton, M. Grant

    2010-12-01

    Pure Sn films deposited on Cu and Cu alloys are prone to spontaneous whisker formation. One way of preventing whisker formation is to alloy Pb into Sn coatings. However, restriction on the use of Pb demands the development of alternative methods for preventing whisker growth. The present work reports the effect of substrate composition on whisker formation and morphology. Despite employing identical plating conditions, long filament-like whiskers grew only on Sn-plated Cu samples and not on brass. The presence or lack of Sn whiskers has been explained via the thermodynamic stability of various intermetallic compounds at the Sn/substrate interface.

  16. Report on the growth of bulk aluminum nitride and subsequent substrate preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Rojo, J.; Slack, Glen A.; Morgan, Kenneth; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Schowalter, Leo J.

    2001-10-01

    High-quality, bulk aluminum nitride crystal grains exceeding 1 cm in dimension have been obtained using a self-seeded sublimation-recondensation growth technique at 0.9 mm/h driving rate. X-ray double crystal diffraction and topography show a full-width-at-half-maximum of around 100 arcsec and extensive areas with a density of dislocations less than 10 4 cm -2, respectively. These substrates have been prepared by chemical mechanical polishing techniques to obtain a surface roughness of 1.4-1.6 nm. The size, structural quality, and surface roughness prove these substrates to be adequate for III-nitride device fabrication.

  17. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong; Loh, Guan Chee; Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  18. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, Peter; Hayes, Russell E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve a sufficient amount of the first layer to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent to the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  19. Process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sheldon, P.; Hayes, R.E.

    1984-12-04

    Disclosed is a process for selectively patterning epitaxial film growth on a semiconductor substrate. The process includes forming a masking member on the surface of the substrate, the masking member having at least two layers including a first layer disposed on the substrate and the second layer covering the first layer. A window is then opened in a selected portion of the second layer by removing that portion to expose the first layer thereunder. The first layer is then subjected to an etchant introduced through the window to dissolve the first layer a sufficient amount to expose the substrate surface directly beneath the window, the first layer being adapted to preferentially dissolve at a substantially greater rate than the second layer so as to create an overhanging ledge portion with the second layer by undercutting the edges thereof adjacent the window. The epitaxial film is then deposited on the exposed substrate surface directly beneath the window. Finally, an etchant is introduced through the window to dissolve the remainder of the first layer so as to lift-off the second layer and materials deposited thereon to fully expose the balance of the substrate surface.

  20. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Tsang, Siu Hon; Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong; Loh, Guan Chee; Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2015-03-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO2/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ˜25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ˜2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  1. Growth of Aeromonas hydrophila at Low Concentrations of Substrates Added to Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooij, D.; Visser, A.; Hijnen, W. A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of an Aeromonas hydrophila isolate obtained from filtered river water to grow at low substrate concentrations was studied in batch experiments with tap water supplied with low concentrations of substrates. Growth was assessed by colony count determinations. The isolate only multiplied in the used tap water (2 to 3 mg of dissolved organic carbon per liter) after the addition of a small amount of an assimilable carbon compound. d-Glucose especially caused growth of the organism even at initial concentrations below 10 μg of C per liter. At initial glucose concentrations below the Ks value (12 μg of C per liter), generation times and yield (colony-forming units per milligram of substrate-C) were nonlinear with 1/initial glucose concentrations and initial glucose concentrations, respectively. From these observations, the maintenance coefficient m was calculated (m = 0.015 mg of glucose per mg [dry wt] per h at 12°C). At initial concentrations below the Ks value of starch (73 μg of C per liter), no growth was observed, but complete use of starch occurred in these situations after the addition of 10 μg of glucose-C per liter. The results of this study show that information of ecological significance may be obtained by very simple batch experiments. Moreover, the isolate studied may be used in growth experiments to assess the maximum concentration of glucose which might be present in water, particularly tap water. PMID:16345582

  2. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  3. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  4. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  5. Spent mushroom substrates as component of growing media for germination and growth of horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Medina, E; Paredes, C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Moral, R

    2009-09-01

    This research work was conducted in order to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom substrate (SMS) in the production of horticultural seedlings replacing part of the peat in the growing media. Three vegetable species with different salt sensitivities, the less sensitive being tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Muchamiel), the moderately salt-sensitive being courgette (Cucurbita pepo L. var. Afrodite F1) and the most salt-sensitive being pepper (Capsicum annum L. var. Lamuyo F1) were grown in 12 media containing SMS of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus (SMS-AB) and Pleurotus ostreatus (SMS-PO)) or a mixture of both 50% (v/v) (SMS-50), as well as peat in various ratios. The proportions of each residue in the mixtures elaborated with peat were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% v/v residue. A substrate of 100% peat was used as control. The experiment was arranged in a completely-randomised design with two replicates per treatment under greenhouse conditions. Prior to sowing, some physical, physico-chemical and chemical properties of the growing media were determined and seed germination and fresh weight of seedling were also measured. In most of the cases, the addition of SMS to the growing media produced an increase in the pH values, salt contents, macro and micronutrient concentrations and a decrease in the water holding capacity contents in comparison to peat, whereas great differences were found in the air capacity values between SMS-based substrates and peat. Up to 75% SMS can be used in mixtures with peat for seed germination of the plant species studied. Regarding the most suitable SMS-based substrates for plant growth, any substrate could be used for tomato seedling production. However, all SMS-AB-based substrates and the media containing low dose of SMS-PO and SMS-50 were adequate for growth of courgette and pepper. PMID:19409775

  6. Development of a Xeno-Free Substrate for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hailin; Yang, Jinliang; Wei, Yuquan; Chen, Harry Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are cultured on inactivated live feeder cells. For clinical application using hESCs, there is a requirement to minimize the risk of contamination with animal components. Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from feeder cells is the most natural way to provide xeno-free substrates for hESC growth. In this study, we optimized the step-by-step procedure for ECM processing to develop a xeno-free ECM that supports the growth of undifferentiated hESCs. In addition, this newly developed xeno-free substrate can be stored at 4°C and is ready to use upon request, which serves as an easier way to amplify hESCs for clinical applications. PMID:25861280

  7. Dracaena marginata biofilter: design of growth substrate and treatment of stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Praveen, R S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the efficiency of Dracaena marginata planted biofilters to decontaminate urban runoff. A new biofilter growth substrate was prepared using low-cost and locally available materials such as red soil, fine sand, perlite, vermiculite, coco-peat and Sargassum biomass. The performance of biofilter substrate was compared with local garden soil based on physical and water quality parameters. Preliminary analyses indicated that biofilter substrate exhibited desirable characteristics such as low bulk density (1140 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (59.6%), air-filled porosity (7.82%) and hydraulic conductivity (965 mm/h). Four different biofilter assemblies, with vegetated and non-vegetated systems, were examined for several artificial rain events (un-spiked and metal-spiked). Results from un-spiked artificial rain events suggested that concentrations of most of the chemical components in effluent were highest at the beginning of rain events and thereafter subsided during the subsequent rain events. Biofilter growth substrate showed superior potential over garden soil to retain metal ions such as Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb during metal-spiked rain events. Significant differences were also observed between non-vegetated and vegetated biofilter assemblies in runoff quality, with the latter producing better results. PMID:26512973

  8. Low Temperature Direct Growth of Graphene Films on Transparent Substrates by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Geoffrey Sandosh Jeffy

    Graphene, two dimensional sheet of carbon atoms has recently gained attention as some of its properties are very useful for electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaic applications. Its high mobility makes it useful in radio-frequency applications and its transparency makes it useful as transparent electrodes in photovoltaics. It is known that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the techniques that can be used to synthesize graphene. A lot of work has been done on selecting appropriate substrates and hydrocarbon sources. Nickel, having a high solubility at high temperatures has been in focus lately. Ethylene which has a lower breaking point compared to other hydrocarbons has a good efficiency in the synthesis of graphene. Complexity associated with graphene synthesis and transfers onto transparent substrates constitute the major obstacles to using this material for photovoltaics and optoelectronics applications. Here we show a novel method of obtaining graphene directly on glass via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using ethylene as the hydrocarbon source and nickel as the catalyst. The low cracking temperature of ethylene which is 542.8 °C permits us to use glass substrates directly in the CVD furnace. To improve the thickness of graphene, a good manipulation of pressure and hydrogen during the growth process will be useful. We introduce a novel catalyst etching technique after the growth results in graphene settling down on the glass substrate in a transfer-free process. Raman spectroscopy indicated good uniformity and high quality before and after the etching process.

  9. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene. PMID:24857894

  10. Polarity Effects of Substrate Surface in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (0-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films are also deposited on the (000 I) Al203 substrates. It is found that the two polar surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which are strongly inference the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of epitaxial films on the ZnO substrates are different from the film on the Al203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite Surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth using reactive sputtering deposition.

  11. Growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes on glass substrate with an amorphous carbon catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jae Keun; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Dong; Lee, Jae-Hyeoung; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Byungyou

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the direct growth of metal-free carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates with microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were used as a catalyst layer to grow metal-free CNTs. The a-C films were deposited on Corning glass substrates using RF magnetron sputtering with the use of a carbon target (99.99%) at room temperature. They were pretreated with hydrogen plasma using a microwave PECVD at 600 degrees C. Then, CNTs were prepared using microwave PECVD with a mixture of methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases. The CNTs were grown at different substrate temperatures (400 degrees C, 500 degrees C, and 600 degrees C) for 30 minutes. Other conditions were fixed. The growth trends of CNTs against substrate temperature were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The structure of a-C catalyst layer and grown CNTs were measured by Raman spectroscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images showed that the CNTs had bamboo-like multi-walled structures. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed that the CNTs consisted of only carbon. PMID:22409050

  12. Metal Catalyst for Low-Temperature Growth of Controlled Zinc Oxide Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Hyun; Kwon, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires generated by hydrothermal method present superior physical and chemical characteristics. Quality control of the growth has been very challenging and controlled growth is only achievable under very limited conditions using homogeneous seed layers with high temperature processes. Here we show the controlled ZnO nanowire growth on various organic and inorganic materials without the requirement of a homogeneous seed layer and a high temperature process. We also report the discovery of an important role of the electronegativity in the nanowire growth on arbitrary substrates. Using heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers with low-temperature hydrothermal methods, we demonstrate well-controlled ZnO nanowire arrays and single nanowires on flat or curved surfaces. A metal catalyst and heterogeneous metal oxide interlayers are found to determine lattice-match with ZnO and to largely influence the controlled alignment. These findings will contribute to the development of novel nanodevices using controlled nanowires. PMID:24625584

  13. On a geometric model of crystal growth on a flat substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brednikhina, Anna; Debelov, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is devoted to computer simulation of crystalline aggregates growth from a homogeneous solution. This process is considered from the geometric point of view, when crystals can be represented as a collection of flat faces, growing layer by layer with stable relative growth rates in the directions of their perpendiculars. Simply speaking, we extend Frank's model [H. Muller-Krumbhaar, Yu. Saito, Crystal Growth and Solidification, in: Surfactant Science Series, vol. 89, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2000, pp. 853-854] to the case of simultaneous growth of several individuals placed on a flat unbounded static substrate. Attention is given not only to finding the outer boundary of an aggregate but to determining the interfacing surfaces between individuals. In other words, our goal is to construct detailed bounding surfaces of all individuals included in an aggregate.

  14. Growth Process of Vacuum Deposited Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Films on Rubbing-Treated Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofuji, Masato; Inaba, Katsuhiko; Omote, Kazuhiko; Hoshi, Hajime; Takanishi, Yoichi; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    2003-12-01

    Surface morphology, crystal lattice spacings and crystallite size of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films grown on rubbed surfaces were probed at different stages of growth, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The films consisted of many slender crystallites extending along the rubbing direction, due to the α-type columnar structure along the same direction. AFM revealed that the aspect ratio of crystal domains increases as the films grow, implying a change in the ratio of crystal growth rates in the two different directions parallel to the substrates. XRD demonstrated marked differences in the two intercolumnar directions. The molecular spacing is expanded in the thickness direction at the initial stage of growth, while it remains constant throughout the growth in the lateral (c-axis) direction. The crystallite size in the thickness direction is always comparable to the film thickness, while the size in the c-axis direction shows no change.

  15. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of

  16. Equilibrium-restricted solid-on-solid growth model on fractal substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub; Kim, Jin Min

    2009-08-01

    The equilibrium-restricted solid-on-solid growth model on fractal substrates is studied by introducing a fractional Langevin equation. The growth exponent beta and the roughness exponent alpha defined, respectively, by the surface width via W approximately t(beta) and the saturated width via W(sat) approximately L(alpha), L being the system size, were obtained by a power-counting analysis, and the scaling relation 2alpha+d(f)=z(RW) was found to hold. The numerical simulation data on Sierpinski gasket, checkerboard fractal, and critical percolation cluster were found to agree well with the analytical predictions of the fractional Langevin equation. PMID:19792071

  17. Generalization of Monod kinetics for analysis of growth data with substrate inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, J.H.T.

    1987-02-05

    The inhibitory effect of butanol on yeast growth has been studied for the strain Candida utilis ATCC 8205 growing aerobically on butanol under batch conditions. A mathematical expression was then proposed to fit the kinetic pattern of butanol inhibition on the specific growth rate. The maximum allowable butanol concentration above which cells do not grow was predicted to be 9.16 g/l. The proposed model appears to accurately represent the experimental data obtained in this study and the literature data developed for a variety of batch culture systems at widely ranging substrate concentrations. 20 references.

  18. Ultraviolet radiation on innate immunity and growth of broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris): implications for facilities design.

    PubMed

    Siroski, Pablo Ariel; Poletta, Gisela Laura; Fernandez, Lucia; Ortega, Hugo Héctor; Merchant, Mark Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Sunlight is a key environmental factor in almost all ecosystems, and it is necessary for many physiological functions. Many vertebrates require ultraviolet (UV) radiation to perform different physiological processes. Artificial light is used to supplement UV in captive animals, through appropriate photoperiods and UV wavelengths. Previous studies reported that repeated exposure to artificial UV radiation may cause damage to the immune system. Taking into account the importance of UV effects and the serum complement system, the relationship between them was investigated. The study lasted 90 days and was carried out in plastic chambers. Ninety six broad-snouted caiman (C. latirostris) were assigned to four treatment groups with two replicates each: total darkness (TD), 8 hr per day (8 hr) and 16 hr per day (16 hr) of artificial UV/visible light exposure, and normal photoperiod of natural light (NP). Snout-vent length was measured to determine animal growth. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the effects of artificial UV/visible light, TD, and NP on the serum complement system. Results showed that animals grew more in the NP group. The capacity of C. latirostris serum to hemolyze sheep red blood cells was higher in the NP group than when they are maintained in constant light-dark cycles (8 and 16 hr) or in TD. These data demonstrate that artificial UV should be considered as a potential hazard for captive crocodilians if it is not properly managed, and this should be taken into account in the general design of facilities for reptilian husbandry. PMID:21850705

  19. Growth and Characterization of III-Nitride LEDs on Vicinal Sapphire Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    GaN and related III-N alloys have great potential applications in optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes (LDs) and high power electronic devices such as transistors. For improved performance and greater versatility of these devices, it is essential to improve the quality of materials and devices. It has been reported that growth on vicinal or misaligned substrates compared to flat ones, lead to smoother and higher crystalline quality thin films. Improved brightness and quantum efficiency, and a reduction of the forward current at which maximum quantum efficiency occurs are among the improved optical properties resulting from the use of misaligned substrates and a thick base layer. We report on the characteristics of InGaN based blue/green LEDs grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on specially fabricated dome shaped sapphire substrates. These dome shaped substrates provide varying degrees of off-cut within a single wafer. Surface morphologies, crystalline qualities and emission properties across the entire wafer surface have been mapped by various techniques, including optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction and electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results are compared with those of blue/green LEDs grown on conventional on-axis substrates.

  20. L: -Stereoselective amino acid amidase with broad substrate specificity from Brevundimonas diminuta: characterization of a new member of the leucine aminopeptidase family.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Hidenobu; Hariyama, Nozomi; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2006-04-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta TPU 5720 produces an amidase acting L-stereoselectively on phenylalaninamide. The enzyme (LaaA(Bd)) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation and four steps of column chromatography. The final preparation gave a single band on SDS-PAGE with a molecular weight of approximately 53,000. The native molecular weight of the enzyme was about 288,000 based on gel filtration chromatography, suggesting that the enzyme is active as a homohexamer. It had maximal activity at 50 degrees C and pH 7.5. LaaA(Bd) lost its activity almost completely on dialysis against potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), and the amidase activity was largely restored by the addition of Co(2+) ions. The enzyme was, however, inactivated in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid even in the presence of Co(2+), suggesting that LaaA(Bd) is a Co(2+)-dependent enzyme. LaaA(Bd) had hydrolyzing activity toward a broad range of L-amino acid amides including L-phenylalaninamide, L-glutaminamide, L-leucinamide, L-methioninamide, L-argininamide, and L-2-aminobutyric acid amide. Using information on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme, the gene encoding LaaA(Bd) was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of the strain and sequenced. Analysis of 4,446 bp of the cloned DNA revealed the presence of seven open-reading frames (ORFs), one of which (laaA ( Bd )) encodes the amidase. LaaA(Bd) is composed of 491 amino acid residues (calculated molecular weight 51,127), and the deduced amino acid sequence exhibits significant similarity to that of ORFs encoding hypothetical cytosol aminopeptidases found in the genomes of Caulobacter crescentus, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Mesorhizobium loti, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and leucine aminopeptidases, PepA, from Rickettsia prowazekii, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, and Escherichia coli K-12. The laaA ( Bd ) gene modified in the nucleotide sequence upstream from its start codon

  1. Sub-surface alloying largely influences graphene nucleation and growth over transition metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Zhao, Xingju; Xue, Xinlian; Shi, Jinlei; Li, Chong; Ren, Xiaoyan; Niu, Chunyao; Jia, Yu; Guo, Zhengxiao; Li, Shunfang

    2015-11-11

    Sub-surface alloying (SSA) can be an effective approach to tuning surface functionalities. Focusing on Rh(111) as a typical substrate for graphene nucleation, we show strong modulation by SSA atoms of both the energetics and kinetics of graphene nucleation simulated by first-principles calculations. Counter-intuitively, when the sub-surface atoms are replaced by more active solute metal elements to the left of Rh in the periodic table, such as the early transition metals (TMs), Ru and Tc, the binding between a C atom and the substrate is weakened and two C atoms favor dimerization. Alternatively, when the alloying elements are the late TMs to the right of Rh, such as the relatively inert Pd and Ag, the repulsion between the two C atoms is enhanced. Such distinct results can be well addressed by the delicately modulated activities of the surface host atoms in the framework of the d-band theory. More specifically, we establish a very simple selection rule for optimizing the metal substrate for high quality graphene growth: the introduction of an early (late) solute TM in the SSA lowers (raises) the d-band center and the activity of the top-most host metal atoms, weakening (strengthening) the C-substrate binding, meanwhile both energetically and kinetically facilitating (hindering) the graphene nucleation, and simultaneously promoting (suppressing) the orientation disordering the graphene domains. Importantly, our preliminary theoretical results also show that such a simple rule is also proposed to be operative for graphene growth on the widely invoked Cu(111) catalytic substrate. PMID:26257125

  2. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  3. One-step catalytic growth of carbon nanofiber arrays vertically aligned on carbon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xun; State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 ; Xu, Zheng

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Acetylene as carbon resource and copper foil as catalyst. ► Three carbon nanostructures are synthesized by modulating feeding gas compositions. ► NH{sub 3} is a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays. -- Abstract: Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VA-CNF) arrays on carbon substrate have been synthesized via one-step chemical vapor deposition process on copper foil, by using acetylene as carbon resource. Three types of carbon nanostructures, viz. bare carbon films, CNFs and VA-CNFs grown on carbon substrate, could be selectively synthesized by only modulating the concentration of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} in the feeding gases. It was found that NH{sub 3} was a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays, which could increase the diffusion capability of copper atoms in carbon materials, therefore promote forming larger spherical Cu NPs catalysts for the growth of VA-CNFs. Furthermore, a growth mechanism in different feeding gas compositions was proposed.

  4. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  5. Purely sonochemical route for oriented zinc oxide nanowire growth on arbitrary substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Avinash P.; Katzenmeyer, Aaron M.; Kim, Ja-Yeon; Kwon, Min Ki; Gosho, Yasuhiro; Islam, M. Saif

    2010-04-01

    We report a simple sonochemical method for the seeding and synthesis of Zinc Oxide nanowire arrays that can be formed on a number of substrates that are stable in alcohol and aqueous solution. Vertically aligned ZnO NWs were synthesized from a single solution at room-ambient via ultrasonic excitation. Prior to the NW growth, a ZnO seed layer was deposited using the same system with a different solution. The optimal conditions to produce a high density of oriented wires along with their optical characteristics are presented for ZnO NWs with a significantly high growth rate compared with traditional growth techniques such as evaporation, chemical vapor deposition and sputtering. Our method promises a mass-manufacturable process for fast and inexpensive ZnO NW production for practical low cost electronics, photonics and energy conversion applications.

  6. MBE Growth of AlN Nanowires on Si Substrates by Aluminizing Nucleation.

    PubMed

    E, Yanxiong; Hao, Zhibiao; Yu, Jiadong; Wu, Chao; Liu, Runze; Wang, Lai; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Sun, Changzheng; Luo, Yi

    2015-12-01

    By introducing an aluminization process to achieve nucleation of nanowires (NWs), spontaneous growth of AlN NWs on Si substrates has been realized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The AlN NWs are grown from the nuclei formed by the aluminization process, and the NW density and diameter can be controlled by the aluminization parameters. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of AlN NWs is carefully investigated. Island-like films are found to grow between the NWs due to poor migration ability of Al adatoms. The films are proved to be Al-polar different from the N-polar AlN NWs, which can explain the absence of newly formed NWs. Increasing the V/III ratio can efficiently suppress the growth of Al-polar AlN films. PMID:26437653

  7. MBE Growth of AlN Nanowires on Si Substrates by Aluminizing Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Yanxiong; Hao, Zhibiao; Yu, Jiadong; Wu, Chao; Liu, Runze; Wang, Lai; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Sun, Changzheng; Luo, Yi

    2015-10-01

    By introducing an aluminization process to achieve nucleation of nanowires (NWs), spontaneous growth of AlN NWs on Si substrates has been realized by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The AlN NWs are grown from the nuclei formed by the aluminization process, and the NW density and diameter can be controlled by the aluminization parameters. The influence of growth conditions on the morphologies of AlN NWs is carefully investigated. Island-like films are found to grow between the NWs due to poor migration ability of Al adatoms. The films are proved to be Al-polar different from the N-polar AlN NWs, which can explain the absence of newly formed NWs. Increasing the V/III ratio can efficiently suppress the growth of Al-polar AlN films.

  8. Halo(natrono)archaea isolated from hypersaline lakes utilize cellulose and chitin as growth substrates

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Toshchakov, Stepan V.; Kolganova, Tatyana V.; Kublanov, Ilya V.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, extremely halophilic euryarchaeota were considered mostly as aerobic heterotrophs utilizing simple organic compounds as growth substrates. Almost nothing is known on the ability of these prokaryotes to utilize complex polysaccharides, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. Although few haloarchaeal cellulases and chitinases were recently characterized, the analysis of currently available haloarchaeal genomes deciphered numerous genes-encoding glycosidases of various families including endoglucanases and chitinases. However, all these haloarchaea were isolated and cultivated on simple substrates and their ability to grow on polysaccharides in situ or in vitro is unknown. This study examines several halo(natrono)archaeal strains from geographically distant hypersaline lakes for the ability to grow on insoluble polymers as a sole growth substrate in salt-saturated mineral media. Some of them belonged to known taxa, while other represented novel phylogenetic lineages within the class Halobacteria. All isolates produced extracellular extremely salt-tolerant cellulases or chitinases, either cell-free or cell-bound. Obtained results demonstrate a presence of diverse populations of haloarchaeal cellulo/chitinotrophs in hypersaline habitats indicating that euryarchaea participate in aerobic mineralization of recalcitrant organic polymers in salt-saturated environments. PMID:26441877

  9. Kinetics of substrate utilization and bacterial growth of crude oil degraded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Talaiekhozani, Amirreza; Jafarzadeh, Nematollah; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Talaie, Mohammad Reza; Beheshti, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Pollution associated with crude oil (CO) extraction degrades the quality of waters, threatens drinking water sources and may ham air quality. The systems biology approach aims at learning the kinetics of substrate utilization and bacterial growth for a biological process for which very limited knowledge is available. This study uses the Pseudomonas aeruginosa to degrade CO and determines the kinetic parameters of substrate utilization and bacterial growth modeled from a completely mixed batch reactor. The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa can remove 91 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbons and 83 % of the aromatic compounds from oily environment. The value k of 9.31 g of substrate g(-1) of microorganism d(-1) could be far higher than the value k obtained for petrochemical wastewater treatment and that for municipal wastewater treatment. The production of new cells of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source can exceed 2(3) of the existing cells per day. The kinetic parameters are verified to contribute to improving the biological removal of CO from oily environment. PMID:26413306

  10. Ni nanoparticle catalyzed growth of MWCNTs on Cu NPs @ a-C:H substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Solaymani, S.; Akbarzadeh Pasha, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    NiCu NPs @ a-C:H thin films with different Cu content were prepared by co-deposition by RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) from acetylene gas and Cu and Ni targets. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for growing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 825 °C by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). By addition of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate for Ni NPs catalyst, the density of the grown CNTs is greatly enhanced in comparison to bare Si substrate. Furthermore the average diameter of the grown CNTs decreases by decreasing of Cu content of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer. However Cu NPs @ a-C:H by itself has no catalytic property in MWCNTs growth. Morphology and electrical and optical properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer is affected by Cu content and each of them is effective parameter on growth of MWCNTs based on Ni NPs catalyst. Moreover, adding of a low amount of Ni NPs doesn't vary optical, electrical and morphology properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer but it has a profound effect on its catalytic activity. Finally the density and diameter of MWCNTs can be optimized by selection of the Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate of Ni NPs.

  11. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Flynn, Theodore M; Suess, Melanie K; Bradley, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios ((2)H/(1)H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the (2)H/(1)H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid (2)H/(1)H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the (2)H/(1)H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in (2)H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  12. Transhydrogenase and Growth Substrate Influence Lipid Hydrogen Isotope Ratios in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Flynn, Theodore M.; Suess, Melanie K.; Bradley, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fatty acids preserve metabolic and environmental information in their hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H). This ratio is influenced by parameters that include the 2H/1H of water in the microbial growth environment, and biosynthetic fractionations between water and lipid. In some microbes, this biosynthetic fractionation has been shown to vary systematically with central energy metabolism, and controls on fatty acid 2H/1H may be linked to the intracellular production of NADPH. We examined the apparent fractionation between media water and the fatty acids produced by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Growth was in batch culture with malate as an electron donor for sulfate respiration, and with pyruvate and fumarate as substrates for fermentation and for sulfate respiration. A larger fractionation was observed as a consequence of respiratory or fermentative growth on pyruvate than growth on fumarate or malate. This difference correlates with opposite apparent flows of electrons through the electron bifurcating/confurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB. When grown on malate or fumarate, mutant strains of D. alaskensis G20 containing transposon disruptions in a copy of nfnAB show different fractionations than the wild type strain. This phenotype is muted during fermentative growth on pyruvate, and it is absent when pyruvate is a substrate for sulfate reduction. All strains and conditions produced similar fatty acid profiles, and the 2H/1H of individual lipids changed in concert with the mass-weighted average. Unsaturated fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to their saturated homologs, and anteiso-branched fatty acids were generally depleted in 2H relative to straight-chain fatty acids. Fractionation correlated with growth rate, a pattern that has also been observed in the fractionation of sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:27445998

  13. Novel Growth Regime of MDCK II Model Tissues on Soft Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaliman, Sara; Jayachandran, Christina; Rehfeldt, Florian; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that MDCK II cells grow in circular colonies that densify until contact inhibition takes place. Here, we show that this behavior is only typical for colonies developing on hard substrates and report a new growth phase of MDCK II cells on soft gels. At the onset, the new phase is characterized by small, three-dimensional droplets of cells attached to the substrate. When the contact area between the agglomerate and the substrate becomes sufficiently large, a very dense monolayer nucleates in the center of the colony. This monolayer, surrounded by a belt of three-dimensionally packed cells, has a well-defined structure, independent of time and cluster size, as well as a density that is twice the steady-state density found on hard substrates. To release stress in such dense packing, extrusions of viable cells take place several days after seeding. The extruded cells create second-generation clusters, as evidenced by an archipelago of aggregates found in a vicinity of mother colonies, which points to a mechanically regulated migratory behavior. PMID:24703316

  14. Novel growth regime of MDCK II model tissues on soft substrates.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Sara; Jayachandran, Christina; Rehfeldt, Florian; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2014-04-01

    It is well established that MDCK II cells grow in circular colonies that densify until contact inhibition takes place. Here, we show that this behavior is only typical for colonies developing on hard substrates and report a new growth phase of MDCK II cells on soft gels. At the onset, the new phase is characterized by small, three-dimensional droplets of cells attached to the substrate. When the contact area between the agglomerate and the substrate becomes sufficiently large, a very dense monolayer nucleates in the center of the colony. This monolayer, surrounded by a belt of three-dimensionally packed cells, has a well-defined structure, independent of time and cluster size, as well as a density that is twice the steady-state density found on hard substrates. To release stress in such dense packing, extrusions of viable cells take place several days after seeding. The extruded cells create second-generation clusters, as evidenced by an archipelago of aggregates found in a vicinity of mother colonies, which points to a mechanically regulated migratory behavior. PMID:24703316

  15. Features of SOI substrates heating in MBE growth process obtained by low-coherence tandem interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, P. V.; Goryunov, A.. V.; Lobanov, D. N.; Luk'yanov, A. Yu.; Novikov, A. V.; Tertyshnik, A. D.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Differences in heating of silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates in molecular beam epitaxy were revealed by low-coherence tandem interferometry. Using this technique the interference effects which impede the correct evaluation of SOI substrate temperature by infrared pyrometers can be eliminated and so the reliable temperature readout can be achieved. It was shown that at the same thermocouple and heater power settings the real temperature of SOI substrates is higher than of silicon ones and the difference may be as high as 40-50 °C at temperatures close to 600 °C. It is supposed that such effect is caused by the additional absorption of heater radiation by the buried oxide layer in the mid-infrared range. Independent proof of this effect was obtained by growing on both types of substrates a series of structures with self-assembled Ge nanoislands whose parameters are known to be very temperature sensitive. The proposed low-coherence interferometry technique provides precise real-time control of the growth temperature and so allows formation of SiGe nanostructures with desired parameters.

  16. Successive selective growth of semipolar (11-22) GaN on patterned sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendille, Florian; Hugues, Maxime; Vennéguès, Philippe; Teisseire, Monique; De Mierry, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Thanks to the use of two successive selective growths by metal organic chemical vapor deposition reactor, high quality semipolar (11-22) GaN with a homogenous defect repartition over the surface was achieved. The procedure starts with a first selective growth on a patterned sapphire substrate, leading to continuous stripes of three dimensional (3D) GaN crystals of low defect density. Then, a second selective growth step is achieved by depositing a SiNx nano-mask and a low temperature GaN nano-layer on the top of the GaN stripes. Hereby, we demonstrate an original way to obtain a homoepitaxial selective growth on 3D GaN crystals by taking advantage of the different crystallographic planes available. Basal stacking faults (BSFs) are generated during this second selective growth but could be eliminated by using a three-step growth method in which elongated voids are created above the defective area. For a fully coalesced sample grown using the 2 step method, dislocation density of 1.2 × 108 cm-2 and BSFs density of 154 cm-1 with a homogenous distribution have been measured by cathodoluminescence at 80 K. Consequently the material quality of this coalesced semipolar layer is comparable to the one of polar GaN on c-plane sapphire.

  17. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H.

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  18. Fabrication of Nanodot Decorated Sapphire Substrates for Abbreviated Growth Mode Deposition of Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biser, Jeffrey M.

    The overarching theme of this body of work is the development and demonstration of sapphire substrates with sub-micron scale surface features laid out in arrays with controlled shape, size, and distribution. The key contributions of the work are: (1) the collaborative demonstration that such substrates enable novel GaN fabrication options like the Abbreviated Growth Mode (AGM) approach that can lead to lower cost, higher quality LED devices, (2) the proof-of-concept demonstration that large scale surface patterning with the use of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates is a feasible approach for creating low-cost patterns that should be compatible with AGM, and (3) that the Aluminum-to-sapphire conversion process used to fabricate the surface structures has distinct zones of behavior with regard to feature size and temperature that can be used to suggest an optimized set of process conditions.

  19. Epitaxial growth of ZnO nanowall networks on GaN/sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Hyun-Kyu; Yi, Min-Su; Park, Nae-Man; Park, Jong-Hyurk; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Maeng, Sung-Lyul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Moon, Seung-Eon

    2007-01-01

    Heteroepitaxy of vertically well-aligned ZnO nanowall networks with a honeycomblike pattern on GaN /c-Al2O3 substrates by the help of a Au catalyst was realized. The ZnO nanowall networks with wall thicknesses of 80-140nm and an average height of about 2μm were grown on a self-formed ZnO thin film during the growth on the GaN /c-Al2O3 substrates. It was found that both single-crystalline ZnO nanowalls and catalytic Au have an epitaxial relation to the GaN thin film in synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments. Hydrogen-sensing properties of the ZnO nanowall networks have also been investigated.

  20. Pressate from peat dewatering as a substrate for bacterial growth. [Rhizopus arrhizus; Xanthomonas campestris; Aureobasidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Cooper, D.G.

    1985-07-01

    This study considered the possibility of using water expressed during the drying of fuel-grade peat as a substrate for microbial growth. Highly humified peat pressed for 2.5 min at 1.96 MPa produced water with a chemical oxygen demand of 690 mg/liter. Several biological compounds could be produced by using the organic matter inexpressed peat water as a substrate. These included polymers such as chitosan, contained in the cell wall of Rhizopus arrhizus, and two extracellular polysaccharides, xanthan gum and pullulan, produced by Bacillus subtilis grown in the expressed water. Small additions of nutrients to the peat pressate were necessary to obtain substantial yields of products. The addition of peptone, yeast extract, and glucose improved production of the various compounds. Biological treatment improved the quality of the expressed water to the extent that in an industrial process it could be returned to the environment.

  1. Low-Temperature in Situ Growth of Graphene on Metallic Substrates and Its Application in Anticorrosion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minmin; Du, Zehui; Yin, Zongyou; Zhou, Wenwen; Liu, Zhengdong; Tsang, Siu Hon; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2016-01-13

    Metal or alloy corrosion brings about huge economic cost annually, which is becoming one area of growing concern in various industries, being in bulk state or nanoscale range. Here, single layer or few layers of graphene are deposited on various metallic substrates directly at a low temperature down to 400 °C. These substrates can be varied from hundreds-micrometer bulk metallic or alloy foils to tens of nanometer nanofibers (NFs). Corrosion analysis reveals that both graphene-grown steel sheets and NFs have reduced the corrosion rate of up to ten times lower than that of their bare corresponding counterparts. Moreover, such low-temperature in situ growth of graphene demonstrates stable and long-lasting anticorrosion after long-term immersion. This new class of graphene coated nanomaterials shows high potentials in anticorrosion applications for submarines, oil tankers/pipelines, and ruggedized electronics. PMID:26683895

  2. Effect of GaAs substrate orientation on the growth kinetic of GaN layer grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laifi, J.; Chaaben, N.; Bouazizi, H.; Fourati, N.; Zerrouki, C.; El Gmili, Y.; Bchetnia, A.; Salvestrini, J. P.; El Jani, B.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the kinetic growth of low temperature GaN nucleation layers (LT-GaN) grown on GaAs substrates with different crystalline orientations. GaN nucleation layers were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a temperature range of 500-600 °C on oriented (001), (113), (112) and (111) GaAs substrates. The growth was in-situ monitored by laser reflectometry (LR). Using an optical model, including time-dependent surface roughness and growth rate profiles, simulations were performed to best approach the experimental reflectivity curves. Results are discussed and correlated with ex-situ analyses, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible reflectance (SR). We show that the GaN nucleation layers growth results the formation of GaN islands whose density and size vary greatly with both growth temperature and substrate orientation. Arrhenius plots of the growth rate for each substrate give values of activation energy varying from 0.20 eV for the (001) orientation to 0.35 eV for the (113) orientation. Using cathodoluminescence (CL), we also show that high temperature (800-900 °C) GaN layers grown on top of the low temperature (550 °C) GaN nucleation layers, grown themselves on the GaAs substrates with different orientations, exhibit cubic or hexagonal phase depending on both growth temperature and substrate orientation.

  3. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2013-02-15

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  4. A Census of Broad-line Active Galactic Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies: Coeval Star Formation and Rapid Black Hole Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Hsu, Alexander D.; Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.

    2013-02-01

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  5. Real-time characterization of film growth on transparent substrates by rotating-compensator multichannel ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Collins, R W

    1998-07-01

    A multichannel spectroscopic ellipsometer in the fixed-polarizer-sample-rotating-compensator-fixed-analyzer (PSC(R)A) configuration has been developed and applied for real-time characterization of the nucleation and growth of thin films on transparent substrates. This rotating-compensator design overcomes the major disadvantages of the multichannel ellipsometer in the rotating-polarizer-sample-fixed-analyzer (P(R)SA) configuration while retaining its high speed and precision for the characterization of thin-film processes in real time. The advantages of the PSC(R)A configuration include (i) its high accuracy and precision for the detection of low-ellipticity polarization states that are generated upon reflection of linearly polarized light from transparent film-substrate systems, and (ii) the ability to characterize depolarization of the reflected light, an effect that leads to errors in ellipticity when measured with the P(R)SA configuration. A comparison of the index of refraction spectra for a glass substrate obtained in the real-time PSC(R)A mode in 2.5 s and in the ex situ fixed-polarizer-fixed-compensator-sample-rotating-analyzer (PCSA(R)) mode in ~10 min show excellent agreement, with a standard deviation between the two data sets of 8 x 10(-4), computed over the photon energy range from 1.5 to 3.5 eV. First, we describe the PSC(R)A ellipsometer calibration procedures developed specifically for transparent substrates. In addition, we describe the application of the multichannel PSC(R)A instrument for a study of thin-film diamond nucleation and growth on glass in a low-temperature microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. PMID:18285868

  6. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  7. Study of the surface cleaning of GOI and SGOI substrates for Ge epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Hirashita, Norio; Usuda, Koji; Nakaharai, Shu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Toyoda, Eiji; Takagi, Shin-ichi

    2009-11-01

    An effective wet cleaning process, optimized for low temperature Ge epitaxial growth on thin Ge or SiGe structures with reduced surface roughening, is proposed. It is found that HF + HCl cleaning is the most effective wet cleaning method that is applicable to the low temperature thermal cleaning. It is also found that temperature of the thermal cleaning appropriate to 25-30 nm thick germanium on insulator (GOI) or silicon-germanium on insulator (SGOI) substrates is approximately 450 °C. Moreover, it is also found that the temperatures of Ge epitaxial growth even in lattice-matched systems must be reduced to around 400 °C to prevent surface roughening and those in lattice-mismatched systems also must be reduced sufficiently (300 °C for strained Ge growth on SGOI ( Xeff = 0.6)) to prevent lattice relaxation as well as surface roughening. Finally, the successful formation of the compressively strained GOI structures is demonstrated by applying these wet cleaning and low temperature thermal cleaning processes and low temperature Ge epitaxy to thin SGOI substrates.

  8. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-07-01

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core–shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires.

  9. Effect of substrate temperature on the growth and properties of boron-doped microcrystalline silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Qing-Song; Wu, Zhi-Meng; Geng, Xin-Hua; Zhao, Ying; Sun, Jian; Xi, Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Highly conductive boron-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films are prepared by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (VHF PECVD) at the substrate temperatures (TS) ranging from 90°C to 270°C. The effects of TS on the growth and properties of the films are investigated. Results indicate that the growth rate, the electrical (dark conductivity, carrier concentration and Hall mobility) and structural (crystallinity and grain size) properties are all strongly dependent on TS. As TS increases, it is observed that 1) the growth rate initially increases and then arrives at a maximum value of 13.3 nm/min at TS=210°C, 2) the crystalline volume fraction (Xc) and the grain size increase initially, then reach their maximum values at TS=140°C and finally decrease, 3) the dark conductivity (σd), carrier concentration and Hall mobility have a similar dependence on TS and arrive at their maximum values at TS=190°C. In addition, it is also observed that at a lower substrate temperature TS, a higher dopant concentration is required in order to obtain a maximum σd.

  10. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core-shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires. PMID:27465800

  11. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO{sub 2} (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO{sub 2} (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry. - Graphical abstract: Flower nanostructured vanadium oxide film was prepared by hydrothermal reaction for photocatalysis application. - Highlights: • Monoclinic VO{sub 2} nanorod array and flower-like nanostructure were directly grown on FTO substrate by hydrothermal reaction. • The growth mechanism was analyzed by FESEM at different time. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} flower-like nanostructure film was obtained after calcining VO{sub 2} film. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good light activity and potential application in photocatalysis.

  12. Growth of epitaxial silicon nanowires on a Si substrate by a metal-catalyst-free process

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Wakamatsu, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    The growth of epitaxial Si nanowires by a metal-catalyst-free process has been investigated as an alternative to the more common metal-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid process. The well-aligned Si nanowires are successfully grown on a (111)-oriented Si substrate without any metal catalysts by a thermal treatment using silicon sulfide as a Si source at approximately 1200 °C. The needle-shaped Si nanowires, which have a core–shell structure that consists of a single-crystalline Si core along the <111> direction consistent with the substrate direction and a surface coating of silicon oxide, are grown by a metal-catalyst-free process. In this process, the silicon sulfide in the liquid phase facilitates the nucleation and nanowire growth. In contrast, oxygen-rich nanowires that consist of crystalline Si at the tip and lumpy silicon oxide on the body are observed in a sample grown at 1300 °C, which disturbs the epitaxial growth of Si nanowires. PMID:27465800

  13. Atomistic view in the initial stages of growth of epitaxial graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-03-01

    For both fundamental studies and potential development of graphene electronics, it is pressing to search for reliable methods for mass production of quality graphene. Epitaxial growth of graphene on catalytic metal substrates combined with post-growth transfer has become a promising route towards this goal [1,2]. However, to better control the quality and yield of graphene, a comprehensive understanding of the growth kinetics is essential. In particular, how the carbon atoms adsorbed on the metal surface (or dissolved into the metal) meet to nucleate into stable carbon islands will greatly influence both the growth rate and quality of larger carbon entities such as graphene sheets. In this talk, we first show that the delicate competition between carbon-carbon bonding and carbon-metal bonding dictates the initial nucleation sites of graphene on metal surfaces. These results are discussed in connection with the experimental findings that on Ir(111) and Ru(0001) substrates graphene nucleates from the step edges [4,5]. We also predict that on Cu(111) nucleation should take place everywhere on a terrace. Next we study larger carbon clusters on Cu(111) and explicitly compare the stability of linear and compact structures. We find that the linear carbon ``nanoarches'' are more stable than compact islands consisting of up to 13 carbon atoms, and these nanoarched structures may serve as the missing bridge between carbon dimers and larger graphene nanodomes. Based on these improved understanding of the atomistic rate processes involved, we propose a few kinetic pathways that may lead to better growth control of bilayer graphene and graphene nanoribbons as elemental building blocks for developing graphene electronics. Work done in collaboration with Hua Chen, Wenguang Zhu, Robert Van Wesep, Wei Chen, Ping Cui, and Haiping Lan, and supported by USDOE, USNSF, and NNSF of China.

  14. Demonstrating benthic control of anomalous solute transport: biofilm growth interacts with substrate size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Tank, J. L.; Bolster, D.; Hanrahan, B.

    2014-12-01

    In fluvial systems, biofilms are the main driver of biogeochemical transformations. Biofilms grow on most surfaces in the benthic and hyporheic regions, where they process waterborne solutes. These solutes are transported in the regional flow and their fluxes near the biofilms are controlled by local physical properties, such as head gradients and hydraulic conductivity. These properties are in turn influenced by the growth of the biofilm itself, which can clog porous media and/or develop its own network of porous space. Therefore, the residence time of a solute in proximity to biofilm surfaces, where it can be processed, should be influenced by the properties not only of the physical environment, but by that of the biofilm itself. We hypothesized that the presence of biofilms would increase residence times in the benthic and shallow subsurface regions of the stream bed. We performed controlled experiments in 4 experimental streams at Notre Dame's Linked Experimental Ecosystem Facility (ND-LEEF) to quantify the interaction between substrate and biofilm in controlling anomalous solute transport. Each stream at ND-LEEF had a different substrate configuration: 2 with homogeneous substrate but with different sizes (pea gravel vs. coarse gravel) and 2 with heterogeneous substrate (alternating sections vs. well-mixed reaches). We measured the evolution of the residence time distributions in the streams by injecting rhodamine tracer (RWT) multiple times over the course of a 5 month colonization gradient. Analysis of breakthrough curves demonstrated that in addition to the influence of substrate, biofilm colonization and growth significantly influenced the residence time in the system. Specifically, as biofilms grew, the power-law exponent of the RTD decreased, i.e. the tails of the distributions became heavier, suggesting prolonged retention due to the presence of the biofilms. Although the substrate signature persisted over time, with the coarser gravel bed washing out

  15. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111)B substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-02-01

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {111}B substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {113}B faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  16. Glycothermal Growth of Silver Core/TiO2 Shell Nano-Wires on FTO Substrate.

    PubMed

    Song, Duck-Hyun; Hirato, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires have been successfully prepared on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate via a glycothermal process assisted by a photochemical process. The morphology, diameter, length, and density of synthesized core/shell nano-wires could be varied by photochemical reaction time. The fabricated samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray. We suggested a mechanism to explain the growth of the silver core/TiO2 shell nano-wires. PMID:26328391

  17. Ordered growth of germanium hut islands on Si (001) molecular bonded substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Poydenot, V.; Dujardin, R.; Rouviere, J.L.; Barski, A.; Fournel, F.

    2004-12-06

    Ordered germanium hut islands are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on high twist angle molecular bonded silicon (001) substrates (twist angle higher than 20 deg.). We show that the growth organization is induced by an array of interfacial tilt dislocations. Plan-view transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations show that the orientation and period of the tilt dislocation array determine the orientation, period, and length of elongated germanium hut islands. The strain field generated by an array of tilt dislocations is proposed as the driving force of the reported organization.

  18. Growth of InAs on Si substrates at low temperatures using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Smita; Song, Xueyan; Babcock, S. E.; Kuech, T. F.; Wheeler, Dane; Wu, Bin; Fay, P.; Seabaugh, Alan

    2008-11-01

    The growth behavior of InAs on Si using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was studied. The large lattice mismatch of InAs to Si, ˜12%, results in island formation under typical MOVPE growth conditions, which prevents the development of the thin coherent films of InAs needed for high-speed device applications. The growth of InAs at low temperature is expected to lead to rapid nucleation and low surface mobility, resulting in the formation of a coherent film at low thicknesses. This study explored the growth behavior of InAs on Si at low temperatures, i.e. <350 °C and varying V/III ratio. InAs films were grown on {1 0 0}-, {1 1 1}- and {2 1 1}-oriented Si substrates using trimethyl indium, tertiary butyl arsine and AsH 3. Small islands ranging from 15 to 30 nm form on the samples at growth temperatures <325 °C. Subsequent annealing of this thin layer at 600 °C for 5 min leads to island coarsening. High-resolution X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize InAs layer grown on Si.

  19. Peptide-modified Substrate for Modulating Gland Tissue Growth and Morphology In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Hiroaki; Sathi, Gulsan Ara; Farahat, Mahmoud; Rahman, Kazi Anisur; Sakai, Takayoshi; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Takuo; Torii, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    In vitro fabricated biological tissue would be a valuable tool to screen newly synthesized drugs or understand the tissue development process. Several studies have attempted to fabricate biological tissue in vitro. However, controlling the growth and morphology of the fabricated tissue remains a challenge. Therefore, new techniques are required to modulate tissue growth. RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid), which is an integrin-binding domain of fibronectin, has been found to enhance cell adhesion and survival; it has been used to modify substrates for in vitro cell culture studies or used as tissue engineering scaffolds. In addition, this study shows novel functions of the RGD peptide, which enhances tissue growth and modulates tissue morphology in vitro. When an isolated submandibular gland (SMG) was cultured on an RGD-modified alginate hydrogel sheet, SMG growth including bud expansion and cleft formation was dramatically enhanced. Furthermore, we prepared small RGD-modified alginate beads and placed them on the growing SMG tissue. These RGD-modified beads successfully induced cleft formation at the bead position, guiding the desired SMG morphology. Thus, this RGD-modified material might be a promising tool to modulate tissue growth and morphology in vitro for biological tissue fabrication. PMID:26098225

  20. Simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, M.; Shahid, M. Y.; Iqbal, F.; Fatima, K.; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Arbi, H. M.; Tsu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we report thermal evaporation technique as a simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on p-type silicon substrate. A mixture of Si and C60 powder of high purity (99.99%) was evaporated from molybdenum boat. The as grown film was characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer and Hall Measurements. The XRD pattern displayed four peaks at 2Θ angles 28.550, 32.700, 36.100 and 58.900 related to Si (1 1 1), 4H-SiC (1 0 0), 4H-SiC (1 1 1) and 4H-SiC (2 2 2), respectively. FTIR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer and electrical properties further strengthened the 4H-SiC growth.

  1. Substrate orientation dependence on the solid phase epitaxial growth rate of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, B. L.; Yates, B. R.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Gomez-Selles, J. L.; Elliman, R. G.; Jones, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    The solid phase epitaxial growth process has been studied at 330 °C by transmission electron microscopy for Ge wafers polished at 10°-15° increments from the [001] to [011] orientations. The velocity showed a strong dependence on substrate orientation with the [001] direction displaying a velocity 16 times greater than the [111] direction. A lattice kinetic Monte Carlo model was used to simulate solid phase epitaxial growth (SPEG) rates at different orientations, and simulations compared well with experimental results. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and plan view transmission electron microscopy revealed stacking fault and twin defect formation in the [111] orientation where all other orientations showed only hairpin dislocations. The twin defects formed from Ge SPEG were comparatively less dense than what has previously been reported for Si, which gave rise to higher normalized velocities and a constant [111] SPEG velocity for Ge.

  2. Undulate Cu(111) Substrates: A Unique Surface for CVD Graphene Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqian; Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yanhui; Chen, Zhiying; Tang, Chunmiao; Sui, Yanping; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiaoliang; Xie, Xiaoming; Yu, Guanghui; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xinyu

    2015-10-01

    Cu(111) is a suitable substrate for sixfold graphene domain synthesis, as confirmed theoretically and experimentally. However, an undulate striped structure, where stretched flower-like or approximate diamond-shaped graphene domains had formed, appeared on Cu(111) after annealing and growth in our study. Graphene domains were stretched along the undulate stripes. The Cu surface coated with graphene domains was flatter than the surrounding undulate striped structure. Oxygen plasma was used to remove the graphene coating, and the exposed Cu was also flat. We propose that slight steps formed on Cu(111) in the annealing process. The faster rate of graphene growth along these steps contributed to the stretching domain shape. Furthermore, the release of internal stress or the shrinking of Cu during cooling promotes the expansion step to form an undulate striped structure. However, the coated Cu step motion is limited by graphene. Consequently, the resulting surface is flat, thereby clearly indicating a graphene-Cu interaction.

  3. Patterned growth of neuronal cells on modified diamond-like carbon substrates.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Stephen; Regan, Edward M; Uney, James B; Dick, Andrew D; McGeehan, Joseph P; Mayer, Eric J; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2008-06-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has been explored as a biomaterial with potential use for coating implantable devices and surgical instruments. In this study the interaction of DLC with mammalian neuronal cells has been studied along with its modifications to improve its function as a biomaterial. We describe the use of DLC, oxidised DLC and phosphorus-doped DLC to support the growth and survival of primary central nervous system neurones and neuroblastoma cells. None of these substrates were cytotoxic and primary neurones adhered better to phosphorus-doped DLC than unmodified DLC. This property was used to culture cortical neurones in a predetermined micropattern. This raises the potential of DLC as a biomaterial for central nervous system (CNS) implantation. Furthermore, patterned DLC and phosphorus-doped DLC can direct neuronal growth, generating a powerful tool to study neuronal networks in a spatially distinct way. This study reports the generation of nerve cell patterns via patterned deposition of DLC. PMID:18359076

  4. Growth of carbon nanotubes on surfaces: the effects of catalyst and substrate.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Angel Berenguer; Geng, Junfeng

    2013-08-01

    We report a study of synthesising air-stable, nearly monodispersed bimetallic colloids of Co/Pd and Fe/Mo of varying compositions as active catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Using these catalysts we have investigated the effects of catalyst and substrate on the carbon nanostructures formed in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. We will show how it is possible to assess the influence of both the catalyst and the support on the controlled growth of carbon nanotube and nanofiber arrays. The importance of the composition of the catalytic nuclei will be put into perspective with other results from the literature. Furthermore, the influence of other synthetic parameters such as the nature of the nanoparticle catalysts will also be analysed and discussed in detail. PMID:23882847

  5. Screening of Rhizobacteria for Their Plant Growth Promotion Ability and Antagonism Against Damping off and Root Rot Diseases of Broad Bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Indira Devi, S; Talukdar, N C; Chandradev Sharma, K; Jeyaram, K; Rohinikumar, M

    2011-01-01

    Development of microbial inoculants from rhizobacterial isolates with potential for plant growth promotion and root disease suppression require rigorous screening. Fifty-four (54) fluorescent pseudomonads, out of a large collection of rhizobacteria from broad bean fields of 20 different locations within Imphal valley of Manipur, were initially screened for antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani, of diseased roots of broad bean and also three other reference fungal pathogens of plant roots. Fifteen fluorescent pseudomonas isolates produced inhibition zone (8-29 mm) of the fungal growth in dual plate assay and IAA like substances (24.1-66.7 μg/ml) and soluble P (12.7-56.80 μg/ml) in broth culture. Among the isolates, RFP 36 caused a marked increase in seed germination, seedling biomass and control of the root borne pathogens of broad bean. PCR-RAPD analysis of these isolates along with five MTCC reference fluorescent pseudomonas strains indicated that the RFP-36 belonged to a distinct cluster and the PCR of its genomic DNA with antibiotic specific primers Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and 2, 4-diacetyl phloroglucinol suggested possible occurrence of gene for the potent antibiotics. Overall, the result of the study indicated the potential of the isolate RFP 36 as a microbial inoculant with multiple functions for broad bean. PMID:22282623

  6. Carbon dimers as the dominant feeding species in epitaxial growth and morphological phase transition of graphene on different Cu substrates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yue; Cui, Ping; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-05-29

    Cu substrates are highly preferred for the potential mass production of high-quality graphene, yet many of the important aspects of the atomistic growth mechanisms involved remain to be explored. Using multiscale modeling, we identify C-C dimers as the dominant feeding species in the epitaxial growth of graphene on both Cu(111) and Cu(100) substrates. By contrasting the different activation energies involved in C-C dimer diffusion on terraces and its attachment at graphene island edges, we further reveal why graphene growth is diffusion limited on Cu(111), but attachment limited on Cu(100). We also find even higher potential energy barriers against dimer diffusion along the island edges; consequently, a dendritic-to-compact transition is predicted to take place during graphene enlargement on either substrate, but at different growth temperatures. These findings serve as new insights for better control of epitaxial graphene growth. PMID:26066446

  7. Carbon Dimers as the Dominant Feeding Species in Epitaxial Growth and Morphological Phase Transition of Graphene on Different Cu Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yue; Cui, Ping; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-05-01

    Cu substrates are highly preferred for the potential mass production of high-quality graphene, yet many of the important aspects of the atomistic growth mechanisms involved remain to be explored. Using multiscale modeling, we identify C-C dimers as the dominant feeding species in the epitaxial growth of graphene on both Cu(111) and Cu(100) substrates. By contrasting the different activation energies involved in C-C dimer diffusion on terraces and its attachment at graphene island edges, we further reveal why graphene growth is diffusion limited on Cu(111), but attachment limited on Cu(100). We also find even higher potential energy barriers against dimer diffusion along the island edges; consequently, a dendritic-to-compact transition is predicted to take place during graphene enlargement on either substrate, but at different growth temperatures. These findings serve as new insights for better control of epitaxial graphene growth.

  8. Selective growth of ZnO nanowires on substrates patterned by photolithography and inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenti, M.; Verna, A.; Fontana, M.; Quaglio, M.; Porro, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO NWs) were grown by a two-step growth method, involving the deposition of a patterned ZnO thin seeding layer and the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ZnO NWs. Two ways of patterning the seed layer were performed. The seeding solution containing ZnO precursors was deposited by sol-gel/spin-coating technique and patterned by photolithography. In the other case, the seeding solution was directly printed by inkjet printing only on selected portion of the substrate areas. In both cases, crystallization of the seed layer was achieved by thermal annealing in ambient air. Vertically aligned ZnO NWs were then grown by CVD on patterned, seeded substrates. The structure and morphology of ZnO NWs was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy measurements, respectively, while the vibrational properties were evaluated through Raman spectroscopy. Results showed that less-defective, vertically aligned, c-axis oriented ZnO NWs were grown on substrates patterned by photolithography while more defective nanostructures were grown on printed seed layer. A feature size of 30 µm was transferred into the patterned seed layer, and a good selectivity in growing ZnO NWs was obtained.

  9. Interfacial growth of controllable morphology of silver patterns on plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanghui; Qi, Shengli; Wang, Xiaodong; Tian, Guofeng; Sun, Guang; Liu, Wei; Yan, Xiaona; Wu, Dezhen; Wu, Zhanpeng; Zhang, Li

    2012-10-11

    Controllable growth of newly born silver nanoparticles to fractal, cauliflower-like, microscale disks and continuous silver layers with high conductivity and reflectivity on plastic substrates has been developed via solid-liquid interfacial reduction and growing of ion-doped polymeric films. Such approaches involve polyimide (PI) films as substrates, its corresponding silver-ion-doped precursors as solid oxidants, and facile immersion of ion-doped polymeric films in aqueous reducing solution. The solution reducing process belongs to liquid-solid interfacial reduction processes, during which silver ions doped in polymeric matrix transformed to newly born silver nanoparticles which further aggregated and migrated along the liquid-solid interface to form dendrite, cauliflower-like and lamella disk-like architecture and/or severely compact continuous silver nanolayers with highly reflective and conductive properties. Time-dependent morphology evolutions of silver particles were traced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This strategy can also extend to synthesis of many other metals on polymeric films while maintaining outstanding metal-polymer adhesion based on incorporation of various metal ions, and may offer an opportunity to fabricate large scale, high-output, cost-effective processes for metal patterns on flexible polymeric substrates. PMID:23016702

  10. Graphene growth at the interface between Ni catalyst layer and SiO2/Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Song, Kwan-Woo; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2011-07-01

    Graphene was synthesized deliberately at the interface between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate as well as on top surface of Ni film using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which is suitable for large-scale and low-cost synthesis of graphene. The carbon atom injected at the top surface of Ni film can penetrate and reach to the Ni/SiO2 interface for the formation of graphene. Once we have the graphene in between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate, the substrate spontaneously provides insulating SiO2 layer and we may easily get graphene/SiO2/Si structure simply by discarding Ni film. This growth of graphene at the interface can exclude graphene transfer step for electronic application. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy show that graphene was successfully synthesized at the back of Ni film and the coverage of graphene varies with temperature and time of synthesis. The coverage of graphene at the interface depends on the amount of carbon atoms diffused into the back of Ni film. PMID:22121737

  11. Correlation between substrate bias, growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiping; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai; Wu, Huaping; Jia, Zechun

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films which are deposited at different substrate biases by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique with PH 3 as the dopant source. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, residual stress measurement, UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy and temperature-dependent conductivity measurement. The atomic fraction of phosphorus in the films as a function of substrate bias is obtained by XPS analysis. The optimum bias for phosphorus incorporation is about -80 V. Raman spectra show that the amorphous structures of all samples with atomic-scaled smooth surface are not remarkably changed when PH 3 is implanted, but some small graphitic crystallites are formed. Moreover, phosphorus impurities and higher-energetic impinging ions are favorable for the clustering of sp 2 sites dispersed in sp 3 skeleton and increase the level of structural ordering for ta-C:P films, which further releases the compressive stress and enhances the conductivity of the films. Our analysis establishes an interrelationship between microstructure, stress state, electrical properties, and substrate bias, which helps to understand the deposition mechanism of ta-C:P films.

  12. Growth of textured MgO through e-beam evaporation and inclined substrate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Lei, C. H.; Ma, B.; Evans, H.; Efstathiadis, H.; Manisha, R.; Massey, M.; Balachandran, U.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2006-08-01

    Long length textured MgO template on Hastelloy C276™ (HC) has been successfully deposited in a reel-to-reel (R2R) electron beam (e-beam) evaporation system by inclined substrate deposition (ISD). High deposition rate up to 10 nm s-1 with exposure length of 7 cm has been realized. The MgO template showed good in-plane texture of 9.5°-11.5° measured from the (002) phi scans. Experimental results reveal that MgO in-plane texture is formed by the preferred growth direction of [11n]\\parallel \\mathrm {substrate} normal and one of the MgO {200} planes rotates to the in-flux direction. A new expression, termed the 'two-thirds relationship', between the inclination angle α and the tilted angle of the (00l) plane from the substrate normal, β, has been summarized. YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) film deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on strontium ruthenate (SRO) buffered ISD MgO showed Tc of 91 K with transition width of 1 K. Critical current measurement indicated an Ic of 110 A cm-1 at 77 K in self-field for 0.68 µm YBCO film, corresponding to a Jc of 1.6 MA cm-2.

  13. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Boris N; Bermudez, Victor M; Hite, Jennifer K; Robinson, Zachary R; Wheeler, Virginia D; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C

    2015-02-28

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer. PMID:25640166

  14. Growth and spectroscopic characterization of monolayer and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Boris N.; Bermudez, Victor M.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Sridhara, Karthik; Hernández, Sandra C.

    2015-02-01

    Atomically thin two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D h-BN) is one of the key materials in the development of new van der Waals heterostructures due to its outstanding properties including an atomically smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength, chemical inertness and high electrical resistance. The development of 2D h-BN growth is still in the early stages and largely depends on rapid and accurate characterization of the grown monolayer or few layers h-BN films. This paper demonstrates a new approach to characterizing monolayer h-BN films directly on metal substrates by grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Using h-BN films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition on Cu and Ni substrates, two new sub-bands are found for the A2u out-of-plane stretching mode. It is shown, using both experimental and computational methods, that the lower-energy sub-band is related to 2D h-BN coupled with substrate, while the higher energy sub-band is related to decoupled (or free-standing) 2D h-BN. It is further shown that this newly-observed fine structure in the A2u mode can be used to assess, quickly and easily, the homogeneity of the h-BN-metal interface and the effects of metal surface contamination on adhesion of the layer.

  15. Growth and fabrication of deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes on silicon carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Craig Gunar

    Interest in deep ultraviolet (< 280 nm) emitters has developed rapidly in recent years, with its use in applications such as water purification, solid state lighting, and biochemical detection now being explored. The aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride material systems are ideal for low cost, highly efficient emitters at these wavelengths, in the same manner that the InGaN LED revolutionized light emitters in the blue, green, and near-ultraviolet wavelengths. While the work to date on such devices have made use of sapphire as a substrate for epitaxial growth, silicon carbide has significant advantages including ease of growth and manufacture, reproducibility, and the potential for fewer dislocations in the material. This work follows the development of AlN and high-composition AlGaN films on SiC to a sufficient quality for emitter applications. A comprehensive examination of the AlN nucleation and buffer layers led to dislocation densities in the low 109cm-2. An extensive study of the n- and p-type doping of AlxGa 1-xN (x > 0.5) was undertaken to develop highly conductive material. The internal quantum efficiency of the quantum well region was significantly improved through modified growth conditions and precursor selection, and a device fabrication process was developed to obtain low turn-on voltages below 5 V and reliable device performance for over 100 hours of use. Careful thermal management of the devices through novel mask designs and improvement in packaging allowed for significant advances in light extraction, resulting in high-power LED emission at 280 nm. Packaged dies exhibited powers as high as 52 muW at 20 mA and 0.24 mW at 100 mA. The greatest obstacle to high external quantum efficiency in these devices is the absorbing nature SiC substrate. This has been successfully mitigated through two different techniques. First, distributed Bragg reflectors consisting of AlGaN/AlN stacks have been developed, with reflectivities greater than 80% at 275

  16. Effect of lateral dimension on the surface wrinkling of a thin film on compliant substrate induced by differential growth/swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Han, Xue; Li, Guoyang; Lu, Conghua; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2015-10-01

    Surface wrinkling in thin films on compliant substrates is of considerable interest for applications involving surface patterning, smart adhesion, liquid/cell shaping, particle assembly, design of flexible electronic devices, as well as mechanical characterization of thin film systems. When the in-plane size of the system is infinite, the critical wrinkling strain is known to be governed by the moduli ratio between the film and substrate. Here we show a surprising result that the lateral dimension of the film can play a critical role in the occurrence of surface wrinkling. The basic phenomenon was established through selective UV/Ozone (UVO) exposure of a strain-free PDMS slab via composite copper grids with different meshes, followed by treatment using mixed ethanol/glycerol solvents with different volume fractions of ethanol. To understand the physics behind the experimental observations, finite element (FE) simulations were performed to establish an analytical expression for the distribution of shear tractions at the film-substrate interface. Subsequent theoretical analysis leads to closed-form predictions for the critical growth/swelling strain for the onset of wrinkling. Our analysis reveals that the occurrence of surface wrinkling and post-wrinkling pattern evolution can be controlled by tuning the lateral size of the thin film for a given moduli ratio. These results may find broad applications in preventing surface wrinkling, creating desired surface patterns, evaluating the interfacial shear strength of a film/substrate system and designing flexible electronic devices.

  17. Carbon tetrachloride degradation: Effect of microbial growth substrate and vitamin B{sub 12} content

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, S.; Stensel, H.D.; Ferguson, J.F.

    2000-05-01

    Microbial degradation kinetics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) under reducing conditions were investigated for different cultures, fed with 1,2-propanediol, dextrose, propionalde-hyde, or acetate and nitrate, in the anaerobic step of an anaerobic/aerobic operation sequence. Methanogenesis was inhibited due to the aerobic step. CT biodegradation rates followed first-order kinetics with respect to CT concentration and biomass and were not affected by the presence of growth substrate. CT degradation rates increased linearly with higher intracellular vitamin B{sub 12} content. The culture fed 1,2-propanediol had the highest vitamin B{sub 12} content, which was 3.8, 4.7, and 16 times that of the propionaldehyde-,dextrose-, and acetate-fed cultures, respectively, and its first-order degradation rate constant was 2.8, 4.5, 6.0 times that for those cultures, respectively. No CT degradation occurred with culture liquid, suggesting that intracellular factors were responsible for CT degradation. The propanediol culture was able to sustain a constant CT degradation rate for a 16-day test period without substrate addition. Compared to a propanediol-fed culture grown only under anaerobic conditions, the propanediol culture grown under the sequential anaerobic/aerobic condition resulted in more biomass growth and a greater CT degradation rate per unit of propanediol fed, although its CT degradation rate per unit of biomass was lower.

  18. Influence of Metal Substrates on the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Zhong, Lixiang; Li, Yuanchang

    Using ab initio calculations, we systematically investigate the graphene nucleation on ten kinds of metal substrates that have been reported for the chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene. Noble metals (Cu, Ag and Au) and Co have a kinetic smallest graphene precursor, corresponding to the structural transition from linear chain to sp2 compact cluster. Ru, Rh, Ir and Pt have a energetic smallest graphene precursor, which is much larger than that in terms of kinetics. While for Ni and Pd, the carbon atoms trend to immerse inside the metals, resulting in the distinctively different growth mechanism from other metals. The different influence of metals is associated with their characterized carbon-metal and carbon-carbon coupling competition. The incorporation of five-membered rings into the sp2 compact cluster is the result of the competition between the curvature energy and the edge formation energy of graphene islands, and is suitable for the enlargement of graphene domain. And the effect of experimental conditions such as temperature, step or defects on the nucleation of graphene at different metal substrates is also discussed. This work was supported by the MOST, NSFC and Shenzhen Projects for Basic Research of China.

  19. Tilt growth of CdTe epilayers on sapphire substrates by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebe, H.; Sawada, A.; Maruyama, K.; Nishijima, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Takigawa, H.

    1991-12-01

    We studied model lattice matching in the growth direction by tilt growth and found that the ratio of the tilt angle of the epilayer (α) to the offset angle of the substrate (θ) had a maximum at α / θ = 0.73, independent of the offset angle. Experimental plots of the ratio versus the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of (333) CdTe rocking curves in double-crystal X-ray diffraction show that the ratio ranges from 0.05 to 0.6 while the FWHM varies from 1100 to 400 arc sec. This result suggests that the lattice inclination orients the lattice structure perpendicular to the CdTe-sapphire heterointerface and that the tilt angle reduces defects such as dislocations and stacking faults. Most epilayers grown on sapphire substrates with offset angles above 3° were confirmed to have a α / θ ratio below 0.2. This suggests that crystal defects may be generated by shearing stress due to large offset angles. Greater defect density lowers the ratio and degrades crystallinity.

  20. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Renshaw, Christopher K.

    2010-09-06

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barrier solar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of {eta}{sub p}=14.4{+-}0.4% and {eta}{sub p}=14.8{+-}0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-film solar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  1. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Shiu, K. T.; Zimmerman, J.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barriersolar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of η{sub p}=14.4±0.4% and η{sub p}=14.8±0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-filmsolar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  2. Short-Term Effects of Grade Retention on the Growth Rate of Woodcock-Johnson III Broad Math and Reading Scores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of grade retention in first grade on the growth of the Woodcock-Johnson broad mathematics and reading scores over three years using linear growth curve modeling on an academically at-risk sample. A large sample (n = 784) of first grade children who were at risk for retention were initially identified based on low literacy scores. Scores representing propensity for retention were constructed based on 72 variables collected in comprehensive baseline testing in first grade. We closely matched 97 pairs of retained and promoted children based on their propensity scores using optimal matching procedures. This procedure adjusted for baseline differences between the retained and promoted children. We found that grade retention decreased the growth rate of mathematical skills but had no significant effect on reading skills. In addition, several potential moderators of the effect of retention on growth of mathematical and reading skills were identified including limited English language proficiency and children's conduct problems. PMID:19083352

  3. Pretreatment of polyethylene terephthalate substrate for the growth of Ga-doped ZnO thin film.

    PubMed

    Kim, D W; Kang, J H; Lim, Y S; Lee, M H; Seo, W S; Park, H H; Seo, K H; Park, M G

    2011-02-01

    The effect of the pretreatment of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate on the growth of transparent conducting Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin film was investigated. Because of its high gas and moisture absorption and easy gas permeation, PET substrate was annealed at 100 degrees C in a vacuum chamber prior to the sputtering growth of GZO thin film for the outgassing of impurity gases. GZO thin film was deposited on the pretreated PET substrate by rf-magnetron sputtering and significantly improved electrical properties of GZO thin film was achieved. Electrical and structural characterizations of the GZO thin films were carried out by 4-point probe, Hall measurement, and scanning electron microscopy, and the effects of the pretreatment on the improved properties of GZO thin films were discussed. This result is not only useful to PET substrate, but also could be applicable to other plastic substrates which inevitably containing the moisture and impurity gases. PMID:21456250

  4. Rubrene polycrystalline films growth from vacuum deposition at various substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ku-Yen; Wang, Yan-Jun; Chen, Ko-Lun; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Shen, Ji-Lin; Chiu, Kuan-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Rubrene polycrystalline films growth from vacuum deposition (with a fixed source temperature of 300 °C) were characterized with respect to various substrate temperatures (Tsub=103-221 °C). First, the growth behavior of these as-deposited polycrystalline films is confirmed to follow an activated surface-adsorption process with an activation energy EA=0.69±0.01 eV. A comparison of EA for the growth of some other small organic molecular solid films is given. Then, the surface morphology and the temporal evolution of the grain size in these polycrystalline films with respect to Tsub are described and discussed. Furthermore, by X-ray diffraction, these rubrene crystalline grains are confirmed to have an orthorhombic structure, and the average coherent length and lattice microstrain of the crystallites deposited at high Tsub (189-221 °C) are estimated and compared. This experimental work reveals that Tsub has a strong influence on the growth rate, the surface morphology, and the structural properties of the as-deposited rubrene polycrystalline films.

  5. Preferential Crystal Growth of (100)-Oriented BiFeO3 Films on Si Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Yasui, S.; Funakubo, H.; Uchida, H.

    2011-10-01

    Bi-based perovskite-type oxide materials such as BiFeO3 (BFO) and the related compounds receive much attention and have been developed actively as important candidates for Pb-free ferroelectric / piezoelectric materials instead of toxic Pb-based perovskite oxide materials. Recently, many researches have been reported for thin films of BFO by various film-deposition techniques for actual application of semiconductive devices, microactuators, etc. In this report, we tried preferential crystal growth of BFO films on semiconductive silicon substrates using uniaxial-(100)-oriented LaNiO3 (LNO) buffer layer. BFO films were fabricated via chemical solution deposition (CSD) technique on platinized silicon wafer [(111)Pt/TiO2/(100)Si] and (100)LNO-coated platinized silicon [(100)LNO/(111)Pt/TiO2/(100)Si] substrates. XRD analysis indicated that the films fabricated on (111)Pt/TiO2/(100)Si substrate consisted of randomly-oriented BFO crystal with lower crystallinity and trace amount of the second Bi2Fe4O9 phase. On the other hand, the films on (100)LNO/(111)Pt/TiO2/(100)Si consisted of uniaxial-(100)-oriented BFO crystal with higher crystallinity. The crystallization temperature these films were 450 and 400°C, respectively. These results suggest that the BFO crystal was grown epitaxially on uniaxial oriented (100)LNO plane which also had perovskite-type crystal structure. Consequently, (100)-oriented BFO films were prepared on Si substrate successfully using (100)LNO buffer layer.

  6. [Environmental Effect of Substrate Amelioration on Lake: Effects on Phragmites communis Growth and Photosynthetic Fluorescence Characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ju-hua; Zhong, Ji-cheng; Fan, Cheng-xin; Huang, Wei; Shang, Jing-ge; Gu, Xiao-zhi

    2015-12-01

    Growth of rooted aquatic macrophytes was affected by the nature and composition of lake bottom sediments. Obviously, it has been recognized as an important ecological restoration measure by improving lake substrate and then reestablishing and restoring aquatic macrophytes in order to get rid of the environmental problem of lake. This study simulated five covering thickness to give an insight into the influence of substrate amelioration on Phragmites communis growth and photosynthetic fluorescence characteristics. The results showed that the total biomass, plant height, leaf length and leaf width of Phragmites communis under capping 5 cm were much more significant than those of capping 18 cm (P < 0.01), at the 120 d, the underground: shoot biomass ratio and fine root: underground biomass ratio were also much higher than those of other treatments (P < 0.05), which indicated that capping 18 cm treatment would significantly inhibit the growth of Phragmites communis , but the growth of control group Phragmites communis was slightly constrained by eutrophicated sediment. In addition, as the capping thickness growing, the underground: shoot biomass ratio of the plant would be reduced dramatically, in order to acquire much more nutrients from sediment for plant growing, the underground biomass of Phragmites communis would be preferentially developed, especially, the biomass of fine root. However, Photosystem II (PS II) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), quantum yield (Yield), photochemical quenching (qP), non-photochemical quenching (qN) of Phragmites communis under different treatments had no significant differences (P > 0.05), furthermore, with much greater capping thickness, the photosynthesis structure of PS II would be much easier destroyed, and PS II would be protected by increasing heat dissipating and reducing leaf photosynthetic area and leaf light-captured pigment contents. In terms of the influence of sediment amelioration by soil exchange on the growth and

  7. Alteration of architecture of MoO3 nanostructures on arbitrary substrates: growth kinetics, spectroscopic and gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illyaskutty, Navas; Sreedhar, Sreeja; Sanal Kumar, G.; Kohler, Heinz; Schwotzer, Matthias; Natzeck, Carsten; Pillai, V. P. Mahadevan

    2014-10-01

    MoO3 nanostructures have been grown in thin film form on five different substrates by RF magnetron sputtering and subsequent annealing; non-aligned nanorods, aligned nanorods, bundled nanowires, vertical nanorods and nanoslabs are formed respectively on the glass, quartz, wafer, alumina and sapphire substrates. The nanostructures formed on these substrates are characterized by AFM, SEM, GIXRD, XPS, micro-Raman, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. A detailed growth model for morphology alteration with respect to substrates has been discussed by considering various aspects such as surface roughness, lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficient, of both substrates and MoO3. The present study developed a strategy for the choice of substrates to materialize different types MoO3 nanostructures for future thin film applications. The gas sensing tests point towards using these MoO3 nanostructures as principal detection elements in gas sensors.

  8. Bioengineering Organized, Multilamellar Human Corneal Stromal Tissue by Growth Factor Supplementation on Highly Aligned Synthetic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Du, Yiqin; Mann, Mary M.; Yang, Enzhi; Funderburgh, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Recapitulating the microstructure of the native human corneal stromal tissue is believed to be a key feature in successfully engineering the corneal tissue. The stratified multilayered collagen fibril lamellae with orthogonal orientation determine the robust biomechanical properties of this tissue, and the uniform collagen fibril size and interfibrillar spacing are critical to its optical transparency. The objective of this investigation was to develop a highly organized collagen-fibril construct secreted by human corneal stromal stem cells (hCSSCs) to mimic the human corneal stromal tissue. In culture on a highly aligned fibrous substrate made from poly(ester urethane) urea, the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2, 10 ng/mL) and transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3, 0.1 ng/mL) impacted the organization and abundance of the secreted collagen fibril matrix. hCSSCs differentiated into keratocytes with significant upregulation of the typical gene markers, including KERA, B3GnT7, and CHST6. FGF-2 treatment stimulated hCSSCs to secrete collagen fibrils strongly aligned in a single direction, whereas TGF-β3 induced collagenous layers with orthogonal fibril orientation. The combination of FGF-2 and TGF-β3 induced multilayered lamellae with orthogonally oriented collagen fibrils, in a pattern mimicking the human corneal stromal tissue. The constructs were 60–70 μm thick and had an increased content of cornea-specific extracellular matrix components, including keratan sulfate, lumican, and keratocan. The approach of combining substrate cues with growth factor augmentation offers a new means to engineer well-organized, collagen-based constructs with an appropriate nanoscale structure for corneal repair and regeneration. PMID:23557404

  9. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  10. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  11. EBSD study of substrate-mediated growth of hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J.; Kidambi, P. R.; Hofmann, S.; Ducati, C.

    2014-06-01

    Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) is a promising insulating material to complement and enable graphene electronics. Given the good lattice match to graphite, graphene/h-BN heterostructures may be grown with negligible amounts of strain and defect states, resulting in high carrier mobilities approaching values for suspended graphene. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has emerged as one of the preferred routes for the synthesis of 2D materials for electronic applications. Here we report on the growth of h-BN by low pressure CVD, using borazine as a precursor. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in conjunction with topographic imaging in the scanning electron microscope are used to investigate the change in crystal structure and orientation of three metallic catalyst substrates: Co, Ni and Cu, by high temperature processing and the growth of nanoscale h-BN domains. The behaviour of the metal foils is interpreted in light of the prevalent growth models. EBSD and imaging conditions are optimized to allow efficient acquisitions for these composite and nanostructured specimens.

  12. Solid-support substrates for plant growth at a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zeoponics is only in its developmental stages at the Johnson Space Center and is defined as the cultivation of plants in zeolite substrates that contain several essential plant growth cations on their exchange sites, and have minor amounts of mineral phases and/or anion-exchange resins that supply essential plant growth anions. Zeolites are hydrated aluminosilicates of alkali and alkaline earth cations with the ability to exchange most of their constituent exchange cations as well as hydrate/dehydrate without change to their structural framework. Because zeolites have extremely high cation exchange capabilities, they are very attractive media for plant growth. It is possible to partially or fully saturate plant-essential cations on zeolites. Zeoponic systems will probably have their greatest applications at planetary bases (e.g., lunar bases). Lunar raw materials will have to be located that are suited for the synthesis of zeolites and other exchange resings. Lunar 'soil' simulants have been or are being prepared for zeolite/smectite synthesis and 'soil' dissolution studies.

  13. GaAs buffer layer technique for vertical nanowire growth on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoqing Parizi, Kokab B.; Huo, Yijie; Kang, Yangsen; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Li, Yang

    2014-02-24

    Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to III–V nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surface leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.

  14. Effect of substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam (Mactra chinensis Philippi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Zhuang; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xingzhi

    2016-05-01

    Substrate is a critical environmental factor affecting the activity of bivalves. To examine the effect of the substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam (Mactra chinensis Philippi), a series of short-term experiments were conducted using a variety of substrates with different ratios of sand to mud. The experimental group cultured without substrate showed poor survival, with all juveniles died after day 20. The juveniles cultured in mud without sand showed a lower survival rate (25.54% ± 0.40% on day 45) than those in other groups. The juveniles cultured in sand without mud, or the mixtures of sand and mud with a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, exhibited modest survival at day 45. Maximal weight gain rate (WGR), shell length growth rate (LGR), and specific growth rate (SGR) were observed when the sand concentration was 61.97%, 77.69%, and 64.64%, respectively. As the fast growth and high survival were observed when the sand to mud ratio was 1:1 (50% sand) and 2:1 (67% sand), a sand concentration of more than 50% is optimal. The optimal concentration of sand in the substrate for rearing juvenile sunray surf clams was 67% which resulted in the fastest growth and highest survival. These results can be used to developing a nursery/farming technique of improving the yield of sunray surf clams.

  15. Effect of substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuekai; Li, Zhuang; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu; Yang, Feng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xingzhi

    2016-08-01

    Substrate is a critical environmental factor affecting the activity of bivalves. To examine the effect of the substrate component on the growth and survival of juvenile sunray surf clam ( Mactra chinensis Philippi), a series of short-term experiments were conducted using a variety of substrates with different ratios of sand to mud. The experimental group cultured without substrate showed poor survival, with all juveniles died after day 20. The juveniles cultured in mud without sand showed a lower survival rate (25.54% ± 0.40% on day 45) than those in other groups. The juveniles cultured in sand without mud, or the mixtures of sand and mud with a ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively, exhibited modest survival at day 45. Maximal weight gain rate ( WGR), shell length growth rate ( LGR), and specific growth rate ( SGR) were observed when the sand concentration was 61.97%, 77.69%, and 64.64%, respectively. As the fast growth and high survival were observed when the sand to mud ratio was 1:1 (50% sand) and 2:1 (67% sand), a sand concentration of more than 50% is optimal. The optimal concentration of sand in the substrate for rearing juvenile sunray surf clams was 67% which resulted in the fastest growth and highest survival. These results can be used to developing a nursery/farming technique of improving the yield of sunray surf clams.

  16. Growth and characterization of epitaxial aluminum layers on gallium-arsenide substrates for superconducting quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Miao, G.-X.; Jaikissoon, M.; Langenberg, D.; McConkey, T. G.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Z. R.

    2016-06-01

    The quest for a universal quantum computer has renewed interest in the growth of superconducting materials on semiconductor substrates. High-quality superconducting thin films will make it possible to improve the coherence time of superconducting quantum bits (qubits), i.e., to extend the time a qubit can store the amplitude and phase of a quantum state. The electrical losses in superconducting qubits highly depend on the quality of the metal layers the qubits are made from. Here, we report on the epitaxy of single-crystal Al (011) layers on GaAs (001) substrates. Layers with 110 nm thickness were deposited by means of molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature and monitored by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed simultaneously at four azimuths. The single-crystal nature of the layers was confirmed by ex situ high-resolution x-ray diffraction. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy analysis of the sample’s surface revealed a featureless surface with root mean square roughness of 0.55 nm. A detailed in situ study allowed us to gain insight into the nucleation mechanisms of Al layers on GaAs, highlighting the importance of GaAs surface reconstruction in determining the final Al layer crystallographic orientation and quality. A highly uniform and stable GaAs (001)-(2× 4) reconstruction reproducibly led to a pure Al (011) phase, while an arsenic-rich GaAs (001)-(4× 4) reconstruction yielded polycrystalline films with an Al (111) dominant orientation. The near-atomic smoothness and single-crystal character of Al films on GaAs, in combination with the ability to trench GaAs substrates, could set a new standard for the fabrication of superconducting qubits.

  17. Encapsulation of the heteroepitaxial growth of wide band gap γ-CuCl on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, F. O.; O'Reilly, L.; Natarajan, G.; McNally, P. J.; Daniels, S.; Taylor, D. M.; William, S.; Cameron, D. C.; Bradley, A. L.; Miltra, A.

    2006-01-01

    γ-CuCl semiconductor material has been identified as a candidate material for the fabrication of blue-UV optoelectronic devices on Si substrates due to its outstanding electronic, lattice and optical properties. However, CuCl thin films oxidise completely into oxyhalides of Cu II within a few days of exposure to air. Conventional encapsulation of thin γ-CuCl by sealed glass at a deposition/curing temperature greater than 250 °C cannot be used because CuCl interacts chemically with Si substrates when heated above that temperature. In this study we have investigated the behaviour of three candidate dielectric materials for use as protective layers for the heteroepitaxial growth of γ-CuCl on Si substrates: SiO 2 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), organic polysilsesquioxane-based spin on glass material (PSSQ) and cyclo olefin copolymer (COC) thermoplastic-based material. The optical properties (UV/Vis and IR) of the capped luminescent CuCl films were studied as a function of time, up to 28 days and compared with bare uncapped films. The results clearly show the efficiency of the protective layers. Both COC and the PSSQ layer prevented CuCl film from oxidising while SiO 2 delayed the effect of oxidation. The dielectric constant of the three protective layers was evaluated at 1 MHz to be 2.3, 3.6 and 6.9 for C0C, SiO 2 and PSSQ, respectively.

  18. Phase selective growth and characterization of vanadium dioxide films on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomo; Okimura, Kunio; Hajiri, Tetsuya; Kimura, Shin-ichi; Sakai, Joe

    2013-04-28

    We report on selective growth of VO{sub 2} films with M1, M2, and intermediate T phases on silicon (Si) substrates by using inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted sputtering (ICPS) under particular conditions. The film composed of M2 phase was proved to be under strong in-plane compressive stress, which is consistent with stress-induced M2 phase. Crystalline structural phase transition (SPT) properties of these films were demonstrated together with infrared light transmittance as a measure of insulator-metal transition (IMT) against temperature. Characteristic correlations between SPT and IMT for films with M2 and intermediate-T phases were reported. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements probed an energy gap of the film in the M2 phase at around 0.4 eV from the Fermi level indicating the presence of a Mott gap.

  19. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ˜100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V-1 s-1. The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM.

  20. Simulation of Epitaxial Growth of DNA-nanoparticle Superlattices on Pre-patterned Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Saijie; Li, Ting; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    DNA self-assembly is a well-developed approach towards the construction of a great variety of nanoarchitectures. E-beam lithography is widely used for high-resolution nanoscale patterning. Recently, a new technique combining the two methods was developed to epitaxially grow DNA-mediated nanoparticle superlattices on a pre-patterned surface. Here we use multi-scale simulations to study and predict the formation and defects of the absorbed superlattice monolayer. We demonstrate that the epitaxial growth is enthalpy driven and show that the anisotropy of the DNA-mediated substrates leads to structure defects. We develop design rules to dramatically reduce defects of the attached layer. Ultimately, with the assist of our simulation, this technique will open the door for the construction of well-ordered, three-dimensional novel metamaterials. This work was supported by the the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) FA9550-11-1-0275.

  1. Removal of GaAs growth substrates from II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieker, S.; Hartmann, P. R.; Kießling, T.; Rüth, M.; Schumacher, C.; Gould, C.; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a process that enables the removal of II-VI semiconductor epilayers from their GaAs growth substrate and their subsequent transfer to arbitrary host environments. The technique combines mechanical lapping and layer selective chemical wet etching and is generally applicable to any II-VI layer stack. We demonstrate the non-invasiveness of the method by transferring an all-II-VI magnetic resonant tunneling diode. High resolution x-ray diffraction proves that the crystal integrity of the heterostructure is preserved. Transport characterization confirms that the functionality of the device is maintained and even improved, which is ascribed to completely elastic strain relaxation of the tunnel barrier layer.

  2. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrates for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shicai; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Mei; Chen, Chuansong; Zhang, Chao

    2014-04-25

    We demonstrate that continuous, uniform graphene films can be directly synthesized on quartz substrates using a two-temperature-zone chemical vapor deposition system and that their layers can be controlled by adjusting the precursor partial pressure. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirm the formation of monolayer graphene with a grain size of ∼100 nm. Hall measurements show a room-temperature carrier mobility above 1500 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). The optical transmittance and conductance of the graphene films are comparable to those of transferred metal-catalyzed graphene. The method avoids the complicated and skilled post-growth transfer process and allows the graphene to be directly incorporated into a fully functional biosensor for label-free detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This device shows a fast response time of a few milliseconds and achieves a high sensitivity to ATP molecules over a very wide range from 0.002 to 5 mM. PMID:24671026

  3. Product formation from thiophene by a mixed bacterial culture. Influence of benzene as growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Isabelle M; Mosbaek, Hans; Arvin, Erik

    2003-07-01

    The influence of benzene as a growth substrate on the cometabolic conversion of thiophene was investigated in batch systems with microorganisms originating from an creosote contaminated site. Benzene was shown to stimulate the conversion of thiophene with a first-order rate, during the initial phase of transformation. The microorganisms were able to transform thiophene in the absence of benzene at a zero-order rate. Thiophene was converted to five oxidation products, regardless of the presence of benzene. Benzene had no influence on the distribution of these oxidation products. The main oxidation product, a thiophene sulphoxide dimer, represented 78+/-12% of the transformed thiophene, while the second most important product, also a thiophene sulphoxide dimer, represented 20+/-2% of the converted thiophene. PMID:12767308

  4. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrate as saturable absorber for femtosecond solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. C.; Man, B. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Chen, C. S.; Liu, M.; Yang, C.; Gao, S. B.; Feng, D. J.; Hu, G. D.; Huang, Q. J.; Chen, X. F.; Zhang, C.

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel method for the direct metal-free growth of graphene on quartz substrate. The direct-grown graphene yields excellent nonlinear saturable absorption properties and is demonstrated to be suitable as a saturable absorber (SA) for an ultrafast solid-state laser. Nearly Fourier-limited 367 fs was obtained at a central wavelength of 1048 nm with a repetition rate of 105.7 MHz. At a pump power of 7.95 W, the average output power was 1.93 W and the highest pulse energy reached 18.3 nJ, with a peak power of 49.8 kW. Our work opens an easy route for making a reliable graphene SA with a mode-locking technique and also displays an exciting prospect in making low-cost and ultrafast lasers.

  5. Growth of CuInS{sub 2} films on crystalline substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, R.; Scheer, R.; Alt, M.; Lewerenz, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    CuInS{sub 2} films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on hydrogen terminated Si(111) substrates with 4{degree} miscut. X-ray diffraction (XRD) texture analysis reveals that CuInS{sub 2} was grown heteroepitaxially with the epitaxial relationships CuInS{sub 2}(112){parallel}Si(111) and CuInS{sub 2} [11{bar 1}]{parallel}Si<11{bar 2}>. Moreover, a substantial amount of rotational twins is observed. The crystalline order is maintained across the interface as observed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations show that nonstoichiometric preparation greatly influences the growth morphology and leads to the formation of secondary phases.

  6. Local epitaxial growth of ZrO2 on Ge (100) substrates by atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungsub; Chui, Chi On; Saraswat, Krishna C.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2003-09-01

    High-k dielectric deposition processes for gate dielectric preparation on Si surfaces usually result in the unavoidable and uncontrolled formation of a thin interfacial oxide layer. Atomic layer deposition of ˜55-Å ZrO2 film on a Ge (100) substrate using ZrCl4 and H2O at 300 °C was found to produce local epitaxial growth [(001) Ge//(001) ZrO2 and [100] Ge//[100] ZrO2] without a distinct interfacial layer, unlike the situation observed when ZrO2 is deposited using the same method on Si. Relatively large lattice mismatch (˜10%) between ZrO2 and Ge produced a high areal density of interfacial misfit dislocations. Large hysteresis (>200 mV) and high frequency dispersion were observed in capacitance-voltage measurements due to the high density of interface states. However, a low leakage current density, comparable to values obtained on Si substrates, was observed with the same capacitance density regardless of the high defect density.

  7. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed. PMID:27379305

  8. Scalable and Direct Growth of Graphene Micro Ribbons on Dielectric Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Debin; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Xie, Dan; Ren, Tian-Ling; Zhang, Yuegang

    2013-01-01

    Here we report on a scalable and direct growth of graphene micro ribbons on SiO2 dielectric substrates using a low temperature chemical vapor deposition. Due to the fast annealing at low temperature and dewetting of Ni, continuous few-layer graphene micro ribbons grow directly on bare dielectric substrates through Ni assisted catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon precursors. These high quality graphene micro ribbons exhibit low sheet resistance of ~700 Ω −2100 Ω, high on/off current ratio of ~3, and high carrier mobility of ~655 cm2V−1s−1 at room temperature, all of which have shown significant improvement over other lithography patterned CVD graphene micro ribbons. This direct approach can in principle form graphene ribbons of any arbitrary sizes and geometries. It allows for a feasible methodology towards better integration with semiconductor materials for interconnect electronics and scalable production for graphene based electronic and optoelectronic applications where the electrical gating is the key enabling factor. PMID:23443152

  9. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sanjay K.; Vankar, V. D.; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i) mirror polished, (ii) catalyst patterned, (iii) mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv) electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure) structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  10. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and succinate production from levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Bott, Michael; Woo, Han Min

    2015-10-01

    Thermochemical processing provides continuous production of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass. Levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate C6H10O5 in a bio-oil, has been used for ethanol production using engineered Escherichia coli. Here we provide the first example for succinate production from levoglucosan with Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known industrial amino acid producer. Heterologous expression of a gene encoding a sugar kinase from Lipomyces starkeyi, Gibberella zeae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed for levoglucosan conversion in C. glutamicum because the wild type was unable to utilize levoglucosan as sole carbon source. As result, expression of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK) of L. starkeyi only enabled growth with levoglucosan as sole carbon source in CgXII minimal medium by catalyzing conversion of levoglucosan to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequently, the lgk gene was expressed in an aerobic succinate producer of C. glutamicum, strain BL-1. The recombinant strain showed a higher succinate yield (0.25 g g(-1)) from 2% (w/v) levoglucosan than the reference strain BL-1 from 2% (w/v) glucose (0.19 g g(-1)), confirming that levoglucosan is an attractive carbon substrate for C. glutamicum producer strains. In summary, we demonstrated that a pyrolytic sugar could be a potential carbon source for microbial cell factories. PMID:26363018

  11. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i) mirror polished, (ii) catalyst patterned, (iii) mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv) electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure) structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  12. X-ray structure of the fourth type of archaeal tRNA splicing endonuclease: insights into the evolution of a novel three-unit composition and a unique loop involved in broad substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akira; Fujishima, Kosuke; Yamagami, Ryota; Kawamura, Takuya; Banfield, Jillian F.; Kanai, Akio; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cleavage of introns from precursor transfer RNAs (tRNAs) by tRNA splicing endonuclease (EndA) is essential for tRNA maturation in Archaea and Eukarya. In the past, archaeal EndAs were classified into three types (α′2, α4 and α2β2) according to subunit composition. Recently, we have identified a fourth type of archaeal EndA from an uncultivated archaeon Candidatus Micrarchaeum acidiphilum, referred to as ARMAN-2, which is deeply branched within Euryarchaea. The ARMAN-2 EndA forms an ε2 homodimer and has broad substrate specificity like the α2β2 type EndAs found in Crenarchaea and Nanoarchaea. However, the precise architecture of ARMAN-2 EndA was unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ε2 homodimer of ARMAN-2 EndA. The structure reveals that the ε protomer is separated into three novel units (αN, α and βC) fused by two distinct linkers, although the overall structure of ARMAN-2 EndA is similar to those of the other three types of archaeal EndAs. Structural comparison and mutational analyses reveal that an ARMAN-2 type-specific loop (ASL) is involved in the broad substrate specificity and that K161 in the ASL functions as the RNA recognition site. These findings suggest that the broad substrate specificities of ε2 and α2β2 EndAs were separately acquired through different evolutionary processes. PMID:22941657

  13. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  14. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline. PMID:24857922

  15. Zeoponic Plant Growth Substrate Development at the Johnson Space Center and Possible Use at a Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, John E.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a substrate, termed zeoponics, that will slowly release all of the essential nutrients into solution for plant growth experiments in advanced life support system testbeds. This substrate is also potentially useful in the near future on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station and could eventually be used at an outpost on Mars. Chemical analyses of the Martian soil by the Viking and Mars Pathfinder missions have indicated that several of the elements required for plant growth are available in the soil. It may be possible to use the martian soil as the bulk substrate for growing food crops, while using smaller amounts of zeoponic substrate as an amendment to rectify any nutrient deficiencies.

  16. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  17. Growth characteristics of different heart cells on novel nanopatch substrate during electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Stout, David A; Raimondo, Emilia; Marostica, Giuliano; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    During a heart attack, the heart's oxygen supply is cut off, and cardiomyocytes perish. Unfortunately, once these tissues are lost, they cannot be replaced and results in cardiovascular disease-the leading cause of deaths worldwide. Advancements in medical research have been targeted to understand and combat the death of these cardiomyocytes. For example, new research (in vitro) has demonstrated that one can expand cardiomyocyte adhesion and proliferation using polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) (50:50 (weight percent)) supplemented with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) to create a cardiovascular patch. However, the examination of other cardiovascular cell types has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this present in vitro study was to determine cell growth characteristics of three different important cardiovascular cell types (aortic endothelial, fibroblast and cardiomyocyte) onto the substrate. Cells were seeded onto different PLGA:CNF ratio composites to determine if CNF density has an effect on cell growth, both in static and electrically stimulated environments. During continuous electrical stimulation (rectangle, 2 nm, 5 V/cm, 1 Hz), cardiomyocyte cell density increased in comparison to its static counterparts after 24, 72 and 120 hours. A minor rise in Troponin I excretion in electrical stimulation compared to static conditions indicated nominal cardiomyocyte cell function during cell experiments. Endothelial and fibroblast cell growth experiments indicated the material hindered or stalled proliferation during both static and electrical stimulation experiments, thus supporting the growth of cardiomyocytes onto the dead tissue zone. Furthermore, the results specified that CNF density did have an effect on PLGA:CNF composite cytocompatibility properties with the best results coming from the 50:50 [PLGA:CNF (weight percent:weight percent)] composite. Therefore, this study provides further evidence that a conductive scaffold using nanotechnology should be

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qihui; Wang, Chengqiang; Hou, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhilin; Ye, Jiangping; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hu; Wang, Jun; Guo, Haimeng; Yu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yanan; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacillus brevis DZQ7 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from tobacco rhizosphere. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. brevis DZQ7. Several functional genes related to antimicrobial activity were identified in the genome. PMID:26294619

  19. Direct Growth of Graphene-like Films on Single Crystal Quartz Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonau, Siarhei

    Direct growth of graphene-like (GL) films (nano-crystalline graphite films) on single crystal quartz substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane and molecular beam growth (MBG) is reported. The GL films have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electrical measurements. Raman spectroscopy reveals nanocrystalline structure of the films grown at different conditions. The thinnest CVD grown GL films obtained so far have a thickness of 1.5 nm, a relatively rough surface structure and electrical conductivity in the range of 20 kO/square. Low temperature Hall-effect measurements performed on these films have revealed that the major charge carriers are holes with mobility of 40 cm2/Vs at room temperature. While inferior to graphene in terms of electronic properties, the graphene-like films possess very high chemical sensitivity. Study of MBG grown films revealed formation of a non-conductive carbon layer of low crystallinity on the initial stage of the growth process. In order to study the influence of the quartz substrate on the film formation process we performed ab initio simulation of the MBG process. For this simulation we used an atom-by-atom approach, which, we believe, is a closer approximation to the real molecular beam deposition process reported so far. The simulation showed that the initial formation of the film follows the atomic structure of the substrate. This leads to a high content of sp3 hybridized atoms at the initial stage of growth and explains formation of a non-conductive film. Additionally, we demonstrated how a non-conductive film becomes conductive with the increase of the film thickness. These results agree fairly well with the data obtained by AFM, electrical, and Raman measurements conducted on the films grown by MBG. High chemical sensitivity of GL films has been demonstrated by measuring the change in their conductance during exposure to a NO2-containing atmosphere. Sensitivity of CVD

  20. Growth of AlGaN on silicon substrates: a novel way to make back-illuminated ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2015-08-01

    AlGaN, with its tunable wide-bandgap is a good choice for the realization of ultraviolet photodetectors. AlGaN films tend to be grown on foreign substrates such as sapphire, which is the most common choice for back-illuminated devices. However, even ultraviolet opaque substrates like silicon holds promise because, silicon can be removed by chemical treatment to allow back-illumination,1 and it is a very low-cost substrate which is available in large diameters up to 300 mm. However, Implementation of silicon as the solar-blind PD substrates requires overcoming the lattice-mismatch (17%) with the AlxGa1-xN that leads to high density of dislocation and crack-initiating stress. In this talk, we report the growth of thick crack-free AlGaN films on (111) silicon substrates through the use of a substrate patterning and mask-less selective area regrowth. This technique is critical as it decouples the epilayers and the substrate and allows for crack-free growth; however, the masking also helps to reduce the dislocation density by inclining the growth direction and encouraging dislocations to annihilate. A back-illuminated p-i-n PD structure is subsequently grown on this high quality template layer. After processing and hybridizing the device we use a chemical process to selectively remove the silicon substrate. This removal has minimal effect on the device, but it removes the UV-opaque silicon and allows back-illumination of the photodetector. We report our latest results of back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors growth on silicon.

  1. Kinetics of epitaxial growth of Si and SiGe films on (1 1 0) Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, N.; Moriyama, Y.; Nakaharai, S.; Tezuka, T.; Mizuno, T.; Takagi, S.

    2004-03-01

    The epitaxial growth of Si and SiGe layers on (1 1 0) Si substrates using UHV-CVD is studied with comparing that on (1 0 0) substrates. It is revealed that, while the growth rate on (1 1 0) surfaces is quite lower than that on (1 0 0) surfaces, the Ge content of SiGe is the same between (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) surfaces, meaning that the ratio of decomposition yields of source molecules for Si and Ge are same in both the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) substrates. This characteristic is expected to lead to the epitaxial growth of SiGe films with uniform Ge content over the three-dimensional patterned structure, which can be utilized for vertical FET and Fin-FETs. Actually, it has been experimentally confirmed that the SiGe films grown over trench structures has a uniform Ge content.

  2. Effect of colloidal substrate curvature on pH-responsive polyelectrolyte brush growth.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Benjamin T; Neilson, Alexander J G; Willott, Joshua D; Webber, Grant B; Edmondson, Steve; Wanless, Erica J

    2013-05-21

    Coatings consisting of polymer brushes are an effective way to modify solid interfaces. Polymer brush-modified hybrid particles have been prepared by surface-initiated activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ARGET ATRP) of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEA) on silica particles. We have optimized the synthesis with respect to changing the reducing agent, temperature, and reaction solvent from an aqueous ethanol mixture to an aqueous methanol mixture. Our flexible electrostatically adsorbed macroinitiator approach allows for the modification of a variety of surfaces. Polybasic brushes have been grown on silica particles of different sizes, from 120 to 840 nm in diameter, as well as on wafers, and a comparison of the products has allowed the effect of surface curvature to be elucidated. An examination of the thickness of the dry brush and the aqueous hydrodynamic brush at both pH 7 and at 4 demonstrated that growth increased substantially with substrate curvature for particles with a diameter below 450 nm. This is attributed to the increasing separation between active chain ends, reducing the rate of termination. This is believed to be the first time that this effect has been demonstrated experimentally. Furthermore, we have seen that polymer brush growth on planar wafers was significantly reduced when the reaction mixture was stirred. PMID:23617419

  3. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2006-09-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The technique described herein relies on the production of the nitride precursor (N3-) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (July 2004-September 2005) focused on the initial measurement of the solubility of GaN in molten LiCl as a function of temperature, the construction of electrochemical cells, the modification of a commercial glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and on securing intellectual property for the technique.

  4. Characterization of Xylanolytic Enzymes in Clostridium cellulovorans: Expression of Xylanase Activity Dependent on Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kosugi, Akihiko; Murashima, Koichiro; Doi, Roy H.

    2001-01-01

    Xylanase activity of Clostridium cellulovorans, an anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, was characterized. Most of the activity was secreted into the growth medium when the bacterium was grown on xylan. Furthermore, when the extracellular material was separated into cellulosomal and noncellulosomal fractions, the activity was present in both fractions. Each of these fractions contained at least two major and three minor xylanase activities. In both fractions, the pattern of xylan hydrolysis products was almost identical based on thin-layer chromatography analysis. The major xylanase activities in both fractions were associated with proteins with molecular weights of about 57,000 and 47,000 according to zymogram analyses, and the minor xylanases had molecular weights ranging from 45,000 to 28,000. High α-arabinofuranosidase activity was detected exclusively in the noncellulosomal fraction. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that cellulosomes derived from xylan-, cellobiose-, and cellulose-grown cultures had different subunit compositions. Also, when xylanase activity in the cellulosomes from the xylan-grown cultures was compared with that of cellobiose- and cellulose-grown cultures, the two major xylanases were dramatically increased in the presence of xylan. These results strongly indicated that C. cellulovorans is able to regulate the expression of xylanase activity and to vary the cellulosome composition depending on the growth substrate. PMID:11717260

  5. Molten salt-based growth of bulk GaN and InN for substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure approach to growth of bulk group III-nitrides is outlined. Native III-nitride substrates for optoelectronic and high power, high frequency electronics are desirable to enhance performance and reliability of these devices; currently, these materials are available in research quantities only for GaN, and are unavailable in the case of InN. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions associated with traditional crystal growth techniques place these activities on the extreme edges of experimental physics. The novel techniques described herein rely on the production of the nitride precursor (N{sup 3-}) by chemical and/or electrochemical methods in a molten halide salt. This nitride ion is then reacted with group III metals in such a manner as to form the bulk nitride material. The work performed during the period of funding (February 2006-September 2006) focused on establishing that mass transport of GaN occurs in molten LiCl, the construction of a larger diameter electrochemical cell, the design, modification, and installation of a made-to-order glove box (required for handling very hygroscopic LiCl), and the feasibility of using room temperature molten salts to perform nitride chemistry experiments.

  6. Large interface diffusion in endotaxial growth of MnP films on GaP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nateghi, N. Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2014-10-07

    The metal organic vapor deposition of MnP films on GaP (100) substrates is shown to have a substantial endotaxial component. A study of the growth time evolution of the endotaxial depths of MnP grains reveals a diffusion-controlled growth with a relatively large diffusion coefficient of Mn in GaP. The value (2.2 ± 1.5) × 10⁻¹⁵ (cm²/s) obtained at 650 °C is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the reported Mn diffusion in bulk GaP. GaP surface mounds provide further indirect evidence that this large diffusion coefficient is concurrent with the out-diffusion of Ga atoms at the growing MnP/GaP interface. No trace of dislocations could be observed at or near this interface, which strongly suggests that Mn diffusion occurs through vacant sites generated by the difference between the crystallographic structures of MnP and GaP.

  7. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmark, H.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Holmestad, R.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi2 particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H2 flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi2 particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiHx species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi2 particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi2 particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  8. Si substrates texturing and vapor-solid-solid Si nanowhiskers growth using pure hydrogen as source gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmark, H.; Holmestad, R.; Nagayoshi, H.; Matsumoto, N.; Nishimura, S.; Terashima, K.; Marioara, C. D.; Walmsley, J. C.; Ulyashin, A.

    2009-02-15

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have been used to study silicon substrate texturing and whisker growth on Si substrates using pure hydrogen source gas in a tungsten hot filament reactor. Substrate texturing, in the nanometer to micrometer range of mono- and as-cut multicrystalline silicon, was observed after deposition of WSi{sub 2} particles that acted as a mask for subsequent hydrogen radical etching. Simultaneous Si whisker growth was observed for long residence time of the source gas and low H{sub 2} flow rate with high pressure. The whiskers formed via vapor-solid-solid growth, in which the deposited WSi{sub 2} particles acted as catalysts for a subsequent metal-induced layer exchange process well below the eutectic temperature. In this process, SiH{sub x} species, formed by substrate etching by the H radicals, diffuse through the metal particles. This leads to growth of crystalline Si whiskers via metal-induced solid-phase crystallization. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the WSi{sub 2} particles and the structure of the Si substrates in detail. It has been established that the whiskers are partly crystalline and partly amorphous, consisting of pure Si with WSi{sub 2} particles on their tips as well as sometimes being incorporated into their structure.

  9. The effects of culture media, solid substrates, and relative humidity on growth, sporulation and conidial discharge of Valdensinia heterodoxa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiguang; Shamoun, Simon F

    2006-11-01

    Valdensinia heterodoxa (Sclerotiniacae) is a potential fungal bioherbicide for control of salal (Gaultheria shallon). The effect of culture media, substrates and relative humidity (RH) on growth, sporulation and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa was determined for two isolates PFC2761 and PFC3027 in vitro. Culture media significantly affected the growth, sporulation, and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa. Of eight agar media used, colony radial growth was optimal on salal oatmeal agar and salal potato dextrose agar for isolates PFC2761 and PFC3027, respectively; whereas sporulation was at an optimum on salal oatmeal agar for both isolates. Of the eight liquid media tested, mycelial production was highest on wheat bran-salal-potato dextrose broth. Growth on solid substrates greatly stimulated sporulation and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa. Of the 12 solid substrates used, the greatest numbers of discharged conidia were observed from wheat bran and wheat bran-salal within 14d of sporulation. Sporulation on solid substrates continued for 42d. RH significantly affected the sporulation and conidial discharge for both isolates across all solid substrates tested. No conidia were produced or discharged below 93 % RH on wheat bran-salal and millet. With an increase of the RH from 93 to 97 %, sporulation and the number of discharged conidia increased significantly for both isolates on wheat bran-salal, but not on millet. PMID:17070027

  10. Effect of substrate growth temperatures on H diffusion in hydrogenated Si/Si homoepitaxial structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lin; Lee, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; David Theodore, N.; Alford, T. L.; Mayer, J. W.; Chen, Peng; Lau, S. S.

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated <100> Si/Si homoepitaxial structures, which were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at various temperatures. The substrate growth temperature can significantly affect the H diffusion behavior, with higher growth temperatures resulting in deeper H diffusion. For the Si/Si structure grown at the highest temperature of 800 °C, H trapping occurs at the epitaxial Si/Si substrate interface, which results in the formation of (100) oriented microcracks at the interface. The mechanism of H trapping and the potential application of these findings for the development of a method of transferring ultrathin Si layers are discussed.

  11. Substrate and metabolite diffusion within model medium for soft cheese in relation to growth of Penicillium camembertii.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, Mazen; Fourcade, Florence; Amrane, Abdeltif; Prigent, Yves

    2006-08-01

    Penicillium camembertii was cultivated on a jellified peptone-lactate based medium to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. Diffusional limitations due to substrate consumption were not involved in the linear growth recorded during culture, while nitrogen (peptone) limitation accounted for growth cessation. Examination of gradients confirmed that medium neutralization was the consequence of lactate consumption and ammonium production. The diffusion of the lactate assimilated from the core to the rind and that of the ammonium produced from the rind to the core was described by means of a diffusion/reaction model involving a partial linking of consumption or production to growth. The model matched experimental data throughout growth. PMID:16491357

  12. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanbo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yuwei; Wang, Baoqiang; Zhu, Zhanping; Zeng, Yiping

    2012-06-01

    We report on the growth of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We investigate the influence of the GaAs substrate surface treatment, growth temperature, and V/III flux ratios on the crystal quality and the surface morphology of GaSb epilayers. Comparing to Ga-rich GaAs surface preparation, the Sb-rich GaAs surface preparation can promote the growth of higher-quality GaSb material. It is found that the crystal quality, electrical properties, and surface morphology of the GaSb epilayers are highly dependent on the growth temperature, and Sb/Ga flux ratios. Under the optimized growth conditions, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high quality GaSb layers on GaAs substrates. The p-type nature of the unintentionally doped GaSb is studied and from the growth conditions dependence of the hole concentrations of the GaSb, we deduce that the main native acceptor in the GaSb is the Ga antisite (GaSb) defect.

  13. Substrate-biasing during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition to tailor metal-oxide thin film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Profijt, H. B.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2013-01-15

    Two substrate-biasing techniques, i.e., substrate-tuned biasing and RF biasing, have been implemented in a remote plasma configuration, enabling control of the ion energy during plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD). With both techniques, substrate bias voltages up to -200 V have been reached, which allowed for ion energies up to 272 eV. Besides the bias voltage, the ion energy and the ion flux, also the electron temperature, the electron density, and the optical emission of the plasma have been measured. The effects of substrate biasing during plasma-assisted ALD have been investigated for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and TiO{sub 2} thin films. The growth per cycle, the mass density, and the crystallinity have been investigated, and it was found that these process and material properties can be tailored using substrate biasing. Additionally, the residual stress in substrates coated with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied with the substrate bias voltage. The results reported in this article demonstrate that substrate biasing is a promising technique to tailor the material properties of thin films synthesized by plasma-assisted ALD.

  14. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  15. Substrate heater for large area YBa 2Cu 3O x films growth without electrical feedthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vase, P.; Shen, Y. Q.; Holst, T.; Hagensen, M.; Freltoft, T.

    1994-12-01

    A new substrate heater based on an optical waveguide is demonstrated. The substrate heater is capable of heating a 2″ diameter substrate to 900°C with a temperature uniformity better than +/- 2°C. The substrate heater is ideal for use in reactive atmospheres because the heating source is placed outside the deposition chamber. The substrate heater is used in a laser ablation deposition system. To overcome the problem with the very narrow deposition profile typical for laser ablation, the substrate heater may be scanned 2″ by 2″.

  16. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Hu, Y.H.; Liu, Z.G.; Wang, X.F.; Wang, M.T.

    2015-01-15

    Petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} on Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution, joined (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce{sup 3+} and controls the morphology of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} particle. PAH and Ce{sup 3+} form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO{sub 2} as prepared precursor Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO{sub 2} has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB. - Graphical abstract: Each Ce-atom connects three Cl-atoms and three allyls in three dimensional spaces. To take the plane as a reference plane which is arrayed with three Ce-atom as equilateral triangle. The triangular each vertex is Ce-atom, the triangular center place is Cl-atom, the equilateral triangle which is mutually perpendicular with Ce-triangle surface and the inclined angle is 60° is made up with three Cl-atoms. - Highlights: • Petals

  17. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. PMID:24981747

  18. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-10-05

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  19. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Yan, Yanfa; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-10-01

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  20. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process. PMID:24777097

  1. Self-catalyzed growth mechanism of InAs nanowires and growth of InAs/GaSb heterostructured nanowires on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoye; Du, Wenna; Yang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xingwang; Yang, Tao

    2015-09-01

    The growth mechanism of III-V nanowires (NWs) grown without the use of any foreign catalysts, especially the growth mechanism of InAs NWs grown on Si substrates, is still an open question and controversial. To make it clear, we in detail investigated metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of InAs NWs on Si substrates. Based on assuming the growth of InAs NWs by self-catalyzed growth mode, we firstly realized the growth of InAs/GaSb heterostructured NWs both in the axial direction by utilizing the catalysis of In droplet and in the radial direction (core/shell structure) by consuming In droplet. In particular, we found the presence of a certain amount of In atoms in the top droplet of the InAs/GaSb axially heterostructured NWs, which is the direct evidence of self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mode for the growth of InAs NWs on Si. All the results obtained here support that the InAs NWs are grown by self-catalyzed VLS mechanism. The reasons for the absence of In droplets in the growth of InAs NWs were also discussed in details.

  2. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; MacKenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Bindley, G.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is an important compound semiconductor material upon which Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) layers are deposited epitaxially to form structures that are used in high performance detectors covering a wide infrared (IR) spectral band. The epitaxial growth of high quality MCT layers presents many technical challenges and a critical determinant of material performance is the quality of the underlying bulk CZT substrate. CZT itself is a difficult material to manufacture where traditional methods of bulk growth are complex and low yielding, which constrains the supply of commercially available substrates. In this work we report on the epitaxy-ready finishing of Travelling Heather Method (THM) grown Cd0.96Zn0.04Te substrates. The THM method is well established for the growth of high quality CZT crystals used in nuclear, X-ray and spectroscopic imaging applications and in this work we demonstrate the application of this technique to the growth of IR specification CZT substrates with areas of up to 5 cm x 5 cm square. We will discuss the advantages of the THM method over alternative methods of bulk CZT growth where the high yield and material uniformity advantages of this technique will be demonstrated. Chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) of 4 cm x 4 cm CZT substrates reveals that III-V (InSb/GaSb) like levels of epitaxy-ready surface finishing may be obtained with modified process chemistries. Surface quality assessments will be made by various surface analytical and microscopy techniques from which the suitability of the material for subsequent assessment of quality by epitaxial growth will be ascertained.

  3. Epitaxial growth and orientation of AlN thin films on Si(001) substrates deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Valcheva, E.; Birch, J.; Persson, P. O. A ring .; Tungasmita, S.; Hultman, L.

    2006-12-15

    Epitaxial domain formation and textured growth in AlN thin films deposited on Si(001) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering was studied by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The films have a wurtzite type structure with a crystallographic orientation relationship to the silicon substrate of AlN(0001)(parallel sign)Si(001). The AlN film is observed to nucleate randomly on the Si surface and grows three dimensionally, forming columnar domains. The in-plane orientation reveals four domains with their a axes rotated by 15 deg. with respect to each other: AlN<1120>(parallel sign)Si[110], AlN<0110>(parallel sign)Si[110], AlN<1120>(parallel sign)Si[100], and AlN<0110>(parallel sign)Si[100] An explanation of the growth mode based on the large lattice mismatch and the topology of the substrate surface is proposed.

  4. Chloride-based SiC growth on a-axis 4H-SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Ian D.; Farkas, Ildiko; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Hassan, Jawad ul; Janzén, Erik

    2016-01-01

    SiC has, during the last few years, become increasingly important as a power-device material for high voltage applications. The thick, low-doped voltage-supporting epitaxial layer is normally grown by CVD on 4° off-cut 4H-SiC substrates at a growth rate of 5 - 10 μm / h using silane (SiH4) and propane (C3H8) or ethylene (C2H4) as precursors. The concentrations of epitaxial defects and dislocations depend to a large extent on the underlying substrate but can also be influenced by the actual epitaxial growth process. Here we will present a study on the properties of the epitaxial layers grown by a Cl-based technique on an a-axis (90° off-cut from c-direction) 4H-SiC substrate.

  5. Epitaxial growth and electrochemical transfer of graphene on Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Shinji; Saito, Yuta; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Iridium (Ir) layers epitaxially deposited on α-Al2O3 (0001) substrates was investigated. The X-ray diffraction, Raman and reflection high energy electron diffraction characterizations revealed that graphene films were epitaxially grown on Ir(111) layers, and the in-plane epitaxial relationship between graphene, Ir(111), and α-Al2O3(0001) was graphene ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩//Ir⟨ 11 2 ¯ ⟩//α-Al2O3⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩. The graphene on Ir(111) was electrochemically transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates. We also demonstrated the reuse of the Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates in multiple growth and transfer cycles.

  6. The effect of substrate temperature and growth rate on the doping efficiency of single crystal boron doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Demlow, SN; Rechenberg, R; Grotjohn, T

    2014-10-01

    The substrate growth temperature dependence of the plasma gas-phase to solid-phase doping efficiency in single crystal, boron doped diamond (BDD) deposition is investigated. Single crystal diamond (SCD) is grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPACVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) type Ib substrates. Samples are grown at substrate temperatures of 850-950 degrees C for each of five doping concentration levels, to determine the effect of the growth temperature on the doping efficiency and defect morphology. The substrate temperature during growth is shown to have a significant effect on the grown sample defect morphology, and a temperature dependence of the doping efficiency is also shown. The effect of the growth rate on the doping efficiency is discussed, and the ratio of the boron concentration in the gas phase to the flux of carbon incorporated into the solid diamond phase is shown to be a more predictive measure of the resulting boron concentration than the gas phase boron to carbon ratio that is more commonly reported. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Nitrogen Form on pH and Petunia Growth in a WholeTree Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our research was to investigate the effect of nitrogen form and proportion on peat-lite (PL) and WholeTree (WT) substrate pH and petunia growth. Chipped whole pine trees (consisting of needles, limbs, bark, wood and cones) were obtained from a commercial fuel wood chipping operation...

  8. Effect of substrate morphology slope distributions on light scattering, nc-Si:H film growth, and solar cell performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Jäger, Klaus; Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Topič, Marko; Hänni, Simon; Zhang, Chao; Heidt, Anna; Meier, Matthias; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2014-12-24

    Thin-film silicon solar cells are often deposited on textured ZnO substrates. The solar-cell performance is strongly correlated to the substrate morphology, as this morphology determines light scattering, defective-region formation, and crystalline growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H). Our objective is to gain deeper insight in these correlations using the slope distribution, rms roughness (σ(rms)) and correlation length (lc) of textured substrates. A wide range of surface morphologies was obtained by Ar plasma treatment and wet etching of textured and flat-as-deposited ZnO substrates. The σ(rms), lc and slope distribution were deduced from AFM scans. Especially, the slope distribution of substrates was represented in an efficient way that light scattering and film growth direction can be more directly estimated at the same time. We observed that besides a high σ(rms), a high slope angle is beneficial to obtain high haze and scattering of light at larger angles, resulting in higher short-circuit current density of nc-Si:H solar cells. However, a high slope angle can also promote the creation of defective regions in nc-Si:H films grown on the substrate. It is also found that the crystalline fraction of nc-Si:H solar cells has a stronger correlation with the slope distributions than with σ(rms) of substrates. In this study, we successfully correlate all these observations with the solar-cell performance by using the slope distribution of substrates. PMID:25418361

  9. Growth of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, Adam R.; Allen, Martin W.; Reeves, Roger J.

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial layers of ZnO have been grown on c-plane, (0001) sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The oxygen:zinc flux ratio was found to be crucial in obtaining a film with a smooth surface and good crystallinity. When increasing film thickness from ~80 to 220 nm we observed an increase in the streakiness of RHEED images, and XRD revealed a reduction in crystal strain and increase in crystal alignment. A film with surface roughness of 0.5 nm and a XRD rocking curve FWHM of 0.1 for the main ZnO peak (0002) was achieved by depositing a low temperature ZnO buffer layer at 450 °C and then growing for 120 minutes at 700 °C with a Zn-cell temperature of 320 °C and an oxygen partial pressure of 7e-7 Torr. We found novel structures on two samples grown outside of our ideal oxygen:zinc flux ratio. SEM images of a sample believed to have been grown in a Zn-rich environment showed flower like structures up to 150 um in diameter which appear to have formed during growth. Another sample believed to have been deposited in a Zn-deficient environment had rings approximately 1.5 um in diameter scattered on its surface.

  10. High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Osamu; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2014-11-11

    A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

  11. Growth and characterization of TiO2 nanotubes from sputtered Ti film on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappanda, Karumbaiah N.; Smith, York R.; Mohanty, Swomitra K.; Rieth, Loren W.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Misra, Mano

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis of self-organized TiO2 nanotube arrays formed by anodization of thin Ti film deposited on Si wafers by direct current (D.C.) sputtering. Organic electrolyte was used to demonstrate the growth of stable nanotubes at room temperature with voltages varying from 10 to 60 V (D.C.). The tubes were about 1.4 times longer than the thickness of the sputtered Ti film, showing little undesired dissolution of the metal in the electrolyte during anodization. By varying the thickness of the deposited Ti film, the length of the nanotubes could be controlled precisely irrespective of longer anodization time and/or anodization voltage. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the thin film nanotubes. The tubes exhibited good adhesion to the wafer and did not peel off after annealing in air at 350 °C to form anatase TiO2. With TiO2 nanotubes on planar/stable Si substrates, one can envision their integration with the current micro-fabrication technique large-scale fabrication of TiO2 nanotube-based devices.

  12. Optimization of silk films as substrate for functional corneal epithelium growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liang; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Kaplan, David L

    2016-02-01

    The corneal epithelium is the first cellular barrier to protect the cornea. Thus, functional tissue engineering of the corneal epithelium is a strategy for clinical transplantation. In this study, the optimization of silk films (SFs) as substrates for functional human corneal epithelium growth was investigated with primary human corneal epithelial cells on SFs, poly-D-lysine (PDL) coated SFs, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) modified SFs and PDL blended SFs. PDL coated SFs significantly promoted cell adhesion at early phases in comparison to the other study groups, while PDL blended SF significantly promoted cell migration in a "wound healing" model. All film modifications promoted cell proliferation and viability, and a multi-layered epithelium was achieved in 4 weeks of culture. The epithelia formed were tightly apposed and maintained an intact barrier function against rose bengal dye penetration. The results suggested that a differentiated human corneal epithelium can be established with primary corneal epithelial cells on SFs in vitro, by optimizing SF composition with PDL. PMID:25891207

  13. Characterization of nitrogen substrate limitation on Escherichia coli's growth by parameter identification tools.

    PubMed

    Rios-Lozano, M; Guerrero-Torres, V; Badillo-Corona, A; Chairez, I; Garibay-Orijel, C

    2016-07-01

    Carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (CNR) has shown to be a relevant factor in microorganisms growth and metabolites production. It is usual that this factor compromises the productivity yield of different microorganisms. However, CNR has been rarely modeled and therefore the nature of its specific influence on metabolites production has not been understood clearly. This paper describes a parametric characterization of the CNR effect on the Escherichia coli metabolism. A set of parameters was proposed to introduce a mathematical model that considers the biomass, substrate and several byproducts dynamical behavior under batch regimen and CNR influence. Identification algorithm used to calculate the parameters considers a novel least mean square strategy that formalizes the CNR influence in E. coli metabolism. This scheme produced a step-by-step method that was suitable for obtaining the set of parameters that describes the model. This method was evaluated under two scenarios: (a) using the data from a set of numerical simulations where the model was tested under the presence of artificial noises and (b) the information obtained from a set of experiments under different CNR. In both cases, a leave-one-experiment-out cross-validation study was considered to evaluate the model prediction capabilities. Feasibility of the parametric identification method was proven in both considered scenarios. PMID:27021346

  14. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Céspedes, J.; Álvarez-García, J.; Zhang, X.; Hampshire, J.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process (~700 °C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to

  15. Au-Seeded Growth of Vertical and in-Plane III–V Nanowires on Graphite Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is promising as a transparent, flexible, and possibly cost-effective substrate for nanowire-based devices. We have investigated Au-seeded III–V nanowire growth with graphite as a model substrate. The highest yield of undoped vertical nanowires was found for InAs, but we also observed vertical nanowires for the InP, GaP, and GaAs materials. The yield of vertical nanowires for GaP and GaAs was strongly improved by supplying the p-dopant DEZn before nanowire growth but not by supplying H2S or HCl. In-plane GaAs and GaP nanowire growth exhibited an unexpected behavior, where the seed particles seemingly reflected on the side facets of other nanowires. These results pave the way for vertical and in-plane hybrid graphene- nanowire devices. PMID:24592968

  16. Growth Kinetics of Microscopic Silicon Rods Grown on Silicon Substrates by the Pyrolytic Laser-Induced Chemical Vapor Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se Il; Lee, Sang Soo

    1990-01-01

    By using a cw Ar+ ion laser beam, microscopic crystalline silicon rods ≈ 102 μm in diameter and ≈ 103 μm in height have been grown on a silicon substrate by pyrolytic dissociation of SiH4. The kinetics of lateral growth of the silicon rods is derived from the time integration of the Arrhenius equation using a reasonable assumption that the temperature on the edge of the deposit saturates inversely to the substrate temperature with illumination time. For the axial growth, excluding the initial transient growth, the same result as Bäuerle and his collaborators is derived. The influences of laser power and illumination time on the deposited diameter and height are found experimentally, and it is found that the derived theory agrees well with the experimental results.

  17. The growth of low band-gap InAs on (111)B GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, Roger E.; Guido, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Growth on the (111)B orientation exhibits a number of advantageous properties as compared to the (100) during the early stages of strained-layer epitaxy. In accordance with a developing model of nucleation and growth, we have deposited thin (60 A - 2500 A), fully relaxed InAs films on (111)B GaAs substrates. Although thicker InAs films are subject to the formation of twin defects common to epitaxy on the (111)B orientation, appropriate control of the growth parameters can greatly minimize their density. Using this knowledge base, InAs films up to 2 microns in thickness with improved morphology and structural quality have been grown on (111)B GaAs substrates.

  18. The Growth of Low Band-Gap InAs on (111)B GaAs Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Growth on the (111)B orientation exhibits a number of advantageous properties as compared to the (100) during the early stages of strained-layer epitaxy. In accordance with a developing model of nucleation and growth, we have deposited thin (60 A - 2500 A), fully relaxed InAs films on (111)B GaAs substrates. Although thicker InAs films are subject to the formation of twin defects common to epitaxy on the (111)B orientation, appropriate control of the growth parameters can greatly minimize their density. Using this knowledge base, InAs films up to 2 microns in thickness with improved morphology and structural quality have been grown on (111)B GaAs substrates.

  19. Microbial enrichment of a novel growing substrate and its effect on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Trifonova, R; Postma, J; Schilder, M T; van Elsas, J D

    2009-10-01

    The quality of torrefied grass fibers (TGF) as a new potting soil ingredient was tested in a greenhouse experiment. TGF was colonized with previously selected microorganisms. Four colonization treatments were compared: (1) no inoculants, (2) the fungus Coniochaeta ligniaria F/TGF15 alone, (3) the fungus followed by inoculation with two selected bacteria, and (4) the fungus with seven selected bacteria. Cultivation-based and DNA-based methods, i.e., PCR-DGGE and BOX-PCR, were applied to assess the bacterial and fungal communities established in the TGF. Although colonization was not performed under sterile conditions, all inoculated strains were recovered from TGF up to 26 days incubation. Stable fungal and bacterial populations of 10(8) and 10(9) CFU/g TGF, respectively, were reached. As a side effect of the torrefaction process that aimed at the chemical stabilization of grass fibers, potentially phytotoxic compounds were generated. These phytotoxic compounds were cold-extracted from the fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Four of 15 target compounds that had previously been found in the extract of TGF were encountered, namely phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, benzopyran-2-one, and tetrahydro-5,6,7,7a-benzofuranone. The concentration of these compounds decreased significantly during incubation. The colonized TGF was mixed with peat (P) in a range of 100%:0%, 50%:50%, 20%:80%, and 0%:100% TGF/P (w/w), respectively, to assess suitability for plant growth. Germination of tomato seeds was assessed three times, i.e., with inoculated TGF that had been incubated for 12, 21, and 26 days. In these tests, 90-100% of the seeds germinated in 50%:50% and 20%:80% TGF/P, whereas on average only 50% of the seeds germinated in pure TGF. Germination was not improved by the microbial inoculants. However, plant fresh weight as well as leaf area of 28-day-old tomato plants were significantly increased in all treatments where C. ligniaria F/TGF15 was inoculated compared

  20. Growth of tin oxide thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paloly, Abdul Rasheed; Satheesh, M.; Martínez-Tomás, M. Carmen; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente; Rajappan Achary, Sreekumar; Bushiri, M. Junaid

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the growth of tin oxide (SnO2) thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophobic (siliconized) and hydrophilic (non-siliconized) glass substrates by using the spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of SnO2 thin films with tetragonal rutile-phase structure. Average particle size of nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 3-4 nm measured from the front view images obtained by a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FESEM), while the size of nanoparticle clusters, when present, were in the range of 11-20 nm. Surface morphology of SnO2 films grown over hydrophobic substrates revealed larger isolated particles which are less crowded compared to the highly crowded and agglomerated smaller particles in films on hydrophilic substrates. Blue shift in the band gap is observed in samples in which the average particle size is slightly larger than the exciton Bohr radius. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples grown over hydrophobic substrates exhibited an intense defect level emission and a weak near band edge emission. The enhanced visible emission from these SnO2 thin films is attributed to lattice defects formed during the film growth due to the mismatch between the film and the hydrophobic substrate surface.

  1. Drawing Circuits with Carbon Nanotubes: Scratch-Induced Graphoepitaxial Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Amorphous Silicon Oxide Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jin; Chung, Yoon Jang; Kim, Yun Ho; Han, Jeongho; Lee, Young-Kook; Kong, Ki-jeong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jeong-O

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the orientations of nanomaterials on arbitrary substrates is crucial for the development of practical applications based on such materials. The aligned epitaxial growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on specific crystallographic planes in single crystalline sapphire or quartz has been demonstrated; however, these substrates are unsuitable for large scale electronic device applications and tend to be quite expensive. Here, we report a scalable method based on graphoepitaxy for the aligned growth of SWNTs on conventional SiO2/Si substrates. The “scratches” generated by polishing were found to feature altered atomic organizations that are similar to the atomic alignments found in vicinal crystalline substrates. The linear and circular scratch lines could promote the oriented growth of SWNTs through the chemical interactions between the C atoms in SWNT and the Si adatoms in the scratches. The method presented has the potential to be used to prepare complex geometrical patterns of SWNTs by ‘drawing' circuits using SWNTs without the need for state-of-the-art equipment or complicated lithographic processes. PMID:24924480

  2. Growth of high quality InP layers in STI trenches on miscut Si (0 0 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Leys, M. R.; Nguyen, N. D.; Loo, R.; Brammertz, G.; Richard, O.; Bender, H.; Dekoster, J.; Meuris, M.; Heyns, M. M.; Caymax, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report the selective area epitaxial growth of high quality InP in shallow trench isolation (STI) structures on Si (0 0 1) substrates 6° miscut toward (1 1 1) using a thin Ge buffer layer. We studied the impact of growth rates and steric hindrance effects on the nano-twin formation at the STI side walls. It was found that a too high growth rate induces more nano-twins in the layer and results in InP crystal distortion. The STI side wall tapering angle and the substrate miscut angle induced streric hindrance between the InP facets and the STI side walls also contribute to defect formation. In the [1¯ 1 0] orientated trenches, when the STI side wall tapering angle is larger than 10°, crystal distortion was observed while the substrate miscut angle has no significant impact on the InP defect formation. In the [1¯ 1 0] trenches, both the increased STI tapering angle and the substrate miscut angle induce high density of defects. With a small STI tapering angle and a thin Ge layer, we obtained extended defect free InP in the top region of the [1 1 0] trenches with aspect ratio larger than 2.

  3. Growth behavior of hexagonal GaN on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Kai; Jiang, Ming-Chien

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the microstructure and optical properties of hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) films grown by high-temperature pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on Si(100) and Si(111) substrates. The growth mechanism, crystallization, and surface morphology of h-GaN deposition on both Si(100) and Si(111) substrates were monitored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy at various times in the growth process. Our results indicated that the h-GaN grown on Si(111) has better crystalline structure and optical properties than that on Si(100) owing to the smaller mismatch of the orientations of the Si(111) substrate and h-GaN film. On the Si(100) substrate, the growth principles of PLD and N2 plasma nitridation are the main contributions to the conversion of the cubic GaN into h-GaN. Moreover, no significant Ga–Si meltback etching was observed on the GaN/Si surface with the PLD operation temperature of 1000 °C. The TEM images also revealed that an abrupt GaN/Si interface can be obtained because of the suppression of substrate–film interfacial reactions in PLD.

  4. Low-temperature growth and direct transfer of graphene-graphitic carbon films on flexible plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Jung, Myung Hee; Choi, Kwang Yeol; Bae, Sukang; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Lee, Youngbin; Shin, Dolly; Lee, Bora; Shin, Huiyoun; Choi, Myungshin; Park, Kyuho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Byung Hee

    2012-08-31

    We demonstrate low-temperature growth and direct transfer of graphene-graphitic carbon films (G-GC) onto plastic substrates without the use of supporting materials. In this approach, G-GC films were synthesized on copper layers by using inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, enabling the growth of few-layer graphene (G) on top of Cu and the additional growth of graphitic carbon (GC) films above the graphene layer at temperatures as low as 300 °C. The patterned G-GC films are not easily damaged or detached from the polymer substrates during the wet etching and transfer process because of the van der Waals forces and π-π interactions between the films and the substrates. Raman spectroscopy reveals the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms and the crystallinity of the G-GC films. The optical transparency and sheet resistance of the G-GC films are controlled by modulating the film thickness. Strain sensors are successfully fabricated on plastic substrates, and their resistance modulation at different strains is investigated. PMID:23057073

  5. Plasma assisted growth of MoO3 films on different substrate locations relative to sublimation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rabindar K.; Saini, Sujit K.; Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we reported the role of substrate locations relative to source on the growth of MoO3 films deposited on Ni coated glass substrates using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP). According to the XRD and SEM results, substrate location is very crucial factor to control the morphology of MoO3 films and the best nanostructure growth (in terms of alignments and features) is obtained in case of Sample B (in which substrate is placed on source). The structural results point out that all films exhibit only orthorhombic phase of molybdenum oxide (i.e. α-MoO3)but the most preferential growth is recorded in Sample B due to the presence of intense peaks crossponding to only (0 k 0) family of crystal planes (k = 2, 4,6..). The Raman analysis again confirms the orthorhombic nature of MoO3 NFs and details of vibrational bondsin Sample B have been given in the present report. The MoO3 NFs show intense PL emission in wavelength range of 300-700 nm with three peaks located at 415, 490, and 523 nm in accordance to the improved crystallinity in Sample B.

  6. Effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of the red sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Senhao; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Ren, Yichao; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Three color variants of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus are recognized, the red one is highly valued in the market. When the red variant is cultured in ponds in China, its body color changes from red to celadon in 3-6 months. The effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of this animal were investigated. Juveniles of red A. japonicus were cultured in cages suspended at a range of water depths (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm). The specific growth rate of red sea cucumbers was significantly higher in animals cultured at deeper water layers compared with those grown at shallowers. Body weights were greatest for sea cucumbers cultured at a depth of 150 cm and their survival rates were highest at a depth of 200 cm. A scale to evaluate the color of red sea cucumbers ( R value) was developed using a Pantone standard color card. All stocked animals in the 9-month trial retained a red color, however the red body color was much more intense in sea cucumbers cultured at shallower depths, while animals suspended in deeper layers became pale. In a separate trial, A. japonicus were cultured in suspended cages with seven different colored substrates. Substrate color had a significant effect on the growth and body-color of red A. japonicus. The yield were greatest for A. japonicus cultured on a yellow substrate, followed by green > white > orange > red > black and blue. All sea cucumbers in the 7-month trial retained a red color, although the red was most intense (highest R value) in animals cultured on a blue substrate and pale (lowest R value) for animals cultured on a green substrate.

  7. Graphene growth on a Pt(111) substrate by surface segregation and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Hua; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Kitahara, Masayo; Xu, Ming-Sheng; Miyamoto, Satoru; Fujita, Daisuke

    2012-02-01

    We report on the fabrication of a sizable graphene sheet on a carbon-doped Pt(111) substrate through surface segregation and precipitation. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveals that the graphene covered more than 98% of the substrate surface. Our graphene consists of single-layer graphene across the substrate with fractions of several micrometer wide bi- and tri-layer graphene islands. We also show that the number of graphene layers can be precisely determined by analyzing AES data. While Raman spectroscopy is usually used to study graphene on SiO2, we show that AES is a powerful tool to characterize graphene grown on metal substrates.

  8. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Jarrett A; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W

    2015-01-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3. PMID:26030835

  9. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Jarrett A.; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3. PMID:26030835

  10. Ridge InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well selective growth in nanoscale trenches on Si (001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhou, X.; Li, M.; Kong, X.; Mi, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, W.; Pan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of InGaAs/InP multi-quantum-well in nanoscale V-grooved trenches on Si (001) substrate was studied using the aspect ratio trapping method. A high quality GaAs/InP buffer layer with two convex {111} B facets was selectively grown to promote the highly uniform, single-crystal ridge InP/InGaAs multi-quantum-well structure growth. Material quality was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and room temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements. This approach shows great promise for the fabrication of photonics devices and nanolasers on Si substrate.

  11. HVPE-GaN growth on GaN-based advanced substrates by Smart CutTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwinska, Malgorzata; Amilusik, Mikolaj; Fijalkowski, Michal; Sochacki, Tomasz; Lucznik, Boleslaw; Grzanka, Ewa; Litwin-Staszewska, Elzbieta; Nowakowska-Siwinska, Anna; Grzegory, Izabella; Guiot, Eric; Caulmilone, Raphael; Seiss, Martin; Mrotzek, Tobias; Bockowski, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Advanced Substrates consist of a 200-nm-thick GaN layer bonded to a handler wafer. The thin layer is separated from source material by Smart CutTM technology. GaN on Sapphire Advanced Substrates were used as seeds in HVPE-GaN growth. Unintentionally doped and silicon-doped GaN layers were crystallized. Free-standing HVPE-GaN was characterized by X-ray diffraction, defect selective etching, photo-etching, Hall method, Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results were compared to HVPE-GaN grown on standard MOCVD-GaN/sapphire templates.

  12. Chaperonin CCT-Mediated AIB1 Folding Promotes the Growth of ERα-Positive Breast Cancer Cells on Hard Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Ze; Qiu, Juhui; Zhang, Lingling; Luo, Xiangdong; Jang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Clinical observations have revealed a strong association between estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive tumors and the development of bone metastases, however, the mechanism underlying this association remains unknown. We cultured MCF-7 (ERα-positive) on different rigidity substrates. Compared with cells grown on more rigid substrates (100 kPa), cells grown on soft substrates (10 kPa) exhibited reduced spreading ability, a lower ratio of cells in the S and G2/M cell cycle phases, and a decreased proliferation rate. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids (SILAC), we further compared the whole proteome of MCF-7 cells grown on substrates of different rigidity (10 and 100 kPa), and found that the expression of eight members of chaperonin CCT increased by at least 2-fold in the harder substrate. CCT folding activity was increased in the hard substrate compared with the soft substrates. Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), was identified in CCT immunoprecipitates. CCT folding ability of AIB1 increased on 100-kPa substrate compared with 10- and 30-kPa substrates. Moreover, using mammalian two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assays, we found that the polyglutamine repeat sequence of the AIB1 protein was essential for interaction between CCTζ and AIB1. CCTζ-mediated AIB1 folding affects the cell area spreading, growth rate, and cell cycle. The expressions of the c-myc, cyclin D1, and PgR genes were higher on hard substrates than on soft substrate in both MCF-7 and T47D cells. ERα and AIB1 could up-regulate the mRNA and protein expression levels of the c-myc, cyclin D1, and PgR genes, and that 17 β-estradiol could enhance this effects. Conversely, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, could inhibit these effects. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that some ERα-positive breast cancer cells preferentially grow on more rigid substrates. CCT-mediated AIB1 folding appears to be involved in the rigidity response of breast cancer cells, which provides novel insight into the

  13. Growth, nucleation, and electrical properties of molecular beam epitaxially grown, As-doped Ge on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, P.; Yacobi, B.G.; Asher, S.E.; Jones, K.M.; Hafich, M.J.; Robinson, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    Epitaxial Ge is grown on (100)Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The effect of various MBE growth conditions on both the nucleation and morphology of Ge grown on Si is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). These studies indicate that, at the substrate temperatures examined (300--600 /sup 0/C), heteroepitaxy of Ge on Si favors three-dimensional growth, which is enhanced by both higher growth temperatures and substrate preparation techniques that leave residual surface contamination. Heavily doped n/sup +/ Ge layers are obtained using an elemental As source. The electrical properties of these films are evaluated by Hall--van der Pauw measurements. Growth temperatures of 250 /sup 0/C and optimum As:Ge flux ratios yield electron concentrations as high as 2.5 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Hall effect data show that for As concentrations which exceed this optimum level, a decrease in both the electron concentration and drift mobility is observed, indicating the presence of electrically inactive As.

  14. Topotaxial growth of α-Fe2O3 nanowires on iron substrate in thermal annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Srivastava, A. K.; Babu, Mahendra; Rai, Sanjay; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    A detail cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of as-grown α-Fe2O3 nanowire sample, synthesized on iron substrate by thermal annealing method, was carried out to understand the mechanism of growth in this system. Iron undergoes sequential oxidation to form a layered structure of Fe/FeO/Fe3O4/α-Fe2O3. α-Fe2O3 nanowires grow on to the top of α-Fe2O3 layer. It was found that subsequent oxide layers grow topotaxially on the grains of iron, which results in a direct orientation relationship between the α-Fe2O3 nanowire and the parent grain of iron. The results also showed that the grains of α-Fe2O3 layer, which were uniquely oriented in [110] direction, undergo highly anisotropic growth to form the nanowire. This anisotropic growth occurs at a twin interface, given by (-11-1), in the α-Fe2O3 layer. It was concluded that the growth at twin interface could be the main driving factor for such anisotropic growth. These observations are not only helpful in understanding the growth mechanism of α-Fe2O3 nanowires, but it also demonstrates a way of patterning the nanowires by controlling the texture of iron substrate.

  15. Low-temperature GaN growth on silicon substrates by single gas-source epitaxy and photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.A.; Tolle, J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Roucka, R.; Ritter, Cole; Kouvetakis, J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    2005-08-15

    We report a unique low-temperature growth method for epitaxial GaN on Si(111) substrates via a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) buffer layer. The method utilizes the decomposition of a single gas-source precursor (D{sub 2}GaN{sub 3}){sub 3} on the substrate surface to form GaN. The film growth process is further promoted by irradiation of ultraviolet light to enhance the growth rate and ordering of the film. The best epitaxial film quality is achieved at a growth temperature of 550 deg. C with a growth rate of 3 nm/min. The films exhibit intense photoluminescence emission at 10 K with a single peak at 3.48 eV, indicative of band-edge emission for a single-phase hexagonal GaN film. The growth process achieved in this study is compatible with low Si processing temperatures and also enables direct epitaxy of GaN on ZrB{sub 2} in contrast to conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition based approaches.

  16. The use of substrate materials and topography to modify growth patterns and rates of differentiation of muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, L M; Nock, V; Evans, J J; Alkaisi, M M

    2016-07-01

    Cells are cultured on platforms made of a variety of materials with selected topographies during studies of cell response and behavior. Understanding the effects of substrates is essential for such applications as developing effective interfaces between body cells and implanted materials and devices. In this study, the effects of substrate surface properties on cell differentiation and alignment on C2C12 myoblasts cultured on conventional or fabricated polymeric cell culture substrates were investigated. Comparisons were made between cells cultured on tissue culture grade polystyrene (TCPS), glass, Permanox, and cured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry of cell markers was used to analyse the extent of differentiation. Alignment and guidance of cell growth and spread were studied using patterned platforms. Gratings were made on polystyrene (PS) and PDMS and differentiation was facilitated after 5 days by media exchange. Differences in cell morphology were observed between cells cultured on TCPS and PDMS substrates. Fully differentiated myotubes were observed in highest numbers on TCPS substrates and were non-detectable on PDMS substrates in the time frame of 144 h. Muscle cell alignment and their differentiation followed along the grating patterns on PS and elongated along the pattern length. On the other hand, on PDMS cells formed sheets of tissue and peeled from the substrate. We have revealed the potential for the combinations of surface materials and topography on cell behavior to induce accelerated differentiation and coordinated alignment. The results demonstrate that culture environment can be designed or engineered to modify or regulate muscle cell functions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1638-1645, 2016. PMID:26916910

  17. Fertilizer effects on annual growth in sweetgum, hickory, and cedar substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expanded perlite has long been used as an amendment in container mediums because of its ability to add air space to container substrates without adding to bulk density or affecting substrate pH and EC. However, due to increased restrictions on the harvesting of peat, as well as fluctuations in fuel...

  18. Growth of microcrystalline Si:H and (Si,Ge):H on polyamide substrates using ECR deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, K.; Dalal, V.L.; Chumanov, G.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report on the growth of good quality micro-crystalline Si:H and (Si,Ge):H films on polyamide substrates using a remote plasma ECR deposition technique. They find that under conditions that lead to significant ion bombardment of the substrate, the films are microcrystalline even at relatively low deposition temperatures of about 250 C. A critical factor in inducing microcrystallinity is the presence of a metal coating layer on polyamide. In the absence of such a coating, the films are amorphous, probably because the uncoated polyamide substrate charges up and prevents any further ion bombardment. The quality of the films was measured using both Raman spectroscopy and by studying the activation energy and low-energy absorption coefficient of the films. The sub-gap absorption coefficient was found to follow the crystalline Si absorption curve quite well. The addition of germane to the gas phase shifted the absorption curve to smaller energies.

  19. Direct MOCVD epitaxy of GaAsP on SiGe virtual substrate without growth of SiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Cong; Kohen, David A.; Made, Riko I.; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Kim, Taewan; Milakovich, Tim; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Michel, Jurgen

    2016-05-01

    GaAsP has important applications for solar cells and light-emitting diodes on silicon substrates. Here we demonstrate that GaAsP can be directly grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on previously-prepared lattice-matched SiGe virtual substrates, without prior in-situ growth of SiGe. By optimizing the growth pressure and AsH3 pre-exposure time, the surface morphology of GaAsP is improved and the pinhole densities are reduced by two orders of magnitude from 2.4×107/cm2 to 1.2×105/cm2. The physics is suggested to be an optimization between complete As-termination and AsH3 etching effect of SiGe surface.

  20. Growth morphology of MnAs epilayers on GaAs(1 1 1)-B substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etgens, V. H.; Eddrief, M.; Demaille, D.; Zheng, Y. L.; Ouerghi, A.

    2002-04-01

    MnAs epilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(1 1 1)B substrates. The morphology of epilayers has been studied by coupling several in situ techniques. Two distinct growth regimes were distinguished as a function of the substrate temperature. For the growth at 320°C, the system shows an intriguing mechanism of relaxation that produces MnAs isolated islands (the so-called "blocks") with constant height. The explanation for this mechanism associates the large mobility of atoms at this temperature with the strain due to the important misfit. At lower temperature (200°C) the surface mobility is greatly reduced which results in a more homogeneous film.

  1. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of HgCdTe on Large-Area Si and CdZnTe Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M.; Peterson, J. M.; Vang, T.; Franklin, J. A.; Vilela, M. F.; Olsson, K.; Patten, E. A.; Radford, W. A.; Bangs, J. W.; Melkonian, L.; Smith, E. P. G.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Johnson, S. M.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents the status of HgCdTe growth on large-area Si and CdZnTe substrates at Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS). The different technological tools that were used to scale up the growth from 4 inch to 6 inch diameter on Si and from 4 cm × 4 cm to 8 cm × 8 cm on CdZnTe without sacrificing the quality of the layers are described. Extremely high compositional uniformity and low macrodefect density were achieved for single- and two-color HgCdTe layers on both Si and CdZnTe substrates. Finally, a few examples of detector and focal-plane array results are included to highlight the importance of high compositional uniformity and uniformly low macrodefect density of the epitaxial layers in obtaining high operability and low cluster outages in single- and two-color focal-plane arrays (FPAs).

  2. Heteroepitaxial growth of nonpolar Cu-doped ZnO thin film on MnS-buffered (100) Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tatsuru; Nguyen, Nam; Nagata, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Ishibashi, Keiji; Suzuki, Setsu; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2015-06-01

    The preparation of nonpolar ZnO and Cu-doped ZnO thin films on Si substrates was studied for the application to the fabrication of green-light-emitting diodes. The use of rocksalt MnS and wurtzite AlN as buffer layers is a key technology for achieving the heteroepitaxial growth of nonpolar ZnO thin film on a (100) Si substrate. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements revealed that deposition under a high oxygen partial pressure (∼1 Torr) can enhance the nonpolar crystallization of undoped ZnO, and can simultaneously suppress the formation of defects such as oxygen vacancies. These techniques can be also applied to the growth of Cu-doped ZnO. A room-temperature photoluminescence study revealed that nonpolar [11\\bar{2}0]-oriented Cu-doped ZnO film exhibits enhanced green emission owing to the doped Cu ions.

  3. Direct Growth and Controlled Coalescence of Thick AlN Template on Micro-circle Patterned Si Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Binh Tinh; Hirayama, Hideki; Maeda, Noritoshi; Jo, Masafumi; Toyoda, Shiro; Kamata, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    High-density micro-circle patterned Si substrates were successfully fabricated for the direct overgrowth of thick AlN templates by using NH3 pulsed-flow multilayer AlN growth and epitaxial lateral overgrowth techniques. The experimental results show that an 8-μm-thick AlN template was grown at a very high growth rate on the substrates. The AlN template had full widths at half maximum of 0.23° and 0.37° for the (002) and (102) reflection planes in X-ray diffraction rocking curves. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the roughness of the surface was low (3.5 nm) and the dislocation density was very low (1.5 × 108 cm−2 (screw), 3.7 × 108 (edge) cm−2). PMID:26439169

  4. Growth of nonpolar ZnO Films on (100) β-LiGaO2 substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Yu; Chen, Chenlong; Chang, Liuwen; Chou, Mitch M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Nonpolar m-plane (11¯00) ZnO epitaxial films were grown on (100) β-LiGaO2 (LGO) substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The dependence of growth characteristics on the growth temperatures was investigated. The surface morphologies of ZnO films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the structural properties characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) indicated that the ZnO epilayers were grown in the nonpolar [11¯00] orientation. Detailed structural characterization and defect analysis of nonpolar ZnO epilayer on β-LiGaO2 substrate were studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Optical properties of m-plane ZnO films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence analyses.

  5. Influence of substrate surface defects on the homoepitaxial growth of GaN (0001) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun; Liu, Jianping; Ikeda, Masao; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Zeng, Chang; Yang, Hui

    2015-04-01

    Surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN (0001) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy was studied. Selective growth was observed on the homoepitaxial GaN layer grown on as-received GaN substrate and was attributed to the existence of substrate surface defects. The steps were pinned by defects and meandered. Due to the pinning effect, the step pattern developed to a wavy surface with a strip-like feature along the [ 11 2 bar 0] direction during the subsequent growth of a thick n-GaN layer. Because of the surface undulations, the emission of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on the n-GaN layer was inhomogeneous. The surface defects on GaN substrate could be removed by dry etching and the homoepitaxial layer on the etched substrate showed a smooth morphology and straight atomic steps. As a result, the emission of the InGaN/GaN MQWs became homogeneous.

  6. Selective-area growth of GaN on non- and semi-polar bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shunsuke; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Enatsu, Yuuki; Nagao, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We carried out the selective-area growth of GaN and fabricated InGaN/GaN MQWs on non- and semi-polar bulk GaN substrates by MOVPE. The differences in the GaN structures and the In incorporation of InGaN/GaN MQWs grown on non- and semi-polar GaN substrates were investigated. In the case of selective-area growth, different GaN structures were obtained on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN, (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) GaN, and (10\\bar{1}0) GaN substrates. A repeating pattern of \\{ 1\\bar{1}01\\} and \\{ 1\\bar{1}0\\bar{1}\\} facets appeared on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN. Then, we fabricated InGaN/GaN MQWs on the facet structures on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN. The emission properties characterized by cathodoluminescence were different for \\{ 1\\bar{1}01\\} and \\{ 1\\bar{1}0\\bar{1}\\} facets. On the other hand, for InGaN/GaN MQWs on non- and semi-polar GaN substrates, steps along the a-axis were observed by AFM. In particular on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN, undulations and undulation bunching appeared. Photoluminescence characterization indicated that In incorporation increased with the off-angle from the m-plane and also depended on the polarity.

  7. Effect of Fe coating of nucleation sites on epitaxial growth of Fe oxide nanocrystals on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of Fe coating on the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 nanocrystals (NCs) over Fe-coated Ge epitaxial nuclei on Si(111). To completely cover Ge nuclei with Fe, some amount of Fe (>8 monolayers) must be deposited. Such covering is a key to epitaxial growth because an Fe coating layer prevents the oxidation of Ge surfaces during Fe3O4 formation, resulting in the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on them. This study demonstrates that an appropriate Fe coating of nucleation sites leads to the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 NCs on Si substrates, indicating the realization of environmentally friendly and low-cost Fe3O4 NCs as the resistance random access memory material.

  8. Growth and characterization of Czochralski-grown n and p-type GaAs for space solar cell substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in LEC (liquid encapsulated Czochralski) crystal growth techniques for producing high-quality, 3-inch-diameter, n- and p-type GaAs crystals suitable for solar cell applications is described. The LEC crystals with low dislocation densities and background impurities, high electrical mobilities, good dopant uniformity, and long diffusion lengths were reproducibly grown through control of the material synthesis, growth and doping conditions. The capability for producing these large-area, high-quality substrates should positively impact the manufacturability of highly efficiency, low cost, radiation-hard GaAs solar cells.

  9. Tellurium-Assisted Epitaxial Growth of Large-Area, Highly Crystalline ReS2 Atomic Layers on Mica Substrate.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fangfang; Wang, Cong; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Kaiqiang; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Qingliang; Liang, Xing; Zhang, Zhongyue; Liu, Shengzhong; Lei, Zhibin; Liu, Zonghuai; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic 2D layered material rhenium disulfide (ReS2 ) with high crystal quality and uniform monolayer thickness is synthesized by using tellurium-assisted epitaxial growth on mica substrate. Benefit from the lower eutectic temperature of rhenium-tellurium binary eutectic, ReS2 can grow from rhenium (melting point at 3180 °C) and sulfur precursors in the temperature range of 460-900 °C with high efficiency. PMID:27121002

  10. Characterization of a variety of standard collagen substrates: ultrastructure, uniformity, and capacity to bind and promote growth of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, P.L.; Partlow, L.M.; Stensaas, L.J.; Moatamed, F.

    1981-06-01

    Collagen substrates were characterized after preparation by the four methods most commonly used for tissue culture (saline precipitation, exposure to ammonium hydroxide vapor, exposure to ultraviolet light, and air drying). Although roughly equivalent percentages of collagen were precipitated by each technique (87 to 97%), marked differences were found in surface uniformity and ultrastructure. Substrates were quite uniform if precipitated by exposure to ammonium hydroxide or ultraviolet light, of intermediate uniformity if saline precipitated, and not at all uniform if air dried. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that (a) ammonium hydroxide and saline precipitation primarily resulted in formation of collagen fibrils, (b) air drying produced a small number of fibrils plus a large amount of amorphous material, and (c) exposure to ultraviolet light only resulted in the formation of globular, nonfibrillar collagen aggregates. The capacity of collagen substrates to bind and grow neurons differed markedly with the method of preparation and the amount of collagen plated per unit area. Quantifications of binding and growth of both cerebral and sympathetic neurons revealed that these are separate measures of the biocompatibility of a surface and that growth was uniformly inferior on globular collagen that had been precipitated by ultraviolet light. Long-term (greater than or equal to 2 wk) growth of sympathetic neurons was optimal on thick beds of saline-precipitated collagen, whereas short-term growth was best on thin layers of either saline or ammonium hydroxide-precipitated collagen. Cerebral neurons bound and grew optimally on thick collagen beds after both short- and long-term culture. In addition, cerebral neurons were found to be more dependent on the method of precipitation of the thin collagen substrates than were sympathetic neurons.

  11. Growth and characterization of semi-polar (11-22) GaN on patterned (113) Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Yu, X.; Gong, Y.; Hou, Y. N.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, T.

    2015-06-01

    Patterned (113) Si substrates have been fabricated for the growth of (11-22) semi-polar GaN, which completely eliminates one of the great issues in the growth of semi-polar GaN on silicon substrates, ‘Ga melting-back’. Furthermore, unlike any other mask patterning approaches which normally lead to parallel grooves along a particular orientation, our approach is to form periodic square window patterns. As a result, crack-free semi-polar (11-22) GaN with a significant improvement in crystal quality has been achieved, in particular, basal stacking faults (BSFs) have been significantly reduced. The mechanism for the defect suppression has been investigated based on detailed transmission electron microscopy measurements. It has been found that the BSFs can be impeded effectively at an early growth stage due to the priority growth along the <0001> direction. The additional <1-100> lateral growth above the masks results in a further reduction in dislocation density. The significant reduction in BSFs has been confirmed by low temperature photoluminescence measurements.

  12. Investigation on growth behavior of CNTs synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system on Fe catalyzed substrate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bum Ho; Kim, Won Jae; Kim, Young Baek; Lee, Jong Ho; Park, Jong Woon; Kim, Woo Sam; Shin, Dong Chan

    2008-10-01

    We have studied growth behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on iron (Fe) catalyzed substrate using newly developed atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) system. To investigate the improved growth performance with simple equipment and process on large scale, a new AP-PECVD system containing different concept on downstream gas was designed and manufactured. As a catalyst, either sputtered or evaporated Fe thin film on SiO2/Si substrate was used and acetylene gas was used as a carbon source. We observed growth behavior of CNTs such as height, rate and density were strongly affected by plasma power. The maximum height of 427 microm and 267 microm was synthesized under RF plasma power of 30 W for 30 min and 40 W for 3 min, respectively. The growth rate dramatically increased to 6.27 times as plasma power increased from 30 to 40 W which opens the possibility the mass production of CNTs. By SEM and TEM observation, it was verified the grown CNTs was consists of mixture of single-wall and multi-wall CNTs. The graphitization ratio was measured to be 0.93, indicating that the graphitized CNTs forest was formed and relatively high purity of CNTs was synthesized, being useful for nano-composite materials to reinforce the strength. From our experiments, we can observe that the height and growth rate of CNTs is strong function of plasma power. PMID:19198378

  13. Low temperature growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates for optical, photoluminescence and wettability applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga Prasad, Muvva; Pasha Shaik, Ummar; Madhurima, V.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.

    2016-08-01

    The growth of ZnO nanostructures on flexible polystyrene substrates by a simple vacuum thermal evaporation process is reported. The ZnO films are deposited on polystyrene surfaces of 6 μm thickness which are initially anchored on glass substrates. The as-deposited films are annealed at temperatures up to 180 °C for 6–24 h after which the polystyrene is lifted off from the glass substrates to yield nanostructured films on a flexible substrate. At 180 °C there is transformation of the partially oxidized as-deposited films into nearly stoichiometric ZnO. This is accompanied by the formation of nanostructures such as nanorods, nanotubes and nanodoughnuts. The films, which were 50–200 nm in thickness, are polycrystalline in nature and also exhibit Zn/ZnO core–shell structures under favorable conditions. The nanostructures exhibit transmission greater than 80% in the visible and near infrared regions and band gaps of the order of 4 eV. The films exhibit strong blue photoluminescence and the peak position as well as intensity of emission can be tuned by varying thickness and annealing conditions. To demonstrate the flexibility, the ZnO coated polystyrene substrates were wrapped around a LED to show UV blocking property. Wettability studies indicate that films are hydrophobic with water contact angles between 92°–95°.

  14. Mycelium growth kinetics and optimal temperature conditions for the cultivation of edible mushroom species on lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Zervakis, G; Philippoussis, A; Ioannidou, S; Diamantopoulou, P

    2001-01-01

    The influence of environmental parameters on mycelial linear growth of Pleurotus ostreatus, P. eryngii, P. pulmonarius, Agrocybe aegerita, Lentinula edodes, Volvariella volvacea and Auricularia auricula-judae was determined in two different nutrient media in a wide range of temperature, forming the basis for the assessment of their temperature optima. V. volvacea grew faster at 35 degrees C, P. eryngii at 25 degrees C, P. ostreatus and P. pulmonarius at 30 degrees C, A. aegerita at 25 or 30 degrees C and A. auricula-judae at 20 or 25 degrees C depending on the nutrient medium used and L. edodes at 20 or 30 degrees C depending on the strain examined. The mycelium extension rates were evaluated on seven mushroom cultivation substrates: wheat straw, cotton gin-trash, peanut shells, poplar sawdust, oak sawdust, corn cobs and olive press-cake. The mycelium extension rates (linear growth and colonization rates) were determined by the 'race-tube' technique, and were found to be the highest on cotton gin-trash, peanut shells and poplar sawdust for Pleurotus spp. and A. aegerita. Wheat straw, peanut shells and particularly cotton gin-trash supported fast growth of V. volvacea, whereas wheat straw was the most suitable substrate for L. edodes and A. auricula-judae. Supplemented oak sawdust and olive press-cake were poor substrates for most species examined, while almost all strains performed adequately on corn cobs. PMID:11702409

  15. Growth optimization and characterization of GaN epilayers on multifaceted (111) surfaces etched on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah-Antwi, KwaDwo Konadu Chua, Soo Jin; Soh, Chew Beng; Liu, Hongfei

    2015-11-15

    The four nearest Si(111) multifaceted sidewalls were exposed inside an array of 3 μm-wide square holes patterned on an Si(100) substrate, and this patterned Si(100) substrate was used as a substrate for the deposition of a gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer. Subsequently the effect that the growth pressure, the etched-hole profiles, and the etched-hole arrangement had upon the quality of the as-grown GaN was investigated. The coalescence of the as-grown GaN epilayer on the exposed Si(111) facets was observed to be enhanced with reduced growth pressure from 120 to 90 Torr. A larger Si(001) plane area at the bottom of the etched holes resulted in bidirectional GaN domains, which resulted in poor material quality. The bidirectional GaN domains were observed as two sets of six peaks via a high-resolution x-ray diffraction phi scan of the GaN(10-11) reflection. It was also shown that a triangular array of etched holes was more desirable than square arrays of etched holes for the growth high-quality and continuous GaN films.

  16. Growth of coincident site lattice matched semiconductor layers and devices on crystalline substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J

    2013-08-13

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The method further includes growing a crystalline semiconductor layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy, without any buffer layer between the crystalline semiconductor layer and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The crystalline semiconductor layer will be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the substrate lattice parameter (a). The lattice parameter (a') maybe related to the lattice parameter (a) by a scaling factor derived from a geometric relationship between the respective crystal lattices.

  17. Growth and properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions on soda lime glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, R.G.; Ramanathan, K.; Keyes, B.M.; Moutinho, H.R. )

    1994-06-30

    Polycrystalline thin films of CdTe grown on glass/SnO[sub 2]/CdS substrates are studied using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and time resolved photoluminescence decay techniques. CdS films were deposited by chemical solution. CdTe films were grown by close-spaced sublimation at substrate temperatures between 475--625 [degree]C. CdTe thin films deposited at temperatures higher than 525 [degree]C show preferential orientation in the [l angle]111[r angle] direction. The Grain size of the films increases with substrate temperature and the films are faceted for all the temperatures. The PL decay constant increases with substrate temperature up to 575 [degree]C for as-deposited films on soda-lime substrates. Films on borosilicate substrates show an increase up to the highest temperature used (625 [degree]C). There is systematic increase in the PL decay constant after CdCl[sub 2] heat treatment, and the range of values is 1--1.5 nsec for soda-lime samples and 1--2 nsec for borosilicate samples.

  18. The extent of grain yield and plant growth enhancement by plant growth-promoting broad-spectrum Streptomyces sp. in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam; Srinivas, Vadlamudi; Alekhya, Gottumukkala; Prakash, Bandikinda; Kudapa, Himabindu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and molecular responses of five strains of Streptomyces sp. (CAI-17, CAI-68, CAI-78, KAI-26 and KAI-27), with their proven potential for charcoal rot disease control in sorghum and plant growth-promotion (PGP) in sorghum and rice, were studied to understand the mechanisms causing the beneficial effects. In this investigation, those five strains were evaluated for their PGP capabilities in chickpea in the 2012-13 and 2013-14 post-rainy seasons. All of the Streptomyces sp. strains exhibited enhanced nodule number, nodule weight, root weight and shoot weight at 30 days after sowing (DAS) and pod number, pod weight, leaf area, leaf weight and stem weight at 60 DAS in both seasons over the un-inoculated control. At crop maturity, the Streptomyces strains had enhanced stover yield, grain yield, total dry matter and seed number plant(-1) in both seasons over the un-inoculated control. In the rhizosphere, the Streptomyces sp. also significantly enhanced microbial biomass carbon, dehydrogenase activity, total nitrogen, available phosphorous and organic carbon in both seasons over the un-inoculated control. Of the five strains of Streptomyces sp., CAI-17, CAI-68 and CAI-78 were superior to KAI-26 and KAI-27 in terms of their effects on root and shoot development, nodule formation and crop productivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs had revealed the success in colonization of the chickpea roots by all five strains. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of selected PGP genes of actinomycetes revealed the selective up-regulation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-related and siderophore-related genes by CAI-68 and of β-1,3-glucanase genes by KAI-26. PMID:25646153

  19. The growth of low band-gap InAs on (111)B GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Welser, R.E.; Guido, L.J.

    1995-10-01

    The use of low band-gap materials is of interest for a number of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications, such as bottom cells of optimized multijunction solar cell designs, long wavelength light sources, detectors, and thermophotovoltaics. However, low band-gap materials are generally mismatched with respect to lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and chemical bonding to the most appropriate commercially available substrates (Si, Ge, and GaAs). For the specific case of III-V semiconductor heteroepitaxy, one must contend with the strain induced by both lattice constant mismatch at the growth temperature and differences in the rates of mechanical deformation during the cool down cycle. Several experimental techniques have been developed to minimize the impact of these phenomena (i.e., compositional grading, strained layer superlattices, and high-temperature annealing). However, in highly strained systems such as InAs-on-GaAs, three-dimensional island formation and large defect densities (greater than or equal to 10(exp 8)/ cm(exp {minus}2)) tend to limit their applicability. In these particular cases, the surface morphology and defect density must be controlled during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. At the last SPRAT conference, the authors reported on a study of the evolution of InAs islands on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. Growth on the (111)B orientation exhibits a number of advantageous properties as compared to the (100) during these early stages of strained-layer epitaxy. In accordance with a developing model of nucleation and growth, the authors have deposited thin (60 A - 2500 A), fully relaxed InAs films on (111)B GaAs substrates. Although thicker InAs films are subject to the formation of twin defects common to epitaxy on the (111)B orientation, appropriate control of the growth parameters can greatly minimize their density.

  20. Unstrained and strained semiconductor nanostructure fabrication via molecular beam epitaxical growth on non-planar patterned gallium arsenide(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkar, Atul Ashok

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation contributes to three areas in the emerging field of nanostructures: (i) fabrication of quantum wires (QWR) and quantum dots (QD) via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on non-planar patterned substrates (NPPS), (ii) nature of mesa profile evolution with MBE growth, and (iii) nature of highly strained epitaxy on nanoscale mesas. Using the approach of substrate-encoded size-reducing epitaxy (SESRE) we have successfully fabricated QWRs and QBs in the unstrained GaAs/AlGaAs system and QBs in the highly strained InAs/GaAs system on GaAs (001) mesas with edges oriented along the <100> directions. By controlling the InAs delivery just below that required for 3D island formation on planar GaAs (001) substrates and optimizing the growth conditions, we have been able to selectively position 3D InAs islands on stripe mesas with appropriate shape, size, and orientation. Studies of the effect of growth interruption on the mesa growth profile evolution reveal the dynamic nature of the NPPS surface at typical MBE growth conditions. In the case of [100] oriented stripe mesas, during growth adatom migration was seen from the {101}, sidewalls to the (001) mesa top, whereas during growth interruption adatom migration from the mesa top to the sidewalls was observed. These results have significant implications for the relative magnitudes of the energy barriers relevant to the crystal growth processes on different surfaces. Studies of growth profile evolution dependence on the orientation and the sidewall profile of mesas created via focused ion beam assisted chemical etching evidenced the mesa profiles suitable for nanostructure fabrication via SESRE. We observe a dramatic suppression of 3D island formation during InAs deposition on nanoscale square mesas due to the strain relief available at the free edges of the mesa and substantial strain accommodation in the underlying mesa. The interplay between the strain build-up and the interfacet migration kinetics causes reversal

  1. 4H-SiC homoepitaxy on nearly on-axis substrates using TFS-towards high quality epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Anusha; Song, Haizheng; Sudarshan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    We report high quality homoepitaxial growth on nearly on-axis (± 0.5 °) 4H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Tetrafluorosilane and Propane as Si and C-precursors, respectively. N-type unintentional doping (1017-1014 cm-3) was obtained for 0.6growth were obtained at growth rates Rg- 5-14 μm/h, which was found to be C-controlled. At C/Si<2, Rg was weakly dependent on the ratio, with a clear transition from step-controlled growth (0.6growth as C/Si increases, as observed by others previously. For C/Si>2.0, a linear dependence on C-flow is established, with a return to step-mediated growth, shown by the surface morphology (RMS roughness ∼1 nm), and high polytype uniformity from Raman at high Rg- 14 μm/h. These two behaviors were ascribed to a decrease in the etch rate of SiC by SiF4 with increasing C/Si due to C-aided decomposition of SiF4, both of which make available a greater amount of elemental Si at the surface, thereby suppressing spiral growth. Use of on-axis or near on-axis substrates can eliminate/reduce basal plane dislocations which limit the performance of SiC bipolar electronic devices.

  2. Structural characterization of two-step growth of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire substrates at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Punam; Budai, John D; Aggarwal, R; Narayan, Roger; Narayan, Jagdish

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated two-step growth of high-quality epitaxial ZnO films, where the first layer--the buffer layer (nucleation layer template)--is grown at a low temperature (230-290 C) to induce a smooth (two-dimensional) growth. This is followed by growth at a moderate temperature {approx}430 C to form high-quality smooth ZnO layers for device structures. It was possible to reduce the growth temperature to 250-290 C and obtain a smooth epitaxial template layer on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates with surface roughness less than 1 nm. After the high-temperature growth, the film surface undulations (roughness) increased to about 2 nm, but it is still quite smooth. The calculation of c and a lattice parameters by high-resolution x-ray diffraction shows that the a lattice parameter is fully relaxed at the growth temperatures but the c lattice parameter is dependent on the defect concentration in the growing film. A decoupling between a and c lattice parameters of the films is observed, which leads to abnormal Poisson's ratios ranging from 0.08 to 0.54. The decoupling of the lattice parameters is analyzed based on growth characteristics and the presence of strain and defects in the grown films. We present our detailed studies on the nature of epitaxy, defects and interfaces by using comprehensive x-ray diffraction and high-resolution TEM studies.

  3. Oxide mediated liquid-solid growth of high aspect ratio aligned gold silicide nanowires on Si(110) substrates.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Umananda M; Rath, Ashutosh; Dash, Jatis K; Ghatak, Jay; Yi-Feng, Lai; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Satyam, P V

    2009-11-18

    Silicon nanowires grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method are promising candidates for nanoelectronics applications. The nanowires grow from an Au-Si catalyst during silicon chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, the effect of temperature, oxide at the interface and substrate orientation on the nucleation and growth kinetics during formation of nanogold silicide structures is explained using an oxide mediated liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using real time in situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy (with 40 ms time resolution), we show the formation of high aspect ratio ( approximately 15.0) aligned gold silicide nanorods in the presence of native oxide at the interface during in situ annealing of gold thin films on Si(110) substrates. Steps observed in the growth rate and real time electron diffraction show the existence of liquid Au-Si nano-alloy structures on the surface besides the un-reacted gold nanostructures. These results might enable us to engineer the growth of nanowires and similar structures with an Au-Si alloy as a catalyst. PMID:19843987

  4. Oxide mediated liquid-solid growth of high aspect ratio aligned gold silicide nanowires on Si(110) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Umananda M.; Rath, Ashutosh; Dash, Jatis K.; Ghatak, Jay; Yi-Feng, Lai; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Satyam, P. V.

    2009-11-01

    Silicon nanowires grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method are promising candidates for nanoelectronics applications. The nanowires grow from an Au-Si catalyst during silicon chemical vapor deposition. In this paper, the effect of temperature, oxide at the interface and substrate orientation on the nucleation and growth kinetics during formation of nanogold silicide structures is explained using an oxide mediated liquid-solid growth mechanism. Using real time in situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy (with 40 ms time resolution), we show the formation of high aspect ratio (≈15.0) aligned gold silicide nanorods in the presence of native oxide at the interface during in situ annealing of gold thin films on Si(110) substrates. Steps observed in the growth rate and real time electron diffraction show the existence of liquid Au-Si nano-alloy structures on the surface besides the un-reacted gold nanostructures. These results might enable us to engineer the growth of nanowires and similar structures with an Au-Si alloy as a catalyst.

  5. Growth of TiO{sub 2} Thin Film on Various Substrates using RF Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Riyaz Ahmad Mohamed; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2011-03-30

    The conductivity of Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin film fabricated using Radio Frequency (RF) Magnetron Sputtering on Silicon (Si), Indium doped--Tin Oxide (ITO) and microscope glass (M) substrates is presented in this paper. The dependant of thin film thickness and type of substrate been discussed. TiO{sub 2} was deposited using Ti target in Ar+O{sub 2}(45:10) mixture at 250 W for 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120 minute. Resultant thickness varies from 295 nm to 724 nm with deposition rate 6.4 nm/min. On the other hand, resistivity, Rs value for ITO substrate is between 5.72x10{sup -7} to 1.54x10{sup -6{Omega}}.m, Si substrate range is between 3.52x10{sup -6} to 1.76x10{sup -5{Omega}}.m and M substrate range is between 99 to 332 {Omega}.m. The value of resistivity increases with the thickness of the thin film.

  6. Growth of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ on Co implanted substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Kahlmann, F.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Kabius, B.; Breuer, U.; Buchal, Ch.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied films of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) grown on SrTiO 3 substrates, which were implanted with high doses of Co (1 × 10 16-5 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at 100 keV). The indirect modification of YBCO by local ion implantation of Co into the substrate is investigated to evaluate the feasibility of a new planar technology for the fabrication of Josephson junctions. The modified YBCO might become a barrier region of a Josephson junction. We found a strong diffusion of the implanted Co ions out of the substrates into the YBCO films during the deposition process, forming YBa 2Cu 3- xCo xO 7-δ. Our EDX and SNMS analyses show that the Co concentration x is homogeneous across the films. YBa 2Cu 3- xCo xO 7-δ is well known to be an excellent barrier material for SNS-type Josephson junctions. Using a 1.4 μm thick photoresist mask, we have locally implanted Co into the substrates to study the lateral diffusion of Co into the YBCO film above the non-implanted region. We performed EDX analysis on cross-sectional TEM samples and found strong lateral diffusion of Co from the implanted substrate within the YBCO film located above the non-implanted region.

  7. Substrate Structures For Growth Of Highly Oriented And/Or Epitaxial Layers Thereon

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-07-26

    A composite substrate structure including a substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer is provided together with additional layers such as one or more layers of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. Jc's of 2.3×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 320 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide for a superconducting article including a flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, an inert oxide material layer upon the surface of the flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the layer of the inert oxide material, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer, a layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer, and, a top-layer of a high temperature superconducting material upon the layer of a buffer material.

  8. Influence of substrates on epitaxial growth of B-site-ordered perovskite La2NiMnO6 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Ohkubo, I.; Matsumoto, Y.; Koinuma, H.; Oshima, M.

    2011-09-01

    Epitaxial La2NiMnO6 films were grown on (100)-oriented SrTiO3 and (LaAlO3)0.3-(SrAl0.5Ta0.5O3)0.7 (LSAT) substrates under various growth conditions by pulsed laser deposition. Ferromagnetism and transport properties of B-site-ordered perovskite are greatly influenced by growth conditions. Optimum growth conditions of epitaxial La2NiMnO6 films, which exhibit the ferromagnetism similar to bulk properties, are different for SrTiO3 and LSAT substrates probably due to the difference in surface migration. Since the initial stage of epitaxial growth might vary with the type of substrates, the ordering of Ni and Mn ions is different. Therefore, the ferromagnetism of La2NiMnO6 depends on the epitaxial growth conditions and type of substrates.

  9. Growth of Epitaxial Co Layers on Sb-Passivated GaAs(110) Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, C. M.; Chrost, J.; Ascolani, H.; Avila, J.; Soria, F.; Asensio, M. C.

    The role of Sb in the formation of the Co/GaAs(110) interfaces has been investigated by angular photoelectron diffraction (PD), synchrotron-radiation (SR) core-level photoemission and low-energy electron diffraction. We find that Co forms a metastable bcc phase on GaAs(110), with its principal crystallographic axes parallel to the substrate. From polar-angle-scanned PD, we determine an outward expansion of up to 14% of the lattice constant perpendicular to the surface, for epitaxial Co films grown on nontreated substrates. By Sb passivation of the GaAs(110) surface prior to the Co deposition, the epitaxial quality of the metallic overlayer is improved. The resulting Co phase is found to grow in a perfect bcc (110) orientation with a minor disruption of the substrate underneath and a reduced intralayer spacing outward expansion of less than 1%.

  10. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  11. Growth of ZnO:Al thin films onto different substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Prepelita, Petronela; Medianu, R.; Garoi, F.; Moldovan, A.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present some results regarding undoped and doped ZnO thin films deposited on various substrates like glass, silicon and kapton by rf magnetron sputtering. The influence of the amount of aluminum as well as the usage of different substrates on the final photovoltaic properties of the thin films is studied. For this, structural-morphological and optical investigations on the thin films are conducted. It was found that three important factors must be taken into account for adjusting the final desired application intended for the deposited thin films. These factors are: deposition conditions, the nature of both the dopant material and the substrate. A comparison study between undoped and doped case is also realized. Smooth Al doped ZnO thin films with a polycrystalline structure and a lower roughness than undoped ZnO are obtained.

  12. Effect of storage on the respirometric relationship between substrate utilization and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Ciggin, A S; Orhon, D

    2014-09-01

    The paper evaluated the impact of substrate storage on the respirometric assessment of process stoichiometry based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurements. Two parallel sequencing batch reactors were operated with pulse feeding of synthetic substrate mixture at a sludge age of 8 days and 2 days. During the cycle experiments with acetate, 40-45% of acetate was converted to polyhydroxybutyrate, which was partly consumed during each cycle. Respirometric analysis also yielded OUR profiles for the corresponding cyclic operation. A mass balance expression was derived based on oxygen utilization. Oxygen demands calculated on the basis of partial PHB utilization closely matched the experimental values retrieved from OUR profiles within limits of analytical precision. The relative contribution of storage mechanism represented more than 50% of overall oxygen demand. Substrate storage, when totally disregarded or not properly evaluated, was observed to involve an error of around 10% on overall the oxygen demand. PMID:24997376

  13. Growth and characterization of CdS thin films on polymer substrates for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongseob; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Suho; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    In this work, cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on flexible polymer substrates such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The r.f. magnetron sputtering, which is cost-effective scalable technique, was used for the film deposition. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at different sputtering pressures were investigated. When the CdS film was deposited at lower pressure, the crystallinity and the preferred orientation toward c-axis in hexagonal phase was improved. However, the optical transmittance was reduced as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Compared with the glass substrate, CdS films grown on polymer substrates were exhibited some wore structural and optical characteristics. CdTe thin film solar cell applied to sputtered CdS as a window layer showed a maximum efficiency of 11.6%. PMID:24734656

  14. Dynamic scaling of the growth process of GaN thin films deposited on sapphire substrates by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dianqing; Zhang, Rong; Yu, Huiqiang; Xiu, Xiangqian; Li, Xuefei; Gu, Shulin; Shen, Bo; Shi, Yi; Zheng, Youdou

    2004-06-01

    The growth front evolution of gallium nitride (GaN) thin films deposited on sapphire substrates by HVPE has been studied with atomic force microscope (AFM). The dynamic scaling characteristics are observed during the deposition process. After numerical correlation analysis, the roughness exponent α=0.75 and the growth exponent β=0.59 are obtained by using self-affine model. The roughening mechanisms of GaN thin films has been simply investigated, and the results indicate that one or more roughening mechanisms are present in the growth process in addition to stochastic roughening and diffusion effect. The computed values of the correlations in the input noise are very close to our results.

  15. Monitoring and analyses of substrate surface in first stages of graphene growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Masahiro; Yamada, Shunya; Hayashi, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    In situ ellipsometry was carried out as well as ex situ measurements by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for the analyses of substrate surface in the first stage of graphene growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Evolutions of the ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ were precisely measured during the growth of graphene with the sensitivity far less than 1 nm in film thickness. By the fitting of the experimentally obtained trajectory of ellipsometric parameters on the Ψ–Δ coordinate plane to that of the calculated ones, we confirmed that the graphite volume fraction decreased with growth after a dense graphite material initially formed. This suggests that carbon nanowalls grew on a thin graphitic layer.

  16. Epitaxial growth of homogeneous single-crystalline AlN films on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Liu, Zuolian; Lin, Yunhao; Zhou, Shizhong; Qian, Huirong; Gao, Fangliang; Yang, Hui; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-03-01

    The homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN thin films have been epitaxially grown on single-crystalline Cu (1 1 1) substrates with an in-plane alignment of AlN [11-20]//Cu [1-10] by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology with an integrated laser rastering program. The as-grown AlN films are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarized light microscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The spectroscopic ellipsometry reveals the excellent thickness uniformity of as-grown AlN films on the Cu (1 1 1) substrates with a root-mean-square (RMS) thickness inhomogeneity less than 2.6%. AFM and FESEM measurements indicate that very smooth and flat surface AlN films are obtained with a surface RMS roughness of 2.3 nm. The X-ray reflectivity image illustrates that there is a maximum of 1.2 nm thick interfacial layer existing between the as-grown AlN and Cu (1 1 1) substrates and is confirmed by HRTEM measurement, and reciprocal space mapping shows that almost fully relaxed AlN films are achieved only with a compressive strain of 0.48% within ˜321 nm thick films. This work demonstrates a possibility to obtain homogeneous and crack free single-crystalline AlN films on metallic substrates by PLD with optimized laser rastering program, and brings up a broad prospect for the application of acoustic filters that require abrupt hetero-interfaces between the AlN films and the metallic electrodes.

  17. Substrate uptake tests and quantitative FISH show differences in kinetic growth of bulking and non-bulking activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lou, Inchio; de Los Reyes, Francis L

    2005-12-20

    The competition between filaments and floc formers in activated sludge has been historically described using kinetic selection. However, recent studies have suggested that bacterial storage may also be an important factor in microbial selection, since the dynamic nature of substrate flows into wastewater treatment plants elicit transient responses from microorganisms. Respirometry-based kinetic selection should thus be reevaluated by considering cell storage, and a more reliable method should be developed to include bacterial storage in the analysis of growth of filaments and floc formers in activated sludge. In this study, we applied substrate uptake tests combined with metabolic modeling to determine the growth rates, yields and maintenance coefficients of bulking and non-bulking activated sludge developed in lab scale reactors under feast and famine conditions. The results of quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the filaments Eikelboom Type 1851, Type 021N, and Thiothrix nivea were dominant in bulking sludge, comprising 42.0 % of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS), with 61.6% of the total filament length extending from flocs into bulk solution. Only low levels of Type 1851 filament length (4.9% of MLVSS) occurred in non-bulking sludge, 83.0% of which grew inside the flocs. The kinetic parameters determined from the substrate uptake tests were consistent with those from respirometry and showed that filamentous bulking sludge had lower growth rates and maintenance coefficients than non-bulking sludge. These results provide support for growth kinetic differences in explaining the competitive strategy of filamentous bacteria. PMID:16155949

  18. Heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on vertical Si{110} sidewalls formed on trench-etched Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.; Shen, Haoting; Yuwen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Mayer, Theresa S.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-07-01

    A maskless Si trench structure was developed to integrate crystallographically non-polar GaN microstructures with semi-polar facets on Si(001). GaN "fins" were preferentially grown by MOCVD on Si{110} trench sidewalls formed by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of Si(001) such that GaN(0001)//Si{110} and GaN(10-10)//Si(001), resulting in a non-polar crystal structure with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface. No masking layer was required to prevent GaN growth on the Si(001) top surface of the trenches, instead, it was found that GaN nucleated preferentially on the Si{110} trench sidewalls. GaN was also observed to nucleate at the top corner of the trenches due to Si etching and exposure of high-index Si facets during the pre-growth H2 anneal. This undesired GaN nucleation was successfully suppressed by reducing the H2 anneal time and/or increasing the growth temperature and decreasing the precursor V/III to enhance Ga-adatom diffusion. Cross-sectional TEM studies confirmed that the GaN fins were crystallographically non-polar with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface and were bounded by semi-polar and non-polar facets. The reported Si fabrication and GaN growth process shows promise for the integration of non-polar and semi-polar GaN microstructures on industry standard Si(001) substrates.

  19. Complex, multi-scale small intestinal topography replicated in cellular growth substrates fabricated via chemical vapor deposition of Parylene C.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Abigail N; Kamath, Megha; Pfluger, Courtney A; Burkey, Daniel D; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Wang, Lin; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Native small intestine possesses distinct multi-scale structures (e.g., crypts, villi) not included in traditional 2D intestinal culture models for drug delivery and regenerative medicine. The known impact of structure on cell function motivates exploration of the influence of intestinal topography on the phenotype of cultured epithelial cells, but the irregular, macro- to submicron-scale features of native intestine are challenging to precisely replicate in cellular growth substrates. Herein, we utilized chemical vapor deposition of Parylene C on decellularized porcine small intestine to create polymeric intestinal replicas containing biomimetic irregular, multi-scale structures. These replicas were used as molds for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) growth substrates with macro to submicron intestinal topographical features. Resultant PDMS replicas exhibit multiscale resolution including macro- to micro-scale folds, crypt and villus structures, and submicron-scale features of the underlying basement membrane. After 10 d of human epithelial colorectal cell culture on PDMS substrates, the inclusion of biomimetic topographical features enhanced alkaline phosphatase expression 2.3-fold compared to flat controls, suggesting biomimetic topography is important in induced epithelial differentiation. This work presents a facile, inexpensive method for precisely replicating complex hierarchal features of native tissue, towards a new model for regenerative medicine and drug delivery for intestinal disorders and diseases. PMID:27550930

  20. Growth of single-crystal Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates for microwave superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournet, J.; Gosselink, D.; Jaikissoon, M.; Miao, G.-X.; Langenberg, D.; Mariantoni, M.; Wasilewski, Zr

    Thin Al layers on dielectrics are essential building blocks of circuits used in the quest for scalable quantum computing systems. While molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been shown to produce the highest quality Al layers, further reduction of losses in superconducting resonators fabricated from them is highly desirable. Defects at the Al-substrate interface are likely the key source of losses. Here we report on the optimization of MBE growth of Al layers on GaAs and Si substrates. Si surfaces were prepared by in-situ high temperature substrate annealing. For GaAs, defects typically remaining on the substrate surfaces after oxide desorption were overgrown with GaAs or GaAs/AlAs superlattice buffer layers. Such surface preparation steps were followed by cooling process to below 0°C, precisely controlled to obtain targeted surface reconstructions. Deposition of 110 nm Al layers was done at subzero temperatures and monitored with RHEED at several azimuths simultaneously. The resulting layers were characterized by HRXRD, AFM and Nomarski. Single crystal, near-atomically smooth layers of Al(110) were demonstrated on GaAs(001)-2x4 surface whereas Al(111) of comparable quality was formed on Si(111)-1x1 and 7x7 surfaces.

  1. Hierarchical ZnO Nanowire Growth with Tunable Orientations on Versatile Substrates Using Atomic Layer Deposition Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Kazyak, Eric; Schleputz, Christian M.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wood, Kevin N.; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2015-07-14

    The ability to synthesize semiconductor nanowires with deterministic and tunable control of orientation and morphology on a wide range of substrates, while high precision and repeatability are maintained, is a challenge currently faced for the development of many nanoscale material systems. Here we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) presents a reliable method of surface and interfacial modification to guide nanowire orientation on a variety of substrate materials and geometries, including high-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional templates. We demonstrate control of the orientation and geometric properties of hydrothermally grown single crystalline ZnO nanowires via the deposition of a ZnO seed layer by ALD. The crystallographic texture and roughness of the seed layer result in tunable preferred nanowire orientations and densities for identical hydrothermal growth conditions. The structural and chemical relationship between the ALD layers and nanowires was investigated with synchrotron X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of orientation and morphology control. The resulting control parameters were utilized to produce hierarchical nanostructures with tunable properties on a wide range of substrates, including vertical micropillars, paper fibers, porous polymer membranes, and biological substrates. This illustrates the power of ALD for interfacial engineering of heterogeneous material systems at the nanoscale, to provide a highly controlled and scalable seeding method for bottom-up synthesis of integrated nanosystems.

  2. Self-regulating homogenous growth of high-quality graphene on Co-Cu composite substrate for layer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tianquan; Huang, Fuqiang; Wan, Dongyun; Bi, Hui; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2013-06-01

    The composite substrate of Co and Cu was proposed to grow homogenous high quality wafer-size graphene films by an atmosphere pressure CVD method. The composite substrate consists of a moderate-carbon-solubility metal top (Co coating) as a C-dissolving layer and a low-carbon-solubility metal base (Cu foil) as a C-rejecting layer. During the CVD process, the interdiffusion of Co and Cu atoms occurs in the composite. With the dynamic control on Co and Cu alloying process to affect the carbon solubility, active carbon atoms captured by the Co layer were segregated to form spontaneously a high-quality graphene film on the top of Cu-Co substrate. The tunable layer-number of the graphene films can be precisely controlled by adjusting the thickness of the Co layer. High quality single-layered graphene films with a 98% yield were prepared on an 80 nm-Co-coated Cu foil and insensitive to growth temperature and time. More importantly, this type of composite substrate has also been developed to grow AB-stacked bilayers and three-layer graphene with 99% surface coverage and absence of defects. The approach is opening up a new avenue for high-quality graphene production with precise layer control through composite substrate design.The composite substrate of Co and Cu was proposed to grow homogenous high quality wafer-size graphene films by an atmosphere pressure CVD method. The composite substrate consists of a moderate-carbon-solubility metal top (Co coating) as a C-dissolving layer and a low-carbon-solubility metal base (Cu foil) as a C-rejecting layer. During the CVD process, the interdiffusion of Co and Cu atoms occurs in the composite. With the dynamic control on Co and Cu alloying process to affect the carbon solubility, active carbon atoms captured by the Co layer were segregated to form spontaneously a high-quality graphene film on the top of Cu-Co substrate. The tunable layer-number of the graphene films can be precisely controlled by adjusting the thickness of the Co

  3. Si growth at graphene surfaces on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Junki; Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    We studied the growth of Si at the surface of epitaxial graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). Characteristic flower-like islands with a thickness of 2 to 3 nm nucleated during the growth from 290 to 420 K. The islands became featureless in growth at higher temperatures. The growth was predominantly governed by diffusion-limited aggregation. The diffusion energy was evaluated to be 0.21 eV from the temperature-dependent decrease in the density of the islands.

  4. Nitrogen immobilization in plant growth substrates: clean chip residual, pine bark and peat moss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent of nitrogen (N) immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate (clean chip residual (CCR)). Control treatments of pine bark (PB) and peat moss (PM) were compared to two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm) of CCR for micro...

  5. The growth of low band-gap InAs on (111)B GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    The use of low band-gap materials is of interest for a number of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications, such as bottom cells of optimized multijunction solar cell designs, long wavelength light sources, detectors, and thermophotovoltaics. However, low band-gap materials are generally mismatched with respect to lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and chemical bonding to the most appropriate commercially available substrates (Si, Ge, and GaAs). For the specific case of III-V semiconductor heteroepitaxy, one must contend with the strain induced by both lattice constant mismatch at the growth temperature and differences in the rates of mechanical deformation during the cool down cycle. Several experimental techniques have been developed to minimize the impact of these phenomena (i.e., compositional grading, strained layer superlattices, and high-temperature annealing). However, in highly strained systems such as InAs-on-GaAs, three-dimensional island formation and large defect densities (greater than or equal to 10(exp 8)/ cm(exp -2)) tend to limit their applicability. In these particular cases, the surface morphology and defect density must be controlled during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. At the last SPRAT conference, we reported on a study of the evolution of InAs islands on (100) and (111)B GaAs substrates. Growth on the (111)B orientation exhibits a number of advantageous properties as compared to the (100) during these early stages of strained-layer epitaxy. In accordance with a developing model of nucleation and growth, we have deposited thin (60 A - 2500 A), fully relaxed InAs films on (111)B GaAs substrates. Although thicker InAs films are subject to the formation of twin defects common to epitaxy on the (111)B orientation, appropriate control of the growth parameters can greatly minimize their density. Using this knowledge base, InAs films up to 2 microns in thickness with improved morphology and structural quality have

  6. Growth mechanism of Cobalt(II) Phthalocyanine(CoPc) thin films on SiO{sub 2} and muscovite substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gedda, Murali; Subbarao, Nimmakayala V. V.; Goswami, Dipak K.

    2014-01-28

    Thin films of Cobalt(II) Phthalocyanine (CoPc) were grown by thermal evaporation technique on two different substrates namely SiO{sub 2} and atomically cleaned muscovite mica(001) at various substrate temperatures. Deposition rate has been maintained to 0.3Å/sec during the growth of the films. The growth process is studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films on SiO{sub 2} exhibit only three-dimensional islands and uniformity of these islands improved with substrate temperatures, whereas films on mica (001) consist of long oriented percolated structures. The results revealed that the growth mechanism of CoPc strongly depends on substrate temperatures as well as nature of substrate used. Optical properties were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy and structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction.

  7. Study on effects of substrate temperature on growth and structure of alignment carbon nanotubes in plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Chun; Wang, Tingzhi

    2006-11-01

    Alignment carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) were synthesized on silicon substrate coated with Ni catalyst film and Ta buffer layer by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition using CH 4, NH 3, and H 2 as the reaction gas, and they were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the diameter of the bamboo-structured ACNTs is increased from 62 to 177 nm when the substrate temperature was changed from 626 to 756 °C. Their growth rate is enhanced by the substrate temperature in a range of 626-683 °C and it is reversely reduced with the substrate temperature after the substrate temperature is over 683 °C. Beginning with wetting phenomenon, the effects of the substrate temperature on the structure and growth rate of the ACNTs are analyzed.

  8. Growth of TiO2 nanorods on a Ta substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Suk; Hyun, Jae-Sung; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Young Dok; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2010-05-01

    TiO2 nanorods were successfully grown on Tantalum (Ta) substrates using titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP) as a single precursor without any carriers or bubbling gases. For characterization of the TiO2 structures, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed. For substrate temperatures below 800 degrees C, a rough film structure without nanorods could be found. However, at a sample temperature of 800 degrees C, nanorod structures with a respective diameter and length of 0.1 approximately 0.2 microm and 0.7 approximately 1.5 microm, respectively, could be synthesized. The nanorods exhibited a rutile phase with a 2:1 stoichiometry of O:Ti, identified using XRD and XPS. When the growth temperature exceeded 800 degrees C, agglomeration of the nanorods was identified. PMID:20358953

  9. Influence of phosphorus vapor ambient for InGaAsP growth on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Joji; Ito, Toshio; Shin-ichi Takahashi, N.; Kurita, Shoichi

    1986-12-01

    For visible-light-emitting laser diodes, InGaAsP double heterostructures have been grown on GaAs substrates using liquid-phase epitaxy. As the growth temperature is as high as about 780 °C, a large amount of phosphorus evaporates from the solutions for the cladding layers during the growth process. The phosphorus vapor disturbs the solution composition for the active layer, so that very thin and uniform active layers cannot be obtained. By using In-P-Sn solution and supplying the phosphorus partial pressure around the graphite boat, the influence of phosphorus vapor ambient for InGaAsP (λPL=805 nm) growth is confirmed. When the phosphorus partial pressure increases, the surface of epitaxial layer becomes rough and the substrate is partly etched back. From x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectral measurements, the composition of the grown layer is also found to be changed. As a result of increasing the flow rate of H2 gas in order to protect the solution for the active layer from phosphorus contamination, the double heterostructure wafers with the high-quality active layer can be obtained reproducibly. Thus, pulsed lasing operation at room temperature has been achieved. The lasing wavelength is 816 nm and the threshold current density is ˜4.6 kA/cm2.

  10. Growth kinetics, effect of carbon substrate in biosynthesis of mcl-PHA by Pseudomonas putida Bet001

    PubMed Central

    Gumel, A.M.; Annuar, M.S.M.; Heidelberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    Growth associated biosynthesis of medium chain length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA) in Pseudomonas putida Bet001 isolated from palm oil mill effluent was studied. Models with substrate inhibition terms described well the kinetics of its growth. Selected fatty acids (C8:0 to C18:1) and ammonium were used as carbon and nitrogen sources during growth and PHA biosynthesis, resulting in PHA accumulation of about 50 to 69% (w/w) and PHA yields ranging from 10.12 g L−1 to 15.45 g L−1, respectively. The monomer composition of the PHA ranges from C4 to C14, and was strongly influenced by the type of carbon substrate fed. Interestingly, an odd carbon chain length (C7) monomer was also detected when C18:1 was fed. Polymer showed melting temperature (Tm) of 42.0 (± 0.2) °C, glass transition temperature (Tg) of −1.0 (± 0.2) °C and endothermic melting enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf) of 110.3 (± 0.1) J g−1. The molecular weight (Mw) range of the polymer was relatively narrow between 55 to 77 kDa. PMID:25242925

  11. Expression of Aspergillus hemoglobin domain activities in Aspergillus oryzae grown on solid substrates improves growth rate and enzyme production.

    PubMed

    te Biesebeke, Rob; Boussier, Amandine; van Biezen, Nick; Braaksma, Machtelt; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; de Vos, Willem M; Punt, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    DNA fragments coding for hemoglobin domains (HBD) were isolated from Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger. The HBD activities were expressed in A. oryzae by introduction of HBD gene fragments under the control of the promoter of the constitutively expressed gpdA gene. In the transformants, oxygen uptake was significantly higher, and during growth on solid substrates the developed biomass was at least 1.3 times higher than that of the untransformed wild-type strain. Growth rate of the HBD-activity-producing strains was also significantly higher compared to the wild type. During growth on solid cereal substrates, the amylase and protease activities in the extracts of the HBD-activity-producing strains were 30-150% higher and glucoamylase activities were at least 9 times higher compared to the wild-type strain. These results suggest that the Aspergillus HBD-encoding gene can be used in a self-cloning strategy to improve biomass yield and protein production of Aspergillus species. PMID:16927259

  12. MBE growth of Sb-based nBn photodetectors on large diameter GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyshev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Qiu, Yueming; Liu, Amy W. K.; Koerperick, Edwin J.; Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Norton, Dennis; Faleev, Nikolai N.; Honsberg, Christiana B.

    2013-06-01

    The GaSb-based family of materials and heterostructures provides rich bandgap engineering possibilities for a variety of infrared (IR) applications. Mid-wave and long-wave IR photodetectors are progressing toward commercial manufacturing applications, but to succeed they must move from research laboratory settings to general semiconductor production and they require larger diameter substrates than the current standard 2-inch and 3-inch GaSb. Substrate vendors are beginning production of 4-inch GaSb, but another alternative is growth on 6-inch GaAs substrates with appropriate metamorphic buffer layers. We have grown generic MWIR nBn photodetectors on large diameter, 6-inch GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Multiple metamorphic buffer architectures, including bulk GaSb nucleation, AlAsSb superlattices, and graded GaAsSb and InAlSb ternary alloys, were employed to bridge the 7.8% mismatch gap from the GaAs substrates to the GaSb-based epilayers at 6.1 Å lattice-constant and beyond. Reaching ~6.2 Å extends the nBn cutoff wavelength from 4.2 to <5 µm, thus broadening the application space. The metamorphic nBn epiwafers demonstrated unique surface morphologies and crystal properties, as revealed by AFM, high-resolution XRD, and cross-section TEM. GaSb nucleation resulted in island-like surface morphology while graded ternary buffers resulted in cross-hatched surface morphology, with low root-mean-square roughness values of ~10 Å obtained. XRD determined dislocation densities as low as 2 × 107 cm-2. Device mesas were fabricated and dark currents of 1 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 150K were measured. This work demonstrates a promising path to satisfy the increasing demand for even larger area focal plane array detectors in a commercial production environment.

  13. Influence of temperature on growth rate and competition between two psychrotolerant Antarctic bacteria: low temperature diminishes affinity for substrate uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Nedwell, D B; Rutter, M

    1994-01-01

    The growth kinetics of two psychrotolerant Antarctic bacteria, Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava CR3/2/10 (2/10) and Brevibacterium sp. strain CR3/1/15 (1/15), were examined over a range of temperatures in both batch culture and glycerol-limited chemostat cultures. The maximum specific growth rate (mu max) and Ks values for both bacteria were functions of temperature, although the cell yields were relatively constant with respect to temperature. The mu max values of both strains increased up to an optimum temperature, 24 degrees C for 2/10 and 20 degrees C for 1/15. Strain 1/15 might therefore be considered to be more psychrophilic than strain 2/10. For both bacteria, the specific affinity (mu max/Ks) for glycerol uptake was lower at 2 than at 16 degrees C, indicating a greater tendency to substrate limitation at low temperature. As the temperature increased from 2 to 16 degrees C, the specific affinity of 1/15 for glycerol increased more rapidly than it did for 2/10. Thus 1/15, on the basis of this criterion, was less psychrophilic than was 2/10. The steady-state growth kinetics of the two strains at 2 and 16 degrees C imply that 1/15 would be able to outgrow 2/10 only at relatively low substrate concentrations (< 0.32 g of glycerol.liter-1) and high temperatures (> 12 degrees C), which suggests that 1/15 has a less psychrotolerant survival strategy than does 2/10. Our data were compared with other data in the literature for bacteria growing at low temperatures. They also showed an increase of substrate-specific affinity with increasing temperature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8031092

  14. Growth of Ca2MnO4 Ruddlesden-Popper structured thin films using combinatorial substrate epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacotte, M.; David, A.; Pravarthana, D.; Grygiel, C.; Rohrer, G. S.; Salvador, P. A.; Velazquez, M.; de Kloe, R.; Prellier, W.

    2014-12-01

    The local epitaxial growth of pulsed laser deposited Ca2MnO4 films on polycrystalline spark plasma sintered Sr2TiO4 substrates was investigated to determine phase formation and preferred epitaxial orientation relationships (ORs) for isostructural Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) heteroepitaxy, further developing the high-throughput synthetic approach called Combinatorial Substrate Epitaxy (CSE). Both grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction patterns of the film and substrate were indexable as single-phase RP-structured compounds. The optimal growth temperature (between 650 °C and 800 °C) was found to be 750 °C using the maximum value of the average image quality of the backscattered diffraction patterns. Films grew in a grain-over-grain pattern such that each Ca2MnO4 grain had a single OR with the Sr2TiO4 grain on which it grew. Three primary ORs described 47 out of 49 grain pairs that covered nearly all of RP orientation space. The first OR, found for 20 of the 49, was the expected RP unit-cell over RP unit-cell OR, expressed as [100][001]film||[100][001]sub. The other two ORs were essentially rotated from the first by 90°, with one (observed for 17 of 49 pairs) being rotated about the [100] and the other (observed for 10 of 49 pairs) being rotated about the [110] (and not exactly by 90°). These results indicate that only a small number of ORs are needed to describe isostructural RP heteroepitaxy and further demonstrate the potential of CSE in the design and growth of a wide range of complex functional oxides.

  15. Growth of GaN epilayers on c-, m-, a-, and (20.1)-plane GaN bulk substrates obtained by ammonothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudziński, M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Janicki, L.; Serafinczuk, J.; Kucharski, R.; Zając, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Doradziński, R.; Dwiliński, R.; Strupiński, W.

    2011-08-01

    GaN epilayers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on c-, m-, a-, and (20.1)-plane GaN substrates obtained by the ammonothermal method. The influence of (i) the surface preparation of substrates, (ii) MOCVD growth parameters, and (iii) the crystallographic orientation of substrates on the structural and optical properties of GaN epilayers was investigated and carefully analyzed. It was observed that the polishing of substrates and their misorientation have strong impact on the quality of GaN epilayers grown on these substrates. The MOCVD growth process was optimized for epilayers grown on m-plane GaN substrates. The best structural and optical properties were achieved for epilayers deposited at 1075 °C and the total reactor pressure of 50 mbar. These conditions were applied to grow GaN epilayers on substrates with other ( c-, a-, and (20.1)-plane) crystallographic orientations in the same MOCVD process. Particularly good optical properties were obtained for GaN epilayers deposited on polar and non-polar ( m- and a-plane) substrates, whereas slightly worse optical properties were observed for epilayers deposited on the semi-polar substrate. It therefore means that MOCVD growth conditions optimized for a given crystallographic direction ( m-plane direction in this case) work rather well also for other crystallographic directions.

  16. Modification of graphene chemistry for metal nanoparticle growth: the effect of substrate selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaniewski, Anna; Nemanich, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow metal nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include silicon oxide, silicon, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. This work is supported through the National Science Foundation under Grant # DMR-1206935 .

  17. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior. PMID:22709270

  18. Direct evidence of strain transfer for InAs island growth on compliant Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marçal, L. A. B.; Magalhães-Paniago, R.; Malachias, Angelo; Richard, M.-I.; Cavallo, F.; Lagally, M. G.; Schmidt, O. G.; Schülli, T. Ü.; Deneke, Ch.

    2015-04-13

    Semiconductor heteroepitaxy on top of thin compliant layers has been explored as a path to make inorganic electronics mechanically flexible as well as to integrate materials that cannot be grown directly on rigid substrates. Here, we show direct evidences of strain transfer for InAs islands on freestanding Si thin films (7 nm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using a beam size of 300 × 700 nm{sup 2} can directly probe the strain status of the compliant substrate underneath deposited islands. Using a recently developed diffraction mapping technique, three-dimensional reciprocal space maps were reconstructed around the Si (004) peak for specific illuminated positions of the sample. The strain retrieved was analyzed using continuous elasticity theory via Finite-element simulations. The comparison of experiment and simulations yields the amount of strain from the InAs islands, which is transferred to the compliant Si thin film.

  19. Coincident site lattice-matched growth of semiconductors on substrates using compliant buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew

    2016-08-23

    A method of producing semiconductor materials and devices that incorporate the semiconductor materials are provided. In particular, a method is provided of producing a semiconductor material, such as a III-V semiconductor, on a silicon substrate using a compliant buffer layer, and devices such as photovoltaic cells that incorporate the semiconductor materials. The compliant buffer material and semiconductor materials may be deposited using coincident site lattice-matching epitaxy, resulting in a close degree of lattice matching between the substrate material and deposited material for a wide variety of material compositions. The coincident site lattice matching epitaxial process, as well as the use of a ductile buffer material, reduce the internal stresses and associated crystal defects within the deposited semiconductor materials fabricated using the disclosed method. As a result, the semiconductor devices provided herein possess enhanced performance characteristics due to a relatively low density of crystal defects.

  20. Selective growth and field emission of vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes on hole-patterned silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Y.; Lee, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, T. J.; Lyu, S. C.; Lee, C. J.

    2003-07-01

    We have achieved selective growth of high-purity carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on iron-deposited hole-patterns by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of acetylene gas. The vertically well-aligned CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on hole-patterned silicon substrates. The CNTs indicated multiwalled and bamboo-like structure. The turn-on gate voltage at the CNT-based triode structure was about 55 V and emission current density was 2.0 μA at the applied gate voltage of 100 V.

  1. Epitaxial growth of YBCO films on metallic substrates buffered with yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-05-01

    Biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were grown on polished Hastelloy C (HC) substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) and electron-beam evaporation. A water-cooled sample stage was used to dissipate heat generated by the Kaufman ion source and to maintain the substrate temperature below 100 °C during deposition. X-ray pole figures were used for texture analysis. In-plane texture measured from the YSZ (111) φ-scan full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) was 13.2° and out-of-plane texture from the YSZ (002) ω-scan FWHM was 7.7°. In-plane texture improved with lowered substrate temperature during IBAD deposition. RMS surface roughness of 3.3 nm was measured by atomic force microscopy. A thin CeO2 buffer layer (≈10 nm) was deposited to improve the lattice match between the YSZ and YBCO films and to enhance the biaxial alignment of YBCO films. YBCO films were epitaxially grown on IBAD-YSZ buffered HC substrates with and without CeO2 buffer layers by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In-plane texture FWHMs of 12° and 9° were observed for CeO2 (111) and YBCO (103), respectively. Tc=90 K, with sharp transition, and Jc values of ≈2×106 A/cm2 at 77 K in zero field were observed on 0.5-μm-thick, 5-mm-wide, and 1-cm-long samples.

  2. Oriented growth and transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards a Schwann cell fate on micropatterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anup D; Zbarska, Svitlana; Petersen, Emma M; Marti, Mustafa E; Mallapragada, Surya K; Sakaguchi, Donald S

    2016-03-01

    While Schwann cells (SCs) have a significant role in peripheral nerve regeneration, their use in treatments has been limited because of lack of a readily available source. To address this issue, this study focused on the effect of guidance cues by employing micropatterned polymeric films to influence the alignment, morphology and transdifferentiation of bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards a Schwann cell-like fate. Two different types of polymers, biocompatible polystyrene (PS) and biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were used to fabricate patterned films. Percentages of transdifferentiated MSCs (tMSCs) immunolabeled with SC markers (α-S100β and α-p75(NTR)) were found to be similar on patterned versus smooth PS and PLA substrates. However, patterning had a significant effect on the alignment and elongation of the tMSCs. More than 80% of the tMSCs were oriented in the direction of microgrooves (0°-20°), while cells on the smooth substrates were randomly oriented. The aspect ratio [AR, ratio of length (in direction of microgrooves) and breadth (in direction perpendicular to microgrooves)] of the tMSCs on patterned substrates had a value of approximately five, as compared to cells on smooth substrates where the AR was one. Understanding responses to these cues in vitro helps us in understanding the behavior and interaction of the cells with the 3D environment of the scaffolds, facilitating the application of these concepts to designing effective nerve guidance conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26371993

  3. Silicanizing Process On Mild Steel Substrate by Using Tronoh Silica Sand: Microstructure, composition and coating growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y, Yusnenti F. M.; M, Othman; Mustapha, Mazli; I, MohdYusri

    2016-02-01

    A new Silicanizing process on formation of coating on mild steel using Tronoh Silica Sand (TSS) is presented. The process was performed in the temperature range 1000- 1100°C and with varying deposition time of 1-4 hours. Influence of the layer and the substrate constituents on the coating compatibility of the whole silicanized layer is described in detail. Morphology and structure of the silicanized layer were investigated by XRF, XRD and SEM. It is observed that diffusion coatings containing high concentrations of silica which profile distribution of SiO2 in the silicanized layer was encountered and the depth from the surface to the substrate was taken as the layer thickness. The results also depicted that a longer deposition time have tendency to produce a looser and larger grain a hence rougher layer. The silicanized layer composed of FeSi and Fe2SiO4 phases with preferred orientation within the experimental range. It is also found that longer deposition time and higher temperature resulted in an increase in SiO2 concentration on the substrate (mild steel).

  4. The limitations of seedling growth and drought tolerance to novel soil substrates in arid systems: Implications for restoration success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Amber; Lewandrowski, Wolfgang; Stevens, Jason; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam

    2016-04-01

    Introduction With the limited knowledge available regarding the impact of drought on seedling growth, an understanding of seedling tolerance to arid conditions is crucial for restoration success (James et al., 2013; Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014). However, restoration in semi-arid areas faces the challenge of re-establishing plant communities on altered soil substrates (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). These substrates are a result of anthropogenic disturbances such as mining which have altered the plant-soil-water dynamics of the ecosystem (Machado et al., 2013). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of mining on the plant-soil-water dynamics of an arid ecosystem of Western Australia (Pilbara region, North Western Australia) and the implications these altered relationships have on seedling growth and their responses to drought. Methods Drought responses of native plant species were assessed through a series of glasshouse experiments. Firstly, 21 species dominant to the Pilbara region were subjected to drought in a topsoil growth media to assess variation in responses (leaf water potential at the time of stomatal closure) across species and identify traits associated with drought tolerance. Secondly, four species ranging in their drought tolerance identified previously, were grown to two leaf stages (second and fourth leaf stage) in three mining substrates (topsoil, a topsoil and waste mix and waste) to assess seedling drought responses to various potential restoration substrates and how that varied with plant development stage. Results and discussion Four morphological traits were found to be significantly associated with drought indicators (leaf mass ratio, stem area, stem length, stem weight), however, these were weak correlations. Waste substrate and its addition to topsoil reduced plant total biomass but did not alter species responses to drought. However, the soil physical properties of the waste reduced water retention and water availability for plant uptake

  5. Preferential Growth of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Substrate by Europium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated that europium oxide (Eu2O3) is a new type of active catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) growth under suitable conditions. Both random SWNT networks and horizontally aligned SWNT arrays are efficiently grown on silicon wafers. The density of the SWNT arrays can be altered by the CVD conditions. This result further provides the experimental evidence that the efficient catalyst for SWNT growth is more size dependent than the catalysts themselves. Furthermore, the SWNTs from europium sesquioxides have compatibly higher quality than that from Fe/Mo catalyst. More importantly, over 80% of the nanotubes from Eu2O3 are semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs), indicating the preferential growth of s-SWNTs from Eu2O3. This new finding could open a way for selective growth of s-SWNTs, which can be used as high-current nanoFETs and sensors. Moreover, the successful growth of SWNTs by Eu2O3 catalyst provides new experimental information for understanding the preferential growth of s-SWNTs from Eu2O3, which may be helpful for their controllable synthesis. PMID:21076709

  6. Formation of oxides and their role in the growth of Ag nanoplates on GaAs substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Gosztola, D.; Lei, C.; Haasch, R.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-10-21

    Simple galvanic reactions between highly doped n-type GaAs wafers and a pure aqueous solution of AgNO3 at room temperature provide an easy and efficient protocol to directly deposit uniform Ag nanoplates with tunable dimensions on the GaAs substrates. The anisotropic growth of the Ag nanoplates in the absence of surfactant molecules might be partially ascribed to the codeposition of oxides of gallium and arsenic, which are revealed by extensive data from electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, during the growth of the Ag nanoplates. The electron microscopic characterization shows that each Ag nanoplate has a 'necked' geometry, that is, it pins on the GaAs lattices through only a tiny neck (with sizes of <10 nm). In addition, the as-grown Ag nanoplates exhibit strong enhancement toward Raman scattering of materials on (or around) their surfaces.

  7. Heteroepitaxial growth of β-SiC thin films on Si(100) substrate using bis-trimethylsilylmethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Wook; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    1996-12-01

    A non-toxic and non-flammable organosilicon source having alternate Si-C bonding structure, bis-trimethylsilylmethane [C7H20Si2], was first used to deposit epitaxial β-SiC films at low growth temperature by chemical vapor deposition. Epitaxial β-SiC films were successfully grown on carburized Si(100) substrates at temperatures as low as 1100 °C, although the carburized buffer layer was a well-oriented, (100) polycrystalline film. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the films contain twins, stacking faults, and antiphase boundaries. Without the carburized buffer layer, highly (111) preferred oriented β-SiC films were grown by increasing the growth temperature.

  8. Growth and enrichment of pentachlorophenol-degrading microorganisms in the nutristat, a substrate concentration-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgers, M; Bogte, J J; Breure, A M; van Andel, J G

    1993-01-01

    The nutristat, a substrate concentration-controlled continuous culture, was used to grow pentachlorophenol (PCP)-degrading microorganisms. The PCP concentration control system consisted of on-line measurement of the PCP concentration in the culture vessel with a tangential filter and a flowthrough spectrophotometer. With PCP concentrations between 45 and 77 microM, a stable situation was established in the nutristat, with an average dilution rate of 0.035 +/- 0.003 h-1. Compared with those of fed-batch cultures and chemostat cultures, the growth rates of microorganisms in the PCP nutristat were significantly higher, leading to considerable time savings in the enrichment procedure. In addition, PCP accumulation to severe inhibitory levels in the culture is prevented because the set point determines the (maximum) PCP concentration in the culture. The use of the nutristat as a tool for the growth of bacteria that degrade toxic compounds is discussed. PMID:8250560

  9. Growth behavior of GaN nanowires on c-plane sapphire substrate by applying various catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppulingam, B.; Bhalerao, G. M.; Singh, Shubra; Baskar, K.

    2016-07-01

    Systematic reaction has been used to control the vapor-liquid-solid growth of gallium nitride nanowires (NWs) using different catalysts. GaN NWs were grown using Cu, Au, Pd/Au alloy catalysts on c-plane sapphire substrate. XRD and Raman analysis revealed the crystalline wurtzite phase of GaN synthesized at 900 °C. High density GaN NWs were studied using SEM and HRTEM. Elemental composition and impurities were analyzed by EDX. Diameter of individual NW, grown using Au catalyst is found to be ~50 nm. The diameter of NWs grown with the help of Cu catalyst was found to be ˜65 nm, whereas with Pd/Au catalyst, the diameter was about 100-200 nm. NBE emission observed from PL spectra for Cu catalyst (377 nm), Au catalyst (372 nm) as well as Pd/Au catalyst (385 nm) growth of GaN NWs respectively has been presented and discussed.

  10. Gas-source MBE growth of strain-relaxed Si1-xCx on Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Keisuke; Sakai, Shoichiro; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Junji; Nakagawa, Kiyokazu; Usami, Noritaka; Hoshi, Yusuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Shiraki, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-01

    The hole effective mass in a compressively strained Si formed on a (100) surface is expected to be low. The growth of a high quality strain-relaxed Si1-xCx increases the possibility of high performance electronic devices using compressively strained Si film. In this study, growth conditions and their influence on microstructural aspects of Si1-xCx grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy were studied. Disilane and trimethylsilane were used as source gases. It was found that the strain-relaxation process and defect formation were influenced not only by substrate temperature but also by flow rates of the source gases. Relationships between the morphological aspects and non-substitutional carbon concentration were studied.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from cucumber seedling substrate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Shang, QingMao; Li, Pinglan

    2015-04-20

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from the cucumber seedling substrate collected in Beijing, China. The complete genome of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 consists of one single circular chromosome (3,864,316 bp) without any plasmid. From the genome, we identified clusters responsible for non-ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites, and genes related to the plant growth promotion hormone such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and acetoin secretion. In addition, genes that contribute to biofilm formation were also found on the genome of L-H15. Complete genome information enables further study on the beneficial interactions between B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 and host plants, and the future application of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 as biofertilizer and biocide. PMID:25725457

  12. Kinetic surface roughening and wafer bow control in heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Walker, Glenn; Chai, Jessica; Iacopi, Alan; Fernandes, Alanna; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2015-01-01

    A thin, chemically inert 3C-SiC layer between GaN and Si helps not only to avoid the "melt-back" effect, but also to inhibit the crack generation in the grown GaN layers. The quality of GaN layer is heavily dependent on the unique properties of the available 3C-SiC/Si templates. In this paper, the parameters influencing the roughness, crystalline quality, and wafer bow are investigated and engineered to obtain high quality, low roughness 3C-SiC/Si templates suitable for subsequent GaN growth and device processing. Kinetic surface roughening and SiC growth mechanisms, which depend on both deposition temperature and off-cut angle, are reported for heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si substrates. The narrower terrace width on 4° off-axis Si enhances the step-flow growth at 1200 °C, with the roughness of 3C-SiC remaining constant with increasing thickness, corresponding to a scaling exponent of zero. Crack-free 3C-SiC grown on 150-mm Si substrate with a wafer bow of less than 20 μm was achieved. Both concave and convex wafer bow can be obtained by in situ tuning of the deposited SiC layer thicknesses. The 3C-SiC grown on off-axis Si, compared to that grown on on-axis Si, has lower surface roughness, better crystallinity, and smaller bow magnitude. PMID:26487465

  13. Kinetic surface roughening and wafer bow control in heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si(111) substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Walker, Glenn; Chai, Jessica; Iacopi, Alan; Fernandes, Alanna; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2015-01-01

    A thin, chemically inert 3C-SiC layer between GaN and Si helps not only to avoid the “melt-back” effect, but also to inhibit the crack generation in the grown GaN layers. The quality of GaN layer is heavily dependent on the unique properties of the available 3C-SiC/Si templates. In this paper, the parameters influencing the roughness, crystalline quality, and wafer bow are investigated and engineered to obtain high quality, low roughness 3C-SiC/Si templates suitable for subsequent GaN growth and device processing. Kinetic surface roughening and SiC growth mechanisms, which depend on both deposition temperature and off-cut angle, are reported for heteroepitaxial growth of 3C-SiC on Si substrates. The narrower terrace width on 4° off-axis Si enhances the step-flow growth at 1200 °C, with the roughness of 3C-SiC remaining constant with increasing thickness, corresponding to a scaling exponent of zero. Crack-free 3C-SiC grown on 150-mm Si substrate with a wafer bow of less than 20 μm was achieved. Both concave and convex wafer bow can be obtained by in situ tuning of the deposited SiC layer thicknesses. The 3C-SiC grown on off-axis Si, compared to that grown on on-axis Si, has lower surface roughness, better crystallinity, and smaller bow magnitude. PMID:26487465

  14. Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Tian, Xueli; Yin, Jun; Liu, Yu; Dong, Zhanmin; Sun, Jia-Lin; Ma, Wanyun

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 1011. We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection. PMID:27094084

  15. Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Tian, Xueli; Yin, Jun; Liu, Yu; Dong, Zhanmin; Sun, Jia-Lin; Ma, Wanyun

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 1011. We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

  16. Epitaxial growth of ZnO on quartz substrate by sol-gel spin-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebil, W.; Boukadhaba, M. A.; Fouzri, A.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO thin films grown on Quartz substrates using sol-gel method were synthesized and annealing at different temperature (700 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C). The structural, optical and morphological comparison of ZnO layers elaborated with that obtained by the sophisticated and expensive technique MOCVD demonstrates the success of the ZnO epitaxial growth on quartz substrate by sol-gel process. Sol-gel ZnO film deposited on quartz substrate annealed at 1000 °C exhibit only (00l) XRD peak which is similar to the diffraction patterns of epitaxial ZnO grown on sapphire by MOCVD. The Surface morphology was examined by SEM which revealed that the grain size becomes larger and faceted as increasing annealing temperature. Pl emission peak of sol-gel ZnO annealed at 1000 °C revealed a close similarity with that obtained by MOCVD ZnO but with a weaker intensity.

  17. Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Tian, Xueli; Yin, Jun; Liu, Yu; Dong, Zhanmin; Sun, Jia-Lin; Ma, Wanyun

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 10(11). We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection. PMID:27094084

  18. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of high-quality InSb on InP and GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, J. E.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Chen, Y. C.; Tsukamoto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of InSb were grown on InP and GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The dependence of the epilayer quality on flux ratio, J sub Sb4/J sub In, was studied. Deviation from an optimum value of J sub Sb4/J sub In (approx. 2) during growth led to deterioration in the surface morphology and the electrical and crystalline qualities of the films. Room temperature electron mobilities as high as 70,000 and 53,000 sq cm /V-s were measured in InSb layers grown on InP and GaAs substrates, respectively. Unlike the previous results, the conductivity in these films is n-type even at T = 13 K, and no degradation of the electron mobility due to the high density of dislocations was observed. The measured electron mobilities (and carrier concentrations) at 77 K in InSb layers grown on InP and GaAs substrates are 110,000 sq cm/V-s (3 x 10(15) cm(-3)) and 55,000 sq cm/V-s (4.95 x 10(15) cm(-3)), respectively, suggesting their application to electronic devices at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  20. Effect of growth rate and substrate limitation on the composition and structure of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McMurrough, I.; Rose, A. H.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study was made of the composition and structure of walls isolated from yeast grown in continuous culture at different rates, under three conditions of glucose limitation in which the concentrations of glucose and ammonium sulphate in the medium and the oxygen-transfer rate in the culture were varied, and one condition of NH4+ limitation. 2. The contents of total glucan and total mannan in the walls were relatively little affected by the growth rate under any of the four sets of conditions. The phosphorus and protein contents of walls from yeast grown under each of the four conditions increased as the growth rate was decreased. Walls from yeast grown under NH4+ limitation contained only half as much protein as walls from cells grown under glucose limitation. The proportion of lipid was greatest in walls from yeast grown under NH4+ limitation. 3. A procedure was devised for fractionating isolated walls, based on the ease with which the glucan and mannan were extracted with water and with hot and cold 6% (w/v) potassium hydroxide solution. The percentage of glucan, mannan, protein and phosphorus in each of the fractions was affected by the rate of growth and by the nature of the substrate limitation. 4. The β-fructofuranosidase activities of yeast grown under glucose limitation increased as the growth rate was lowered, but decreased at very low growth rates. The effects at low growth rates were probably due to repression of enzyme synthesis by residual glucose in the culture filtrate. The β-fructofuranosidase activities of yeast grown under NH4+ limitation were much lower than those from yeast grown under any of the conditions of glucose limitation. 5. Yeast cells grown at any of the rates under NH4+ limitation were longer and thinner than those grown at the same rate under any of the conditions of glucose limitation. Mean cell volumes were dependent on growth rate but not on the nature of the substrate limitation. 6. Electron micrographs of thin sections of

  1. Surfactant role of Ag atoms in the growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Tsuyoshi; Sone, Junki; Nakatsuji, Kan; Hirayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-13

    The growth of Si layers on Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates was studied for coverages of up to a few mono-layers. Atomically flat islands were observed to nucleate in the growth at 570 K. The top surfaces of the islands were covered in Ag atoms and exhibited a √3×√3 reconstruction with the same surface state dispersions as Si(111)√3×√3-Ag substrates. These results indicate that the Ag atoms on the substrate always hop up to the top of the Si layers.

  2. Area Selective Growth of Titanium Diselenide Thin Films into Micropatterned Substrates by Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Sophie L; de Groot, C H Kees; Gurnani, Chitra; Hector, Andrew L; Huang, Ruomeng; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Levason, William; Pearce, Stuart J; Thomas, Fiona; Reid, Gillian

    2013-12-10

    The neutral, distorted octahedral complex [TiCl4(Se (n) Bu2)2] (1), prepared from the reaction of TiCl4 with the neutral Se (n) Bu2 in a 1:2 ratio and characterized by IR and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (77)Se{(1)H}) NMR spectroscopy and microanalysis, serves as an efficient single-source precursor for low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of titanium diselenide, TiSe2, films onto SiO2 and TiN substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns on the deposited films are consistent with single-phase, hexagonal 1T-TiSe2 (P3̅m1), with evidence of some preferred orientation of the crystallites in thicker films. The composition and structural morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. SEM imaging shows hexagonal plate crystallites growing perpendicular to the substrate, but these tend to align parallel to the surface when the quantity of reagent is reduced. The resistivity of the crystalline TiSe2 films is 3.36 ± 0.05 × 10(-3) Ω·cm with a carrier density of 1 × 10(22) cm(-3). Very highly selective film growth from the reagent was observed onto photolithographically patterned substrates, with film growth strongly preferred onto the conducting TiN surfaces of SiO2/TiN patterned substrates. TiSe2 is selectively deposited within the smallest 2 μm diameter TiN holes of the patterned TiN/SiO2 substrates. The variation in crystallite size with different diameter holes is determined by microfocus X-ray diffraction and SEM, revealing that the dimensions increase with the hole size, but that the thickness of the crystals stops increasing above ∼20 μm hole size, whereas their lengths/widths continue to increase. PMID:24489437

  3. Area Selective Growth of Titanium Diselenide Thin Films into Micropatterned Substrates by Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The neutral, distorted octahedral complex [TiCl4(SenBu2)2] (1), prepared from the reaction of TiCl4 with the neutral SenBu2 in a 1:2 ratio and characterized by IR and multinuclear (1H, 13C{1H}, 77Se{1H}) NMR spectroscopy and microanalysis, serves as an efficient single-source precursor for low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of titanium diselenide, TiSe2, films onto SiO2 and TiN substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns on the deposited films are consistent with single-phase, hexagonal 1T-TiSe2 (P3̅m1), with evidence of some preferred orientation of the crystallites in thicker films. The composition and structural morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. SEM imaging shows hexagonal plate crystallites growing perpendicular to the substrate, but these tend to align parallel to the surface when the quantity of reagent is reduced. The resistivity of the crystalline TiSe2 films is 3.36 ± 0.05 × 10–3 Ω·cm with a carrier density of 1 × 1022 cm–3. Very highly selective film growth from the reagent was observed onto photolithographically patterned substrates, with film growth strongly preferred onto the conducting TiN surfaces of SiO2/TiN patterned substrates. TiSe2 is selectively deposited within the smallest 2 μm diameter TiN holes of the patterned TiN/SiO2 substrates. The variation in crystallite size with different diameter holes is determined by microfocus X-ray diffraction and SEM, revealing that the dimensions increase with the hole size, but that the thickness of the crystals stops increasing above ∼20 μm hole size, whereas their lengths/widths continue to increase. PMID:24489437

  4. Growth and characterization of periodically polarity-inverted ZnO structures on sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsub; Yao, Takafumi

    2012-10-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of periodically polarity inverted (PPI) ZnO heterostructures on (0 0 0 1) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. For the periodically inverted array of ZnO polarity, CrN and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} polarity selection buffer layers are used for the Zn- and O-polar ZnO films, respectively. The change of polarity and period in fabricated ZnO structures is evaluated by diffraction patterns and polarity sensitive piezo-response microscopy. Finally, PPI ZnO structures with subnanometer scale period are demonstrated by using holographic lithography and regrowth techniques.

  5. Growth of In xGa 1- xAs layers with pyramidal morphology on (1 0 0)GaAs patterned substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, S.; Balakrishnan, K.; Koyama, T.; Hayakawa, Y.; Kumagawa, M.

    2000-05-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial growth of In xGa 1- xAs ( x=0.6) layers on various types of patterned (1 0 0)GaAs substrates was investigated. Non-planar InGaAs layer having filled tent-like structure was grown on non-patterned substrate. When the InGaAs was grown on circular-patterned substrate, a non-hollow pyramid structure was obtained. Perfect hollow pyramid structured InGaAs was found to be grown on trench substrates of (1 0 0)GaAs.

  6. Identification and characterization of a cytoskeleton-associated, epidermal growth factor sensitive pp60c-src substrate.

    PubMed

    Maa, M C; Wilson, L K; Moyers, J S; Vines, R R; Parsons, J T; Parsons, S J

    1992-12-01

    In studies aimed at identifying and characterizing pp60c-src substrates that participate in the enhanced mitogenic response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) observed in murine C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts overexpressing c-src, we have identified a 75-kDa protein (p75) whose properties are consistent with those expected of such a substrate. We present evidence to show that p75 is immunologically related to a recently described, cytoskeleton-associated, pp60v-src substrate [Wu et al. (1991). Mol. Cell. Biol., 11, 5113-5124), and that its phosphotyrosine content is increased cooperatively by c-src overexpression and EGF stimulation. p75 is rapidly (within 2 min) phosphorylated on tyrosine upon EGF treatment and undergoes a second, prolonged phase of tyrosyl phosphorylation from 7 to 21 h after EGF addition, suggesting that tyrosyl phosphorylation of p75 is important for late as well as early events following EGF receptor activation. Enhanced tyrosyl phosphorylation of p75 is also seen when cells overexpressing c-src are treated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), but significantly less phosphorylation is observed with insulin and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Both basal and EGF-induced tyrosyl phosphorylation of p75 are reduced in cells overexpressing mutated forms of c-src (unmyristylated, or kinase deficient) as compared with wild-type c-src overexpressers, indicating the dependence of the enhanced tyrosyl phosphorylation on membrane-associated, enzymatically active pp60c-src. In cellular fractionation experiments p75 partitions with the cytosol, while immunofluorescence studies reveal a striking colocalization with pp60c-src at the plasma membrane and in the perinuclear region. Partial co-staining of p75 and actin occurs at the cell's periphery. These data provide evidence for p75 being a direct substrate of pp60c-src. The possible role of p75 in the enhanced response to EGF seen in c-src overexpressers is discussed. PMID:1281304

  7. Growth-substrate induced performance degradation in chemically synthesized monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Amani, Matin; Chin, Matthew L.; Mazzoni, Alexander L.; Burke, Robert A.; Dubey, Madan; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun

    2014-05-19

    We report on the electronic transport properties of single-layer thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. MoS{sub 2} has been extensively investigated for the past two years as a potential semiconductor analogue to graphene. To date, MoS{sub 2} samples prepared via mechanical exfoliation have demonstrated field-effect mobility values which are significantly higher than that of CVD-grown MoS{sub 2}. In this study, we will show that the intrinsic electronic performance of CVD-grown MoS{sub 2} is equal or superior to that of exfoliated material and has been possibly masked by a combination of interfacial contamination on the growth substrate and residual tensile strain resulting from the high-temperature growth process. We are able to quantify this strain in the as-grown material using pre- and post-transfer metrology and microscopy of the same crystals. Moreover, temperature-dependent electrical measurements made on as-grown and transferred MoS{sub 2} devices following an identical fabrication process demonstrate the improvement in field-effect mobility.

  8. Growth-substrate induced performance degradation in chemically synthesized monolayer MoS2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, Matin; Chin, Matthew L.; Mazzoni, Alexander L.; Burke, Robert A.; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Dubey, Madan

    2014-05-01

    We report on the electronic transport properties of single-layer thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) on Si/SiO2 substrates. MoS2 has been extensively investigated for the past two years as a potential semiconductor analogue to graphene. To date, MoS2 samples prepared via mechanical exfoliation have demonstrated field-effect mobility values which are significantly higher than that of CVD-grown MoS2. In this study, we will show that the intrinsic electronic performance of CVD-grown MoS2 is equal or superior to that of exfoliated material and has been possibly masked by a combination of interfacial contamination on the growth substrate and residual tensile strain resulting from the high-temperature growth process. We are able to quantify this strain in the as-grown material using pre- and post-transfer metrology and microscopy of the same crystals. Moreover, temperature-dependent electrical measurements made on as-grown and transferred MoS2 devices following an identical fabrication process demonstrate the improvement in field-effect mobility.

  9. Thin-film growth of (110) rutile TiO2 on (100) Ge substrate by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Nagata, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Nabatame, Toshihide; Ogura, Atsushi; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The deposition conditions of (100) rutile TiO2 grown on p-type (100) Ge substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were optimized to improve the electrical properties of the TiO2/Ge structure. Increasing the substrate temperature (T sub) enhanced the grain growth, the surface roughness of the film, and Ge diffusion into the TiO2 layer. The growth rate, which was controlled by the laser density in PLD (L d), affected the Ge diffusion. L d of 0.35 J/cm2 (0.37 nm/min) enhanced the Ge diffusion and improved the crystallinity and surface roughness at a temperature of 450 °C, at which GeO x undergoes decomposition and desorption. However, the Ge diffusion into TiO2 degraded the electrical properties. By using the optimized conditions (L d = 0.7 J/cm2 and T sub = 420 °C) with postannealing, the TiO2/Ge structure showed an improvement in the leakage current of 3 orders of magnitude and the capacitance–voltage property characteristics indicated the formation of a p–n junction.

  10. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  11. Growth of poly-crystalline Cu films on Y substrates by picosecond pulsed laser deposition for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Klini, A.; Manousaki, A.; Perrone, A.; Fotakis, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the deposition of Cu thin films on Y substrates for photocathode applications by pulsed laser deposition employing picosecond laser pulses is reported and compared with the use of nanosecond pulses. The influence of power density (6-50 GW/cm2) on the ablation of the target material, as well as on the properties of the resulting film, is discussed. The material transfer from the target to the substrate surface was found to be rather efficient, in comparison to nanosecond ablation, leading to the growth of films with high thickness. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a quasi-continuous film morphology, at low power density values, becoming granular with increasing power density. The structural investigation, through X-ray diffraction, revealed the poly-crystalline nature of the films, with a preferential growth along the (111) crystallographic orientation of Cu cubic network. Finally, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed a low contamination level of the grown films, demonstrating the potential of a PLD technique for the fabrication of Cu/Y patterned structures, with applications in radiofrequency electron gun technology.

  12. IMC Growth at the Interface of Sn-2.0Ag-2.5Zn Solder Joints with Cu, Ni, and Ni-W Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiaxing; Wang, Haozhe; Hu, Anmin; Li, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Growth of intermetallic compounds (IMC) at the interface of Sn-2.0Ag-2.5Zn solder joints with Cu, Ni, and Ni-W substrates have been investigated. For the Cu substrate, a Cu5Zn8 IMC layer with Ag3Sn particles on top was observed at the interface; this acted as a barrier layer preventing further growth of Cu-Sn IMC. For the Ni substrate, a thin Ni3Sn4 film was observed between the solder and the Ni layer; the thickness of the film increased slowly and steadily with aging. For the Ni-W substrate, a thin Ni3Sn4 film was observed between the solder and Ni-W layer. During the aging process a thin layer of the Ni-W substrate was transformed into a bright layer, and the thickness of bright layer increased with aging.

  13. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  14. Impact of Phenolic Substrate and Growth Temperature on the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E; Shah, Manesh B; Zhang, B; Ruckert, Christian; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Jansson, J

    2009-01-01

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol, or phenol at 5 and 28 C, both for the wild-type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label-free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol- degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  15. Growth and Analysis of HgCdTe on Alternate Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, J. D.; Bubulac, L. O.; Smith, P. J.; Jacobs, R. N.; Markunas, J. K.; Jaime-Vasquez, M.; Almeida, L. A.; Stoltz, A.; Arias, J. M.; Brill, G.; Chen, Y.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Farrell, S.; Lee, U.

    2012-10-01

    Dislocations generated at the HgCdTe/CdTe(buffer layer) interface are demonstrated to play a significant role in influencing the crystalline characteristics of HgCdTe epilayers on alternate substrates (AS). A dislocation density >108 cm-2 is observed at the HgCdTe/CdTe interface. Networks of dislocations are generated at the HgCdTe/CdTe interface. The dislocation networks are observed to entangle. Significant dislocation reduction occurs within a few microns of the HgCdTe/CdTe interface. The reduction in dislocation density as a function of depth is enhanced by annealing. Etch pit density and x-ray diffraction full-width at half-maximum values increase as a function of the lattice mismatch between HgCdTe epilayer and the buffer layer/substrate. The experimental results suggest that only by reducing HgCdTe/CdTe lattice mismatch will the desired crystallinity be achieved for HgCdTe epilayers on AS.

  16. Growth of highly textured PbTiO3 films on conductive substrate under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Haixiong; Zhou, Zhi; Bowland, Christopher C.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-08-01

    Perovskite structure (ABO3) thin films have wide applications in electronic devices due to their unique properties, including high dielectric permittivity, ferroelectricity and piezoelectric coupling. Here, we report an approach to grow highly textured thick lead titanate (PbTiO3) films on conductive substrates by a two-step hydrothermal reaction. Initially, vertically aligned TiO2 nanowire arrays are grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass, which act as template crystals for conversion to the perovskite structure. The PbTiO3 films are then converted from TiO2 NW arrays by diffusing Pb2+ ions into the template through a second hydrothermal reaction. The dielectric permittivity and piezoelectric coupling coefficient (d33) of the PbTiO3 films are as high as 795 at 1 kHz and 52 pm V-1, respectively. The reported process can also potentially be expanded for the assembly of other complex perovskite ATiO3 (A = Ba, Ca, Cd, etc) films by using the highly aligned TiO2 NW arrays as templates. Therefore, the approach introduced here opens up a new door to synthesize ferroelectric thin films on conductive substrates for application in sensors, actuators, and ultrasonic transducers that are important in various industrial and scientific areas.

  17. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires—Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45–50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  18. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  19. Controlling growth rate anisotropy for formation of continuous ZnO thin films from seeded substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R H; Slamovich, E B; Handwerker, C A

    2013-05-17

    Solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films are promising candidates for low-temperature-processable active layers in transparent thin film electronics. In this study, control of growth rate anisotropy using ZnO nanoparticle seeds, capping ions, and pH adjustment leads to a low-temperature (90 ° C) hydrothermal process for transparent and high-density ZnO thin films. The common 1D ZnO nanorod array was grown into a 2D continuous polycrystalline film using a short-time pure solution method. Growth rate anisotropy of ZnO crystals and the film morphology were tuned by varying the chloride (Cl(-)) ion concentration and the initial pH of solutions of zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), and the competitive adsorption effects of Cl(-) ions and HMTA ligands on the anisotropic growth behavior of ZnO crystals were proposed. The lateral growth of nanorods constituting the film was promoted by lowering the solution pH to accelerate the hydrolysis of HMTA, thereby allowing the adsorption effects from Cl(-) to dominate. By optimizing the growth conditions, a dense ∼100 nm thickness film was fabricated in 15 min from a solution of [Cl(-)]/[Zn(2+)] = 1.5 and pH=  4.8 ± 0.1. This film shows >80% optical transmittance and a field-effect mobility of 2.730 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at zero back-gate bias. PMID:23595114

  20. Controllable growth of durable superhydrophobic coatings on a copper substrate via electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    He, Ge; Lu, Shixiang; Xu, Wenguo; Szunerits, Sabine; Boukherroub, Rabah; Zhang, Haifeng

    2015-04-28

    Superhydrophobic coatings on a copper substrate are grown via electrodeposition followed by thermal annealing. The influence of the deposition potential, zinc ion concentration, deposition time, annealing temperature and annealing time on the wetting properties was systematically investigated. The coating electrodeposited at -1.35 V for 25 min and annealed at 190 °C for 60 min exhibited excellent superhydrophobicity with a contact angle as high as 170 ± 2° and a sliding angle of almost 0°. The water drop can fully bounce as a balloon when impinging such a solid surface, exhibiting excellent non-sticking properties. By adopting various characterization methods, it was demonstrated that the as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces also exhibited properties of anticorrosion, antiabrasion, long-term stability and durability and large buoyancy force, which offer an effective strategy and promising industrial applications for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on various metallic materials. PMID:25821030

  1. Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T.

    2012-10-15

    Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

  2. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate limited habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple stresses temperature, moisture, and for chemoheterotrophs, sources of carbon and energy of the Dry Valley Antarctica soils allow at best depauperate communities, low in species diversity and population density. The nature of community structure, the operation of biogeochemical cycles, the evolution and mechanisms of adaptation to this habitat are of interest in informing speculations upon life on other planets as well as in modeling the limits of gene life. Yeasts of the Cryptococcus vishniacil complex (Basidiobiastomycetes) are investigated, as the only known indigenes of the most hostile, lichen free, parts of the Dry Valleys. Methods were developed for isolating these yeasts (methods which do not exclude the recovery of other microbiota). The definition of the complex was refined and the importance of nitrogen sources was established as well as substrate competition in fitness to the Dry Valley habitats.

  3. Growth and characterization of Li-doped ZnO thin films on nanocrystalline diamond substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Xia, Yiben; Wang, Linjun; Xu, Jinyong; Hu, Guang; Zhu, Xuefeng; Shi, Weimin

    2008-02-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond(NCD) films with a mean surface roughness of 23.8 nm were grown on silicon substrates in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition(HFCVD) system. Then, Zn 1-xLi xO (x=0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15) films were deposited on these NCD films by radio-frequency(RF) reactive magnetron sputtering method. When x was 0.1, the Li-doped ZnO film had a larger resistivity more than 10 8Ω•cm obtained from Hall effect measurement. All the Zn 1-xLi xO films had a strong c-axis orientation structure determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The above results suggested that the Li-doped ZnO film/NCD structure prepared in this work was attractive for the application of high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices.

  4. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device. PMID:20672139

  5. CMOS-compatible catalytic growth of graphene on a silicon dioxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Sung; Lim, Jae-Young; Jung, Su-Ho; Kang, Seog-Gyun; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Choi, Jae-Young; Hwang, Sung-Woo; Whang, Dongmok

    2016-08-01

    We report the direct growth of graphene on a dielectric SiO2 surface by utilizing complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible germane as a gas-phase catalyst. Results of Raman spectroscopy and XPS confirmed that the synthesized graphene consist of a sp2 hybridized carbon network. We were able to fabricate graphene field effect transistors without the wet etching process, and the calculated mobility was ˜160 cm2/V.s at high carrier concentration (n = 3 × 1012 cm-2). Furthermore, the crystallinity and morphology of graphene is easily controlled from single-layer graphene to graphene nanowall structures by adjusting the reaction conditions. The results of this study verify the promising catalytic graphene growth method on a non-catalytic insulating surface without metal contaminations.

  6. Temperature-controlled coalescence during the growth of Ge crystals on deeply patterned Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschini, Roberto; Salvalaglio, Marco; Scaccabarozzi, Andrea; Isa, Fabio; Falub, Claudiu V.; Isella, Giovanni; von Känel, Hans; Montalenti, Francesco; Miglio, Leo

    2016-04-01

    A method for growing suspended Ge films on micron-sized Si pillars in Si(001) is discussed. In [C.V. Falub et al., Science 335 (2012) 1330] vertically aligned three-dimensional Ge crystals, separated by a few tens of nanometers, were obtained by depositing several micrometers of Ge using Low-Energy Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. Here a different regime of high growth temperature is exploited in order to induce the merging of the crystals into a connected structure eventually forming a continuous, two-dimensional film. The mechanisms leading to such a behavior are discussed with the aid of an effective model of crystal growth. Both the effects of deposition and curvature-driven surface diffusion are considered to reproduce the main features of coalescence. The key enabling role of high temperature is identified with the activation of the diffusion process on a time scale competitive with the deposition rate. We demonstrate the versatility of the deposition process, which allows to switch between the formation of individual crystals and a continuous suspended film simply by tuning the growth temperature.

  7. Growth of bedding plants in commercial potting substrate amended with vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Bachman, G R; Metzger, J D

    2008-05-01

    Vermicompost has been promoted as a viable alternative container media component for the horticulture industry. The purpose of this research was to investigate the use of vermicompost at different points in the production cycle of tomato, marigold, pepper, and cornflower. The incorporation of vermicompost of pig manure origin into germination media up to 20% v/v enhanced shoot and root weight, leaf area, and shoot:root ratios of both tomato and French marigold seedlings; however amendment with vermicompost had little influence on pepper and cornflower seedling growth. Moreover there was no effect on the germination of seed of any species. When seedlings of tomato, French marigold, and cornflower were transplanted into 6-cell packs there was greater plant growth in media amended with vermicompost compared to the control media, and the greatest growth when vermicompost was amended into both the germination and transplant media. This effect was increased when seedlings in the transplant media were irrigated with water containing fertilizer. PMID:17689243

  8. Impact of substrate nitridation on the growth of InN on In2O3(111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, YongJin; Sadofev, Sergey; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Galazka, Zbigniew; Uecker, Reinhard; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We study the growth of InN films on In2O3(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under N excess. InN films deposited directly on In2O3(111) exhibit a strongly faceted morphology. A nitridation step prior to growth is found to convert the In2O3(111) surface to InN{0001}. The morphology of InN films deposited on such nitridated In2O3(111) substrates is characteristic for growth by instable step-flow and is thus drastically different from the three-dimensional growth obtained without nitridation. We show that this change originates from the different polarity of the films: while InN films deposited directly on In2O3(111) are In-polar, they are N-polar when grown on the nitridated substrate.

  9. Self-assembled growth of multi-layer graphene on planar and nano-structured substrates and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Hou, Xing-Gang; Zhao, Meng-Li; Li, De-Jun; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Cheng, Guo-An

    2013-11-01

    Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs grown on planar and nano-structured substrates were studied and are found to be strongly dependent on the nature of substrates. Substrates having good conductivity and large aspect ratios such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have good field emission properties. The best field emission properties of MLG/CNT composites with optimal shapes were observed with a low turn-on electric field of 0.93 V μm-1, a threshold field of 1.56 V μm-1, a maximum emission current density of 60.72 mA cm-2, and excellent stability.Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs

  10. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Varela, L; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  11. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Varela, L.; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  12. Epitaxial Growth of beta-Silicon Carbide (SiC) on a Compliant Substrate via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda L.

    1996-01-01

    Many lattice defects have been attributed to the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal coefficient of expansion between SiC and silicon (Si). Stacking faults, twins and antiphase boundaries are some of the lattice defects found in these SiC films. These defects may be a partial cause of the disappointing performance reported for the prototype devices fabricated from beta-SiC films. The objective of this research is to relieve some of the thermal stress due to lattice mismatch when SiC is epitaxially grown on Si. The compliant substrate is a silicon membrane 2-4 microns thick. The CVD process includes the buffer layer which is grown at 1360 C followed by a very thin epitaxial growth of SiC. Then the temperature is raised to 1500 C for the subsequent growth of SiC. Since silicon melts at 1415 C, the SiC will be grown on molten Silicon which is absorbed by a porous graphite susceptor eliminating the SiC/Si interface. We suspect that this buffer layer will yield less stressed material to help in the epitaxial growth of SiC.

  13. Plasmonic-enhanced Raman scattering of graphene on growth substrates and its application in SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan; Chen, Guanxiong; Du, Yuanxin; Xu, Jin; Wu, Shuilin; Qu, Yan; Zhu, Yanwu

    2014-10-01

    We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and Sudan IV.We detail a facile method for enhancing the Raman signals of as-grown graphene on Cu foils by depositing gold nanoislands (Au Nis) onto the surface of graphene. It is found that an enhancement of up to 49 fold in the graphene Raman signal has been achieved by depositing a 4 nm thick Au film. The enhancement is considered to be related to the coupling between graphene and the plasmon modes of Au Nis, as confirmed by the finite element simulations. The plasmonic effect of the Au/graphene/Cu hybrid platform leads to a strong absorption at the resonant wavelength whose position shifts from visible light (640 nm) to near-infrared (1085 nm) when the thickness of Au films is increased from 2 nm to 18 nm. Finally, we demonstrate that hybrid substrates are reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) systems, showing an enhancement factor of ~106 for dye molecules Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 6G with uniform and stable response and a detection limit of as low as 0.1 nM for Sudan III and

  14. Nuclei growth kinetics during the nucleation of gold on UHV-cleaved mica substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of crystalline sizes during nucleation of gold on mica surfaces cleaved in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) reveal the presence of symmetric, sharply peaked distributions which flatten and broaden with increasing nucleation time. When the number density of nuclei increases, the growth rate is suppressed. The time taken to reach a given size increases with increasing temperature when the nuclei are growing as isolated particles. When the nuclei are spaced so far that their diffusion fields overlap, then the time taken to reach a given size decreases with increasing temperature.

  15. Epitaxial growth of lead zirconium titanate thin films on Ag buffered Si substrates using rf sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chun; Laughlin, David E.; Kryder, Mark H.

    2007-04-23

    Epitaxial lead zirconium titanate (PZT) (001) thin films with a Pt bottom electrode were deposited by rf sputtering onto Si(001) single crystal substrates with a Ag buffer layer. Both PZT(20/80) and PZT(53/47) samples were shown to consist of a single perovskite phase and to have the (001) orientation. The orientation relationship was determined to be PZT(001)[110](parallel sign)Pt(001)[110](parallel sign)Ag(001)[110](parallel sign)Si(001)[110]. The microstructure of the multilayer was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electron diffraction pattern confirmed the epitaxial relationship between each layer. The measured remanent polarization P{sub r} and coercive field E{sub c} of the PZT(20/80) thin film were 26 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and 110 kV/cm, respectively. For PZT(53/47), P{sub r} was 10 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} and E{sub c} was 80 kV/cm.

  16. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining. PMID:23270331

  17. Growth of highly textured PbTiO3 films on conductive substrate under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haixiong; Zhou, Zhi; Bowland, Christopher C; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-08-28

    Perovskite structure (ABO(3)) thin films have wide applications in electronic devices due to their unique properties, including high dielectric permittivity, ferroelectricity and piezoelectric coupling. Here, we report an approach to grow highly textured thick lead titanate (PbTiO(3)) filmson conductive substrates by a two-step hydrothermal reaction. Initially, vertically aligned TiO(2) nanowire arrays are grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass, which act as template crystals for conversion to the perovskite structure. The PbTiO(3) films are then converted from TiO(2) NW arrays by diffusing Pb(2+) ions into the template through a second hydrothermal reaction. The dielectric permittivity and piezoelectric coupling coefficient (d(33)) of the PbTiO(3) films are as high as 795 at 1 kHz and 52 pm V−1, respectively. The reported process can also potentially be expanded for the assembly of other complex perovskite ATiO(3) (A = Ba, Ca, Cd,etc) films by using the highly aligned TiO(2) NW arrays as templates. Therefore, the approach introduced here opens up a new door to synthesize ferroelectric thin films on conductivesubstrates for application in sensors, actuators, and ultrasonic transducers that are important in various industrial and scientific areas. PMID:26243166

  18. Growth and characterization of epitaxial layers of Ge on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fathy, D.; White, C.W.; Holland, O.W.

    1987-03-01

    Thin single crystalline layers of Ge with atomically sharp boundaries have been formed epitaxially on (100) Si substrates. This was done by /sup 74/Ge ion implantation into Si followed by steam oxidation. Using both Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have found that a Ge layer forms as a result of Ge segregated at the moving SiO/sub 2/ interface during steam oxidation. For a SiO/sub 2/ layer that has swept through the implanted region, essentially all of the Ge is snow-ploughed and no Ge is lost to the oxide layer. The Ge layers and its two bounding interfaces, i.e., Ge/SiO/sub 2/ and Ge/Si, have been characterized as a function of the implantation dose and energy. The thickness of the Ge layer formed is dependent on the implantation dose. Thicknesses from a fraction of a monolayer to greater than 50 monolayers of Ge can be formed on Si by this mechanism. Initially the Ge layer forms a coherent interface with the underlying Si with no misfit dislocations, and misfit dislocations only appear as the thickness of the film is increased.

  19. Application of RF magnetron sputtering for growth of AZO on glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorannevis, Z.; Akbarnejad, E.; Salar Elahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aluminum zinc oxide (AZO), as one of the most promising transparent conducting oxide (TCO) materials, has now been widely used in thin film solar cells. In this study the optimization process of the RF magnetron sputtered AZO films was performed at room temperature by studying its physical properties such as structural, optical, electrical and morphological at different deposition times (10, 20, 40 and 60 min) for its use as a front contact for the Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) based thin film solar cell applications. Influence of the deposition time was investigated on the physical properties of the AZO thin film by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectrophotometer and four point probes. XRD analysis suggests that the preferred orientation of grains for all the samples prepared at different growth times are along (002) plane having the hexagonal structure. From optical measurements the films show an average transmission over 60%. Moreover it was found that by increasing the growth time, which implies increasing the film thicknesses as well as improving the crystallinity the resistivity of the grown films decrease from the 10-2 Ωcm to the order of 10-3 Ωcm.

  20. Optimization of growth conditions for (La1-yPry)1-x CaxMnO3 thin films on annealed oxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Brian; Grant, Daniel; Biswas, Amlan

    2014-03-01

    Consistent growth of flat, epitaxial thin films is essential for uncovering the unique transport characteristics of rare-earth manganite systems. We have developed pulsed laser deposition growth conditions for (La1-yPry)1-x CaxMnO3 (LPCMO, y = 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) thin films on annealed NdGaO3 (NGO) and SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The extra annealing step for NGO and STO produces atomically flat substrates with well-defined terraces of unit cell step height. Films grown on these annealed substrates demonstrate better lattice matching compared to films grown on as-received substrates. Consequently, annealing substrates before film growth leads to higher quality thin films with a more controllable thickness. We demonstrate that these optimized growth parameters yield LPCMO thin films that are also atomically flat, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. We are using these thin films to restrict phase growth to reduced dimensions and to study the origin of thermodynamic phase competition due to first order transitions in manganites. NSF DMR-0804452

  1. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulators Consisting of Hydrogenated III-V Thin films on Si(111) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Crisostomo, Christian; Yao, Liang-Zi; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Lin, Hsin; Albao, Marvin; Bansil, Arun

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure calculations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. A total of six compounds (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, TlAs, TlSb and TlN) are identified to be nontrivial in unhydrogenated case; whereas for hydrogenated case, only four (GaBi, InBi, TlBi and TlSb) remains nontrivial. The band gap is found to be as large as 855 meV for the hydrogenated TlBi film, making this class of III-V materials suitable for room temperature applications. TlBi remains topologically nontrivial with a large band gap at various hydrogen coverages, indicating the robustness of its band topology against bonding effects of substrates. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  2. Growth of linked silicon/carbon nanospheres on copper substrate as integrated electrodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Yanhong; Tan, Qiangqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Yunfa; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2013-12-01

    We report the growth of linked silicon/carbon (Si/C) nanospheres on Cu substrate as an integrated anode for Li-ion batteries. The Si/C nanospheres were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on Cu substrate as current collector using methyltrichlorosilane as precursor, a cheap by-product of the organosilane industry. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the linked Si/C nanospheres with a diameter of 400-500 nm contain Si, CuxSi, and Cu nanocrystals, which are highly dispersed in the amorphous carbon nanospheres. A CCVD mechanism was tentatively proposed, in which the evaporated Cu atoms play a critical role to catalytically grown Si nanocrystals embedded within linked Si/C nanospheres. The electrochemical measurement shows that these Si/C nanospheres delivered a capacity of 998.9, 713.1, 320.6, and 817.8 mA h g-1 at 50, 200, 800, and 50 mA g-1 respectively after 50 cycles, much higher than that of commercial graphite anode. This is because the amorphous carbon, CuxSi, and Cu in the Si/C nanospheres could buffer the volume change of Si nanocrystals during the Li insertion and extraction reactions, thus hindering the cracking or crumbling of the electrode. Furthermore, the incorporation of conductive CuxSi and Cu nanocrystals and the integration of active electrode materials with Cu substrate may improve the electrical conductivity from the current collector to individual Si active particles, resulting in a remarkably enhanced reversible capacity and cycling stability. The work will be helpful in the fabrication of low cost binder-free Si/C anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  3. Growth of linked silicon/carbon nanospheres on copper substrate as integrated electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Yanhong; Tan, Qiangqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Yunfa; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2014-01-01

    We report the growth of linked silicon/carbon (Si/C) nanospheres on Cu substrate as an integrated anode for Li-ion batteries. The Si/C nanospheres were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on Cu substrate as current collector using methyltrichlorosilane as precursor, a cheap by-product of the organosilane industry. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the linked Si/C nanospheres with a diameter of 400-500 nm contain Si, Cu(x)Si, and Cu nanocrystals, which are highly dispersed in the amorphous carbon nanospheres. A CCVD mechanism was tentatively proposed, in which the evaporated Cu atoms play a critical role to catalytically grown Si nanocrystals embedded within linked Si/C nanospheres. The electrochemical measurement shows that these Si/C nanospheres delivered a capacity of 998.9, 713.1, 320.6, and 817.8 mA h g(-1) at 50, 200, 800, and 50 mA g(-1) respectively after 50 cycles, much higher than that of commercial graphite anode. This is because the amorphous carbon, Cu(x)Si, and Cu in the Si/C nanospheres could buffer the volume change of Si nanocrystals during the Li insertion and extraction reactions, thus hindering the cracking or crumbling of the electrode. Furthermore, the incorporation of conductive Cu(x)Si and Cu nanocrystals and the integration of active electrode materials with Cu substrate may improve the electrical conductivity from the current collector to individual Si active particles, resulting in a remarkably enhanced reversible capacity and cycling stability. The work will be helpful in the fabrication of low cost binder-free Si/C anode materials for Li-ion batteries. PMID:24201898

  4. In-situ spectroelectrochemical characterization of the electrochemical growth and breakdown of a lead dodecanoate coating on a lead substrate.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaecker, Michel; Dowsett, Mark; Grayburn, Rosie; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Adriaens, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns a time lapse spectroelectrochemical study of the growth of lead dodecanoate layers on a lead substrate in an aqueous solution using cyclic voltammetry. In-situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out on station BM26A (DUBBLE) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France. The diffraction pattern images were taken using a two-dimensional Mar CCD camera. After deposition of the coating, a spectroelectrochemical study of a linear sweep voltammetry experiment using an acetic acid electrolyte, simulating 'active' lead corrosion, was carried out on both a bare and lead dodecanoate coated sample. The results show that the coating inhibits the formation of new lead corrosion products. PMID:25476375

  5. Heteroepitaxy growth of GaAsBi on Ge(100) substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Pan, Wenwu; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the growth of GaAsBi single-crystal film on Ge substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. A high-quality GaAsBi epilayer has been obtained. It has been found that the surfactant effect of Bi suppresses the interdiffusion of Ge at the GaAsBi/Ge interface and reduces the misfit dislocation density. The Bi atoms occupy the As sites, as indicated by the appearance of GaBi-like TO(Γ) and LO(Γ) phonon modes in Raman spectra. In addition, the redshift of the GaAs-like LO(Γ) phonon frequency has been observed in the Raman spectra, owing to the Bi-induced biaxial strain and the alloying effect as well.

  6. Molecular dynamic simulations of surface morphology and pulsed laser deposition growth of lithium niobate thin films on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hao-Nan; Pei, Zi-Dong; Kong, Yong-Fa; Xu, Jing-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The molecular dynamic simulation of lithium niobate thin films deposited on silicon substrate is carried out by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. The simulation results show that the Si (111) surface is more suitable for the growth of smooth LiNbO3 thin films compared to the Si(100) surface, and the optimal deposition temperature is around 873 K, which is consistent with the atomic force microscope results. In addition, the calculation molecular number is increased to take the electron spins and other molecular details into account. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922003), the International S&T Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2013DFG52660), the Taishan Scholar Construction Project Special Fund, China, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 65030091 and 65010961).

  7. Heteroepitaxial growth of (111) 3C-SiC on (110) Si substrate by second order twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzalone, R.; Bongiorno, C.; Severino, A.; D'Arrigo, G.; Abbondanza, G.; Foti, G.; La Via, F.

    2008-06-01

    Cubic (111)-oriented silicon carbide (3C-SiC) heteroepitaxy on (110) silicon substrate was performed by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. A comparison with the previous work by Nishiguchi et al. [Appl. Phy. Lett. 84, 3082 (2004)] shows that the relationship (110)Si∥(111) 3C-SiC could be misleading. Based on x-ray diffraction pole figures and numerical simulations, we prove that this relationship is due to the formation of second order twins during the initial stages of growth. This analysis also reveals that the crystal starts to grow with a misalignment of 3.5° along the ⟨002⟩ Si direction to adapt the mismatch of lattice parameters.

  8. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates. PMID:26537227

  9. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  10. Growth of thick, continuous GaN layers on 4-in. Si substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, H. P. D.; Frayssinet, E.; Bavard, A.; Rondi, D.; Cordier, Y.; Kennard, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the growth of thick GaN epilayers on 4-in. Si(1 1 1) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Using intercalated AlN layers that contribute to counterbalance the tensile strain induced by the thermal mismatch between gallium nitride and the silicon substrate, up to 6.7 μm thick crack-free group III-nitride layers have been grown. Root mean-squares surface roughness of 0.5 nm, threading dislocation densities of 1.1×10 9 cm -2, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) full widths at half-maximum (FWHM) of 406 arcsec for the GaN(0 0 2) and of 1148 arcsec for the GaN(3 0 2) reflection have been measured. The donor bound exciton has a low-temperature photoluminescence line width of 12 meV. The correlation between the threading dislocation density and XRD FWHM, as well as the correlation between the wafer curvature and the GaN in-plane stress is discussed. An increase of the tensile stress is observed upon n-type doping of GaN by silicon.

  11. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One andmore » two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.« less

  12. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-05

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134 meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121 meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  13. Assessment of heavy metals phytotoxicity using seed germination and root elongation tests: a comparison of two growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Di Salvatore, M; Carafa, A M; Carratù, G

    2008-11-01

    Seed germination and root elongation test is used to evaluate hazardous waste sites and to assess toxicity of organic and inorganic compounds. Paper substrate, especially circular filter paper placed inside a Petri dish has long been used for this test. Same reports indicate that filter paper might interfere with the toxicity of inorganic substances, especially metal cations. This study evaluate toxicity of Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu on lettuce, broccoli, tomato and radish seed using two bed material: agar and filter paper. The results show that percent germination is not affected by substrates; vice versa, as for root elongation, the test in agar showed to be more sensible than that the one on filter paper. The radical growth inhibition depends on the metal, on the tested concentration and on the species; among the tested metals, cadmium was the one determining the highest toxic effects on different species and lettuce was the plant that suffered more. From the comparison, it is clearly evident the greater sensibility of the test in agar; on the other hand, the lower sensibility of the test on the filter paper might be caused by the partial and not homogeneous exposition of the root to metal cations. PMID:18768198

  14. Growth and characterization of >=6" epitaxy-ready GaSb substrates for use in large area infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, M. J.; Martinez, B.; Tybjerg, M.; Smith, B.; Mowbray, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we report on an industry first; the commercial growth and characterization of >/=6" diameter GaSb substrates that are suitable for use in the fabrication of epitaxially grown, large area MWIR-VLWIR detectors. Results will be presented on the production of single crystal >/=6" GaSb ingots grown by a modified version of the Czochralski (LEC) technique, supported by the analysis of bulk material quality by spatial etch pit density assessments with mm resolution. The electrical quality of 6" GaSb crystals will be assessed. Hall mobility, resistivity and carrier level measurements will be made spatially. High quality, epitaxy-ready type surfaces have been prepared and we will demonstrate how the key surface quality characteristics of roughness, oxide thickness and flatness have been maintained across production processes that scale from 4" to >=6" wafer formats. Comparisons will be made between >=6" GaSb and other large diameter compound semiconductor materials produced in volume such as GaAs and InP. We conclude by demonstrating that the commercial production of large diameter GaSb substrates has matured and is thus ready to support the full commercialization of GaSb based detector technologies.

  15. A truncated phosphorylated p130Cas substrate domain is sufficient to drive breast cancer growth and metastasis formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumbrink, Joerg; de la Cueva, Ana; Soni, Shefali; Sailer, Nadja; Kirsch, Kathrin H

    2016-08-01

    Elevated p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate) levels are found in aggressive breast tumors and are associated with poor prognosis and resistance to standard therapeutics in patients. p130Cas signals majorly through its phosphorylated substrate domain (SD) that contains 15 tyrosine motifs (YxxP) which recruit effector molecules. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas is important for mediating migration, invasion, tumor promotion, and metastasis. We previously developed a Src*/SD fusion molecule approach, where the SD is constitutively phosphorylated. In a polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT)/Src*/SD double-transgenic mouse model, Src*/SD accelerates PyMT-induced tumor growth and promotes a more aggressive phenotype. To test whether Src*/SD also drives metastasis and which of the YxxP motifs are involved in this process, full-length and truncated SD molecules fused to Src* were expressed in breast cancer cells. The functionality of the Src*/SD fragments was analyzed in vitro, and the active proteins were tested in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model. Breast cancer cells expressing the full-length SD and the functional smaller SD fragment (spanning SD motifs 6-10) were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging and caliper measurements. Compared with control animals, the complete SD promoted primary tumor growth and an earlier onset of metastases. Importantly, both the complete and truncated SD significantly increased the occurrence of metastases to multiple organs. These studies provide strong evidence that the phosphorylated p130Cas SD motifs 6-10 (Y236, Y249, Y267, Y287, and Y306) are important for driving mammary carcinoma progression. PMID:26867768

  16. Epitaxial growth of polar KTaO3 thin-films on polar perovskite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J.; Nichols, J.; Hwang, J.; Seo, S. S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The atomic polarity plays an important role in a wide range of physical phenomena at heterointerfaces. For example, the polar/non-polar nature of a LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system induces partial conducting electrons at the heterointerfaces to avoid diverging electrostatic potential, the so-called ``polar catastrophe,'' which results in intriguing two-dimensional transport and magnetic properties. In this presentation, we discuss another system in which the role of the polar interface is important: the KTaO3/GdScO3 (KTO/GSO) polar/polar system. At the KTO/GSO interface, there is a ``polar conflict'' heterointerface along the [001] direction, where the AO and BO2 layers have reversed net charges so that there is a conflict between the chemical bonding and the electrostatic charges, i.e. K1+O2-(1-)/Sc3+O24- (1-) or Ta5+O24- (1 +) /Gd3+O2-(1 +) , which is unstable in the electrostatic point of view. We ask a fundamental question: ``How is the polar conflict resolved in the atomically flat heterointerfaces of such polar/polar systems?'' We have synthesized epitaxial KTO thin films on GSO substrates using pulsed laser deposition. From X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have observed that the polar conflict is quite effectively avoided by forming only two non-polar mono-layers at the heterointerface, resulting in high-quality epitaxial thin films on top of the layers. Our result suggests a new way to create two-dimensional confined layers using the polar conflict of the heterointerfaces of two polar materials.

  17. Growth and properties of crystalline barium oxide on the GaAs(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Lång, J.; Tuominen, M.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P. Kokko, K.; Kuzmin, M.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Polojärvi, V.; Guina, M.

    2013-11-04

    Growing a crystalline oxide film on III-V semiconductor renders possible approaches to improve operation of electronics and optoelectronics heterostructures such as oxide/semiconductor junctions for transistors and window layers for solar cells. We demonstrate the growth of crystalline barium oxide (BaO) on GaAs(100) at low temperatures, even down to room temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements reveal that the amount of interface defects is reduced for BaO/GaAs, compared to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs, suggesting that BaO is a useful buffer layer to passivate the surface of the III-V device material. PL and photoemission data show that the produced junction tolerates the post heating around 600 °C.

  18. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  19. Iron-doped carbon aerogels: novel porous substrates for direct growth of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Stephen A; Baumann, Theodore F; Kong, Jing; Satcher, Joe H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2007-04-24

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K+-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe2+- or Fe3+-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO2, and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD, and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH4 (1000 sccm), H2 (500 sccm), and C2H4 (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 degrees C for 10 min, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled (approximately 25 nm in diameter and up to 4 microm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs was grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 degrees C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 degrees C. PMID:17381146

  20. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.